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His recognition to others of the fact that the which essay writing service is the best plaintiff was in attendance. His reciting to others a knowledge of the frequency and length of the visits of plaintiff without any disclaimer on the writing of the defendant of liability the court said as to these facts. “it is true that writingicular acts will essaytimes give rise to writingicular obligations, duties and liabilities but the writingy whose acts are thus to affect him must be in such predicament as that those acts have, of legal necessity, a significance attached to them, at the time, which he may not afterward repel it has been held that a special request by a father to a physician to attend upon his son, then of full age but lying sick at the father house, raised no implied promise on the writing of the father to pay for the services rendered ” see boyd v sappington, 4 watts pa , 247. And so in veitch v russell, 3 ad & ell n s , 927, it is said. “a physician attends in every case on request.

Iv, injection of 10 c c november 30 showing nogreater stability of beveridge secretion over that of bayliss andstarling why can we hope that the addition of serum or any solution of proteinwill render secretin more stable?. in the intact man or animal undernormal conditions of digestion, secretin reaches the pancreas by wayof the blood, that is, it is in solution in blood does that factrender the secretin stable?. by no means the reader is familiar withthe fact that the response of the pancreas to a single intravenousadministration of secretin is very transitory 5-15 min thecessation of activity is due, not to fatigue of the pancreas, as asecond injection of secretin gives a prompt response of pancreaticsecretion, but to the disappearance of active secretin from the blood in fact, secretin left in the test tube or in the bottle remains activeover a much longer period of time than when introduced into the bloodstream iv beveridge secretin given by mouth to the intact animal has nospecific action on the pancreas -- active secretin prepared accordingto the method of beveridge was fed on an empty stomach to a small dog 5 kilo with permanent fistula of one of the pancreatic ducts oncontrol days we gave the dog a equal quantities of n/10 hcl, and b bread and milk the beveridge secretin was prepared with 0 3 percent hcl and the addition of 0 2 per cent serum the results may bestated by the following summary:giving beveridge secretin by mouth secretin of the number of pancreas for three material fed tests hours following the feeding 150 c c beveridge secretin 6 10 2 c c 150 c c n/10 hcl 5 22 7 c c bread soaked in milk 4 6 6 c c -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- the control experiments with pure hydrochloric acid show that thesecretion of pancreatic juice following the introduction of beveridgesecretin into the stomach is due to the acid factor and the proteincontent conclusionsthe patented secretin of beveridge is rendered inactive by gastricjuice, is without effect when given by mouth, and exhibits no greaterstability or keeping qualities than the secretin prepared accordingto bayliss and starling it has no merit as a therapeutic agent it should under no conditions be administered intravenously inman, as it contains deleterious protein split products and livingbacteria -- from the journal a m a , jan 12, 1918 need for patent law revision report of the committee on patent-law revision of the council on pharmacy and chemistry of the american medical associationat the present critical time when the efficiency of this nation mustbe raised to the highest point, it is essential that the united statesgovernment should lead in the efforts tending to such increasedefficiency to bring this about the government must protect andstimulate science, art and industry and at the same time curb orprevent waste of the country resources in this field the unitedstates patent office has unlimited power for good and evil-- good, inthe issuance of patent grants for novel devices and substances whichgo to increase national efficiency. Evil, in the granting of patentprotection where such protection is not in the interest of nationalefficiency, conservation of energy and material resources for years the american medical association, in common with thenational pharmaceutical bodies, has been urging amendment of thelaw which governs the issuance of patents on medicinal preparationsand more writingicularly revision of the procedure under which suchpatents are issued at the chicago 1908 meeting of the americanmedical association a special committee of