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Which Question Would Help Improve The Development Of Ideas In An Essay?


Of course, manlike, he which question would help improve the development of ideas in an essay? blamed his wife for having mislaid it my wife contributes this slam gratis however, after a few minutes' search, one of them discovered that the sweater was just where it belonged on the man's back i met "father" cross, a veritable giant of a man and the greatest authority on chinese dialects in the country, shouting in a great, roaring voice. "bar steward!. bar steward!. bring me a bottle of whiskey, quick!. " i could hear him mumbling. "you don't get me into a life-boat without a bottle of essaything to keep me warm " this same man lost his trousers while climbing out of the life-boat onto the wolf when the hitachi was first captured essaybody sent him a package a few days afterwards containing an old pair of suspenders, and i think that "father" would have murdered the sender if he could have found out who it was i have often regretted that the sender did not enclose lieut rose's calling card just about the time i reached the deck there was an order given from the bridge of the wolf in a very disgusted voice, which was shortly followed by a very choice assortment of cuss words, essay of which were in english i looked to the westward and saw that our rescuing cruiser was only a cloud, and at that time was about five degrees up from the horizon later on i kidded essay of the german officers about it, and they each passed the blame on to essaybody else.

Their privileges and duties when summoned as witnesses in courts of justice, and their liability for malpractice by tracy c becker, a b , ll b , counsellor-at-law. Professor of criminal law and medical jurisprudence in the law dewritingment of the university of buffalo. Chairman executive committee new york state bar association, etc legal status of physicians chapter i of the right to practise medicine and surgery legal definition and history of the terms physician and surgeon at common law the right to administer drugs or medicines or to performsurgical operations was free to all and such was the rule of theroman civil law but the importance of prescribing certain educationalqualifications for those who made such practices their means of gaininga livelihood soon became apparent, and as early as the year 1422, during the reign of henry the fifth in england, an act of parliamentwas adopted forbidding any one, under a penalty of both fine andimprisonment, from “using the mysterie of fysyck unless he hath studiedit in essay university and is at least a batchellor of science ”as a result of this and other statutory regulations, a class ofprofessional men grew up, who were called “physicians, ” because theyprofessed to have the qualifications required by such legal regulationsto wisely prescribe drugs and medicines for the cure of diseases a chirurgeon or surgeon latin, chirurgus. Greek, χειρουργος, compounded of χειρ, the hand, and ἐργειν, to work as thederivation of the word shows, was one who professed to cure disease orinjuries by manual treatment and appliances it would be more interesting than profitable to trace the historyof these terms, and of the professions of medicine and surgery fromthe early times, when the clergy administered healing to the body aswell as to the soul, and when barbers were generally surgeons, andblood-letting by the knife-blade and the use of leeches caused thecommon application of the term “leech” to those who practised surgery definition - for the purposes of this treatise, however, it willbe sufficient to define the term “physician, ” as meaning any one whoprofesses to have the qualifications required by law to practisethe administration of drugs and medicines, and the term “surgeon, ”as meaning any one who professes to have the like qualifications toperform surgical operations, for the cure of the sick or injured for a list of the early statutes of england relating to the practice ofmedicine the reader may consult ordronaux’ “jurisprudence of medicine, ”p 5, note 2 the present statutory regulations throughout the united states and inengland and canada will be more writingicularly referred to and synopsizedhereafter in this volume chapter ii acquirement of legal right to practise medicine and surgery now generally regulated by statute - in nearly all of the unitedstates, as well as in england, france, gerthesis, and other civilized andintelligent communities, the legal right to practise the administrationof drugs and medicines, or to perform operations in surgery for thepurpose of curing diseases or injuries, has for thesis years been theobject of statutory legislation the necessity and propriety ofregulating by law such practices is generally conceded it is manifestto all that a person engaging in the practice of medicine or surgeryas a profession is holding himself out to the world, and especially tohis patients, as one qualified by education and experience to possessmore than ordinary skill and ability to deal with the great problemsof health and life he professes to the world that he is competent andqualified to enter into the closest and most confidential relationswith the sick and afflicted, and that he is a fit and proper person tobe permitted freely, and at all hours and all seasons, to enter thehomes, the family circle, and the private chamber of persons sufferingfrom disease or injury all this he professes and does upon his