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Then warm it a littleagain and wash it with fresh rose-water, adding to each pound twelvedrops of oil of lignum rhodium culpeper its general use is, to soften and supple the roughness ofthe skin, and take away the chops of the lips, hands, face, or otherwritings unguentum potabile college take of butter without salt, a pound and an half, spermaceti, madder, tormentil roots, castoreum, of each half an ounce:boil them as you ought in a sufficient quantity of wine, till the winebe consumed, and become an ointment culpeper i know not what to make of it unguentum resinum college take of pine rozin, or rozin of the pine-tree, of thepurest turpentine, yellow wax washed, pure oil, of each equal writings:melt them into an ointment according to art culpeper it is as pretty a cerecloth for a new sprain as most is, and cheap unguentum rosatum or, ointment of roses college take of fresh hog grease cleansed a pound, fresh redroses half a pound, juice of the same three ounces, make it into anointment according to art culpeper it is of a fine cooling nature, exceeding useful in allgallings of the skin, and frettings, accompanied with choleric humours, angry pushes, tetters, ringworms, it mitigates diseases in the headcoming of heat, as also the intemperate heat of the stomach and liver desiccativum rubrum or, a drying red ointment college take of the oil of roses omphacine a pound, white wax fiveounces, which being melted and put in a leaden mortar, put in the earthof lemnos or bole-ammoniac, lapis calaminaris, of each four ounces, litharge of gold, ceruss, of each three ounces, camphire one dram, make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it binds and restrains fluxes of humours unguentum e solano or, ointment of nightshade college take of juice of nightshade, litharge washed, of eachfive ounces, ceruss washed eight ounces, white wax seven ounces, frankincense in powder ten drams, oil of roses often washed in watertwo pounds, make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it was invented to take away inflammations from wounds, and to keep people from scratching of them when they are almost well or, ointment of tutty college take of tutty prepared two ounces, lapis calaminaris oftenburnt and quenched in plantain water an ounce, make them, being finelypowdered, into an ointment, with a pound and an half of ointment ofroses culpeper it is a cooling, drying ointment, appropriated to theeyes, to dry up hot and salt humours that flow down thither, theeyelids being anointed with it valentia scabiosæ college take of the juice of green scabious, pressed out with ascrew, and strained through a cloth, hog grease, of each as muchas you will, heat the hog grease in a stone mortar, not grind it, putting in the juice by degrees for the more commodious mixture andtincture, afterwards set it in the sun in a convenient vessel, so asthe juice may overtop the grease, nine days being passed, pour off thediscoloured juice, and beat it again as before, putting in fresh juice, set it in the sun again five days, which being elapsed, beat it again, put in more juice, after fifteen days more, do so again, do so fivetimes, after which, keep it in a glass, or glazed vessel tapsivalentia college take of the juice of mullen, hog grease, of each as muchas you will, let the grease be cleansed and cut in pieces, and beat itwith the juice, pressed and strained as you did the former ointment, then keep it in a convenient vessel nine or ten days, then beat ittwice, once with fresh juice, until it be green, and the second timewithout juice beaten well, pouring off what is discoloured, and keep itfor use tapsimel college take of the juice of celandine and mullen, of each onewriting, clarified honey, two writings, boil them by degrees till the juicebe consumed, adding the physician prescribing vitriol, burnt alum, burnt ink, and boil it again to an ointment according to art ointments more compound unguentum agrippa college take of briony roots two pounds, the roots of wildcucumbers one pound, squills half a pound, fresh english orris roots, three ounces, the roots of male fern, dwarf elder, water caltrops, oraaron, of each two ounces, bruise them all, being fresh, and steep themsix or seven days in four pounds of old oil, the whitest, not rank, then boil them and press them out, and in the oil melt fifteen ouncesof white wax, and make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it purges exceedingly, and is good to anoint the belliesof such as have dropsies, and if there be any humour or flegm in anywriting of the body that you know not how to remove provided the writing benot too tender you may anoint it who can write my term paper with this. But yet be not too busywith it, for i tell you plainly it is not very safe unguentum amarum or, a bitter ointment college take of oil of rue, savin, mints, wormwood, bitter almonds, of each one ounce and an half, juice of peach flowers and leaves, andwormwood, of each half an ounce, powder of rue, mints, centaury theless, gentian, tormentil, of each one dram, the seeds of coleworts, thepulp of colocynthis, of each two drams, aloes hepatic, three drams, meal of lupines half an ounce, myrrh washed in grass water a dram andan half, bull gall an ounce and an half, with a sufficient quantityof juice of lemons, and an ounce and an half of wax, make it into anointment according to art unguentum apostolorum or, ointment of the apostles college take of turpentine, yellow wax, ammoniacum, of eachfourteen drams, long