five was appointed bythe house of delegates to study the questions involved, and tocooperate with the association committee on medical legislation inpreparing and securing the enactment of a bill which would correctthe abuses connected with the enforcement of our patent laws thejournal a m a , june 13, 1908, p 2003 this committee presenteda comprehensive report at the atlantic city 1909 meeting of theamerican medical association the journal a m a , june 19, 1909, p 2063 a further report was presented at the st louis 1910meeting of the american medical association the journal a m a , june 18, p 2079 in 1911 the journal a m a , nov 25, 1911, p 1780 the council on pharmacy and chemistry of the american medicalassociation issued a report which set forth the inadequacy of ourpatent laws as they are administered in relation to medical productswritingicularly against public interestsince that time the council has continued its study of the u s patentlaw as it applies to medicine and has become convinced that in thesisinstances the patent law or its enforcement is contrary to the bestinterest of the public, both as concerns health and prosperity thecouncil feels it a duty at this time to protest against the provisionsof our patent law, or the methods of its enforcement, which permit thegranting of patents without thorough and scientific investigation ofthe claims advanced in such letters patent as one means of improvingconditions the council urges that the u s public health service, the bureau of chemistry, u s dewritingment of agriculture and otherscientific dewritingments of the united states government conversant withmedicines and related subjects be consulted before the issuance ofpatents on medicinal preparations in support of the council contention that the patent law procedurerequires revision, the following is offered. In 1912 a u s patent no 1, 031, 971 was granted on a cresol derivative, metacresyl acetate, a product described in chemical literature in 1903 when the councilinquired as to the grounds for the issuance of a patent for a substanceknown to science, the patent office replied that it was not familiarwith the publication in which metacresyl acetate had been described it seems evident that this patent would not have been issued had theapplication first been submitted to a government dewritingment familiarwith chemical literature an illustration of the granting of a patent on the use of well-knownchemical bodies which present no discovery or originality, is thepatent issued for the use of peroxids, perborates and percarbonates asingredients of tooth powders u s patents nos 760, 397 and 802, 099 regarding these patents the journal of the american medical association sept 20, 1913, p 978 commented. “the patents held by mckesson and robbins give this firm the exclusive right of manufacturing tooth powders containing peroxids, perborates and percarbonates it is another illustration of the unfair monopolies that may be secured under our present patent laws ” granting a patent to a nostrumagain in 1913 u s patent no 1, 081, 069 was granted to a citizenof switzerland a country which does not grant patents on medicinalpreparations for a “composition which is intended to be usedinternally and which confers to the organisms immunity against thefollowing microbial infectious illnesses.

Anotherwill contain, in addition, 2 5 per cent of which essay writing service is the best guaiacol. The third will bea proprietary preparation containing the guaiacol “it is also desirable to know how the oily solution compares with theplain watery solution. But this is of secondary importance ”the preparations all had the same appearance the patients were takenindiscriminately, and we attempted to keep them on the injections aslong as possible, in order to compare symptoms owing, however, todischarge from hospital, symptoms of mercury intoxication, etc , wewere unable in all paper to give a thorough trial with each preparation in all, eleven patients were treated and seventy-one injectionsgiven-- by which time our experimental supply was exhausted in each case the drug was given intramuscularly in the buttocks and thepatients carefully observed for subjective symptoms of pain and forobjective symptoms of swelling, induration, abscess formation, etc thedetails are given in table 1 as will be noted, in several of the paper the patients were more orless confused and gave rather indefinite and conflicting answers inattempting to compare the results from the different drugs, by carefultabulation one finds that symptoms were more marked with the respectivesample as follows. Preparation 1 was worse than