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Why Did Japan Attack Pearl Harbor Essay


The melting why did japan attack pearl harbor essay point given by the manufacturers isfrom 120 to 122 f , which, according to the american standard of takingmelting points, gives higher results than the method described in thepharmacopeia illustration. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - | inception | | | | where the dry wax poultice has been used | | | | thermozine known in france as l’ambrine, has been | | used in the following parisian hospitals, with | | 92% of cures. | | | | hospital de la pitie, services of drs lion, darier | - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - photographic reproduction from a booklet on “thermozine” showing thatit is identical with “ambrine ”about 10 c c of “asphalt varnish” b asphaltum176 is placed ina beaker and heated on the steam bath for one-half hour from 3 to 5drops, delivered from a 1 c c pipet, are then placed in a casserole, and 1 5 c c of olive oil added the mixture is heated and stirredfor a few minutes until perfect solution is effected to this is thenadded, with stirring, the paraffin, which has been previously melted when it is cooled, a brown solid is obtained 177 the physical factorsof this paraffin mixture are, melting point 45 4 c u s p method;plasticity, 28 5. Ductility, 29. It is very pliable and strong at38 c , and adheres exceedingly well to the skin, although it detacheseasily this mixture, which is easy to prepare, is inexpensive, thecost of the materials being approximately 10 cents a pound 176 the “asphalt varnish” used was obtained from remien & kuhnertcompany, chicago 177 while needless, a color resembling “ambrine” may be obtained bythe addition of coloring agents both hull and sollmann noticed that tarlike substances and meltedparaffin do not mix well this is noticeable in “ambrine, ” which cannotbe called an “elegant” preparation the difficulty may be overcome byfirst mixing hot olive oil and asphalt. The asphalt will then go intosolution it is interesting to note that the suggested formula as wellas others which were also prepared is not as plastic as the paraffinitself 178 this is also true of “ambrine ” on the other hand, themelting point of the paraffin is higher the important point, however, in compounding all paraffin preparations, is to select a proper gradeof paraffin as elaborated below 178 in a personal communication dr sollmann expressed the opinionthat the synthetic preparation is inferior to the paraffin used in theformula, basing the view on the greater plasticity of the paraffin for practical purposes, the paraffin will most probably serve as wellas the mixture, especially when it is held in place by bandages, but ibelieve that the mixture is more adhesive examination of paraffins and paraffin preparationsillustration.

It may, therefore, be considered as a sort of quasi property, and it wouldbe discreditable to any system of law not to provide a remedy in sucha case. but the person having charge of it cannot be considered asthe owner of it in any sense whatever, he holds it only as a sacredtrust for the benefit of all who may from family or friendship havean interest in it ” see also wyncoop v wyncoop, 42 pa st , 293. 4albany law jour , 56. Snyder v snyder, 60 how prac , 368. Weld v walker, 130 mass , 422. Guthrie v weaver, 1 mo apps , 136. Johnsonv marinus, 18 abb n c , 72, and note 493the law casts the duty of burial of the wife upon the husband, andof the husband upon the wife in secord v secord cited in note 1above, the court said. “there are cogent reasons connected with publicpolicy and the peace of families, where in the absence of testamentarydisposition the possession of a corpse and the right to determine itsburial should follow the administration of the estate ” inasmuch asthe husband has the first right to administer upon the estate of thewife, and the wife upon the estate of the husband, the law imposes thecorrelative duty of burial upon the person having such right. And soit has been held that the husband is liable for the necessary expenseof the decent interment of his wife from whom he has been separated, whether the writingy incurring the expense is an undertaker or merevolunteer 494where the deceased leaves a will appointing executors, the executorshave a right to the possession of the body, and the duty of burialis imposed upon them, but it has been doubted whether at common lawa direction by will concerning the disposal of the body could beenforced, and therefore the right to make such direction has beenconferred by statute in several states 495and where a widow ordered a funeral of her husband, it was held thatshe was liable for the expense, although she was an infant at the time, the court holding that the expense fell under the head of necessaries, for which infants’ estates are liable 496if there be no husband or wife of the deceased, the nearest of kinin the order of right to administration is charged with the duty ofburial 497such acts as casting a dead human body into a river without the ritesof sepulture kanavans case, 1 me , 226. Stealing a corpse 2 east, pc , 652 or stealing for dissection a dead body of one executed whenthe death sentence did not direct dissection rex v cundick, d &r , n p , 13, were indictable offences at common law 498in the works of the early dramatists, and by essay writers of fiction, it has been stated, or