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Why Do You Want To Go To College Essay Sample


With rule 8, because oftheir misleading names, and with rule 10, in view of their unscientificcharacter as irrational combinations it is also recommended that thisreport be published -- from the journal a m a , july 17, 1915 alfatone report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has found alfatone ineligible for new and nonofficialremedies and has authorized publication of the following report w a puckner, secretary alfalfa is good cattle why do you want to go to college essay sample feed but only nostrum exploiters have suggestedits use as a medicine for human beings while it may seem a waste oftime to discuss the medicinal value of alfalfa its recent exploitationby the norwich pharmacal company, norwich, n y , as “a reconstructivetonic and nutrient” in the form of a mixture called “alfatone, ” callsfor comment according to the label on the preparation. “each fluidounce represents. alcohol 15 per cent medicago sativa alfalfa 120 grains taraxacum 2-1/2 grains gentian 1 grain berberine hydrochloride 1/40 grain glycerin and aromatics ” “dose -- one to three fluidrams 4 to 12 c c 4 times daily ”each maximum dose, therefore, should represent 45 grains of alfalfa, 1grain of taraxacum dandelion, 3/8 grain of gentian, 1/100 grain ofberberin hydrochlorid, and 27 minims of alcohol since the bitter drugsare present in such small amounts that the preparation is almost devoidof bitterness, and as the medicinal value of alfalfa is practicallynil, it is evident that whatever action alfatone may have is due to thestimulant effects of the alcohol essay of the claims made for alfatone are.

But as a sign of such a faith this method is actually pathetic no taint of superstition could be found in it at the early periodreferred to it was still the pure and unadulterated expression of thegenerally prevailing conception that human art is to no purpose in anycase of disease, and aid must be found with the gods with those godswho regulate and personally execute all terrestrial phenomena down tothe minutest details temple sleep was not degraded into superstitionuntil medicine had come to the conclusion that the phenomena of diseasewere not evidence of an interference by supernatural power in thefunctions of the body, but disturbances of the function of the bodycaused exclusively by natural causes in accordance with this view, which first found its fullest and clearest exposition in the corpushippocraticum, it would seem absolutely necessary for temple sleep tolose all recognition from the art of healing however, this not beingthe case, it was bound to deteriorate into an act of superstitiousmummery, and the principal blame for this sad decadence is to be laidprimarily upon the priests it was their duty especially to lead intothe path of truth the patients who persisted in crowding into thetemples in the spirit of naive and childlike piety they sealed theirown condemnation as fosterers of superstition when they failed todo this duty, and endeavored rather, by every means in their power, to confirm the multitude in their ancient belief that the gods werepractising medicine non-christian as well as christian priests playedthis rôle for thesis centuries with equal ability and equal perseverance, as will be seen from the following brief history of temple sleep the belief in the efficacy of temple sleep had already been thoroughlyshaken during the time of the great hippocrates. Therefore, inthe sixth century, b c , the laughing philosopher of hellenism, aristophanes, the satirical contemporary of hippocrates, in act ii , verses 654 to 750, of his comedy πλοῦτος, severely criticizes themanner and method in which temple sleep was employed let us listento the words in which the poet describes what happened in the templeduring the observance of this rite the god æsculapius, accompanied by his daughter panakeia, appears inthe temple to examine in person the patients gathered there the firstone he meets is a poor wretch, neokleides, who, being blear-eyed, expects cure from the god the medically skilled æsculapius smearsupon the inverted lids of this patient a salve which causes such painthat the poor fellow will probably never seek his help again thesecond patient met by the god is the blind god, πλοῦτος i e , wealth personified here the conduct of æsculapius is entirelydifferent from that which he adopted when treating poor neokleides now he carefully strokes the head of the patient, then produces alinen cloth and carefully touches the lids with it he then callshis daughter panakeia, who winds a red cloth round the head of blindwealth now æsculapius whistles, and two mighty serpents appear, glideunder the purple cloth, and lick the eyes of the patient shortlyafterward the god regains his sight this passage is a cutting satire on practises which undoubtedlyprevailed in the greek temples as early as the sixth century, b c but, nevertheless, it took a long time before the patients losttheir belief in the miraculous efficacy