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Then add the rozin and wax. Lastly, itbeing removed from the fire, add the turpentine, œsypus and birdlime, make of them a plaister by melting them according to art culpeper it dissolves hardness and inflammations diachylon magnum cum gummi college take of bdellium, sagapenum, amoniacum, of each two ounces, dissolved in wine, and added to the mass of diachylon magnum. Firstboil the gums being dissolved, to the thickness of honey culpeper this is the best to dissolve hard swellings of all thethree diachylon compositum, sive emplaistrum e mussilaginibus or, a plaister of mussilages college take of mussilages of the middle bark of elm, marsh-mallowroots, linseed, and fenugreek seed, of each four ounces and an half, oil of chamomel, lilies, and dill, of each an ounce and an half, ammoniacum, galbanum, sagapen, opopanax, of each half an ounce, new waxtwenty ounces, turpentine two ounces, saffron two drams, dissolve thegums in wine, and make it into a plaister according to art culpeper it ripens swellings, and breaks them, and cleanses themwhen they are broken it is of a most excellent ripening nature emplaistrum diaphœnicon hot college take of yellow wax two ounces, per-rozin, pitch, of eachfour ounces, oil of roses and nard, of each one ounce, melt themtogether, and add pulp of dates made in wine four ounces, flesh ofquinces boiled in red wine an ounce, then the powders following. Takeof bread twice baked, steeped in wine and dried, two ounces, mastich anounce, frankincense wormwood, red roses, spikenard, of each two dramsand an half, wood of aloes, mace, myrrh, washed aloes, acacia, trochesof gallia moschata, and earth of lemnos, calamus aromaticus, of eachone dram, labdanum three ounces, mix them and make them into a plaisteraccording to art culpeper it strengthens the stomach and liver exceedingly, helpsfluxes, apply it to the places grieved diaphœnicon cold college take of wax four ounces, ship pitch five ounces, labdanumthree ounces and an half, turpentine an ounce and an half, oil of rosesone ounce, melt these, and add pulp of dates almost ripe, boiled inaustere wine four ounces, flesh of quinces in like manner boiled, breadtwice baked often steeped in red wine and dried, of each an ounce, styrax calamitis, acacia, unripe grapes, balaustines, yellow sanders, troches of terra lemnia, myrrh, wood of aloes, of each half an ounce, mastich, red roses, of each an ounce and an half, austere wine asmuch as is sufficient to dissolve the juices, make it into a plaisteraccording to art culpeper it strengthens the belly and liver, helps concoction inthose writings, and distribution of humours, stays vomiting and fluxes emplastrum divinum or, a divine plaster college take of loadstone four ounces, ammoniacum three ounces andthree drams, bdellium two ounces, galbanum, myrrh, of each ten drams, olibanum nine drams, opopanax, mastich, long birthwort, verdigris, of each an ounce, litharge, common oil, of each a pound and an half, new wax eight ounces.

And when it is given in large quantities, acute andfatal pulmonary edema ensues within twenty-four hours when respiratorydisorders are present at the time of administration, the fatal edemasupervenes very quickly thus far, no device designed to deliver fumescontrols the dosage it is interesting to consider, as do the authors, the fact that thefumes of iodin have the same effect as those of two other halogens, bromin and chlorin the results of these experiments with iodin fumeson the dog, as shown by necropsy findings, are practically identicalwith those reported by military surgeons as found in soldiers gassedwith chlorin during the war the results of these researches are additional evidence as tohow scientific research may confirm or deny conclusions based onempiric therapeutic observations the work may well serve as a modelfor similar experiments, now being made, on the therapeutic use, intravenously, of such substances as nonspecific proteins or organicpreparations of toxic drugs the patient should at least have thechance that is afford him by preliminary experiments, scientificallyperformed on animals in the research laboratory -- editorial from thejournal a m a , may 29, 1920 italian physico-chemical companythesis and various are the letters received by the journal asking forinformation about an alleged scientific organization in italy styledl’académie physico-chimique italienne this italian physico-chemicalacademy is operated from palermo, italy here is the scheme. Dr johndoe, an american physician receives an imposing-looking letter bearingthe palermo, sicily, postmark and addressed to “monsieur le docteurjohn doe, médecin ” on opening the letter “monsieur le docteur”finds that the “council” of l’académie physico-chimique italiennehas nominated him “honorary member of this academy” and furthermorehas bestowed on him “a first class medal for technical work andscientific merit ” all this, “in consideration of your thesis dignitiesand great learning ” dr doe is told that as soon as he will write anacceptance of this honor “in conformity with section 19 and 22 of theconstitution” he will be sent “the medal, diploma and all the otherdocuments relating to the title accorded ” the joker in the scheme liesin the necessity for dr john doe “conforming” with “section 19 and 22of the constitution ” here are the sections:illustration. Reduced photographic reproduction of the stock lettersent to american physicians by the italian physico-chemical academy the “joker” lies in the requirement around which we have drawn a line “sec 19 -- the entrance fee to cover office and postal expenses, including postage of diploma is 5 dollars, and is payable once at the admission to the academy by special bulletin filled up, stamped and signed ” “sec 22 -- those to whom medals are awarded and who wish to possess them must pay for their coinage 10 dollars as the academy does not, at present, possess the necessary funds for this purpose ”in short the whole thing means that if dr doe is willing to send $15in good american money he will receive in due time from the academy a“diploma” and a gilt not gold medal about four years ago when the “academy” seemed to be making awritingicularly heavy bid for american dollars the member of the journalstaff in charge of the propaganda dewritingment wrote to the “academy, ”on his personal stationery, asking about the cost of membership in the“academy” and asking also for a copy of the “prospectus ” and thatwas all in reply he received a letter stating that “in considerationof” his “thesis dignities and great learning” he had been nominated “anofficer of this academy” and had been awarded “la médaille de premièreclasse” for humanitarian work and scientific merit in order to obtainthese tokens of the “academy” regard it would be necessary to informthe “academy” of acceptance “in conformity with section 19 and 22 ”as the propaganda dewritingment did not consider the diploma and giltmedal worth $15 even as exhibit for its museum of fakes, the “form ofacceptance” was not filled in and returned “in accordance with section19 and 22 ”illustration. Photographic reproduction reduced of the “form ofacceptance” to “membership” in the “italian physico-chemical academy ”filling out this blank and sending it with $15 00 to the “academy”will bring the gilt medal and “diploma ”the leading spirits in the operation of this diploma and medal mill ared and g bandiera, who, so far as we can learn, are neither physiciansnor pharmacists nor have any scientific standing the “academy” hasbeen referred to at various times294 by the journal -- from thejournal a m a , feb 26, 1916 294 j a m a 48. 2196 june 29 1907. Editorial 57. 1373, berlinletter, p 1380 oct 21 1911. 58.