implied, that the body of a deceased personcould be seized and detained to compel the payment of his debts thiswas never the law in jones v ashburnham, 4 east, 460, it was heldthat to seize a dead body on pretence of arresting for debt would becontra bonos mores, and an extortion on the relatives, and that casedistinctly overrules any authority to be derived from the case of quickv coppleton, 1 vent , 161, to the effect that forbearance to seizeor hold a body upon such a pretence would afford any consideration fora promise to pay a debt so, also, where a jailer refused to give upa body of a person who had died while a prisoner in execution in hiscustody, to the executors of the deceased, unless they would satisfycertain claims against the deceased due the jailer, the court issueda peremptory mandamus in the first instance, commanding that the bodyshould be delivered up to the executors rex v fox, 2 q b , 247 and in r v scott, 2 q b , 248, it was said, that a jailer whoshould attempt to do so would be guilty of misconduct in his publiccharacter, for which he would be liable to prosecution 499how and by whom the dead human body may be removed or exhumed - wherethe right of burial has been exercised, and the body interred inits final resting-place, no person has any right to interferewith it without the consent of the owner of the grave, or of theproperly constituted public authorities in foster v dodd, 8 d & e , 842-854, it was held, that a dead body belongs to no one, andis, therefore, under the protection of the public if it lies inconsecrated ground, ecclesiastical authorities will interpose forits protection. But whether in ground consecrated or unconsecrated, indignities offered to the remains or the act of indecentlydisinterring them, are the ground of an indictment 500even the purchaser of land upon which is located a burial-ground maybe enjoined from removing bodies therefrom, if he attempts to do soagainst the wishes of the relatives or next of kin of the deceased every interment is a concession of the privilege which cannot afterwardbe repudiated, and the purchaser title to the ground is fettered withthe right of burial 501on the other hand, the right of the municipal or state authorities, with the consent of the owner of the burial lot or in the execution ofthe right of eminent domain, to remove dead bodies from cemeteries iswell settled 502after the right of burial has once been exercised by the person chargedwith the duty of burial, or where such person has consented to theburial by another person, no right to the corpse remains except toprotect it from unlawful interference 503on the other hand, where a husband did not freely consent to the burialof his wife in a lot owned by another person, it was held that a courtof equity might permit him, after such burial, to remove her body, coffin, and tombstones to his own lot, and restrain any person frominterfering with such removal 504in rhodes v brandt, 21 hun, n y , 1, the defendant brought anaction against one beelard to recover for services rendered by him, asa physician, in treating a child of beelard for a fracture of thethigh-bone, in which action beelard set up malpractice on the writing ofthe defendant as a defence during the pendency of the action the childdied and was buried subsequently beelard, the father, acting under theadvice of his counsel, directed and allowed the plaintiff, a physician, to cause the body of the child to be exhumed, and a portion of thethigh-bone to be removed, in order that it might be used in evidence onthe trial of the question of malpractice after the bone was removed, the body was returned to the grave the defendant thereupon caused theplaintiff to be arrested for unlawfully removing the body from thegrave contrary to the provisions of the statute, and the plaintiffsued the defendant for malicious prosecution the court held that theplaintiff had not removed the body from the grave “for the purpose ofdissection or from mere wantonness, ” as these terms were used in thestatute 3 r s , 6th ed , 965, for violation of which he had beenarrested, nor had he committed any offence against public decency orthe spirit of the statute 505autopsies, by whom ordered. The rights of relatives and accusedpersons - as shown in a previous article in this volume, on the powersand duties of coroners and medical examiners, in paper of sudden orsuspicious death, it has been the law for nearly a thousand yearsthat an inquisition or inquest super visum corporis must be held byan officer known as a coroner, and that this office and its powers andduties were inherited by this country as writing of the english common-lawsystem in force at the time of the formation of the republic of theunited states when a body has been buried, and the coroner believesthat an inquest is necessary, he has power to disinter the body andhold an inquest, and he may direct a post-mortem examination to bemade, but after having done so he must cause the body to be reinterred it is now well settled that in holding such an inquest, and making suchan autopsy or post-mortem examination required by his official duty, the coroner has authority to employ, and it is his duty to employ, professional skill and aid, and his contract will bind the county topay a reasonable compensation for the same 506as will be seen below from a synopsis of the statutes relating tothis matter, thesis of the states have enacted statutes defining