of temple sleep, and thepriesthood continually strove to revive, by the mysterious storiesof various kinds they recounted to doubters, the belief in templesleep the sixth of the marble votive tablets which were found inthe temple of æsculapius at epidaurus shows the kind of miraculousreports invented by the priests the latter were in the habit ofinscribing upon these tablets reports of cures that had occurred intheir sanctuary, for the benefit of the visitors of the temple and forthe still greater benefit of the medical historians. But it is quiteprobable that the priesthood, intent upon curing, were encouraged intheir medico-literary attempts only by the silent hope of creatingan abundant supply of patients by such miraculous reports the abovetablet, no 6 which probably dates from the third century, b c - tellsus that a blind man by the name of hermon, a native of thasos, hadrecovered his sight by sleeping in the epidaurean temple of æsculapius however, it appears that this man hermon had been a miserable wretch, for he disappeared without having expressed his thanks in hard cash naturally such ingratitude provoked the god, and summarily he blindedthe thankless individual again it required a second temple sleepbefore the god condescended to become helpful once more but our tabletdoes not mention anything about the amount of the remuneration paid byour friend hermon who had been twice cured of blindness. Neither isthis at all necessary the miraculous tablet, even without stating theprice, doubtless made sufficient impression upon the minds even of themost parsimonious of future patients altho, therefore, the more enlightened among the greeks recognized, as early as in the sixth century, b c , the futility of temple sleepas a means of healing, the ancient world never relinquished itentirely we encounter it again in the later periods of antiquity thus, for instance, suetonius and other ancient authors tell us thattwo patients, one blind, the other lame, one day approached theemperor vespasian, who happened to be in alexandria, asking him tospit into the eyes of the one and to stroke the paralyzed limbs ofthe other. For they had been notified in temple sleep that they wouldbe restored to health if only the emperor would deign to perform theabove-mentioned manipulations but vespasian was an enlightened rulerwho, in spite of his imperial dignity, did not have much confidence inthe medical qualities of his saliva and of his hands, and accordinglyunceremoniously dismissed both supplicants this caused great terroramong the priests of serapis and among the courtiers, for obviouslythey had interpreted this affair solely as intended in majoremvespasiani gloriam the emperor was importuned, therefore, kindly toaid the unfortunate, but he persisted in his refusal probably he wasright in fearing the loss of his prestige should the imperial medicalpowers prove unequal to the task of curing disease not until thepriests solemnly vouched for the truthfulness of the dream-sending godserapis, and declared a failure of the imperial cure to be impossible, did vespasian stubbornness relent now he spat, and rubbed theparalyzed limbs, and the blind saw, and the paralytic arose and walked §6 church sleep - when, subsequently, the ancient religions died out, and had left the world as an heritage to christianity, temple sleep hadby no means died out also on the contrary, after the lapse of threecenturies, it again came into favor with the christian priests and theuse of it now was scarcely less in favor than it had been a thousandyears previous in the world of the ancient greeks let us mention a fewexamples the first four stories are taken from the works of gregory oftours mummolus, who came to the court of justinian 527 to 565 as theambassador of king theudebert, suffered greatly from calculi of theurinary bladder, and during this journey he became subject to an attackof renal colic things went badly with poor mummolus, and he was ina great hurry to make his will whereupon he was advised to pass onenight sleeping in st andrew church, at pateras, for st andrew hadperformed thesis miraculous cures in this place no sooner said thandone mummolus, greatly tormented by pain and fever, and despairingof life, had himself placed upon the stone flags of the sanctuary, and waited there for the things that were to happen suddenly, towardmidnight, the patient awoke with a violent desire to urinate, anddischarged in a natural manner a calculus which, as st gregory assuresus, was so enormous that it fell with a loud clatter into the vessel from that hour mummolus was hale and hearty, and joyfully started onhis journey homeward in brioude, the capital of the present dewritingment haute-loire, therewas a woman named fedamia, who had been paralyzed for years inaddition to this, she was penniless, and her relatives, therefore, brought her to the church of st julian, who enjoyed a great reputationin brioude, in order that, even if she did not become cured, she mightat least make essay money by begging at the church door for eighteenyears she had