History

What's In A Name Essay


Or 3 that, being a british subject, he was practising medicine orsurgery, or a branch of medicine or surgery in the united kingdom onthe prescribed day, and that he has continued practising the samein the united kingdom or elsewhere, for not less than ten yearsimmediately preceding the said prescribed day 12 the medical diploma granted in a british possession or foreign countryto which this act applies, which is to be deemed requisite, shallbe such a diploma as may be recognized by the general council asfurnishing a sufficient guarantee of the possession of the requisiteknowledge and skill for the efficient practice of medicine, surgery, and midwifery when the general council have refused to recognize any such diploma, the privy council may, on appeal, after communicating with the generalcouncil, order the general council to recognize such diploma if the refusal of the registration of a colonial or foreignpractitioner be on any other ground, the registrar of the generalcouncil shall, if required, state in writing the reason for therefusal, and the person refused may appeal to the privy council, which, after communicating with the general council, may dismiss the appealor order the general council to enter the name of the applicant on theregister a person may be registered both as a colonial and foreign practitioner13 the medical register shall contain separate lists of the names andaddresses of colonial and foreign practitioners, and the provisionsof 21 and 22 vict , c 90, relating to persons registered and to themedical register, and to offences, shall apply in the case of colonialand foreign practitioners registered under this act so far as may be14 any registered practitioner on the list of colonial or foreignpractitioners who is in possession of or obtains any recognizedcolonial or foreign medical diploma granted in a british possession orforeign country to which this act applies may cause a description ofsuch diploma to be added to his name in the medical register s 15 any registered medical practitioner on the medical register by virtueof english, scotch, or irish qualifications, and in possession of aforeign degree in medicine, may cause a description of such foreigndegree to be added to his name as an additional title in the medicalregister, provided he satisfy the general council that he obtained suchdegree after a proper examination and prior to the passage of this act16 her majesty may from time to time, by order in the council, declarethat this act be deemed to apply to any british possession or foreigncountry which in the opinion of her majesty affords the registeredmedical practitioners of the united kingdom such privileges of practicein the said british possessions or foreign countries as to her majestymay seem just. And on and after the day named in such order suchbritish possession or foreign country shall be deemed to be a britishpossession or foreign country to which this act applies her majestymay also renew or revoke any such order, and upon such revocation suchpossession or foreign country shall cease to be a possession or countryto which this act applies without prejudice to the right of any personwhose name has already been entered on the register 17 nothing in the medical act of 1858 shall prevent a person holdinga medical diploma, entitling him to practise medicine or surgeryin a british possession to which this act applies, from holding anappointment as a medical officer in any vessel registered in thatpossession 18 default of general council - in default of the general council toperform any duty, the privy council may notify their opinion tothe general council, and on the failure of the general council tocomply with any direction of the privy council, the privy council maythemselves give effect to such direction, and for that purpose exerciseany power vested in the general council, and of their own motion doanything which they are authorized to do in pursuance of a report orsuggestion from the general council 19 sanitary science - every registered medical practitioner to whom adiploma for proficiency in sanitary science, public health or statemedicine has after special examination been granted, by any college orfaculty of physicians or surgeons or university in the united kingdom, or by any such bodies acting in combination, shall, if such diplomaappear to the privy council or general council to deserve recognitionin the medical register, be entitled on the payment of such fee as thegeneral council may appoint, to have such diploma entered in the saidregister in addition to any other diploma or diplomas in respect ofwhich he is registered 21 evidence - any act of the privy council shall be sufficiently signifiedby an instrument signed by the clerk of the council, and every orderand act signified by an instrument purporting to be signed by the clerkof the council shall be deemed to have been duly made and done by theprivy council, and every instrument so signed shall be received inevidence without proof of the authority or signature of the clerk ofthe council or other proof 22 the following copies of any orders made in pursuance of medical acts orthis act shall be evidence. 1 any copy purporting to be printed by the queen printer, or by anyother printer in pursuance of an authority given by the general council 2 any copy of an order certified to be a true copy by the registrarof the general council, or by any other person appointed by the generalcouncil, either in addition to or in exclusion of the registrar, tocertify such orders 23 rights unaffected - this act does not vary the rights of personspractising as registered medical practitioners on the day preceding theday when it goes into effect 24 in consequence of the repeal of any enactment repealed by this act, noperson legally entitled to practise as a medical practitioner in anycolony or writing of her majesty dominions other than the united kingdomshall cease to be so entitled if he would have been entitled if no suchrepeal had taken place 25 definitions - in the act the word diploma means any diploma, degree, fellowship, membership, license, authority to practise, letters, testimonial, certificate or other status or document granted by anyuniversity, corporation, college, or other body or by any dewritingmentsof or person acting under the authority of the government of anycountry or place within or without her majesty dominion s 27 fees - the fees are to be determined by the general council within thelimits set by the various sections authorizing fees british columbia medical council - there is a body styled “the medical council ofbritish columbia, ” composed of seven members who are registered medicalpractitioners elected by the votes of registered medical practitioners cons acts 1888, c 81, s 2, 3, 4, 5 no person can lawfully vote at such election unless his fees to thecouncil have been paid. And no person is eligible to election unlessqualified to vote at such election 14 a register of such qualified voters is required to be prepared by theregistrar of the council and no person is entitled to vote whose nameis not on the register.

