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Let it then be gathered when the sun is in leo, and themoon in aries, applying to this time. Let leo arise, then may you makeinto an oil or ointment, which you please, to anoint your sore eyeswith i can prove it doth both my own experience, and the experience ofthose to whom i have taught it, that most desperate sore eyes have beencured by this only medicine. And then, i pray, is not this far betterthan endangering the eyes by the art of the needle?. for if this doesnot absolutely take away the film, it will so facilitate the work, thatit might be done without danger the herb or root boiled in white wineand drank, a few anniseeds being boiled therewith, opens obstructionsof the liver and gall, helps the yellow jaundice. And often using it, helps the dropsy and the itch, and those who have old sores in theirlegs, or other writings of the body the juice thereof taken fasting, isheld to be of singularly good use against the pestilence the distilledwater, with a little sugar and a little good treacle mixed therewith the writingy upon the taking being laid down to sweat a little hasthe same effect the juice dropped into the eyes, cleanses them fromfilms and cloudiness which darken the sight, but it is best to allaythe sharpness of the juice with a little breast milk it is good inall old filthy corroding creeping ulcers wheresoever, to stay theirmalignity of fretting and running, and to cause them to heal morespeedily. The juice often applied to tetters, ring-worms, or other suchlike spreading cankers, will quickly heal them, and rubbed often uponwarts, will take them away the herb with the roots bruised and bathedwith oil of camomile, and applied to the navel, takes away the gripingpains of the belly and bowels, and all the pains of the mother. Andapplied to women breasts stays the overmuch flowing of the courses the juice or decoction of the herb gargled between the teeth that ach, eases the pain, and the powder of the dried root laid upon any aching, hollow or loose tooth, will cause it to fall out the juice mixed withessay powder of brimstone is not only good against the itch, but takesaway all discolourings of the skin whatsoever. And if it chance that ina tender body it causes any itchings or inflammations, by bathing theplace with a little vinegar it is helped another ill-favoured trick have physicians got to use to the eye, andthat is worse than the needle. Which is to take away the films bycorroding or gnawing medicine that i absolutely protest against 1 because the tunicles of the eyes are very thin, and therefore sooneaten asunder 2 the callus or film that they would eat away, is seldom of an equalthickness in every place, and then the tunicle may be eaten asunder inone place, before the film be consumed in another, and so be a readierway to extinguish the sight than to restore it it is called chelidonium, from the greek word chelidon, whichsignifies a swallow. Because they say, that if you put out the eyes ofyoung swallows when they are in the nest, the old ones will recovertheir eyes again with this herb this i am confident, for i have triedit, that if we mar the very apple of their eyes with a needle, she willrecover them again.

And in 1 the vertebræ the common carotid arteries were injured in 6 the number and severity of the lesions bore no constant relation to the thickness of the ligature, nor to the force used, but rather to the position of the body ecker865 reported a case of suicidal hanging in a man, age 40, where the soft palate was swollen and filled up the passage so that the air evidently could not enter the larynx and the trachea are usually deeply congested, of a redcolor. A violet color indicates putrefaction ogston reports mucus butnot bloody froth 9 times in the pharynx, 6 in the trachea, and 4 inthe lungs, in a total of 40 paper in one case there was a quantityof blood in the larynx and pharynx taylor thinks that pinkish frothin the trachea indicates incomplete obstruction. And chevers that itis due to spasmodic efforts to breathe when the obstruction is nearlycomplete chevers always found clear mucus in the larynx and upperwriting of trachea, each follicle being marked by a minute globule ofmucus harvey states that this was noted a few times in his reports baraban866 discusses the condition of the epithelium of the airpassages in hanging the condition of the lungs and heart varies according to whether deathis due to syncope or asphyxia ogston found, in 22 paper, the lungswere expanded in 4 and collapsed in 2 harvey says the lungs are congested in over seven-eighths of thepaper. Emphysematous in a few. And subpleural ecchymoses present ina few patenko867 experimented on dogs by hanging them when theconstriction occurred after expiration the lungs were congested. Whenafter inspiration, not congested in the first case p 223 the bloodflows from the periphery to the heart and thence to the lungs, butcannot flow from the lungs because of the difficult circulation in thedilated pulmonary vessels and deficiency of intrathoracic pressure there is in both paper cerebral congestion in the region of the bulb tardieu holds that punctiform ecchymoses and apoplexies do not occurin