birthwort roots, olibanum, bdellium, of each sixdrams, myrrh, gilbanum, of each half an ounce, opopanax, verdigris, ofeach two drams, litharge nine drams, oil two pounds, vinegar enough todissolve the gums, make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it consumes corrupt and dead flesh, and makes flesh softwhich is hard, it cleanses wounds, ulcers, and fistulas, and restoresflesh where it is wanting unguentum catapsoras college take of ceruss washed in purslain water, then in vinegarwherein wild rhadish roots have been steeped and pressed out, lapiscalaminaris, chalcitis, of each six drams, burnt lead, goat blood, of each half an ounce, quick-silver sublimated an ounce, the juiceof houseleek, nightshade, plantain, of each two ounces, hog greasecleansed three pounds, oil of violets, poppies, mandrakes, of each anounce. First let them sublimate and exungia, then the oils, juices, andpowders, be mixed, and so made into an ointment according to art unguentum citrinum or, a citron ointment college take of borax an ounce, camphire a dram, white coral halfan ounce, alum plume an ounce, umbilicus marinus, tragacanth, whitestarch, of each three drams, crystal, dentalis utalis, olibanum, niter, white marble, of each two drams, gersa serpentaria an ounce, cerusssix ounces, hog grease not salted, a pound and an half, goat suetprepared, an ounce and an half, hen fat two ounces and an half powder the things as you ought to do both together, and by themselves, melt the fats being cleansed in a stone vessel, and steep in them twocitrons of a mean bigness cut in bits, in a warm bath, after a wholeweek strain it, and put in the powders by degrees, amongst which letthe camphire and borax be the last, stir them, and bring them into theform of an ointment unguentum martiatum college take of fresh bay leaves three pounds, garden rue twopounds and an half, marjoram two pounds, mints a pound, sage, wormwood, costmary, bazil, of each half a pound, sallad oil twenty pounds, yellowwax four pounds, malaga wine two pounds, of all of them being bruised, boiled, and pressed out as they ought, make an ointment according toart culpeper it is a great strengthener of the head, it being anointedwith it.

All which bear on several foot-stalkswhite flowers at the tops of them, consisting of five broad pointedleaves, every one cut in on the end unto the middle, making them seemto be two a-piece, smelling essaywhat sweet, and each of them standingin a large green striped hairy husk, large and round below next to thestalk the seed is small and greyish in the hard heads that come upafterwards who can write my term paper the root is white and long, spreading divers fangs in theground the red wild campion grows in the same manner as the white. But itsleaves are not so plainly ribbed, essaywhat shorter, rounder, and morewoolly in handling the flowers are of the same form and bigness. Butin essay of a pale, in others of a bright red colour, cut in at the endsmore finely, which makes the leaves look more in number than the other the seeds and the roots are alike, the roots of both sorts abiding thesisyears there are forty-five kinds of campion more, those of them which are ofa physical use, having the like virtues with those above described, which i take to be the two chief kinds place they grow commonly through this land by fields andhedge-sides, and ditches time they flower in summer, essay earlier than others, and essayabiding longer than others government and virtues they belong to saturn, and it is found byexperience, that the decoction of the herb, either in white or red winebeing drank, doth stay inward bleedings, and applied outwardly it doesthe like. And being drank, helps to expel urine, being stopped, andgravel and stone in the reins and kidneys two drams of the seed drankin wine, purges the body of choleric humours, and helps those that arestung by scorpions, or other venomous beasts, and may be as effectualfor the plague it is of very good use in old sores, ulcers, cankers, fistulas, and the like, to cleanse and heat them, by consuming themoist humours falling into them and correcting the putrefaction ofhumours offending them carduus benedictus it is called carduus benedictus, or blessed thistle, or holy thistle i suppose the name was put upon it by essay that had little holinessthemselves i shall spare a labour in writing a description of this as almost everyone that can but write at all, may describe them from his own knowledge time they flower in august, and seed not long after government and virtues it is an herb of mars, and under the signof aries now, in handling this herb, i shall give you a rationalpattern of all the rest. And if you please to view them throughout thebook, you shall, to your content, find it true it helps swimming andgiddiness of the head, or the disease called vertigo, because ariesis in the house of mars it is an excellent remedy against the yellowjaundice and other infirmities of the gall, because mars governscholer it strengthens the attractive faculty in man, and clarifies theblood, because the one is ruled by mars the continual drinking thedecoction of it, helps red faces, tetters, and ring-worms, because marscauses them it helps the plague, sores, boils, and itch, the bitingsof mad dogs and venomous beasts, all which infirmities are under mars;thus you see what it doth by sympathy by antipathy to other planets it cures the french pox by antipathy tovenus, who governs it, it strengthens the memory, and cures deafness byantipathy to saturn, who has his fall in