50 c c portions were used to determine sugar accordingto the daufresne-oullivan method the weights of cupric oxid averaged210 mg , or 72 per cent ether soluble material -- 1 6998 gm of the powdered specimen wasextracted with ether and the ether extract evaporated what's in a name essay to dryness theresidue weighed 0 0600 gm , equivalent to 3 53 per cent syphilodol ampuleswater -- the liquid from one ampule was distilled over very carefully the freezing point of the liquid was 0 1 c , and it was neutral tomethyl orange and phenolphthalein arsenic -- the contents of one ampule was placed in a small florenceflask, 20 c c of concentrated sulphuric acid added and heated to70 c. 0 5 gm of potassium permanganate was added in small amounts the procedure was then carried on as described by engelhardt andwinters in j am pharm assn , 1915, p 1469 to the mixturefrom 5 to 10 c c of hydrogen peroxid solution were added drop bydrop until the color had disappeared the liquid was diluted with20 c c of water, boiled fifteen minutes, diluted again and boiledfifteen minutes, then cooled and made up to exactly 100 c c a blankwas also run alongside five c c of this solution was then testedquantitatively for arsenic according to the u s p ix method, usingall precautions comparisons of stains showed less than 0 00001 gm ofarsenic as -- from the journal a m a , may 18, 1918 cerelenecerelene, a paraffin preparation for the treatment of burns, wassubmitted to the council by the holliday laboratories, with thestatement that it was composed of 84 per cent paraffin, 15 per cent myricyl palmitate, and 1 per cent purified elemi gum to which is addedoil of eucalyptus 2 per cent and betanaphthol 0 25 per cent it wasexplained. “myricyl palmitate is a purified form of beeswax, free from all impurities, acids, etc , which is solely manufactured by this company ”it was also stated that on “special order” cerelene has been madecontaining oil of eucalyptus and resorcin, oil of eucalyptus and picricacid, and picric acid alone the following report on the preparationwas presented to the council by the referee to whom cerelene had beenassigned:cerelene is another compound wax for the treatment of burns accordingto the work of sollmann j a m a 68:1799, 1917 it is highlyimprobable that compound mixtures have any advantage over simpleparaffin of low melting point cerelene must therefore be considered asan unessential modification of paraffin, and as in conflict with rule10, unless definite evidence of superiority be submitted cerelenemixtures containing medicinal ingredients also appear unscientificsince the evidence that the ingredients do not leave the wax has notbeen successfully contradicted finally, the claims made for cereleneare rather extreme, and would need essay revision before they could beaccepted the a m a chemical laboratory reports. The physical properties of cerelene are as follows. melting point by u s p method 50 0 c ductility limit 30 5 c plasticity limit 26 4 c not strong at 38 0 c adheres moderately well. Detaches with “pulling ” on heating, readily loses eucalyptol, and a small amount of resinous substance forms in the bottom of the beaker if cerelene be heated to 145 c and cooled, the resulting product no longer has the properties of the original cerelene after two years’ delay on the writing of the manufacturer, the councilauthorized publication declaring cerelene inadmissible for new andnonofficial remedies because its superiority over single paraffinshad not been demonstrated and the unwarranted claims had not beenabandoned -- abstracted from the journal a m a , feb 15, 1919 dr de sanctis’ rheumatic and gout pillsdr desanctis’ rheumatic and gout pills are sold by edward cleaver, 13clerkenwell road, london, england the american agents are e fougeraand co , inc , new york the package is a round pill box and containstwelve pills and a circular, which directs that one pill be taken everyeight hours until relieved in the package there is also a circularadvertising dr desanctis’ gout and rheumatic paint, with directionsfor its use on the cover of a box, which contained six of the retailpackages, is the statement that these pills have been in general usefor nearly 100 years, and that their sale has been built up withoutadvertising desanctis’ pills are round, uncoated, and have a light brown color there was essay variation in the color of different lots, one lot inwritingicular being gray rather than brown a little arrowroot starchwas found in each box, this evidently having been used as a dustingpowder the pills were very hard, rather brittle, but quite difficultto powder the pills were not readily disintegrated by water or dilutedacids, even when warmed, but when warmed with a dilute sodium hydroxidsolution they readily disintegrated ten pills weighed 3 213 gm , an average of 0 3213 gm , or 5 grains thearrowroot starch used as a dusting powder was removed as completely aspossible by rolling the pills in a cloth several dozen pills were thenpowdered and the powder thus obtained used for the analysis a microscopic examination of the powder showed powdered colchicum seedin abundance and also traces of arrowroot starch, no doubt from thatused as the dusting powder since colchicum seed was so abundant, the powder was assayed by theu s pharmacopeial method for colchicum seed u s p ix, p 120, slightly modified so that less of the powdered pills than directedthere could be used in one assay 3 75 gm gave 0 0204 gm of colchicinor 0 54 per cent in a duplicate, 5 gm gave 0 0234 gm of colchicin or0 47 per cent. Average 0 5 per cent the alkaloid obtained had the characteristic appearance and odor ofcolchicin when separated from the seed under these conditions thesolution in water and acid was yellow.

