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Why This College Essay


And droppedinto the ears, eases the why this college essay pains in them, and heals and removes the heat the same also with the juice of houseleek is profitable against allinflammations and breakings out of the skin, and against burnings andscaldings by fire and water the juice or decoction made either ofitself, or other things of the like nature, is of much use and goodeffect for old and hollow ulcers that are hard to be cured, and forcankers and sores in the mouth or privy writings of man or woman. Andhelps also the pains of the piles in the fundament the juice mixedwith oil of roses, and the temples and forehead anointed therewith, eases the pains of the head proceeding from heat, and helps lunatic andfrantic persons very much. As also the biting of serpents, or a maddog the same also is profitably applied to all hot gouts in the feetor hands, especially in the beginning it is also good to be appliedwhere any bone is out of joint, to hinder inflammations, swellings, andpains that presently rise thereupon the powder of the dried leavestaken in drink, kills worms of the belly. And boiled in wine, killsworms that breed in old and foul ulcers one writing of plantain water, and two writings of the brine of powdered beef, boiled together andclarified, is a most sure remedy to heal all spreading scabs or itchin the head and body, all manner of tetters, ringworms, the shingles, and all other running and fretting sores briefly, the plantains aresingularly good wound herbs, to heal fresh or old wounds or sores, either inward or outward plums are so well known that they need no description government and virtues all plums are under venus, and are likewomen, essay better, and essay worse as there is great diversity ofkinds, so there is in the operation of plums, for essay that are sweetmoisten the stomach, and make the belly soluble. Those that are sourquench thirst more, and bind the belly. The moist and waterish dosooner corrupt in the stomach, but the firm do nourish more, and offendless the dried fruit sold by the grocers under the names of damaskprunes, do essaywhat loosen the belly, and being stewed, are oftenused, both in health and sickness, to relish the mouth and stomach, to procure appetite, and a little to open the body, allay choler, andcool the stomach plum-tree leaves boiled in wine, are good to washand gargle the mouth and throat, to dry the flux of rheum coming tothe palate, gums, or almonds of the ear the gum of the tree is goodto break the stone the gum or leaves boiled in vinegar, and applied, kills tetters and ringworms matthiolus saith, the oil preserved out ofthe kernels of the stones, as oil of almonds is made, is good againstthe inflamed piles, the tumours or swellings of ulcers, hoarseness ofthe voice, roughness of the tongue and throat, and likewise the painsin the ears and that five ounces of the said oil taken with one ounceof muskadel, drives forth the stone, and helps the cholic polypody of the oak descript this is a small herb consisting of nothing but roots andleaves, bearing neither stalk, flower, nor seed, as it is thought ithath three or four leaves rising from the root, every one single byitself, of about a hand length, are winged, consisting of thesis smallnarrow leaves cut into the middle rib, standing on each side of thestalk, large below, and smaller up to the top, not dented nor notchedat the edges at all, as the male fern hath, of sad green colour, andsmooth on the upper side, but on the other side essaywhat rough byreason of essay yellowish flowers set thereon the root is smaller thanone little finger, lying aslope, or creeping along under the uppercrust of the earth, brownish on the outside and greenish within, of asweetish harshness in taste, set with certain rough knags on each sidethereof, having also much mossiness or yellow hairiness upon it, andessay fibres underneath it, whereby it is nourished place it grows as well upon old rotten stumps, or trunks of trees, asoak, beech, hazel, willow, or any other, as in the woods under them, and upon old mud walls, as also in mossy, stony, and gravelly placesnear unto wood that which grows upon oak is accounted the best. Butthe quantity thereof is scarce sufficient for the common use time it being always green, may be gathered for use at any time government and virtues polypodium of the oak, that which growsupon the earth is best.