aries, which rules the head it cures quartan agues, and other diseases of melancholy, and adustcholer, by sympathy to saturn, mars being exalted in capricorn alsoprovokes urine, the stopping of which is usually caused by mars or themoon carrots garden carrots are so well known, that they need no description. Butbecause they are of less physical use than the wild kind as indeedalmost in all herbs the wild are the most effectual in physic, as beingmore powerful in operation than the garden kinds, i shall thereforebriefly describe the wild carrot descript it grows in a manner altogether like the tame, but thatthe leaves and stalks are essaywhat whiter and rougher the stalks bearlarge tufts of white flowers, with a deep purple spot in the middle, which are contracted together when the seed begins to ripen, that themiddle writing being hollow and low, and the outward stalk rising high, makes the whole umbel to show like a bird nest the root small, long, and hard, and unfit for meat, being essaywhat sharp and strong place the wild kind grows in divers writings of this land plentifullyby the field-sides, and untilled places time they flower and seed in the end of summer government and virtues wild carrots belong to mercury, andtherefore break wind, and remove stitches in the sides, provoke urineand women courses, and helps to break and expel the stone. The seedalso of the same works the like effect, and is good for the dropsy, and those whose bellies are swelling with wind.

Practicallynon-toxic. Lower temperature, often crisis like. Lower pulse, withbetter elimination.

Such as exceed neither insoftness nor hardness 2 give me leave to be a little critical against the vulgar receivedopinion, which is, that the sap falls down into the roots in theautumn, and rises again in the spring, as men go to bed at night, andrise in the morning. And this idle talk of untruth is so grounded inthe heads, not only of the vulgar, but also of the learned, that aman cannot drive it out by reason i pray let such sapmongers answerme this argument. If the sap falls into the roots in the fall of theleaf, and lies there all the winter, then must the root grow only inthe winter but the root grows not at all in the winter, as experienceteaches, but only in the summer. Therefore, if you set an apple-kernelin the spring, you shall find the root to grow to a pretty bigness inthe summer, and be not a whit bigger next spring what doth the sap doin the root all that while?. pick straws?. ’tis as rotten as a rottenpost the truth is, when the sun declines from the tropic of cancer, the sapbegins to congeal both in root and branch. When he touches the tropicof capricorn, and ascends to us-ward, it begins to wax thin again, andby degrees, as it congealed but to proceed 3 the drier time you gather the roots in, the better they are. Forthey have the less excrementitious moisture in them 4 such roots as are soft, your best way is to dry in the sun, or elsehang them in the chimney corner upon a string. As for such as are hard, you may dry them any where 5 such roots as are great, will keep longer than such as are small;yet most of them will keep a year 6 such roots as are soft, it is your best way to keep them always nearthe fire, and to take this general rule for it. If in winter-time youfind any of your roots, herbs or flowers begin to be moist, as thesistimes you shall for it is your best way to look to them once a monthdry them by a very gentle fire. Or, if you can with convenience keepthem near the fire, you may save yourself the labour 7 it is in vain to dry roots that may commonly be had, as parsley, fennel, plantain, &c but gather them only for present need chapter vof barks 1 barks, which physicians use in medicine, are of these sorts. Offruits, of roots, of boughs 2 the barks of fruits are to be taken when the fruit is full ripe, as oranges, lemons, &c but because i have nothing to do with exoticshere, i pass them without any more words 3 the barks of trees are best gathered in the spring, if of oaks, orsuch great trees. Because then they come easier off, and so you may drythem if you please. But indeed the best way is to gather all barks onlyfor present use 4 as for the barks of roots, ’tis thus to be gotten take the roots ofsuch herbs as have a pith in them, as parsley, fennel, &c slit them inthe middle, and when you have taken out the pith which you may easilydo that which remains is called tho’ improperly the bark, and indeedis only to be used chapter vi of juices 1 juices are to be pressed out of herbs when they are young andtender, out of essay stalks and tender tops of herbs and plants, andalso out of essay flowers 2 having gathered the herb, would you preserve the juice of it, whenit is very dry for otherwise the juice will not be worth a buttonbruise it very well in a stone mortar with a wooden pestle, then havingput it into a canvas bag, the herb i mean, not the mortar, for thatwill give but little juice, press it hard in a press, then take thejuice and clarify it 3 the manner of clarifying it is this. Put it into a pipkin orskillet, or essay such thing, and set it over the fire. And when thescum arises, take it off. Let it stand over the fire till no more scumarise. When you have your juice clarified, cast away the scum as athing of no use 4 when you have thus clarified it, you have two ways to preserve itall the year 1 when it is cold, put it into a glass, and put so much oil on it aswill cover it to the thickness of two fingers. The oil will swim at thetop, and so keep the air from coming to putrify it.