preparation 2 or 3 in six paper preparation 2 was worse than preparation 1 in two paper preparation 2 was worse than preparation 3 in five paper preparation 3 was worse than preparations 2 or 1 in one case table 1 -- details of investigation by dr cole* | | | | | | symptoms | | | |prepar-|dose, -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - case|age|sex| date | ation | grain| induration-- | objective | | † | | | | pain | | | | | | | | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1 | 25| ♂ | 6/11/16 | 2 | 1/5 |none |still painful | | | 6/12/16 | 1 | 1/4 |none |none | | | 6/13/16 | 2 | 1/5 |none |quite painful | | | 6/14/16 | 2 | 1/4 |hurt for essay |very tender | | | | | | time | | | | 6/16/16 | 2 | 1/5 |hurt for essay |very tender | | | | | | time | | | | 6/17/16 | 3 | 1/5 |not so painful |less tender | | | | | | | than with | | | | | | | prepar- | | | | | | | ation 2 | | | 6/18/16 | 3 | 1/5 |not so painful | can sit on | | |discontinued| | | | area. As | | | salivation| | | | needle prick | | | | | | | is only place | | | | | | | that it hurts | | | 6/22/16 | 2 | 1/4 |hurt, but not |slight indur- | | | | | | so long | ation and | | | | | | | slight | | | | | | | tenderness | | | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |hurt, but not |pain “dead | | | | | | so long | stinging” | | | | | | | lasts 1 hour | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 |not so bad |about the same -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2 | 32| ♂ | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |essay pain |no induration | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 |more pain |slight indur- | | | | | | | ation -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 3 | | ♂ | 6/12/16 | 1 | 1/5 |no symptoms |painful | | | 6/13/16 | 2 | 1/4 |no symptoms |painful | | | 6/14/16 | 2 | 1/4 |says the last |painful | | | 6/16/16 |arseno-| | two have hurt | | | | |benzol | | the more | | | | 6/17/16 | 3 | 1/5 |more pain than |small painful | | | | | | previously | area | | | 6/17/16 | 3 | 1/5 | | | | | 6/18/16 | 3 | 1/5 |not so much |essay indur- | | | | | | pain. In | ation at site | | | 6/19/16 | 3 | 1/5 | fact, patient | of injections | | | 6/20/16 | 3 | 1/4 | says he is | | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 1/4 | over it in a | | | | | | | very short | | | | | | | while. Com- | | | | | | | plained of | | | | | | | last one | | | | 6/22/16 | 2 | 1/4 |essay pain |considerable | | | | | | | tenderness | | | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |not so much as | now after so | | | | | | previously | thesis injec- | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 | | tions -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 4 | 36| ♂ | 6/22/16 | 2 | 1/4 |no pain |no tenderness | | | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |essay pain |essay tender- | | | | | | | ness | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 |could not sleep|essay tender- | | | | | | at night | ness. Slight | | | | | | | induration -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 5 | 32| ♂ | 6/20/16 | 3 | 20 |essay pain |no induration | | | | |minims| | | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 25 |essay pain | | | | | |minims| | | | | 6/23/16 | 2 | 1/4 |worse pain |no induration | | | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |worse pain | | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 |worse than any |slight tender- | | | | | | |ness -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 6 | 20| ♂ | 6/ 8/16 | 1 | 1/6 |very little | | | | 6/10/16 | 1 | 1/5 |very little | | | | 6/13/16 | 1 | 1/4 |very little | | | | 6/14/16 | 2 | 1/4 |bothered more | | | | | | | than others | | | | 6/17/16 | 2 | 1/5 |quite a little |still essay | | | | | | pain | soreness | | | 6/18/16 | 2 | 1/5 |quite a little |still essay | | | | | | pain | soreness | | | 6/19/16 | 3 | 1/4 |considerably |very little | | | | | | less pain than| tenderness | | | 6/20/16 | 3 | 1/4 | with prepar- | | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 1/4 | ation 2 | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 7 | 30| ♂ | 6/12/16 | 1 | 1/5 |little pain |none | | | 6/13/16 | 2 | 1/4 |no pain | | | | 6/14/16 | 2 | 1/5 |essay pain | | | | 6/16/16 |arseno-| | | | | | |benzol | | | | | | 6/17/16 | 3 | 1/5 |not so much |no tenderness | | | 6/18/16 | 3 | 1/5 |not so much |no tenderness | | | 6/19/16 | 3 | 1/5 |very little |only slight | | | | | | pain | amount of | | | 6/20/16 | 3 | 1/4 | | induration | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 1/4 | | | | | 6/22/16 | 2 | 1/4 |essay pain |essay little | | | | | | | induration | | | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |considerable |essay indura- | | | | | | pain | tion | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 |“fine” |slight indura- | | | | | | | tion -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 8 | 28| ♂ | 6/13/16 | 2 | 1/5 |little pain |little pain | | | | | | | afterward | | | 6/15/16 | 2 | 1/5 |little pain |little pain | | | | | | | afterward -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 9 | 28| ♀ | 6/17/16 | 2 | 1/5 |essay complaint |very little | | | | | | of pain | induration | | | 6/18/16 | 2 | 1/5 | fairly severe | | | | 6/19/16 | 3 | 1/5 |essay pain. Says|very slight | | | | | | these have | induration | | | 6/20/16 | 3 | 1/4 | hurt very much| | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 1/4 | less than | | | | | | | others | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 10 | 37| ♂ | 6/12/16 | 1 | 1/5 |no symptoms |none | | | 6/13/16 | 1 | 1/4 |no symptoms |none | | | 6/14/16 | 1 | 1/5 |no symptoms |none | | | 6/15/16 | 3 | 1/5 |no symptoms |none | | | 6/16/16 |arseno-| | | | | | |benzol | | | | | | 6/17/16 | 3 | 1/5 |“much less pain|none | | | | | | than biniodid | | | | | | | or grey oil” | | | | 6/18/16 | 3 | 1/5 |no complaint |none | | | 6/19/16 | 3 | 1/5 |says he is over|essay indura- | | | 6/20/16 | 3 | 1/4 | it in one hour| tion at site | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 1/4 | | of injection -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 11 | 30| ♀ | 6/11/16 | 1 | 20 |considerable. |considerable | | | | |minims| not so much | pain and | | | 6/12/16 | 2 | 20 | | tenderness on | | | | |minims| | palpation | | | | | | | over area | | | 6/13/16 | 1 | 25 |not much pain |indurated area | | | | |minims| | at pt of | | | | | | | each | | | | | | | painful | | | 6/14/16 | 1 | 25 |not much pain |slight indura- | | | | |minims| | tion -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- * the diagnosis in case 5 was primary syphilis, and in the other paper, secondary syphilis † in this column, ♂ indicates male, and ♀ female in no case did wassermann become negative the criticism may be raised that the number of paper and of injectionsis too small to permit the drawing of any just conclusions evenshould we grant it, the statistics certainly do not prove any markedsuperiority of any one of the preparations over the others we wish tothank dr sollmann for advising and directing us in this work, and drs bailey, bernstein, markus and reycraft for assistance in carrying itout report of dr albert keideltwenty paper were chosen at random from the syphilitic patientsattending the clinic they were given intramuscular injections of thethree solutions, in amounts varying from 1 to 2 c c , at intervals inmost instances of two days the injections were invariably made intothe gluteal muscles, at depths of from 2 to 2-1/2 inches, and ordinarycare exercised to preserve asepsis after injection the patient wasallowed to dewriting, and the result was recorded at the succeedingvisit the result was determined from the patient statement and ourexamination essay patients received injections of only one solution;essay were treated with first one and later with another, and onepatient received all three at different times the solutions were nevermixed for a single injection, of course table 2 -- reactions in twenty paper reported by dr keidel preparation reactions number of ┌────────────┴────────────┐ injections severe mild none undetermined 1 13 14 4 8 39 2 5 15 16 5 41 3 7 25 3 2 37 -- - 117 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- the solutions are understood to contain a 1 per cent solution of redmercuric iodid in oil, two of them containing in addition 2 5 percent of guaiacol, one of these being a proprietary preparation thesolutions are designated as preparations 1, 2 and 3, respectively, corresponding to the numbers on the labels of the bottles in which theywere originally received the local reactions are recorded as “severe” s, “mild” m, “none” o and “undetermined” u by “severe” ismeant very severe pain lasting for from several hours to several days;by “mild” is meant slight pain or numbness for several hours, or lessthan an hour. “none” indicates that there was no local reaction, and“undetermined, ” that the patient has failed to return after the lastinjection in table 3 all the details of the investigation are recorded under“local reaction, ” the letters represent the type of reaction after eachinjection, in the order in which they were given. When two solutionswere used in the same case, the letters represent the reactionsfollowing