ownaccount, and for his own profit statutory regulation of the right to practise, constitutional - theexercise by the states of these statutory powers is upheld as a validexercise of the “police power, ” to protect the health of the community when the constitutionality of such enactments has been questioned, it has been attacked upon the alleged ground that the statutes underquestion unjustly discriminated in favor of one class of citizens andagainst another class. And as depriving those already engaged in thepractice of medicine or surgery of “their property without due processof law ” state v pennoyer, 18 atl rep , 878. Ex writinge spinney, 10 nev , 323. People v fulda, 52 hun n y , 65-67. Brown v people, 11 colo , 109 opinion of united states supreme court - this subject has beencarefully considered by the united states supreme court in a recentcase, and the broad extent of the legislative powers of the states toregulate such matters clearly and fully declared dent v west va 129 u s , 114 the court say pp 121 et seq - mr justice fielddelivering the opinion, in which all the other justices concur. “theunconstitutionality asserted consists in its the statutes allegedconflict with the clause of the fourteenth amendment, which declaresthat no state shall deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law. The denial to the defendant of the right topractise his profession, without the certificate required, constitutingthe deprivation of his vested right and estate in his profession, whichhe had previously acquired “it is undoubtedly the right of every citizen of the united statesto follow any lawful calling, business, or profession he may choose, subject only to such restrictions as are imposed upon all personsof like age, sex, and condition this right may in thesis respects beconsidered as a distinguishing feature of our republican institutions here all vocations are open to every one on like conditions all maybe pursued as sources of livelihood, essay requiring years of study andgreat learning for their successful prosecution the interest, or, as it is essaytimes termed, the estate acquired in them, that is, theright to continue their prosecution, is often of great value to thepossessors, and cannot be arbitrarily taken from them, any more thantheir real or personal property can be thus taken but there is noarbitrary deprivation of such right where its exercise is not permittedbecause of a failure to comply with conditions imposed by the statefor the protection of society the power of the state to provide forthe general welfare of its people authorizes it to prescribe all suchregulations as, in its judgment, will secure or tend to secure themagainst the consequences of ignorance and incapacity as well as ofdeception and fraud as one means to this end it has been the practiceof different states, from time immemorial, to exact in thesis pursuitsa certain degree of skill and learning upon which the community mayconfidently rely, their possession being generally ascertained uponan examination of the writingies by competent persons, or inferred froma certificate to them in the form of a diploma or license from aninstitution established for instruction on the subjects, scientificand otherwise, with which such pursuits have to deal the nature andextent of the qualifications required must depend primarily upon thejudgment of the state as to their necessity if they are appropriateto the calling or profession, and attainable by reasonable study orapplication, no objection to their validity can be raised because oftheir stringency or difficulty it is only when they have no relationto such calling or profession, or are unattainable by such reasonablestudy and application, that they can operate to deprive one of hisright to pursue a lawful vocation “few professions require more careful preparation by one who seeksto enter it than that of medicine it has to deal with all thosesubtle and mysterious influences upon which health and life depend, and requires not only a knowledge of the properties of vegetable andmineral substances, but of the human body in all its complicatedwritings, and their relation to each other, as well as their influenceupon the mind the physician must be able to detect readily thepresence of disease, and prescribe appropriate remedies for itsremoval every one may have occasion to consult him, but comparativelyfew can judge of the qualifications of learning and skill which hepossesses reliance must be placed upon the assurance given by hislicense, issued by an authority competent to judge in that respect, that he possesses the requisite qualifications due consideration, therefore, for the protection of society, may well induce the state toexclude from practice those who have not such a license, or who arefound upon examination not to be fully qualified the same reasonswhich control in imposing conditions, upon compliance with which thephysician is allowed to practise in the first instance, may call forfurther conditions as new modes of treating disease are discovered, ora more thorough acquaintance is obtained of the remedial propertiesof vegetable and mineral substances, or a more accurate knowledgeis acquired of the human system and of the agencies by which it isaffected it would not be deemed a matter for serious discussion thata knowledge of the new acquisitions of the profession, as it from timeto time advances in its attainments for the relief of the sick andsuffering, should be required for continuance in its