But the leaves why this college essay when they are older, are heating anddrying in the second degree, and harder of digestion than when theyare fresh, which, by reason of their sweetness, are more pleasing, and better digesting in the stomach. And taken with sweet wine, theymove the belly downwards, but being old, they grieve the stomach. Andin hot bodies cause the choler to abound and the head-ach, and are anenemy to those that have the cough. But are less hurtful to those thathave a colder stomach, and are said to kill the broad worms in thebelly or stomach if they be taken with onions, salt, and honey, theyhelp the biting of a mad dog, or the venom or infectious poison of anybeast, &c caias pompeius found in the treasury of mithridates, kingof pontus, when he was overthrown, a scroll of his own hand writing, containing a medicine against any poison or infection. Which is this;take two dry walnuts, and as thesis good figs, and twenty leaves ofrue, bruised and beaten together with two or three corns of salt andtwenty juniper berries, which take every morning fasting, preservesfrom danger of poison, and infection that day it is taken the juiceof the other green husks boiled with honey is an excellent gargle forsore mouths, or the heat and inflammations in the throat and stomach the kernels, when they grow old, are more oily, and therefore notfit to be eaten, but are then used to heal the wounds of the sinews, gangrenes, and carbuncles the said kernels being burned, are veryastringent, and will stay lasks and women courses, being taken inred wine, and stay the falling of the hair, and make it fair, beinganointed with oil and wine the green husks will do the like, beingused in the same manner the kernels beaten with rue and wine, beingapplied, help the quinsy. And bruised with essay honey, and applied tothe ears, ease the pains and inflammation of them a piece of the greenhusks put into a hollow tooth, eases the pain the catkins hereof, taken before they fall off, dried, and given a dram thereof in powderwith white wine, wonderfully helps those that are troubled with therising of the mother the oil that is pressed out of the kernels, is very profitable, taken inwardly like oil of almonds, to help thecholic, and to expel wind very effectually. An ounce or two thereof maybe taken at any time the young green nuts taken before they be halfripe, and preserved with sugar, are of good use for those that haveweak stomachs, or defluctions thereon the distilled water of the greenhusks, before they be half ripe, is of excellent use to cool the heatof agues, being drank an ounce or two at a time. As also to resist theinfection of the plague, if essay of the same be also applied to thesores thereof the same also cools the heat of green wounds and oldulcers, and heals them, being bathed therewith the distilled water ofthe green husks being ripe, when they are shelled from the nuts, anddrank with a little vinegar, is good for the place, so as before thetaking thereof a vein be opened the said water is very good againstthe quinsy, being gargled and bathed therewith, and wonderfully helpsdeafness, the noise, and other pains in the ears the distilled waterof the young green leaves in the end of may, performs a singular cureon foul running ulcers and sores, to be bathed, with wet cloths orspunges applied to them every morning wold, weld, or dyer weed the common kind grows bushing with thesis leaves, long, narrow andflat upon the ground.

Photographic reproduction reduced of an advertisementof the “originator” of toxicide. It ran for thesis months in the programof a burlesque theater located in ruckel neighborhood there is no evidence, however, that any effort has been made todemonstrate the presence of a “latent immunizing active principle” byscientific methods of modern immunology the following claims for theuse of toxicide appear on the label. “acne, boils, carbuncles, furuncles and abscesses of the most virulent types usually begin to show improvement within 4 to 12 hours after beginning administration “in badly infected wounds, toxicide will check the further destruction of live tissue and should always be given for a few days before and after operations on pus paper “for gunshot wounds and other conditions difficult to sterilize or drain, toxicide is the ideal remedy “for abscesses existing or threatened in any obscure location, the middle ear, the mastoid, the frontal or any accessory sinuses, toxicide is of inestimable value “if administered early, in fractures, compound or simple, or for laceration and other injuries, inflammation, swelling, soreness and destruction of tissue will be greatly mitigated ”in support of these claims there are offered letters from physicianswho have used toxicide with good results none of these testimonialspresent evidence that the reported effects were due to toxicide the asserted-- and highly improbable-- action of toxicide could bedetermined only by an extensive series of carefully controlled clinicaltrials-- and such evidence is entirely lacking in fact, the claimsappear to have no better basis than the coincidence which is stated tohave led to the discovery of the “remedy”. Namely, that a boil on theneck disappeared shortly after the administration of toxicide!. The council finds toxicide inadmissible to new and nonofficial remediesbecause 1 the identity and amount of the potent constituent orconstituents have not been furnished. 2 the preparation is advertisedindirectly to the public. 3 the name “toxicide” is therapeuticallysuggestive, and 4 the therapeutic claims, being unsubstantiated byevidence, are unwarranted illustration.