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And it isno exaggeration to say that he has been the most potent factor inmaintaining the chaos of therapeutics the majority of our readers would probably say that the existingscientific medical literature insures the permanence of establishedbeliefs, but every one who has delved into the literature has foundinstances of truths that had been established and forgotten-- buriedunder the ever-increasing avalanche of contributions to that literature illustration. Typical half-page tyree advertisement appearing inmedical journals rapid advances are still being made in the medical sciences and unlessconstant vigilance is exercised therapeutics will return to the chaoticcondition from which it has so recently emerged it was in recognitionof these facts-- the danger of this return to chaos, and the difficulty, in fact, impossibility, of any individual keeping pace with all ofthe medical sciences-- that the american medical association securedthe cooperation of men in various branches of medicine in the councilon pharmacy and chemistry, in order that it may place the results oftherapeutic progress before the readers of the journal in an imwritingialmanner are you profiting by this work, or are you still depending on yourunaided efforts to distinguish the false teachings of the nostrumvenders from that of scientific medicine?. are you prescribing“antikamnia” and “ammonol” or a simple member of the group, such asacetanilid or phenacetin?. are you depending on “tyree antiseptic, ”so called, or are you using an antiseptic about which there is nomystery, for which no false claims are made, and one which is reallyeffective?. in short, are you using drugs of unquestioned value, suchas are described in “useful drugs, ” or are you taking your therapeuticinstructions from nostrum makers’ circulars?. Perhaps you have been led to believe that the council on pharmacy andchemistry is composed of “theorists” and that the nostrums representthe work of “practical men ” every one should strive to be practical, of course, and it is worth while to inquire whether scientificexperimenters, who so largely mold medical literature, should be termedtheorists, or practical men a practical man practices that which isuseful in the treatment of the sick, and he must determine who iscapable of furnishing him with a better materia medica a perusal ofmedical literature will convince any unbiased mind that medical scienceprogresses only by means of experiment, hence experimenters must beconsidered the really practical men while those who cling to outworntheories are really the “theorists ”illustration. Typical aseptinol advertisement when lister introduced antiseptic methods into surgery he inaugurated averitable revolution, which afforded the nostrum makers opportunitiesfor reaping rich harvests through the exploitation-- under extraordinaryclaims-- of cheap mixtures of little, or no, value there is no lackof antiseptics of extraordinary activity in the test tube that arepractically harmless to man, and it would seem natural to suppose thatsuch antiseptics could be used to control the development of bacteriain such diseases as typhoid fever, but, unfortunately, such hopes havenot been fulfilled ehrlich experimented with thesis phenol derivativesthat showed decided antiseptic activity in the test tube, in the hopethat he might find essay that could be used to combat such commondiseases as diphtheria and typhoid fever, but while thesis of these areof low toxicity for man, he was unable to find even one that couldbe used effectively in the treatment of any of these diseases hisdiscovery of arsphenamin “salvarsan” resulted from quite another typeof investigation thesis practitioners lose sight of the essential difference betweenantiseptics and disinfectants and employ antiseptics in paper in whichonly a disinfectant action would be of value an antiseptic does notdestroy bacteria, it merely inhibits their growth. And when it isdiluted too much, it loses its effects and the bacteria may begin tomultiply as though no antiseptic had been used this is especiallytrue after the use of weak antiseptics in the mouth these are soondiluted or removed by the saliva, and the bacteria continue to multiplywith only a momentary interruption at best. Hence to advise the useof an oral antiseptic as an effective means of treating diphtheria islittle short of criminal “tyree antiseptic powder” was submitted to the council nearly twelveyears ago the label on the package stated.