practice, butfor the earnestness with which the plaintiff in error insists that, by being compelled to obtain the certificate required, and preventedfrom continuing in his practice without it, he is deprived of his rightand estate in his profession without due process of law we perceivenothing in the statute which indicates an intention of the legislatureto deprive one of any of his rights no one has a right to practisemedicine without having the necessary qualifications of learning andskill. And the statute only requires that whoever assumes, by offeringto the community his services as a physician, that he possesses suchlearning and skill, shall present evidence of it by a certificate orlicense from a body designated by the state as competent to judge ofhis qualifications as we have said on more than one occasion, it maybe difficult, if not impossible, to give to the terms ‘due processof law’ a definition which will embrace every permissible exertionof power affecting private rights and exclude such as are forbidden they come to us from the law of england, from which country ourjurisprudence is to a great extent derived, and their requirementwas there designed to secure the subject against the arbitraryaction of the crown and place him under the protection of the law they were deemed to be equivalent to ‘the law of the land ’ in thiscountry the requirement is intended to have a similar effect againstlegislative power, that is, to secure the citizen against any arbitrarydeprivation of his rights, whether relating to his life, his liberty, or his property legislation must necessarily vary with the differentobjects upon which it is designed to operate it is sufficient, forthe purposes of this case, to say that legislation is not open to thecharge of depriving one of his rights without due process of law, ifit be general in its operation upon the subjects to which it relates, and is enforceable in the usual modes established in the administrationof government with respect to kindred matters. That is, by process orproceedings adapted to the nature of the case ”early common-law rule concerning suits by physicians the common-law rule was that the physician could not sue and recoverfor his services, though he might for the medicines he furnished thetheory of the law followed the etiquette of his profession and forbadehim from making a specific contract for pay for his services, andobliged him to receive what his patient chose to give him, which wascalled his “honorarium ”the early common-law rule no longer in force - as time went on thistheory vanished from the law for thesis years it has lost its placeamong the rules of professional etiquette in its stead statutoryprovisions have been adopted which forbid a recovery for servicesperformed by persons not legally authorized to practise the right tocontract with the patient or with those who employ the medical man, andhis remedies to enforce such contracts, will be treated of hereafter statutory regulations in new york state - most of the states of theunited states have enacted statutory regulations prescribing in oneform or another the necessary qualifications which entitle a physicianor surgeon to practise, and prescribing penalties for practisingwithout having complied with such statutory requirements in the stateof new york such matters were regulated for the first time by statutein 1787 this was followed by a general enactment on the subject ofthe organization of county medical societies, and of state medicalsocieties having boards of censors, to whom was committed the power toexamine applicants for license to practise, and of issuing licenses laws of 1813, p 94 this law remained in force, with certainmodifications, until 1844, when all acts regulating the practiceof medicine and surgery were repealed a history of the statutoryregulations in new york state up to the act of 1844 on this subjectwill be found in the case of bailey v mogg, 4 denio, 60 154at the time of the passage of the act of 1813, and for thesis yearsafterward, nearly all of the physicians in new york state practisedin accordance with the theories and precepts of what is now calledthe regular or allopathic school of medicine that act provided thatthe physicians in the respective counties of the state of new yorkshould meet in the respective counties and organize county medicalsocieties as a consequence of the fact that the physicians of that daywere chiefly of the allopathic school, they necessarily obtained thecontrol of the county medical societies and state medical societies hence it became difficult, if not impossible, for physicians whowished to practise upon other theories and tenets than those obtainingin that school, to obtain licenses to do so with the growth of thehomœopathic school of medicine and the eclectic school of medicine, came applications to the legislature asking for those practising underthose schools the same rights and privileges of organizing county andstate societies as had been extended to physicians generally by theact of 1813. So that in 1857, by chapter 384, the legislature of newyork state enacted that the homœopathic physicians might meet in theirrespective counties and organize county medical societies, with boardsof censors having the same powers and privileges which were granted bythe act of 1813. And by other laws similar privileges were granted tothe so-called eclectic school after the passage of the act of 1844, down to about 1874, as hereinbefore stated, there was no limitationupon the right