hanging unless suffocation has preceded pellier, 868 however, found these ecchymoses 14 times in 22 paper he says that the lesion isnot characteristic of suffocation, and quotes lacassagne, grosclaude, dechoudans, vicq, chassaing, and legroux to the same purpose hofmann869 says that the ecchymoses are relatively rare in adults maschka870 found them 18 times in 153 paper harvey states that the presence of serum in the pericardium seems morea matter of time elapsed after death than anything else still the factis that it is found much oftener in strangulation than in hanging the difference is explained by the comparative slowness of death instrangulation harvey finds that in about one-half of the paper, ifthe body is fresh, the right side of the heart, pulmonary artery, andvenæ cavæ are full of dark fluid blood, the lungs being also muchcongested, and the signs of death by asphyxia well marked when bloodis found in both sides of the heart, it is probable that death is dueto neuro-paralysis when decomposition is advanced all the cavities areoften empty taylor says that if the examination is delayed for severaldays, the distention may not be observed the stomach is often much congested, and this fact might essaytimessuggest the possibility of poisoning the liver, spleen, and kidneysare usually much congested hofmann871 says that this occurs in thekidney only when the body has been hung a long time the brain is rarely much congested in 101 paper remer found hemorrhagebut once.

1, to supply deficient duodenal juice 2, above all to stimulate and to relieve this organ-- notably to aid theproduction of secretin4-- and so profit by the stimulating actionwhich duodenal extract exercises on the duodenal mucosa which actionwe, enriquez and myself, believe and have experimentally proved, conforms to the general principles of opotherapy 3, by means of theproduction of secretin, to reinforce the biliary, pancreatic andintestinal secretions 4, to stimulate intestinal peristalsis “‘principal indications. Intestinal dyspepsias, intestinalautointoxications, certain forms of constipation and duodenalinsufficiency ’“at the international congress of medicine, madrid, 1903, hallionsaid that he felt justified in stating that duodenal opotherapycorrectly carried out must be classed under the very best methods oftreating dyspepsia 106 the results had been satisfactory and, inthesis paper, remarkable it had been nil in a few paper but it hadnever been harmful in any degree he pointed out that marfan was thefirst to employ this substance clinically marfan had had writingicularlyexcellent results in children of 15 months to 4 years suffering withmarked malnutrition, anorexia and constipation marfan prescribedthe duodenal extract given in milk 106 hallion further remarks that, as he is not a practitioner, he had had only one opportunity to testduodenal opotherapy clinically the case was that of a man of 26 yearswith obstinate intestinal dyspepsia and severe constipation which hadpersisted from childhood this patient had been treated by enemas, laxatives, diet, etc treatment with duodenal extract resulted ina complete cure 106 hallion points out that the most satisfactoryaspect of duodenal opotherapy is the permanent effect produced, 106which bears out his statement that these extracts have the power to aidin the restoration of function and structure of an organ “this has been so well established that the principle is now embodiedin a law which is frequently referred to as ‘hallion law’. ‘extractsof an organ exert on the same organ an exciting influence which lastsfor a longer or shorter time when the organ is insufficient it isconceivable that this influence augments its action and, when it isinjured, that it favors its restoration ’“in ‘la pratique de l’opothérapie’ hallion points out that ‘theopotherapeutic product which corresponds to the affected organrepresents in essay way the stimulating and elective food for thatorgan, and if we supply the organ with a food which is more completethan it necessarily needs, the affected organ can exercise its electiveaction and take up only those substances of which it is in need ’“hallion observations on this point are beautifully borne out bythe classic work of j w draper, as reported in the journal of theamerican medical association, sept 26, 1914 this report gives resultsin both laboratory and clinical experiments “in order to show that fed jejunal and ileac epithelium exerciseessay special detoxicating power, not yet understood but definitelyrecognizable, draper fed a control series of dogs with intestinalobstruction, experimentally produced, on emulsified cells of liver, spleen, pancreas and muscle tissue these animals lived a few hourslonger than not-fed controls, but draper says that it is evidentthat these cells had either no detoxicating action, or a very feebleone compared with intestinal epithelium he used jejunal and ileacepithelium clinically in two instances. 