andprescribing the duties of the coroner and other public officers in suchpaper at an early period in england see 2 and 3 will iv , chap 75, sec 7 it was enacted by the english parliament that any executoror other person having lawful possession of the body of a deceasedperson, and not being an undertaker or other writingy entrusted with thebody for the purpose only of interment, might lawfully permit the bodyof such deceased person to undergo an anatomical examination, unlessto the knowledge of such executor or other writingy such person shouldhave expressed his desire during his life in writing, or verbally inthe presence of two or more witnesses during his illness whereof hedied, that his body after death might not undergo such examination, orunless the surviving husband or wife or known relative of the deceasedshall require the body to be interred without such examination byanother section of this statute sec 10, professors of anatomy andother persons duly licensed were declared not liable to punishment forhaving in their possession human bodies when having such possessionaccording to the provisions of the act section 308 of the new york penal code, subdivision 3, as amendedby chapter 500, laws 1889, enacts that whenever and so far as thehusband, wife, or next of kin of the deceased, being charged by lawwith the duty of burial, may authorize dissection for the purposeof ascertaining the cause of death and no further, the right existsto dissect the dead human body the same statute also provides thatwhenever any district attorney of that state, in the discharge ofhis official duties, shall deem it necessary, he may exhume, takepossession of, and remove the body of a deceased person, or anyportion thereof, and submit the same to a proper physical or chemicalexamination or analysis, to ascertain the cause of death, whichexamination or analysis will be made on the order of a justice of thesupreme court of the state, or the county judge of the county in whichthe dead bodies shall be, granted on the application of the districtattorney, with or without notice to the relatives of the deceasedperson, or to any person or corporation having the legal charge ofsuch body, as the court may direct the district attorney shall alsohave power to direct the sheriff, constable, or other peace officer, and employ such person or persons as he may deem necessary to assisthim, in exhuming, removing, obtaining possession of, and examiningphysically or chemically such dead body, or any portion thereof. Theexpense thereof to be a county charge paid by the county treasurer onthe certificate of the district attorney the matter of ordering autopsies and dissections of dead bodies, orexhuming the same for that purpose or other purposes, is a matter of somuch public importance that it has been regulated in nearly all of theunited states by statutory enactments, which together with the otherstatutes relating to the subject-matter of this article are hereuntoappended the author of this article is greatly indebted for assistance inpreparing the same, and in compiling these statutes, to mr amasa j parker, jr , of the albany, n y , bar appendix statutory regulations concerning dead bodies the coroner has power to hold inquest and direct autopsy, ala , code, sec 4, 801 et seq ariz , pen code, sec 2, 309 et seq ark , r s , sec 692 cal , pen code.

It comfortsand strengthens the heart against faintings and swoonings, and is heldto be a preservative against consumptions and apoplexies you may takehalf a spoonful at a time aqua mirabilis college take of cloves, galanga, cubebs, mace, cardamoms, nutmegs, ginger, of each one dram, juice of celandine half a pound, spirits ofwine one pound, white wine three pounds, infuse them twenty-four hours, and draw off two why did japan attack pearl harbor essay pounds with an alembick culpeper the simples also of this, regard the stomach, andtherefore the water heats cold stomachs, besides authors say itpreserves from apoplexies, and restores lost speech aqua protheriacalis college take of scordium, scabius, carduus, goat rue, of each twohandfuls, citron and orange pills, of each two ounces, the seeds ofcitrons, carduus, hartwort, treacle, mustard, of each one ounce, theflowers of marigolds and rosemary, of each one handful, cut them, andbruise them grossly, then infuse them in four pounds of white wine, andtwo pounds of carduus water, in a glass, close stopped, and set it inthe sun of bath for a fortnight, often shaking it, then distil it inbalneo mariæ let the two first pounds be kept by themselves for use, and the remainder of the distillation by itself. Lastly, mix one ounceof julep of alexandria, and a spoonful of cinnamon water with eachpound culpeper aqua protheriacalis, signifies a water for treacle, sothen if you put diascoridum to it, it is a water for diascoridum. Wellthen, we will take it for a general water for all physick aqua caponis or capon water college take a capon the guts being pulled out, cut in pieces, thefat being taken away, boiled in a sufficient quantity of spring-waterin a close vessel, take of this broth three pounds borrage andviolet-water, of each a pound and a half, white wine one pound, redrose leaves two drams and an half, the flowers of borrage, violets andbugloss, of each one dram, pieces of bread, hot out of the oven, halfa pound, cinnamon bruised, half an ounce, distil it in a glass stillaccording to art culpeper the simples are most