to practise medicine or surgery in this state the inharmonious and injurious effect of such policy of the statebecoming manifest, the legislature, by chapter 436 of laws of 1874, required all persons desiring to practise medicine or surgery toobtain a certificate as to their qualifications from the censors ofessay one of these medical societies by the laws of 1880, chapter 513, additional and more extensive and writingicular provisions were made inreference to this matter, and all the physicians then practising wererequired, on or before the time limited in the act, to file with thecounty clerks of their respective counties their licenses to practisegranted by the censors of their county medical societies, or a diplomaof essay chartered school of medicine. And those persons who desiredto become licensed who were not in practice were likewise required toobtain similar licenses or certificates and file the same a diplomaof a chartered school or medical college was given the same effect as alicense issued by the censors recent legislation in new york state - the whole matter, however, of licensing physicians to practise has, in the state of new york, been recently regulated by chapter 468, laws of 1889, and 499 of 1890, which have reference to the qualifications of persons becoming medicalstudents, and chapter 507 of 1890, which gives to the regents of theuniversity of the state of new york power to select boards of examinersfrom persons nominated by each of the three state medical societies, viz , the new york state medical society, homœopathic medical society, and eclectic medical society these boards prepare questions which areto be approved by the state board of regents. Examinations are heldin different writings of the state upon these questions, the examinationpapers are certified to that one of these boards of examiners whichthe student may elect, and that board in turn certifies whether ornot the examination has been successfully undergone.

Respiration 50. No cerebral symptoms anhour later the movements were limited to the left upper and the rightlower extremities, and there was pain running from the region of thespine down the left arm twenty-four hours after the shock, temperature99 5°. Respiration 40. Pulse 100 had slept well, but the movements inthe left arm had never ceased the next day these motions were limitedto the muscles of the forearm, and on the fourth day they had whollyceased these convulsions consisted in extensive motions of the wholeextremity or of muscles or muscle-groups, and not of simple tremor ifthe movements were forcibly controlled, severe pain ensued next to the motor symptoms the sensory are the most important painnot infrequently occurs after the recovery of consciousness in theaffected limb. It is apt to be sharp, severe, darting and neuralgicin character this may last at intervals for essay days, a dull acheoccurring at first between the intermissions it disappears of itselfin time without lasting effects hyperæsthesia may exist at first should this continue, or ifanæsthesia not due to secondary traumatic conditions should appearlater, we should be inclined to place these symptoms in the third class of other symptoms occurring in accidents from currents of highpotential, those which seem to be due to the direct action of theelectricity are not serious buzzing in the ears and a metallic tastein the mouth often occur at the very beginning before the consciousnessis involved nausea and vomiting frequently occur later there isoften considerable dizziness and vertigo patients essaytimes complainof sensations as of an electric shock running through the body whichoccur without cause essay hours or even days after the real shock essayof these sensations are certainly to be reckoned under the mental orpsychical symptoms susceptibility to the effects of electricity, oflightning, and of thunder-storms, though undoubtedly in thesis paperpsychical, has probably in essay paper an actual foundation this iscertainly the case in lightning stroke on the other hand, in the largemajority of paper of electric accidents no such result follows, and inthesis we are expressly told that such a result was looked for but notfound the temperature, as affected by the electricity alone and not assecondary result of injuries, is not always easy to determine it seemsto be in most paper lowered at first, being in that of moyer 97 5° andin that of robert 97° later it may rise to a certain extent, usuallyto not more than 101°, but here again the influence of traumata isdifficult to separate the pulse may be full and soft or weak and compressible it isfrequently very feeble, essaytimes almost imperceptible, and oftenrapid it is apt to remain rapid and essaywhat soft for days in severepaper the respiration is at first rapid in severe paper unless the shock beso great as to cause its cessation this rapidity remains for a varyingperiod and then disappears as a typical case of the results of shock from an electric wire, wewill mention the one reported by dr f w jackson the patient, aman twenty-two years old, came in contact with a live electric-lightwire, touching it with his hands he was thrown a distance of aboutten feet and then back again, “swinging back and forth two or threetimes ” his hands were in contact with the wire about three minutes, when the current broke and he fell to the ground unconscious was seentwo hours later by physician temperature 100°. Pulse 100, strong andbounding. Pupils dilated. Headache. Nervous and irritable.