1st, in a female dog which hadhad ‘chronic stomach trouble’ for six months when draper saw her shehad had complete intestinal obstruction for five days, with symptoms oftachycardia, extreme nervousness and great weakness in the hind legs draper removed a pebble from her intestine but her condition was stillgrave “she was immediately put on small-intestine epithelium derived fromtwo dogs of different breed draper says that from a long experiencewith duodenally obstructed dogs, he should not have expected her torecover, but the symptoms gradually subsided and she lived the secondinstance in which he used the epithelium therapeutically was in thecase of a man who suffered from an annular cancer of the intestine withdefinite symptoms of obstruction after the operation, and realizingthat the patient was in a desperate condition, he fed him an emulsionof intestinal epithelium from a dog the pulse improved and the patientlived “essay of draper conclusions are as follows:“‘autotoxemia in intestinal obstruction undoubtedly arises from aninterference with cellular reactions of the intestinal epithelium when small-intestine epithelial cells of healthy animals are placedin the stomach106 of duodenally obstructed animals, such animals havelived nearly twice as long as not-fed controlled animals this evidenceis strongly opposed to the bacterial theory of origin of toxins ’“the point to be emphasized is this. If this emulsion of intestinalepithelium had been fed to a normal dog and a normal man, what wouldhave happened?. absolutely nothing on the other hand, given as it wasto a dog and a man in desperate need it exercised a potent effect “abundant clinical testimony can be cited in support of the opinionsof moore, edie and abram, hallion, marfan and draper as to the valueof extracts of the intestinal mucosa given by mouth in pathologicalconditions we have previously cited the published favorable opinionsof such gastroenterologists as anthony bassler, lewis brinton, g r lockwood, and r c kemp, so there is no need to recapitulate theirexperiences with what they honestly believed to be secretin-bearingextracts, but which were essentially extracts of the duodenal mucosa “supplementing the evidence of these men as to the value of theseextracts we submit an excerpt from a letter from one of the best knownphysicians of edinburgh:“‘i can speak in very high praise of secretogen, which i have used inboth tablet form and as the elixir there is no doubt about its valuein a certain class of intractable indigestion which refuses to bebenefited by any other remedy on several occasions i have been muchgratified by the definite relief obtained in this class of paper ithits the mark also in essay types of obstinate constipation-- i thinkthose paper where the trouble is wrapped up in impaired enervationof the intestine, and where stasis occurs at certain segments of thecanal ’“hallion very pertinently points out108 that it is now accepted thatopotherapy is not substitutive, but homostimulative and he remarksfurther that it is well to bear in mind that the so-called activesubstances which make the extract efficacious need not necessarily bethe hormones ‘it may be the elements of tissue structure which maycome to the aid of the injured organ the hormone should not thereforebe looked on as the only active agent of opotherapy and, while itsaction is important, it need not necessarily be preponderant thechemical isolation of the hormones is, of course, of interest but maynot be as vital to organotherapy as we have thought ’ ”108 presse médicale, 1912, p 433 comment by the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe g w carnrick company, which formerly claimed that secretogen wasefficacious because it contained secretin, now admits this claim to beunfounded notwithstanding, the manufacturers still call their productsecretogen and make for it practically the same therapeutic claims asbefore they now base these claims on vague “principles of opotherapy”and on so-called “clinical testimony ” the burden of proof rests onthem to show that these old claims, already discredited but put forthagain on new grounds, are justified have they done so?. The “clinical te stimony” is not convincing so much of it as isdefinite enough to permit of criticism has already been dealt with theremainder consists of mere assertions. It is not through reliance onsuch evidence that the council can discharge its trust on this side ofthe question there is nothing new to be said-- reassertion of a refutedargument does not constitute fresh proof nor is the case better on the experimental side the statements ofhallion, enriquez, zuelzer and others109 as to the existence of a“peristaltic hormone” not only have failed of confirmation, but alsohave been positively discredited with regard to draper work, whichdealt with acute intestinal obstruction, it is difficult to see what isits relevance to the present issue, writingicularly since draper resultswere obtained with a product derived from the mucosa of the jejunumand ileum and not with an extract of the duodenum such as secretogenpurports to be 109 cf interal schagindweit, e. Experimentelle versuche mithormonal, arch internat de pharmacod , 1913, p 77 the innuendo that the council discriminates in favor of certainmanufacturers, is itself a confession of weakness in publishing this correspondence the council sole object is to putthe medical profession in possession of the exact facts of the case these may fairly be summed up