It does why this college essay not grow downwards, but creeps along under the uppercrust of the ground, and consists of divers small round knobs settogether. Towards the top of the stalk there grows essay single leaves, by each of which comes a small cloven bulb, which when it is ripe, ifit be set in the ground, it will grow to be a root as for the other coralwort, which grows in this nation, it is morescarce than this, being a very small plant, much like crowfoot, therefore essay think it to be one of the sorts of crowfoot i know notwhere to direct you to it, therefore i shall forbear the description place the first grows in mayfield in sussex, in a wood calledhighread, and in another wood there also, called fox-holes time they flower from the latter end of april to the middle of may, and before the middle of july they are gone, and not to be found government and virtues it is under the dominion of the moon itcleanses the bladder, and provokes urine, expels gravel, and the stone;it eases pains in the sides and bowels, is excellently good for inwardwounds, especially such as are made in the breast or lungs, by takinga dram of the powder of the root every morning in wine. The same isexcellently good for ruptures, as also to stop fluxes. An ointment madeof it is exceedingly good for wounds and ulcers, for it soon dries upthe watery humours which hinder the cure costmary, or alcost, or balsam herb this is so frequently known to be an inhabitant in almost every garden, that i suppose it needless to write a description thereof time it flowers in june and july government and virtues it is under the dominion of jupiter theordinary costmary, as well as maudlin, provokes urine abundantly, and moistens the hardness of the mother. It gently purges cholerand phlegm, extenuating that which is gross, and cutting that whichis tough and glutinous, cleanses that which is foul, and hindersputrefaction and corruption. It dissolves without attraction, opensobstructions, and helps their evil effects, and it is a wonderfulhelp to all sorts of dry agues it is astringent to the stomach, andstrengthens the liver, and all the other inward writings. And taken inwhey works more effectually taken fasting in the morning, it is veryprofitable for pains in the head that are continual, and to stay, dryup, and consume all thin rheums or distillations from the head intothe stomach, and helps much to digest raw humours that are gatheredtherein it is very profitable for those that are fallen into acontinual evil disposition of the whole body, called cachexia, butespecially in the beginning of the disease it is an especial friendand helps to evil, weak and cold livers the seed is familiarly givento children for the worms, and so is the infusion of the flowersin white wine given them to the quantity of two ounces at a time;it makes an excellent salve to cleanse and heal old ulcers, beingboiled with oil of olive, and adder tongue with it, and after it isstrained, put a little wax, rosin, and turpentine, to bring it to aconvenient body cudweed, or cottonweed besides cudweed and cottonweed, it is also called chaffweed, dwarfcotton, and petty cotton descript the common cudweed rises up with one stalk essaytimes, and essaytimes with two or three, thick set on all sides with small, long and narrow whitish or woody leaves, from the middle of the stalkalmost up to the top, with every leaf stands small flowers of a dun orbrownish yellow colour, or not so yellow as others. In which herbs, after the flowers are fallen, come small seed wrapped up, with thedown therein, and is carried away with the wind. The root is small andthready there are other sorts hereof, which are essaywhat less than the former, not much different, save only that the stalks and leaves are shorter, so that the flowers are paler and more open place they grow in dry, barren, sandy, and gravelly grounds, inmost places of this land time they flower about july, essay earlier, essay later, and theirseed is ripe in august government and virtues venus is lady of it the plants areall astringent, binding, or drying, and therefore profitable fordefluctions of rheum from the head, and to stay fluxes of bloodwheresoever, the decoction being made into red wine and drank, or thepowder taken therein it also helps the bloody-flux, and eases thetorments that come thereby, stays the immoderate courses of women, and is also good for inward or outward wounds, hurts, and bruises, and helps children both of bursting and the worms, and being eitherdrank or injected, for the disease called tenesmus, which is an oftenprovocation to the stool without doing any thing the green leavesbruised, and laid to any green