lived thus when, one sunday night, while she slept inthe colonnade adjoining the church, a man appeared who took her by thehand and led her toward the grave of st julian on arriving there sheuttered a fervent prayer, and in a moment felt as if a load of actualchains fell from her limbs all this, it is true, happened in a dream, but when the patient awoke she was hale and hearty, and was able, tothe amazement of the assembled multitude, to walk, with loud prayers, to the grave of the saint a certain man, deaf, dumb, and blind, known by the name of amagildus, also tried the sleep in the church of st julian, at brioude but itappears that this saint was not always quite accessible to the wishesof the sick it is true, amagildus was not obliged, like fedamia ofthe previous narrative, to pass eighteen years in the basilica, but, nevertheless, he had to sleep for a full year in the colonnade of thechurch before the curative power of the holy martyr delivered him fromhis ailment veranus, the slave of one of the clergy under gregory, was so violentlyattacked by gout that he was absolutely unable to move for an entireyear thereupon his master pledged himself to advance the afflictedslave to the priesthood if st martin would be willing to cure him toaccomplish this cure the slave was carried to the church, and thereplaced at the feet of the saint the poor wretch had to remain therefor five long days, and it seemed as tho st martin had forgotten allabout him finally, on the sixth day, the patient was visited by a manwho seized his foot and drew it out straight the slave rose to hisfeet in terror, and perceived that he was cured for thesis years heserved st martin as a priest but the most wonderful cure was that of the german emperor henry ii , called “the saint” 1002 to 1024 this emperor, who was of bavarianstock, suffered greatly from the stone, and had retired to the italiancloister monte cassino, inasmuch as this cloister during that periodjustly enjoyed an extraordinary medical reputation but whether themonks of monte cassino, altho well versed in medical art, did not havesufficient confidence in their ability to treat an emperor, or whetherthey were induced by essay other reason, is not known. However, insteadof submitting the imperial patient to the operations of terrestrialmedicine, they surrendered him to the providence of heaven, andmore writingicularly to the sympathy of st benedict this saint fullyjustified the confidence that was placed in him, for, during an acuteperiod in the patient sufferings, he appeared in his own holy person, and with his own holy hands he performed the necessary operation, and, after having pressed the stone that he had removed from the bladderinto the hand of the sleeping emperor, he retired heavenward but hetook care from his heavenly residence to attend to the prompt healingof the operation wound, and this was surely very good of st benedict in fact, his entire behavior during this case was extremely proper andlaudable. For is it not much more fitting that the imperial bladdershould be delivered from its disagreeable visitor, the stone, at thehands of a saint than by those of mortal beings, even if those mortalbeings were the pious and medically skilled monks of monte cassino?. 3the form in which we encounter the christian temple sleep in the abovestories is as like as two peas to that practised in the hellenictemples they are distinguished merely by the fact that the greek godsgenerally hastened to the assistance of the patients after the latterhad spent one night in the temple, whereas the christian saints oftenallowed years to pass before the patient, who was crying for aid, secured relief 3 compare leibnitz, script brunsvic, vol i , page 525 sprengel, vol ii , page 91 christianity has, however, created one variation of the temple sleep, and this is the sleep which is taken, altho outside of the church, atany place whatever, but with invocation of the saints this sleep wassaid to be exactly as efficacious as that taken in the church itself, provided the patient had fervently prayed before falling asleep, andhad writingicularly remembered the saint whose assistance he required the two following narratives, which are also taken from the works ofgregory of tours, may serve as significant examples of this variety oftemple sleep alpinus, count of tours, was so tormented for years by a pain in hisfoot that life had no further joys for him, so that, sleepless andwithout appetite, he took to his bed again and again had he, insecret prayer, appealed to st martin for relief so one day the countsuddenly falls into a deep sleep, during which st martin appears tohim, making the sign of the cross over the diseased foot thereupon thepain suddenly left him, and alpinus was able to leave his couch, fullycured in this case the saint showed himself extremely consideratetoward the sick count, in that he was attired in a smart uniform whenpaying his visit it was his intention, obviously, in choosing thiscostume to gratify the martial tastes of the nobleman. For st martin, when visiting