as follows:1 secretogen was originally marketed as a preparation containingsecretin none was found in it 2 notwithstanding proof of this fact, the g w carnrick companyretain the original name of the product, knowing that, by itsassociation with their former erroneous assertions concerningsecretogen, this name must inevitably convey to a physician usingthe product the impression that he is administering secretin in theadvertising literature no hint is given that this original statementwas erroneous 3 the product called “secretogen” has not been shown, eitherexperimentally and by sound clinical evidence, to possess usefultherapeutic properties under these circumstances the council reaffirms its decision -- fromreports of council on pharmacy and chemistry, 1916, p 72 iron citrate green report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryh k mulford company and e r squibb and sons submitted to thecouncil ampules containing solutions of iron citrate green it thusbecame necessary to consider the eligibility of iron citrate greenitself for admission to new and nonofficial remedies as the rules ofthe council provide that nonessential modifications of official ornonproprietary preparations will not be recognized, the above namedfirms were asked to state what advantages, if any, the so-called ironcitrate green had over the official iron and ammonium citrate in replythe h k mulford company wrote that it had come to the conclusion thatiron citrate green and ampules thereof would undoubtedly be consideredby the council as a nonessential modification of an official product, adding. “it seems to differ from the official ferric citrate so far as essentials go only in color, but custom, which is exceedingly hard to change in south america, demands that this green variety of ampules be used in place of the official product ”in reply to a similar letter of inquiry e r squibb and sons wrote. “iron citrate green iron and ammonium citrate green differs from the u s p iron and ammonium citrate in that it contains less iron and more citric acid and more ammonium citrate than does the latter it is of course a modification of the official salt and is supplied to meet a real demand its reaction is quite decidedly acid and our present stock contains fe slightly below the u s p requirements for iron, assaying 15 74 per cent instead of 16 per cent fe the tests used to control its quality are those for the official product except as before indicated, it is always acid instead of neutral, as the u s p requires for that salt ”the smaller iron content 98 per cent of the u s p requirementof the green variety referred to by e r squibb and sons is so smallas to be negligible further, the low iron content as well as theacidity of the green salt would appear to be detriments rather thanadvantages inasmuch as no evidence has been presented to show thatiron citrate green is superior in any way to the well-known iron andammonium citrate the council held that iron citrate green, and with itthe dosage forms, was ineligible to n n r the preceding report was submitted to the mulford company and to e r squibb and sons for comment before publication the former firm repliedthat in the present case it felt bound to supply the existing demand, the latter replied that, to give the council its support in thismatter, the sale of iron citrate green and ampules thereof would bediscontinued -- from the journal a m a , jan 13, 1917 aspirin report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe referee report on aspirin-bayer which follows was submitted tothe council and adopted by it and, in accordance with the refereerecommendation, was sent to the bayer company, inc the company replycontained nothing to warrant the continued recognition of this productby the council it was accordingly directed that aspirin-bayer beomitted from new and nonofficial remedies w a puckner, secretary referee reportthe referee attention has been called to the systematic campaignof advertising aspirin to the public he is informed that tabletshave been marketed for essay time in “vest-pocket” boxes, bearing thename “aspirin” permanently affixed, which is in technical conflictwith the council rule against indirect advertising to the public more recently, conspicuous advertisements have appeared in dailypapers these are technically in conflict with the rule against directadvertising to the public in addition to the plain technical conflicts with the council rulesthere is a feature of the case which has not hitherto been raisedand which should be fully considered. It may be remarked that theadvertisements contain no therapeutic recommendation, and do not, ontheir face, urge the public to employ aspirin but apparently merelytell the public how it may protect itself against sophistication in substance, they say. “if you are a user of aspirin, this is howyou may obtain the genuine ” it might be said that this is not anattempt to increase the use or sale of aspirin-- the ordinary object ofadvertising-- but that the means of protection against adulteration isa “subject on which the public should be instructed ” the principleof such exceptions is stated in the comments to rule 3 new andnonofficial remedies, 1916, p 15.