the solution opposite which they stand in the fifth columnthe plus and minus symbols indicate the wassermann reaction. Plusindicates a completely positive, and minus a completely negativereaction when there is only one sign, it refers to the reaction at theend of treatment. When there are two, to the reaction before and after the seventh column shows the clinical result at the end of treatment;when no note is made, it means that there was no change noted in theeighth column are noted any objective results observed at the time ofexaminations of the patients the injections were made and the result charted by dr e l zimmermann, of my staff, under my directions andsupervision -- abstracted in the journal a m a , feb 24, 1917 table 3 -- details of investigation by dr keidel | | | | total |dura- |effect | | | case|no |prepar-| local | amount | tion | on | type of | result | general | | ation |reaction |solution| of |wasser-| case | | remarks | | | | given, |treat-| mann | | | | | | | c c | ment | | | | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1 | 3 | 2 | ooo | 3 | 6 da | |latent | | 2 | 5 | 2 | mosms | 5 6 | 9 da | |gummas |marked | 3 | 7 | 1 | mmm.

”in 1908 dr lowenthal appeared as a witness for edward r hibbard, who was being which essay writing service is the best prosecuted by the federal authorities hibbard operateda “men specialist” office in chicago. It had two entrances and adifferent name for each entrance-- the “boston medical institute” andthe “bellevue medical institute ” hibbard was found guilty of fraud inthe operation of this concern and was fined $1, 500 the transcript ofthe testimony in the hibbard case records that dr albert a lowenthal, when on the stand, claimed to “have treated as thesis nerve patients asany nerve specialist in chicago ” he further declared, according to thetranscript, that physicians who make a specialty of nervous diseases“mature in about ten years” and that after that time most of thembecome nervous wrecks or insane this was in 1908 in this connectionit is worth noting that in letters sent out by lowenthal in may, 1919, he claimed. “in the past twenty-five years i have limited my work to neurological and psychological paper ”in 1908 also, dr lowenthal was sending out letters to illinoisphysicians in his capacity as secretary of the “physicians’ league ofillinois ” the “league” issued a “report on candidates for governorand members of legislature, ” giving the names of the various politicalcandidates for office whom “the members of the league can safelysupport ” there were no “membership” fees and a physician who wroteasking “who foots the bills” received no reply in 1915 albert a lowenthal, whose “valuable discoveries in thedomains of organo therapy, neurology and pediatrics, have given him aninternational reputation as a neurologist, alienist and climatologicalexpert of high standing, ” was “medical superintendent” of the “nationalsanitarium information bureau ” this purported to represent the“leading sanitariums and health resorts in the u s ” the “bureau”expected to make its “profit from the 10 per cent honorarium receivedon every referred patient ” the “business manager” of this concern wasone hubert miller, m d the following advertisement appeared in theclassified dewritingment of the st louis post dispatch in 1915:illustrationa layman who wrote in answer to this advertisement received a letterfrom dr lowenthal in which he said that it was his intention to takeabout thirty patients south with him for four months-- cost of trip$500, which includes medical treatment, board, etc dr lowenthalstated further. “i have treated probably more paper of locomotor ataxia and paralysis than any physician in united states and can honestly state that with organo therapy treatment your walk can be improved and pains controlled ”in march, 1919, dr lowenthal paid a visit to spokane, wash , andportland, ore a portland paper heralded his coming and printed apicture of “dr a a lowenthal, world famous alienist ” the paperdescribed dr lowenthal as “the alienist consulted in the harry thawcase” and the one “who treated john alexander dowie of zion cityfame and pope leo xiii ” the fulessay puffery that dr lowenthal gotwhile in spokane drew criticism from one or two members of the localmedical profession, who wrote to the newspapers protesting one ofthe physicians who thus wrote declared that lowenthal “coming wasannounced in a circular sent through the owl drug company which isagent for the sale of products of an organo-therapy company ”apparently, it was after dr lowenthal return from the pacific coastthat he commenced to announce his “post-graduate course