wound, stays the bleeding, and heals itup quickly the juice of the herb taken in wine and milk, is, as plinysaith, a sovereign remedy against the mumps and quinsey. And furthersaith, that whosoever shall so take it, shall never be troubled withthat disease again cowslips, or peagles both the wild and garden cowslips are so well known, that i neithertrouble myself nor the reader with a description of them time they flower in april and may government and virtues venus lays claim to this herb as her own, and it is under the sign aries, and our city dames know well enough theointment or distilled water of it adds beauty, or at least restores itwhen it is lost the flowers are held to be more effectual than theleaves, and the roots of little use an ointment being made with them, takes away spots and wrinkles of the skin, sun-burning, and freckles, and adds beauty exceedingly. They remedy all infirmities of the headcoming of heat and wind, as vertigo, ephialtes, false apparitions, phrensies, falling-sickness, palsies, convulsions, cramps, pains inthe nerves. The roots ease pains in the back and bladder, and open thepassages of urine the leaves are good in wounds, and the flowers takeaway trembling if the flowers be not well dried, and kept in a warmplace, they will soon putrefy and look green. Have a special eye overthem. If you let them see the sun once a month, it will do neither thesun nor them harm because they strengthen the brain and nerves, and remedy palsies, greeks gave them the name paralysis the flowers preserved orconserved, and the quantity of a nutmeg eaten every morning, is asufficient dose for inward diseases. But for wounds, spots, wrinkles, and sunburnings, an ointment is made of the leaves, and hog grease crab claws called also water sengreen, knight pond water, water house-leek, pondweed, and fresh-water soldier descript it has sundry long narrow leaves, with sharp prickleson the edges of them, also very sharp pointed. The stalks which bearflowers, seldom grow so high as the leaves, bearing a forked head, likea crab claw, out of which comes a white flower, consisting of threeleaves, with divers yellowish hairy threads in the middle.

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And is effectual also against allvenomous creatures. And applied to the temples, stays inflammations ofthe eyes. It helps burnings, being used with oil, and with a littlealum put to it, is good for st anthony fire it is good for allwheals, pushes, blisters, and blains in the skin. The herb boiled, and laid upon chilblains or kibes, helps them the decoction thereofin water and essay vinegar, heals the itch, if bathed therewith. Andcleanses the head of dandruff, scurf, and dry scabs, and does much goodfor fretting and running sores, ulcers, and cankers in the head, legs, or other writings, and is much commended against baldness and shedding thehair the red beet is good to stay the bloody-flux, women courses, and thewhites, and to help the yellow jaundice. The juice of the root put intothe nostrils, purges the head, helps the noise in the ears, and thetooth-ache. The juice snuffed up the nose, helps a stinking breath, ifthe cause lie in the nose, as thesis times it does, if any bruise hasbeen there. As also want of smell coming that way water betony called also brown-wort, and in yorkshire, bishop-leaves descript first, of the water betony, which rises up with square, hard, greenish stalks, essaytimes brown, set with broad dark greenleaves dented about the edges with notches essaywhat resembling theleaves of the wood betony, but much larger too, for the most writing setat a joint the flowers are thesis, set at the tops of the stalks andbranches, being round bellied and open at the brims, and divided intotwo writings, the uppermost being like a hood, and the lowermost like ahip hanging down, of a dark red colour, which passing, there comes intheir places small round heads with small points at the ends, whereinlie small and brownish seeds. The root is a thick bush of strings andshreds, growing from the head place it grows by the ditch side, brooks and other water-courses, generally through this land, and is seldom found far from thewater-side time it flowers about july, and the seed is ripe in august government and virtues water betony is an herb of jupiter incancer, and is appropriated more to wounds and hurts in the breastthan wood betony, which follows. It is an excellent remedy for sickhogs it is of a cleansing quality the leaves bruised and applied areeffectual for all old and filthy ulcers. And especially if the juice ofthe leaves be boiled with a little honey, and dipped therein, and thesores dressed therewith.