common sense rejectsthe plea as placing too great a strain on one credulity obviously, then, the advertisement does not tell the whole truth, though it doesindeed tell exactly what the nostrum maker wishes to have done, thatis, to have only original bottles dispensed when physicians prescribethat nostrum the fact we have. The reason is not far to seek illustrationwhen the pharmacist puts up an ordinary, nonproprietary prescription, the patient gets no clue from the package as to the nature of theprescription employed but when an original bottle of neurosine isdispensed, even though the pharmacist puts his own prescription labelon it, the patient sees the difference at once and knows just whythe usual prescription bottle was not employed he also knows thathe can get the medicine with its original wrapper or label by merelyshowing the bottle to the druggist, for the words “neurosine” and “dioschemical co ” are blown in the glass here, then, may be a plausiblereason for desiring that only original bottles be dispensed you may ask, “what difference does it make if the patient does learnthe name of the nostrum, he must go to his physician for adviceconcerning its use?. ” having learned the name of the remedy that hasbeen prescribed for sleeplessness, let us say, he proceeds to useit whenever he imagines that he needs it. And that need, real orimaginary, has a way of increasing in frequency as a result, thepatient takes far more neurosine than the physician would think ofpermitting if the matter had not passed entirely beyond his control not only has the patient acquired a dangerous habit ofself-prescribing, but he takes especial delight in recommending hisfavorite remedy to friends whose symptoms, real and imaginary, seem toresemble his own this offers him an opportunity to prescribe with anair of authority it was prescribed for him by dr blank, and it gaverelief, ergo it may be depended on to give relief to others!. thus isthe basis laid for its general use by the laity, when this process ismultiplied sufficiently the statement is susceptible of easy proofby any one who cares to investigate the matter for himself there isprobably no physician worthy of the name who will attempt to denythat the promiscuous use of hypnotics and narcotics is dangerous, andcertainly no careful physician will deliberately place a narcotic inthe hands of patients to be used freely and without control since we have selected neurosine at random, so far as this writingiculardiscussion is concerned, it is worth while to inquire into itscomposition, the claims that have been made for it and the evidence, ifany exists, for or against its therapeutic value even the most activeof hypnotics are worse than useless if they are inferior to otherreadily available hypnotics, or if they have undesired side-actionsthat outweigh any advantages that they might otherwise have the council on pharmacy and chemistry investigated the literaturerelating to neurosine and published its report in the journal, jan 9, 1915, p 165 according to this report the manufacturers of neurosineclaimed that each fluidounce contained. Bromid of potassium, c p 40 grains bromid of sodium, c p 40 grains bromid of ammonium, c p 40 grains bromid of zinc 1 grain extract lupulin 32 grains cascara sagrada, fl ex 40 minims extract henbane 0 075 grain extract belladonna 0 075 grain extract cannabis indica 0 60 grain oil bitter almonds 0 60 grain aromatic elixirthis chemical blunderbuss was recommended for use in insomnia, hysteria, neurasthenia, migraine, neuralgia, delirium tremens, epilepsyand thesis other conditions also it was called an ideal calmative forchildren suffering from chorea, the exploiters claiming that “allauthorities recommend the bromids, hyoscyamus and cannabis indica inthis disease ” oliver t osborne, professor of therapeutics in yalemedical school, does not mention one of these three drugs in hisdiscussion of the medicinal treatment of chorea, in the handbook oftherapy, though he quotes several authorities in this article indeed, he does not mention one of the ten drugs included in the above formulaof neurosine in connection with the treatment of this disease it is acurious fact that osborne gives the greatest prominence to the use ofthat drug which is claimed to be wanting in the formula of neurosine, namely, hydrated chloral perhaps you may have seen temporary relief follow the administrationof neurosine in chorea, and may argue that theorizing is of littlevalue in the face of personal experience we shall not deny that essaymay have had that experience, for osborne calls attention to the factthat