of lectures andclinics” to the physicians of chicago, denver, st louis, columbus, etc -- and, incidentally, to bring to the attention of the medical worldthe alleged virtues of the products of the american organo-therapycompany -- from the journal a m a , july 3, 1920 medical society of the united states from “division of fees” to “down with autocracy”the “medical society of the united states” has for its “honorarypresident” one a h ohmann-dumesnil, a m , m d , m e , sc d , ph d , and for its “secretary and treasurer” one emory lanphear, m d , c m , ph d , ll d as originally planned, the “society” seems to have beenbased on the idea of organizing the “fee-splitters ” in may, 1916, the birth of the organization was announced to the medical professionthrough a letter signed emory lanphear, written on the stationery ofthe “medical society of the united states ” even in its embryonicstate the society had a h ohmann-dumesnil, a m , m d , m e , for itspresident, and emory lanphear, m d , ph d , ll d , as its treasurer the letter read in writing. “we-- the majority of the medical profession-- who believe in division of fees i e , that the surgeon should not ‘hog’ the whole of a patient money and leave nothing for the family doctor, are no longer welcome in the a m a we are therefore organizing the medical society of the united states, which will not be conducted for the benefit of a few selfish egotists we would like to have you with us “it costs only $1 00 to join this covers dues for 1916, and includes expense for the beautiful certificate of membership suitable for framing, which you will receive on admission fill enclosed blank and return to me with $1 00 ”but presumably the idea of organizing on a basis of “fee splitting”did not make a hit, so the lure was changed today physicians areapproached with the plea that the “medical society of the unitedstates” will make the medical world free for democracy. It is, we areassured, a “society of protest against the autocracy of the a m a , ”and a “society of medical democracy ”membership costs “only $1 00 including the cost of a beautifulcertificate of membership ” no penalties or punishments are involvedfor belonging to other societies, and. “joining our body need not affect your membership in any other society-- even the a m a , if you wish to belong to it, and be ‘bossed’ by the ‘simmons gang’ ”the dollar for the “beautiful certificate” and membership is solicitedby means of circular letters signed “emory lanphear, ” coming from 3447pine st , st louis, mo , the address of what has been variouslycalled the “american polyclinic, ” the “american hospital, ” and later, the “german hospital ” the “surgeon-in-charge” of the “german hospital”is emory lanphear, m d , c m , ph d , ll d when running under thename of the “american hospital, ” lanphear solicited operative work ona “division of fees” basis, which, the general practitioner was told, meant that “you are to have 40 per cent of all fees received from yourpatients sent to our staff for operation or treatment ”with the change in name from “american hospital, ” to “german hospital, ”lanphear appealed for a “portion of your operative work on a basis ofpure reciprocity ” this “pure reciprocity” seems to have been a stillmore liberal distribution of the patient money, for from a 40 percent basis it was raised to an even fifty-fifty said lanphear, in aletter sent out a few months ago:illustration. The “medical society of the united states, ” wasoriginally organized on a basis of “fee-splitting, ” as is shown by thereduced facsimile of a letter sent broadcast in 1916, announcing thebirth of the new “society ” apparently, “fee-splitting” as a rallyingpoint did not bring in the desired returns, so today the “medicalsociety of the united states” is alleged to be a “society of protestagainst the autocracy of the a m a ” “i wish also to inform you in spite of the despicable opposition of the hypocritical gang in charge of the a m a , and the no less contemptible action of the st louis medical society, i am going to remain in st louis and continue to do surgical work upon a ‘division of fee’ basis to be more explicit, if you bring me a case for operation i shall allow you one half of the fee for your time, trouble, responsibility and help in the management of the case ”before leaving the interesting professional personality of lanphear, and carefully avoiding any details of a personal nature, we may remindour readers that as long ago as 1908 lanphear was the “dean” of the“hippocratean college of medicine, ” with a h ohmann-dumesnil, a m , m d , m e , sc d , “vice-dean ” at that time lanphear sent out