“castanea, fresh which question would help improve the development of ideas in an essay? leaves, 40 gr. Passiflora, fresh plant, 40 gr. Gelsemium, green tincture, 8 minims. Inula, represented by the camphoraceous stearoptene helenin, 20 grs. Iodized lime, 8 grs. Menthol, 1-4 grs. Aromatic syrup yerba santa, 60 minims ”it is said to be. “a new combination of well-tried remedies of especial value in pertussis and other spasmodic coughs it is composed of astringent, antispasmodic, sedative and expectorant agents, that control the paroxysms, relieve the irritation, promote expectoration, and give tone to mucous membranes involved ”still more exaggerated claims are made for the individual constituentsof casta-flora, writingly by direct statement, writingly by inference forexample. “castanea is almost a specific in whooping cough and other spasmodic coughs “passiflora is a narcotic, sedative and antispasmodic without habit-forming properties, nor does it lock up the secretions and upset digestion like opiates “inula elecampane has been employed as a cough remedy in england for centuries its action is similar to guaiacol and creosote its active principle, helenin, is destructive of tubercle bacilli in dilutions of 1 to 10, 000 “iodized lime, menthol, and yerba santa are too well known as expectorants and antiseptics to require more than passing mention ”that casta-flora is a “new” combination may be admitted. It isimprobable that exactly this combination of obsolete drugs was everbefore selected for any purpose whatever, but the statement ismisleading in that no new principle of therapeutics is involved on thecontrary, the combination is just what might be expected from haphazardchoosing of discarded and nearly forgotten drugs it seems incrediblethat a reputable firm of manufacturing pharmacists would make thepositive statement that castanea is almost a specific in whoopingcough why not say it is a specific?. it would be about as true aspecific or “almost specific” for this disease would rank among greatmedical discoveries. But castanea is merely a slightly astringent drugneither better nor worse than scores of other astringent drugs thathave been tried, found valueless and discarded hardly less surprising are the statements regarding passiflora thisherb has been on the market about three quarters of a century not onlyhas it never established itself in scientific medicine, but it is noteven mentioned in modern standard works on therapeutics of all the statements made in the circular perhaps the most remarkable, in that it is so dangerously misleading, is that regarding helenin, the active principle of elecampane the statement that this principle helenin is destructive of tubercle bacilli in dilutions of 1-10, 000can only mean that it is of extraordinary value in the treatment oftuberculosis. In fact, it is definitely stated that the action ofelecampane is similar to that of guaiacol and creosote it is obvious that any drug which would destroy the tubercle bacilli inthe human lungs without exerting a toxic action on the patient wouldbe a great contribution to medicine but although elecampane may havebeen used for centuries it has proved to have little, if any, merit, and even the national standard dispensatory, p 848, says. “elecampanewas formerly employed as a tonic, stimulant, diuretic, diaphoretic, expectorant, and emmenagogue, but has now largely fallen into disuse ”one looks in vain in the standard textbooks on therapeutics for adescription of the uses of inula or elecampane, and of its so-called“active principle, ” helenin the circular to which reference has been made says, referring to theuse of castanea and passiflora in the treatment of whooping cough. “gelsemium, when made from the fresh, green plant-- as is merrell-- is an excellent adjuvant to the above drugs, and allays the nervous irritability so frequently present ”h c wood, jr pharmacology and therapeutics, 1916, p 160, says ofgelsemium.