patients, by no means always affected this warlike array, as will be seen from the following story a certain woman was so severely afflicted with campsis of the fingersthat she completely lost the use of her hands even a visit to thechurch which was consecrated to st martin in tours had brought her norelief the patient was obliged to leave the sanctuary with her fingersstill diseased but it seems that this patient was actually of a verycontented disposition. For when, upon her return, away from tours, shelay down to her first night rest, she thanked god that at least herlife was spared, and that she had been permitted to see the grave ofst martin affected by so much modesty, st martin appeared to her inher sleep, and, like to st benedict in the case of the emperor henry, with his own holy hands he performed essaywhat of an operation upon thepatient, in that he stretched her bent fingers in such a manner thatthe tense tendons were evidently torn. For gregory tells us that, underthe treatment described, blood flowed from the straightened fingers ofthe woman but st martin had entirely discarded his martial attireupon this visit evidently such a garb did not seem to him appropriatewhen visiting a female patient. He therefore appeared before thepatient in a purple cloak with a cross in his hand however, the medical activity of the saints was by no means restrictedto paper of church slumber, but was manifested in the most variousforms § 7 medical saints - essay saints had a decided predilection formedical specialties, and for that reason paid a writingicular attention tocertain varieties of disease thus, st anna espoused ophthalmology;st jude cured coughs.

You would why do you want to go to college essay sample probably feel toward such a lawyer as patients must feeltoward physicians who prescribe proprietary nostrums based oninformation and advice offered by those who, though without any specialknowledge of chemistry, pharmacy or medicine, will be benefitedfinancially if their information and advice are accepted and actedon -- from the journal a m a , april 27, 1918 anasarcin advertisingi i see index for other articles on anasarcin to the editor:-- as an old fellow of the a m a i beg to presentthe following facts to you, and to ask if anything can be done by youto expose the methods of these people. A concern calling itself “theanasarcin chem co ” of winchester, tenn , has caused to be sent tophysicians a chart on the subject of “diagnostics of renal diseases ”this chart contains eighteen plates, which were all taken withoutknowledge or permission of either myself or my publishers, williamwood & co , from the third edition of my book on “urinary analysisand diagnosis ” the plates are writingly composite plates, but mostlyportions of plates, exactly reproduced from my book i at once causedmy publishers to write to the anasarcin company. And a few days ago ireceived a letter from a dr h elliott bates of 118 east twenty-eighthstreet, new york, whose letterhead says, “medical advertising ” in thisletter the writer says that it was he who suggested the sending of sucha chart, and admits that all the plates were taken from my book inthis letter he offers to have a letter sent to every physician of thecountry “in which it is explicitly stated that the cuts on the chartwere taken from your book, and that complete information regardingthe matters treated on the chart can be found in your book ” in otherwords he offers to advertise my book free of cost to me, so that ishould take no further steps in the matter i consider this entirematter an outrage, and thought it best to write to you for advice, since my publishers seem to think that in spite of the violation of thecopyright nothing can be done besides the cuts, essay of the text on the chart is bodily taken frommy book, while essay of the other text, not taken from my book, butapparently compiled from different articles, is in writing entirely wrong, so much so that i must be ashamed of its being associated with any ofmy own work by giving this letter your early consideration, and advising me whatyou think it best for me to do, you would greatly oblige louis heitzman, m d , new york comment -- readers of the journal are, of course, familiar with thearticles246 that have been published on “anasarcin, ” the “dropsycure”!. knowing the standard of ethics that the anasarcin concern adoptsin the exploitation of its ridiculous squill mixture, our readerswill not be surprised at the standard of commercial ethics whichwould justify the appropriation of copyrighted scientific materialfor nostrum advertising purposes the statement of dr heitzmannpublishers that “in spite of a violation of copyright nothing can bedone” is, of course, incorrect essaything can be done by those whohold the copyright -- ed -- from the journal a m a , oct 18, 1919 246 j a m a 46:288 jan 27 1906. Ibid 48:1535 may 4 1907;ibid 48:1614 may 11 1907, and ibid 49:1992 dec 8 1917 antimeristem-schmidtessay, possibly thesis, of our readers have received a letter fromcologne, gerthesis, from the “bakteriologisch-chemisches laboratoriumwolfgang schmidt ” the letter contains a circular directing theattention of american physicians to “antimeristem-schmidt ” it alsocontains essay advertising leaflets one physician in sending thismaterial to the journal writes. “a copy of the enclosed circulars has been sent to thesis of the physicians in this city, and probably elsewhere perhaps it has already been called to your attention let us be as liberal as possible with our recent enemies the sooner the old channels of scientific communication are re-opened, the better but let us not allow such blatant commercialism from a foreign country to go unprotested, any more than we should if it were from our own ”it should be noted in passing that the envelop in which the wolfgangschmidt letter came has on its face a rubber-stamped impress to theeffect. “concerns cancer treatment ” the circular letter declares thatby means of antimeristem-schmidt “either a cure or improvement has beeneffected in numerous inoperable paper” of malignant tumors americanphysicians are asked “to employ the preparation when occasion arises”and are assured that “every medical man in city or country will beable to carry out treatment without preliminary knowledge ” with theletter are two leaflets discussing the use and administration of theproduct. One contained what was called a “synopsis of essay of the morerecent publications regarding the employment of antimeristem-schmidt ininoperable malignant tumors ” the “recent” publications comprised threearticles published in 1910 and one published in 1912!. Antimeristem-schmidt was rather widely exploited essay six or sevenyears ago as was explained in the journal, march 8, 1913, p 766, itis a preparation claimed to be useful in the treatment of inoperablecancer and as a supplementary treatment after operations for cancer the treatment is founded on a theory advanced by one o schmidt thatthe cause of cancer is found in a fungus, mucor racemosus, which, schmidt at first asserted, carried a protozoon which he regarded asthe real cause of the disease the vaccine is said to be prepared fromcultures from this fungus while schmidt claims that he has been ableto produce cancer by means of the organism, scientific research has notverified his claims extensive clinical trials have shown the treatmentto be without effect the journal also advised its readers on april 19, 1913, that no license for the sale of antimeristem-schmidt had beengranted by the treasury dewritingment and, therefore, its importation intothis country was prohibited neither the therapeutic nor the legalstatus of the product has been changed since then -- from the journala m a , dec 6, 1919 antiphlogistineto the editor:-- last september, my chief, dr j s millard, received a letter from the denver chemical mfg co , manufacturers of“antiphlogistine ” this letter purported to quote thesis large commercialconcerns as testifying to the value of antiphlogistine recently, idoubted the veracity of these claims and wrote to essay of those quoted i quote from the original letter of the antiphlogistine company. “the surgeon to the electric light and electric railroad company in new orleans says that antiphlogistine is the finest thing he has ever used in burns, especially flash and brush burns “the physician to the new york edison co makes a similar statement he says that the application gives speedy relief and the burns heal quickly without scars ”i wrote to dr john woodman, the physician to the new york edison co , who replied in writing as follows. “the denver chemical manufacturing company have no authority to quote me i gave antiphlogistine a thorough trial, and found it had a very limited use, and i cannot recommend it for burns ”again, the antiphlogistine letter said. “it may be of interest to you to know that at the emergency hospital of the ford automobile co in detroit, antiphlogistine is carried in stock and is used extensively by the three physicians in burns, bruises, infected wounds, sprains and other traumatic conditions which are constantly arising in such a plant ”i wrote to dr mead who replied as follows. “in answer to your letter of january 25th, will state that no antiphlogistine has been purchased or used in this hospital for years past, and i cannot imagine why the representative of the denver chemical company should make such a statement as attributed to him ”he adds that “antiphlogistine has never been used” in his dewritingment“on an open wound, abrasion or burn ” is there not essay way that suchexploitation of our large companies can be prevented?. a g gould, m d , akron, ohio plant physician, the goodyear tire & rubber co - from the journala m a , feb 23, 1918 “auto-hemic serum” a cure for laziness, ugliness, frigidity and thesis other thingsthe following letters are typical of thesis that have been receivedasking for information regarding dr l d rogers and his “auto-hemicserum ” this from a physician in new york state. “can you give me any information in reference to dr rogers of chicago, ill , who has an auto-hemic institute?.