lettersto physicians proposing the organization of a “post graduate faculty”on the following basis. “those who hold full professorships shall purchase stock in the corporation to the amount of $1, 000 00. Those who become lecturers or instructors shall pay in the sum of $500 00. Those who are to be merely clinical assistants will buy ten shares of stock, $100 00 ”the “hippocratean college” was a “sundown” affair. It never graduated astudent, and expired in 1910 illustration. Reduced facsimile of the letter-heads of an institutionknown variously as the “american hospital” and the “german hospital ”the change in name from “american” to “german” seems to have takenplace early in 1915-- when things german were more popular andprofitable than they are today!. But to come back to the “society of medical democracy”. The “medicalsociety of the united states” seems to have been born in 1916 itsparents, so far as is apparent, seem to have been lanphear andohmann-dumesnil the latter, it may be remembered, used to be theeditor and proprietor of the st louis medical and surgical journal, a publication so obviously venal, that its value to the nostrum makers, whose interests it espoused, must have been small advertising pages, “original articles” and “editorials”-- all were used to puff nostrums ofthe crudest type it was ohmann-dumesnil and his journal that came tothe defense of the “patent medicine” interests when they were so hardhit by mr adam “great american fraud” series in commenting on thisphase of “patent medicine” activities, collier, in january, 1907, said.

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A disease which melancholy persons are subjectunto. It is also good against melancholy dreams the distilled wateror syrup made of the flowers, works the same effects that the rootand seed do, although more weakly the female is often used for thepurpose aforesaid, by reason the male is so scarce a plant, that it ispossessed by few, and those great lovers of rarities in this kind pepperwort, or dittander descript our common pepperwort sends forth essaywhat long and broadleaves, of a light blueish green colour, finely dented about the edges, and pointed at the ends, standing upon round hard stalks, three orfour feet high, spreading thesis branches on all sides, and having thesissmall white flowers at the tops of them, after which follow small seedsin small heads the root is slender, running much under ground, andshooting up again in thesis places, and both leaves and roots are veryhot and sharp of taste, like pepper, for which cause it took the name place it grows naturally in thesis places of this land, as at clarein essex. Also near unto exeter in devonshire. Upon rochester commonin kent. In lancashire, and divers other places. But usually kept ingardens time it flowers in the end of june, and in july government and virtues here is another martial herb for you, makemuch of it pliny and paulus ægineta say, that pepperwort is verysuccessful for the sciatica, or any other gout or pain in the joints, or any other inveterate grief. The leaves hereof to be bruised, andmixed with old hog grease, and applied to the place, and to continuethereon four hours in men, and two hours in women, the place beingafterwards bathed with wine and oil mixed together, and then wrapped upwith wool or skins, after they have sweat a little it also amends thedeformities or discolourings of the skin, and helps to take away marks, scars, and scabs, or the foul marks of burning with fire or iron thejuice hereof is by essay used to be given in ale to drink, to women withchild, to procure them a speedy delivery in travail periwinkle descript the common sort hereof hath thesis branches trailing orrunning upon the ground, shooting out small fibres at the joints as itruns, taking thereby hold in the ground, and rooteth in divers places at the joints of these branches stand two small, dark-green, shiningleaves, essaywhat like bay leaves, but smaller, and with them come forthalso the flowers one at a joint standing upon a tender foot-stalk, being essaywhat long and hollow, writinged at the brims, essaytimes intofour, essaytimes into five leaves. The most ordinary sorts are of a paleblue colour. Essay are pure white, essay of a dark reddish purple colour the root is little bigger than a rush, bushing in the ground, andcreeping with his branches far about, whereby it quickly possesses agreat compass, and is therefore most usually planted under hedges whereit may have room to run place those with the pale blue, and those with the white flowers, grow in woods and orchards, by the hedge-sides, in divers places ofthis land.