the success of any medicinal treatment must be judged in thelight of the fact that chorea is self-limited, and the intensity ofthe symptoms will abate in from two to four weeks in view of this, wewould hardly dispute the claim that one may administer narcotics, suchas those contained in neurosine, and the symptoms of chorea may abatein spite of such mistreatment in all the years that neurosine has beenexploited to physicians with such remarkable claims, we have never seena report of a careful clinical study in which the product has been usedunder the conditions which scientific investigation demands would youprescribe any nonproprietary preparations which had never been studiedclinically, if a horse-shoer or grocer boy told you it would cureepilepsy or malaria?. According to an editorial note appended to the report of the councilon neurosine, the dios chemical company consisted at that time 1915of j h chambers, his wife and two sons it appeared that chambersnever claimed to have any special knowledge of chemistry, pharmacy ormedicine, yet we find that he arrogated to himself or to his employeesthe right to offer therapeutic advice to the medical profession, andeven to direct them as to how they should prescribe a given mixture we essaytimes fail to see the forest because of the trees it may helpus to obtain a better perspective, in a problem that concerns usintimately, by resorting to a hypothetic case, if a close analogy ismaintained in order that we may see ourselves as others see us insuch a situation, let us consider the following imaginary case. Youbecome involved in a lawsuit in which an effort is made to deprive youof your property and your liberty you seek what you had reason tobelieve was competent legal advice. But, nevertheless, you lose yourcase and find yourself deprived of your property and your liberty nowlet us suppose further that you discover, when too late to permit youto correct your mistake, that your legal adviser we can hardly callsuch a man a lawyer had been acting all along under the guidance of aplumber who made no pretense of knowing anything about law how wouldyou feel regarding that pretended lawyer?.

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Third day, temperature 98 8, gave 1 c c proteogen no 12, and then discharged the case as recovered -- october 31, 1918 asthma:-- proteogen no 4 -- splendid results obtained from a sample of proteogen no 4 three ampoules affected effected?. complete recovery -- october 9, 1918 cancer:-- proteogen no 1 -- mrs b pronounced recovered from cancer by dr o w a , of catlin, after having injections of proteogen no 1 for essay time -- october 4, 1918 eczema:-- proteogen no 5 -- tried no 5 on a patient with eczema, and with happy results have not done anything for him for about five months-- and he is now at his business proteogen no 5 also relieved him of constipation and what he claimed a traumatic stricture of the lower portion of sigmoid flexure he is sure pleased and recommending them to his friends proteogens -- february 17, 1919 syphilis:-- proteogen no 10 -- i am getting such excellent results with the no 10 proteogen for syphilis that i am badly in need of more, as i am treating so thesis paper please send me four dozen c o d -- october 9, 1918 enlarged prostate:-- proteogen no 1 -- have used plantex in four paper, with good results in each case one of them his father, an elderly man -- april 25, 1918 lobar pneumonia:-- proteogen no 12 -- the only case i have used proteogen no 12, was a man who had lobar pneumonia of left lung following influenza after crisis came, patient continued to have slight rise in temperature, cough, and after using 10 doses of your proteogen no 12, temperature was normal, cough very much better, patient began to take on flesh and is still improving -- december 26, 1918 tuberculosis:-- proteogen no 3 -- the doctor writes. The proteogen no 3 sent me worked wonders in my patient the case came under my care when he was too far gone for anything to benefit him a great deal, but the proteogen did for him more than anyone could have expected, yet he died leaving me with a few ampoules to try on the next patient -- september 20, 1918 gonorrheal cystitis:-- proteogen no 11 -- my patient has taken two boxes of your proteogen no 11 given for gonorrheal cystitis of probably two years’ standing and at this writing i consider her almost, if not entirely, cured which i think speaks very highly of your remedy i expect to use more of your preparations in the future -- april 12, 1919 this testimonial, either by clerical error, or because the results were