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The leaves are likewise used to loosen the belly gently, and in decoctions or clysters to ease all pains of the body, openingthe strait passages, and making them slippery, whereby the stone maydescend the more easily and without pain, out of the reins, kidneys, and bladder, and to ease the torturing pains thereof but the rootsare of more special use for those purposes, as well for coughs, hoarseness, shortness of breath and wheezings, being boiled in wine, or honeyed water, and drank the roots and seeds hereof boiled in wineor water, are with good success used by them that have excoriationsin the bowels, or the bloody flux, by qualifying the violence ofsharp fretting humours, easing the pains, and healing the soreness it is profitably taken by them that are troubled with ruptures, cramps, or convulsions of the sinews. And boiled in white wine, forthe imposthumes by the throat, commonly called the king evil, andof those kernels that rise behind the ears, and inflammations orswellings in women breasts the dried roots boiled in milk and drank, is especially good for the chin-cough hippocrates used to give thedecoction of the roots, or the juice thereof, to drink, to those thatare wounded, and ready to faint through loss of blood, and applied thesame, mixed with honey and rosin, to the wounds as also, the rootsboiled in wine to those that have received any hurt by bruises, falls, or blows, or had any bone or member out of joint, or any swelling-pain, or ache in the muscles, sinews or arteries the muscilage of the roots, and of linseed and fenugreek put together, is much used in poultices, ointments, and plaisters, to molify and digest all hard swellings, andthe inflammation of them, and to ease pains in any writing of the body the seed either green or dry, mixed with vinegar, cleanses the skin ofmorphew, and all other discolourings being boiled therewith in the sun you may remember that not long since there was a raging disease calledthe bloody-flux. The college of physicians not knowing what to make ofit, called it the inside plague, for their wits were at ne plus ultraabout it. My son was taken with the same disease, and the excoriationof his bowels was exceeding great. Myself being in the country, wassent for up, the only thing i gave him, was mallows bruised and boiledboth in milk and drink, in two days the blessing of god being uponit it cured him and i here, to shew my thankfulness to god, incommunicating it to his creatures, leave it to posterity maple tree government and virtues it is under the dominion of jupiter thedecoction either of the leaves or bark, must needs strengthen the livermuch, and so you shall find it to do, if you use it it is excellentlygood to open obstructions both of the liver and spleen, and eases painsof the sides thence proceeding wind marjoram called also origanum, eastward marjoram. Wild marjoram, and grovemarjoram descript wild or field marjoram hath a root which creeps much underground, which continues a long time, sending up sundry brownish, hard, square stalks, with small dark green leaves, very like those of sweetmarjoram, but harder, and essaywhat broader. At the top of the stalksstand tufts of flowers, of a deep purplish red colour the seed issmall and essaything blacker than that of sweet marjoram place it grows plentifully in the borders of corn fields, and inessay copses time it flowers towards the latter end of the summer government and virtues this is also under the dominion of mercury it strengthens the stomach and head much, there being scarce a betterremedy growing for such as are troubled with a sour humour in thestomach. It restores the appetite being lost. Helps the cough, andconsumption of the lungs. It cleanses the body of choler, expelspoison, and remedies the infirmities of the spleen. Helps the bitingsof venomous beasts, and helps such as have poisoned themselves byeating hemlock, henbane, or opium it provokes urine and the termsin women, helps the dropsy, and the scurvy, scabs, itch, and yellowjaundice the juice being dropped into the ears, helps deafness, painand noise in the ears and thus much for this herb, between which andadders, there is a deadly antipathy sweet marjoram sweet marjoram is so well known, being an inhabitant in every garden, that it is needless to write any description thereof, neither of thewinter sweet marjoram, or pot marjoram place they grow commonly in gardens. Essay sorts grow wild in theborders of corn fields and pastures, in sundry places of this land;but it is not my purpose to insist upon them the garden kinds beingmost used and useful time they flower in the end of summer government and virtues it is an herb of mercury, and under aries, and therefore is an excellent remedy for the brain and other writings ofthe body and mind, under the dominion of the same planet our commonsweet marjoram is warming and comfortable in cold diseases of the head, stomach, sinews, and other writings, taken inwardly, or outwardly applied the decoction thereof being drank, helps all diseases of the chestwhich hinder the freeness of breathing, and is also profitable for theobstructions of the liver and spleen it helps the cold griefs of thewomb, and the windiness thereof, and the loss of speech, by resolutionof the tongue the decoction thereof made with essay pellitory ofspain, and long pepper, or with a little acorns or origanum, beingdrank, is good for those that cannot make water, and against pains andtorments in the belly.