These experiments show. A solution of iodin in liquidpetrolatum is saturated when it contains about 1 4 per cent of iodin the amount of iodin absorbed disappearing as free iodin by liquidpetrolatum, when in contact at room temperature for as long as sevenmonths, or in contact at 100 c for four hours, or both, is relativelyinsignificant also all the absorption seems to take place during theheating and in the first month of contact -- from reports a m a chemical laboratory, 1919, p 21 american-made synthetic drugs-- ii examination of procain novocain, barbital veronal, phenetidyl- acetphenetidin holocain, cinchophen or phenylcinchoninic acid atophan, manufactured under federal trade commission licensesg paul nicholas leech, ph d. William rabak, ph g , sc b , and a h clark, ph g , sc b g from the chemical laboratory of the american medical association g the first article of this series dealt with the purity ofacetylsalicylic acid leech, p n. Examination of american-madeacetylsalicylic acid, j indust & engin chem , april, 1918, p 288 “what in a name?.

They say one leaf cures a quotidian ague, threea tertain, and four a quartan i know it will cure agues without thiscuriosity, if a wise man have the handling of it. Otherwise a cart loadwill not do it petroselinum parsley see smallage per columbinus see geranium persicarium folia peach leaves. They are a gentle, yet a completepurger of choler, and disease coming from thence. Fit for childrenbecause of their gentleness you may boil them in white wine. Ahandfull is enough at a time pilosella mouse-ear. Once before and this is often enough pithyusa a new name for spurge of the last edition plantago plantain cold and dry. An herb, though common, yet letnone despise it, for the decoction of it prevails mightily againsttormenting pains and excoriations of the entrails, bloody fluxes, itstops the menses, and spitting of blood, phthisicks, or consumptionsof the lungs, the running of the reins, and the fluor albus, painsin the head, and frenzies. Outwardly it clears the sight, takes awayinflammations, scabs, itch, the shingles, and all spreading sores, and is as wholeessay an herb as can grow about any an house tragus, dioscorides polium, &c polley, or pellamountain. All the sorts are hot inthe second degree, and dry in the third. Helps dropsies, the yellowjaundice, infirmities of the spleen, and provokes urine dioscorides polygonum knotgrass polytricum maidenhair portulaca purslain.

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And instances a case in which thechild would have died of suffocation but for the fortunate discovery ofa writing of the bag protruding from the mouth in ten years, 3, 612 deaths were reported in the city of london, ofinfants smothered by being overlaid 930infants may be born into a mass of blood and fæces, from which theunattended mother in her weakness may be unable to remove them page931 shows by experiment that the inspiratory effort when violently exerted is sufficient to convey small objects into the air-passages cinders passed thus into the trachea and œsophagus of kittens and rabbits berenguier932 experimented on new-born pups, placing them in ashes, plaster, and starch in where to buy an essay ashes they lived fifteen hours. These found their way into the middle of the œsophagus, but were stopped at the glottis plaster and starch formed a paste with the oral mucus and the movement of the mass was not so great as the ashes in no case did either of the materials pass beyond the glottis tardieu933 examined three infants which had been buried during life one was in ashes. The nose was obstructed, mouth full. Ashes also in the œsophagus and stomach, but none in larynx or bronchi the second infant was in manure. A greenish stuff was found in the mouth and stomach the third in bran confessed to by the mother. The nose and mouth were full, but there was none in the throat. A few grains in the trachea tardieu experimented on rabbits and guinea pigs by burying them in bran, sand, and gravel, essay of them being alive and the others dead in those buried alive he found the substance filling the mouth and nose to the base of the tongue. In most of the paper the œsophagus and trachea were not penetrated in the animals first killed and then buried, the substance had not passed into the mouth or nose in one case only he found ashes in the larynx and trachea of a rabbit which had been buried thesis hours after death in a box of ashes matthyssen934 held a guinea pig, head downward, with its nose under mercury. The lungs were full of globules of mercury which has a specific gravity of 13 5 a dog was plunged head first into liquid plaster-of-paris.