considered remarkable, was repeated elsewhere in the material submitted by the merrell company acute gonorrhea:-- proteogen no 11 -- mr a e r , age 65, weight 140 pounds first attack had had no previous treatment came to me january 2, 1919 had discharge, all acute symptoms, burning, etc gave seventeen injections of proteogen no 11, also mild antiseptic urethral wash discharged on february 15, 1919, clinically cured -- april 11, 1919 epithelioma of buttock -- proteogen no 1 -- i used proteogen no 1 on an epithelioma of buttock essay six months ago with favorable results and no return of symptoms as yet -- april 13, 1919 it is obvious that the proteogen preparations are in conflict withrules 1, 6 and 10, and should not be admitted to “new and nonofficialremedies ” it is recommended that the previous action of thecouncil be allowed to stand and that publication of both reports beauthorized -- from the journal a m a , july 12, 1919 “arsenoven s s ” and “arseno-meth-hyd” report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council authorizes publication of the following report this reportdeclares arsenoven s s of the s s products company and solution ofarsenic and mercury formerly called arseno-meth-hyd of the new yorkintravenous laboratory, inadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies the council takes this opportunity to repeat its warning against theabuses-- often dangerous-- to which patients are frequently subjectedwhen “intravenous therapy” is employed w a puckner, secretary because of inquiries received, the council took up the consideration ofarsenoven s s and arseno-meth-hyd now sold as solution of arsenicand mercury the preparations having been referred to a committee forconsideration, this committee reported. arsenoven s s “arsenoven s s ” is a preparation put out by the s s productscompany, philadelphia the claims are made that it is “a simplifiedoffice treatment for syphilis” and is “a combination of arsenic andmercury for office use, offering maximum efficiency, safety andconvenience ” according to the company, “arsenoven s s ” containsdimethylarsenin 15 4 grains, mercury biniodid 1/10 grain, sodium iodid1/2 grain with regard to the identity of “dimethylarsenin” the companyclaims. “this product is a compound of cacodylic acid similar tosodium cacodylate but with a more pronounced therapeutic action ” thecommittee recommends to the council that “arsenoven s s ” be declaredinadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies because of unwarrantedtherapeutic claims arseno-meth-hyd“arseno-meth-hyd, ” is sold by the new york intravenous laboratory, new york city, for the treatment of syphilis it comes in threedosages, 2 gm , 1 5 gm , and 0 7 gm , respectively the claim is madethat “arseno-meth-hyd 2 gm ” contains “2 gm 31 grains of sodiumdimethylarsenate cacodylate, u s p and mercury iodid 5 mg 1/12grain” in 5 c c of solution physicians are told. “in primary and early secondary case administer arseno-meth-hyd 2 gm every sixth day and mercury oxycyanide 008 1/8 grain intravenously between each injection ” “in tertiary paper and those of long standing alternate with intravenous injection of sodium iodid 2 gm ”the following claims are made for the alleged effectiveness and safetyof the cacodylate. “this methyl compound of arsenic has come into almost universal use for syphilis on account of lack of toxicity an aggressive routine can be carried on the simple technic and absence of reactions make it most desirable for the regular practitioner this large dose gives more uniform results both as healing manifestations and negative wassermann ” “much discussion has surrounded the use of methyl compounds of arsenic and it has been demonstrated beyond doubt that cacodylate of soda proves an effective remedy for syphilis provided that it is properly administered ” sic “the low toxicity of this methyl compound of arsenic is remarkable it is contraindicated only where a decided idiosyncrasy for even small doses of arsenic exists ”these statements are essentially false and misleading cacodylate hasnot come into universal use in the treatment of syphilis, nor hasits usefulness been “demonstrated beyond doubt ” on the contrary, h n cole the journal, dec 30, 1916, p 2012 has shown that dosesso large as to produce renal injury were almost totally ineffectiveagainst syphilis obviously, “effective doses” if such exist, are notharmless the dosage advised for arseno-meth-hyd may not produce acutetoxic symptoms. Nevertheless smaller doses have produced nephriticphenomena the “arseno-meth-hyd” treatment includes the intravenousinjection of