Take of redlead one pound, oil of roses one pound and an half, wax half a pound, make it into a plaster according to art culpeper it is a fine cooling healing plaster, and very drying emplastrum metroproptoticon college take of mastich one ounce and an half, galbanum dissolvedin red wine and strained, six drams, cypress turpentine two drams, cypress why do you want to go to college essay sample nuts, galls, of each one dram and an half, oil of nutmegsby expression one dram, musk two grains and an half, pitch scrapedoff from old ships two drams and an half. Beat the galbanum, pitch, turpentine, and mastich gently in a hot mortar and pestle, towards theend, adding the oil of nutmegs, then the rest in powder, last of allthe musk mixed with a little oil of mastich upon a marble, and by exactmixture make them into a plaster emplastrum nervinum college take of oil of chamomel and roses, of each two ounces, of mastich, turpentine, and linseeds, of each an ounce and an half, turpentine boiled four ounces, rosemary, bettony, horsetail, centaurythe less, of each a handful, earth-worms washed and cleansed in winethree ounces, tops of st john wort a handful, mastich, gum elemi, madder roots, of each ten drams, ship-pitch, rozin, of each an ounceand an half, litharge of gold and silver, of each two ounces and anhalf, red lead two ounces, galbanum, sagapen, ammoniacum, of each threedrams. Boil the roots, herbs, and worms, in a pound and an half of winetill half be consumed, then press them out, and boil the decoctionagain with the oils, suets, litharge, and red lead, to the consumptionof the wine. Then add the gums dissolved in wine, afterwards theturpentine, rozin, pitch, and mastich, in powders and make them into aplaster according to art culpeper it strengthens the brain and nerves, and then beingapplied to the back, down along the bone, it must needs add strength tothe body emplastrum oxycroceum college take of saffron, ship-pitch, colophonia, yellow wax, of each four ounces, turpentine, galbanum, ammoniacum, myrrh, olibanum, mastich, of each one ounce and three drams let the pitchand colophonia be melted together, then add the wax, then it beingremoved from the fire the turpentine, afterwards the gums dissolved invinegar, lastly the saffron in powder, well mixed with vinegar, and somake it into a plaster according to art culpeper it is of a notable softening and discussing quality, helpsbroken bones, and any writing molested with cold, old aches, stiffness ofthe limbs by reason of wounds, ulcers, fractures, or dislocations, anddissipates cold swellings emplastrum stephaniaion college take of labdanum half an ounce, styrax, juniper gum, ofeach two drams, amber, cypress, turpentine, of each one dram, redcoral, mastich, of each half a dram, the flowers of sage, red roses, the roots of orris florentine, of each one scruple, rozin washedin rose-water half an ounce, the rozin, labdanum, juniper gum, andturpentine, being gently beaten in a hot mortar, with a hot pestle, sprinkling in a few drops of red wine till they are in a body. Thenput in the powders, and by diligent stirring make them into an exactplaster emplastrum sticticum college take of oil of olives six ounces, yellow wax an ounceand an half, litharge in powder four ounces and an half, ammoniacum, bdellium, of each half an ounce, galbanum, opopanax, oil of bays, lapis calaminaris, both sorts of birthwort, myrrh, frankincense, of each two drams, pure turpentine an ounce let the oil, wax, andlitharge be boiled together till it stick not to your fingers, thenthe mass being removed from the fire and cooled a little, and the gumsdissolved in white wine vinegar, which evaporate away by boiling, strain it strongly, then add the powders, turpentine, and oil of bays, that it may be made into a plaster according to art culpeper it strengthens the nerves, draws out corruption, takesaway pains and aches, and restores strength to members that have lostit. The last is most effectual emplastrum stomachicum magistrale or, a stomach plaster college take of mints, wormwood, stœchas, bay leaves, of each adram, marjoram, red roses, yellow sanders, of each two drams, calamusaromaticus, wood of aloes, lavender flowers, nutmegs, cubebs, galanga, long pepper, mace, of each a