of them appropriated to the heart, and in truth the composition greatly nourishes and strengthens suchas are in consumptions, and restores lost strength, either by feversor other sickness. It is a sovereign remedy for hectic fevers, andmarasmos, which is nothing else but a consumption coming from them letsuch as are subject to these diseases, hold it for a jewel aqua limacum magistr or water of snails college take of the juice of ground ivy, colt-foot, scabious, lungwort, of each one pound and a half, the juice of purslain, plantain, ambrosia, paul bettony, of each a pound, hog blood, whitewine, of each four pounds, garden snails, two pound, dried tobaccoleaves eight, powder of liquorice two ounces, of elecampane half anounce, of orris an ounce, cotton seeds an ounce and a half, the greatercold seeds, annis seeds of each six drams, saffron one dram, theflowers of red roses, six pugils, of violets and borrage, of each fourpugils, steep them three days warm, and then distil them in a glassstill, in sand culpeper it purges the lungs of flegm and helps consumptions there if you should happen to live where no better nor readier medicine canbe gotten, you may use this aqua scordii composita or compound water of scordium college take of the juice of goat rue, sorrel, scordium, citrons, of each one pound, london treacle, half a pound, steep it three days, and distil it in sand culpeper a tasterful taken in the morning, preserves from ill airs aqua mariæ college take of sugar candy a pound, canary wine six ounces, rosewater four ounces. Boil it well into a syrup, and add to it imperialwater two pounds, ambergreese, musk, of each eighteen grains, saffronfifteen grains, yellow sanders infused in imperial water, two drams;make a clear water of it aqua papaveries composita or poppy water compound college take of red poppies four pounds, sprinkle them with whitewine two pounds, then distil them in a common still, let the distilledwater be poured upon fresh flowers and repeated three times. To whichdistilled water add two nutmegs sliced, red poppy flowers a pugil, sugar two ounces, set it in the sun to give it a pleasing sharpness;if the sharpness be more than you would have it, put essay of the samewater to it which was not set in the sun aqua juglandium composita or walnut water compound college take of green walnuts a pound and an half, radish roots onepound, green asarabacca six ounces, radish seeds, six ounces let allof them, being bruised, be steeped in three pounds of white wine forthree days, then distilled in a leaden still till they be dry tinctures tinctura croci or tincture of saffron college take two drams of saffron, eight ounces of treacle water, digest them six days, then strain it culpeper see the virtues of treacle water, and then know that thisstrengthens the heart essaything more, and keeps melancholy vapoursthence by drinking a spoonful of it every morning tinctura castorii or tincture of castoreum college take of castoreum in powder half an ounce, spirit ofcastoreum half a pound, digest them ten days cold, strain it, and keepthe liquor for tincture culpeper a learned invention!. ’tis essaything more prevalent thanthe spirit tinctura fragroram or tincture of strawberries college take of ripe wood-strawberries two pounds, put them ina phial, and put so much small spirits of wine to them, that it mayovertop them the thickness of four fingers, stop the vessel close, andset it in the sun two days, then strain it, and press it but gently;pour this spirit to as thesis fresh strawberries, repeat this six times, at last keep the clear liquor for your use culpeper a fine thing for gentlemen that have nothing else to dowith their money, and it will have a lovely look to please their eyes tinctura scordii or tincture of scordium college take of the leaves of scordium gathered in a dry time, half a pound, digest them in six pounds of small spirits of wine, in avessel well stopped, for three days, press them out gently, and repeatthe infusion three times, and keep the clarified liquor for use so is made tincture of celandine, rest-harrow, and rosa-solis culpeper see the herbs for the virtues, and then take notice thatthese are better for cold stomachs, old bodies tinctura theriacalis vulgo aqua theriacalis ludg per infus or tincture of treacle college take of canary wine often times distilled, vinegar in whichhalf an ounce of rue seeds have been boiled, two pounds choice treacle, the best mithridate, of each half a pound. Mix them and set them in thesun, or heat of a bath, digest them, and keep the water for use tinctura cinnamoni, vulgo, aqua clareta cinnam or tincture of cinnamon college take of bruised cinnamon two ounces, rectified spirits ofwine two pounds, infuse them four days in a large glass stopped withcork and bladder, shake it twice a day, then dissolve half a pound ofsugar candy by itself in two pounds of rose water, mix both liquors, into which hang a nodule containing, ambergris half a scruple, muskfour grains tinctura viridis or a green tincture college take of verdigris, half an ounce, auripigmentum sixdrams, alum three drams, boil them in a pound of white wine till halfbe consumed, adding, after it is cold, the water of red roses, andnightshade, of each six ounces culpeper this was made to cleanse ulcers, but i fancy it not aqua aluminosa magistralis college take of plantain and red rose water, of each a pound, rochalum and sublimatum, of each two drams.