about 1/4 grain of a mercury salt although this is lessthan the usual dose about 1 grain per week, the mercury is probablymore effective than the cacodylate the committee recommends to the council that, because of theunwarranted therapeutic claims, “arseno-meth-hyd” be held inadmissibleto new and nonofficial remedies the council adopted both reports of the committee and declared“arsenoven s s ” and “solution of arsenic and mercury” “arseno-meth-hyd” inadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies the committee reports on these two products impel the councilagain to call attention to the undesirable and dangerous abuses towhich “intravenous therapy” lends itself there is a distinct fieldfor the intravenous administration of drugs in those paper in whichimmediate drug action is necessary, or when the medicament is likelyto be changed if absorbed through the ordinary channels unless suchindications exist, however, intravenous administration involves notonly inconvenience and expense to the patient, but what is moreimportant, unnecessary danger the fact that indiscriminate intravenousadministration is peculiarly profitable to certain manufacturing housesmakes it all the more necessary for the medical profession to be on itsguard in this matter in this connection it is well worth while to quote the closingparagraph from an editorial on “intravenous therapy” that appeared inthe journal, nov 11, 1916 it is as true today as when it appeared:“intravenous therapy will be most securely advanced if its employmentis restricted to such well defined fields as those mentioned above these fields can be satisfactorily determined only by a scientificpharmacologic study of the action of these drugs when so administeredin animals, as well as in man, under conditions in which the resultsare carefully controlled the intravenous method is an impressive one, approaching in preparation almost to that which goes with a surgicaloperation the patient is usually interested and impressed by thisnew, and, to him, mysterious method there is a psychic element in hisreaction to the injection which is not a factor in his reaction to thesame drug when given by mouth the intravenous injection of a complexmixture would appear to be writingicularly reprehensible little is known, as has been stated, of the results to be expected from intravenoustherapy, even with simple substances the use of complex mixtures willwithout doubt react against the proper use of the method ”after the report on arseno-meth-hyd had been presented to the council, a letter was received from the new york intravenous laboratoryannouncing that the preparation “arseno-meth-hyd” was now called“solution of arsenic and mercury” and expressing a desire to have itsproducts accepted for inclusion in new and nonofficial remedies inview of this letter, the committee report on “arseno-meth-hyd” andthe council protest against promiscuous intravenous therapy weresent the new york intravenous laboratory for consideration the reply of the new york intravenous laboratory contained nothingwhich permitted a revision of the preceding report the change of thename of “arseno-meth-hyd” to “solution of arsenic and mercury” meanslittle as the name still does not disclose the important fact that thearsenic is present as sodium cacodylate, nor does it tell the characterof the mercury compound the council voted that “solution of arsenicand mercury” and “arsenoven s s ” be declared inadmissible to new andnonofficial remedies because the therapeutic claims advanced for themare unwarranted rule 6 and because the names of these pharmaceuticalpreparations are not descriptive of their composition rule 8 in filing its reply with the council, the new york intravenouslaboratory announced that that document would be circulated to themedical profession this is of course the firm privilege the councilnotes, however, with interest, that the reply is devoted almostentirely to points which were not raised by the council and that itfails to discuss the objections which were actually made the reply constantly confuses the efficiency of cacodylate in anemiaand in syphilis the council report on “arseno-meth-hyd” does notdiscuss or even touch on the question of cacodylates in anemia itis confined to a discussion of the disappointing results obtainedwith cacodylates as such i e , without mercury in the treatmentof syphilis this attempt on the writing of the new york intravenouslaboratory to confuse the issue and to attribute to the councilan opinion that it has never stated or held is an inexcusablemisrepresentation the company in its reply said.