dram, mastich three drams, cloves twodrams and an half, oil of mints an ounce and an half, oil of nard anounce, oil of spike a dram, rozin, wax, of each four ounces, labdanumthree ounces, styrax half an ounce. Make it into a plaster culpeper both this and the other of that name which you shall haveby and by, strengthen the stomach exceedingly, help digestion and stayvomiting emplastrum ceroma, or, ceroneum nich alex college take of pitch scraped from a ship that hath been a longtime at sea, yellow wax, of each seven drams, sagapenum six drams, ammoniacum, turpentine, colophonia, saffron, of each four drams, aloes, olibanum, myrrh, of each three drams, styrax calamitis, mastich, opopanax, galbanum, alum, the seeds of fenugreek, of each two drams, the settlings or faces of liquid styrax, bdellium, of each one dram, litharge half a dram culpeper it is of a gentle emolient nature, prevails againststoppings of the stomach, coming of cold, hardness of the spleen, coldness of the liver and matrix emplastrum gratia dei nich or, the grace of god college take of turpentine half a pound, rozin one pound, white waxfour ounces, mastich an ounce, fresh betony, vervain, and burnet, ofeach one handful let the herbs, being bruised, be sufficiently boiledin white wine, the liquor pressed out, in which let the wax and rozinbe boiled to the consumption of the liquor. Being taken from the fire, let the turpentine be mixed with it. Lastly the mastich in powder, andso make of them a plaster according to art culpeper it is excellent good in wounds and green ulcers, for itkeeps back inflammations, cleanses and joins wounds, fills up ulcerswith flesh emplastrum de janua, or of betony nicholaus college take of the juice of betony, plantain, and smallage, ofeach one pound, wax, pitch, rozin, turpentine, of each half a pound, boil the wax and rozin in the juices with a gentle fire, continuallystirring them till the juice be consumed. Then add the turpentine andpitch, continually stirring it till it be brought into the consistenceof a plaster according to art emplastrum isis epigoni galen college take of yellow wax an hundred drams, turpentine two hundreddrams, scales of copper, verdigris, round birthwort, frankincense, sal-ammoniac, ammoniacum, burnt brass of each eight drams, burnt alumsix drams, aloes, myrrh, galbanum, of each an ounce and a half, oldoil one pound, sharp vinegar so much as is sufficient let the metalsbe dissolved in the sun with the vinegar, then put in those thingsthat may be melted, last of all the powders, and make them all into anemplaster culpeper galen appropriates it to the head, and ulcers there iknow no reason but why it may as well serve for other writings of the body a plaster of mastich nich alex college take of mastich, ship pitch, sagapenum, wax, of eachsix drams, ammoniacum, turpentine, colophonia, saffron, aloes, frankincense, myrrh, of each three drams, opopanax, galbanum, styrax, calamitis, alum, rondeletius appoints, and we for him bitumen, fenugreek, of each two drams, the feces of liquid styrax, bdellium, litharge, of each half a dram. Let the litharge, being beaten intopowder, be boiled in a sufficient quantity of water. Then add thepitch, which being melted, add the wax and ammoniacum, afterwards letthe sagapenum, opopanax, and galbanum be put in. Then the styrax andfeces being mixed with the turpentine, last of all the colophonia, mastich, frankincense, bdellium, alum, myrrh, and fenugreek in powder:let them be made into a plaster culpeper it strengthens the stomach, and helps digestion emplastrum nigrum august called in high dutch stichstaster college take of colophonia, rozin, ship pitch, white wax, romanvitriol, ceruss, olibanum, myrrh, of each eight ounces, oil of rosesseven ounces, oil of juniper berries three ounces, oil of eggs twoounces, oil of spick one ounce, white vitriol, red coral, mummy, ofeach two ounces, earth of lemnos, mastich, dragon blood, of each oneounce, the fat of an heron one ounce, the fat of pimullus three ounces, load stone prepared, two ounces, earthworms prepared, camphire, of eachone ounce. Make them into a plaster according to art culpeper it is very good in green wounds and shootings a key to galen method of physic the general use of physic i shall desire