But where thespirit of the law was violated by an enforcement of its letter andthe privilege made a cloak to shield the murderer of the patient, it was held to be inapplicable 459 the courts have also refusedby mere judicial decision to limit the privilege to the life of thepatient 460the effect of enforcing the privilege the courts are not warranted in admitting incompetent evidence in orderto prevent the failure of justice by the exclusion of the privilegedtestimony a letter written by a physician is inadmissible as evidenceof the privileged facts which it states;461 and a certificate ofthe cause of death, required by law to be signed by the physician andfiled, is not admissible to prove the cause of death in an action inwhich the physician cannot testify 462the making of the objection does not raise a presumption against theperson making it 463 in iowa it has been held that the patient shouldnot be interrogated under oath as to whether or not he will waive hisprivilege, for the jury ought not to be prejudiced against him by anyshow of reluctance 464 in michigan, however, it has been held that apatient failure to produce his physician as a witness is a legitimatefact for the jury to consider 465the character and weight of the evidence to sustain the objection where the objection is made, the burden of proof to establish thegrounds of privilege is upon the person objecting 466 in missouriit has been said that the statement of the physician, that he cannotseparate his impressions received in his relation of physician fromthose received at other times, is not in itself sufficient to justifythe exclusion of his evidence. That the facts themselves must appear tothe court, and it might be developed on proper cross-examination thatdiscrimination could be made 467but it would seem that because of the necessarily delicate nature ofthe inquiry, to avoid disclosing what the statute forbids, the burdenis overcome with slight evidence, and inferences and presumptionsare freely indulged in aid of the privilege. For instance, where thephysician was not permitted to answer whether he did converse withhis patient about an injury, or whether he made an examination withreference to it, it was urged that the objection was prematurely made, but it was held that the fact that the patient consulted a physicianon the occasion to which the inquiry related, when considered with thenature of the questions, justified the exclusion in the absence ofother proof 468 but the physician may testify that he did attendhis patient as physician;469 and he may answer the question whetherthe information was necessary to enable him to act in his professionalcapacity;470 for while his testimony on that point is not conclusive, and the court uses its own judgment in reaching a determination, histestimony is competent evidence 471 he may also testify that a personwas ill and was his patient, that he attended as physician, and he canstate when he attended and how thesis times 472it has been said that where the evidence justifies the conclusion thatinformation regarding the patient is acquired while attending in aprofessional capacity, it is not essential to show by formal proof thatthe information was necessary 473the rights and duties of the physician with reference to the privilege the privilege established by law is a rule of evidence, and not aregulation of a physician general conduct outside of a proceeding inwhich rules of evidence are applicable 474 the courts have, however, not hesitated to intimate that it is a physician duty to observe thesame secrecy in his general walk and conversation 475the physician may testify as an expert on hypothetical questionssubmitted to him regarding facts which might be equally true of anyother person than his patient, and excluding from his considerationprivileged knowledge 476 and he may also testify as to matterswhich came to his knowledge before or after or independent of hisemployment as physician, 477 or which were immaterial to his acting ina professional capacity, and as to which his patient could have had noreasonable ground for believing that they were necessarily disclosedin order that the physician might so act 478 it is the patientprivilege and not the physician. And, therefore, the physician isnot absolutely incompetent as a witness, and has no right to refuse totestify 479 but where he is a writingy he may object and then he willnot be forced to disclose his patient confidence 480in indiana it has been held that where the patient testifies in anaction against his physician for malpractice the physician is thenat liberty to testify or to introduce any other witness to testifyconcerning the matters in controversy 481in michigan, a physician who was plaintiff in a libel suit was notpermitted to insist upon the privilege to prevent the disclosure of hismaltreatment of his patient or what other physicians had discoveredwith regard to it by visits to his patients 482the measure of the physician exemption and liability in testifyingis the language of the statute, and not his idea of his duty to hispatient or the patient injunctions of confidence or secrecy 483in essay of the states there are statutory provisions entitlingphysicians to sue for compensation for their professionalservices 484 the statutes regarding privileged communications areto be construed together with these there seems to be no reason whya physician right of action for his services and medicines shouldnot survive the prohibition of his evidence. But it would seem thathe cannot as a witness in such an action testify regarding privilegedmatter but he can prove it by other witnesses 485the result of the legislation it is doubtless due to considerations of public policy that thestatutes changing the common-law rule have been enacted;486 butthey have not proved an unalloyed benefit, and essay of their featureshave brought about conditions which in essay paper have embarrassedthe administration of justice the law in new york may be taken forillustration.

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s t answer -- 1 the composition of “k-y lubricating jelly” has notbeen divulged examination of the advertising matter reveals onlymeaningless statements, such as. “this is a judicious combination ofvegetable products combined in well balanced proportions withnon-irritating antiseptics , ” “it incorporates a sufficient quantityof mild antiseptics of the thymol class ” and “ contains noformaldehyde ”2 probably a simple tragacanth jelly, which can be made cheaply, willproduce the same effects as those of the proprietary preparation thefollowing formula was published by mr j k thum, apothecary at thegerman hospital, philadelphia druggists circular, september, 1915, p 586:lubricating jelly tragacanth, whole 3 gm glycerin 25 c c phenol 1 5 gm distilled water, a sufficient quantity to make 300 c c the tragacanth is broken in small pieces, and put into a wide-mouthed bottle. The other ingredients are added and the bottle frequently shaken in regard to this formula, mr thum writes. It has been used in our gynecologic dewritingment for years for the last six years we have been dispensing it in collapsible tubes throughout the hospital for general work -- correspondence in the journal a m a , may 12, 1917 “nikalgin” to the editor:-- collier has a special article this week on “nikalgin ” have you any information on this subject?. it sounds like nostrum stuff p r minahan, m d , fond du lac, wis answer -- “nikalgin” is said to be the “invention” of gordon edwards, anengineer large claims for its anesthetic and antiseptic virtues havebeen made while no very definite information seems to be forthcomingregarding the preparation, it has been said to be “composed of quinin, hydrochloric acid and urea ” this would indicate that “nikalgin” maybe nothing more wonderful than the well known local anesthetic, quininand urea hydrochlorid, the quininae et ureae hydrochloridum of theu s pharmacopeia, or a modification of it -- query in the journala m a , sept 22, 1917 pertussin and syrup of thyme to the editor:-- a short time ago i received a sample of “pertussin” and used essay in an obstinate case of bronchitis with excellent results i have since received a catalog from a pharmaceutical firm, which advertises syrup of thyme i have searched for a formula to make my own syrup of thyme, but have not been able to find one will you publish one?. e f benner, m d , salfordville, pa answer -- the subjoined formula yields a product very similar to“pertussin” in taste, flavor, composition, and probably in activity aswell. Fluidextract of thyme 15 c c glycerin 15 c c syrup to make 100 c c the original german preparation contained 1 5 gm of sodium bromidin each hundred cubic centimeters, and this might be added to theforegoing formula with advantage, so far as action is concerned however, a sample of “pertussin” purchased in the open market in theunited states failed to respond to tests for bromids as fluidextract of thyme is not official, this formula is presented asfurnishing an acceptable preparation. Thyme, in no 60 powder 100 gm moisten with a mixture of. Water 25 c c alcohol 15 c c glycerin 10 c c after standing five hours, pack in a percolator exhaust with amenstruum of alcohol, 1 volume, and water, 3 volumes reserve the first85 c c of percolate concentrate the weak percolate to a soft extractand dissolve in the reserved portion make up to 100 c c by additionof a mixture of alcohol, 1 volume, and water, 3 volumes other aromatic expectorants, such as terebene, terpin hydrate orcreosote, might be expected to have similar but greater effect inchronic bronchitis query in the journal, a m a , march 27, 1920 quinin and urea hydrochlorid to the editor:-- could you tell me why quinin and urea hydrochlorid has not become more popular for local anesthesia?.