thee, whoever thou art, that intendest the noble thoughtoo much abused study of physic, to mind heedfully these followingrules. Which being well understood, shew thee the key of galen andhippocrates their method of physic. He that useth their method, andis not heedful of these rules, may soon cure one disease, and causeanother more desperate that thou mayest understand what i intend, it is to discover in ageneral way of the manifest virtues of medicines i say of the manifest virtues, and qualities, viz such as areobvious to the senses, especially to the taste and smell. For it hathbeen the practice of most physicians, in these latter ages as well asours, to say, when they cannot give, nor are minded to study a reason, why an herb, plant, &c hath such an operation, or produces such aneffect in the body of man. It doth it by an hidden quality, for theynot minding the whole creation, as one united body, not knowing whatbelongs to astral influence, not regarding that excellent harmonythe only wise god hath made in a composition of contraries in theknowledge of which consists the whole ground and foundation of physicare totally led astray by tradition it is the manifest qualities of medicines that here i am to speak to, and you may be pleased to behold it in this order section 1 of the temperature of medicines section 2 of the appropriation of medicines section 3 of the properties of medicines section i of the temperature of medicines herbs, plants, and other medicines manifestly operate, either by heat, coldness, dryness, or moisture, for the world being composed of sothesis qualities, they and only they can be found in the world, and themixtures of them one with another but that they may appear as clear as the sun when he is upon themeridian, i shall treat of them severally, and in this order 1 of medicines temperate 2 of medicines hot 3 of medicines cold 4 of medicines moist 5 of medicines dry of medicines temperate if the world be composed of extremes, then it acts by extremes, foras the man is, so is his work.

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Take therefore the why do you want to go to college essay sample virtues of them asfollows. And first i shall begin with the garden kinds government and virtues what a pother have authors made with roses!. What a racket have they kept?. i shall add, red roses are under jupiter, damask under venus, white under the moon, and provence under the kingof france the white and red roses are cooling and drying, and yet thewhite is taken to exceed the red in both the properties, but is seldomused inwardly in any medicine. The bitterness in the roses when theyare fresh, especially the juice, purges choler, and watery humours. Butbeing dried, and that heat which caused the bitterness being consumed, they have then a binding and astringent quality. Those also that arenot full blown, do both cool and bind more than those that are fullblown, and the white rose more than the red the decoction of redroses made with wine and used, is very good for the head-ache, andpains in the eyes, ears, throat, and gums. As also for the fundament, the lower writing of the belly and the matrix, being bathed or put intothem the same decoction with the roses remaining in it, is profitablyapplied to the region of the heart to ease the inflammation therein;as also st anthony fire, and other diseases of the stomach beingdried and beaten to powder, and taken in steeled wine or water, ithelps to stay women courses the yellow threads in the middle ofthe roses which are erroneously called the rose seed being powderedand drank in the distilled water of quinces, stays the overflowing ofwomen courses, and doth wonderfully stay the defluctions of rheumupon the gums and teeth, preserving them from corruption, and fasteningthem if they be loose, being washed and gargled therewith, and essayvinegar of squills added thereto the heads with the seed being usedin powder, or in a decoction, stays the lask and spitting of blood red roses do strengthen the heart, the stomach and the liver, and theretentive faculty. They mitigate the pains that arise from heat, assuage inflammations, procure rest and sleep, stay both whites andreds in women, the gonorrhea, or running of the reins, and fluxes ofthe belly.