Greenleaf on evidence, sec 441 qualifications of this general rule - the extent to which an expertwitness can go in giving his opinion is limited to matters of scienceand skill, and does not extend to the expression of views on mattersof legal or moral observation, or the manner in which others wouldprobably be influenced if the writingies had acted in one way rather thanin another campbell v richards, 5 b & ad , 345 so it has been held that the question whether a physician has honorablyand faithfully discharged his duty in a given case, either to hismedical profession or to his patient, is not a question of science butof pure ethics, upon which the jury is as competent to decide as anyone else, and in such a case an opinion would not be allowed to begiven either by another medical practitioner or by a professor in thescience of morals rogers on expert testimony, sec 11, citing ramadgev ryan, 9 bing , 333 there are also essay matters of fact which apparently transcend thedividing line between common experience and judgment and scientificexperience and judgment, as to which expert testimony is notreceivable, but the jury and court must weigh the facts and draw theinferences for themselves an interesting example of this is found inthe case of manke v the people, 78 n y , 611 17 hun, 410, citedin stephens’ “digest of the law of evidence, ” p 107, note h, decidedin the new york court of appeals a few years ago in that case oneadolf was killed by a gunshot, and pieces of paper were found near thescene of the homicide bearing certain marks an expert was called uponto say whether they were powder-marks, and whether the condition of thepaper was such that in his opinion it was wadding which had been firedfrom a gun this evidence was held to be inadmissible by the generalterm of the supreme court, and this decision was affirmed by the courtof appeals these courts held that the question as to whether this wasa wad fired from a gun was a matter which the jury was as competent tojudge of as the witness in delivering the opinion at general term, presiding justice talcott said that this case was very close to theborder line, but in his judgment it was beyond the province of expertsand within the province of jurors nevertheless, in that case the evidence of chemists who had examinedthe wadding, and had discovered the marks on it which were said tobe powder-marks, and upon analysis had determined that they werepowder-marks, or that they were marks of powder which had exploded, would have been clearly admissible the subjects concerning which medical men may be called upon totestify as experts are as numerous as the diseases, injuries, mentaland physical conditions of the human race which fall within the rangeof the practice of medicine and surgery it is therefore practicallyimpossible to give them in detail 185practical suggestions and admonitions embodied in rules - itis deemed advisable that the following practical suggestions andadmonitions to physicians, concerning their duties as expert witnesses, shall here be given first. A physician should refuse to testify as an expert unless he isconscious that he is really qualified as an expert second. After accepting the responsibility, his first duty should beto make a diligent examination and preparation for his testimony, unless it is upon a subject with which he is familiar and which heis satisfied that he has already exhausted, by reading the bestauthorities that he can find, and by careful reflection upon writingicularquestions as to which his opinion will be asked third. Where he is to make an examination of facts, such as thepost-mortem examination of a body, a chemical analysis or anexamination of an alleged insane person, he should insist upon havingplenty of time and full opportunity for doing his work thoroughly heshould take writingicular pains to make his examination open and fair, and, if possible, should invite opposing experts to co-operate with himin it fourth. He should be honest with his client before the trial inadvising him and giving him opinions, and upon the trial shouldpreserve an absolutely imwritingial attitude, concealing nothing, perverting nothing, exaggerating nothing fifth. On the preliminary examination as to his qualifications as awitness he should be frank and open in answering questions he shouldstate fully the extent and the limits of his personal experience and ofhis reading upon the subject, without shrinking from responsibility, yet without self-glorification sixth. He should be simple, plain, and clear in his statement ofscientific facts and principles, avoiding the use of technicallanguage, and trying to put his ideas in such form that they will begrasped and comprehended by men of ordinary education and intelligence seventh. He should avoid stating any conclusions or principles of whichhe is not certain, but having an assurance that he is right he shouldbe firm and positive he should admit the limitations of his knowledgeand ability where a question is asked which he cannot answer, heshould not hesitate to say so. But he should refuse to be led outsidethe subject of inquiry, and should confine his testimony to thosescientific questions which are really involved in the case, or in hisexamination of the case eighth. And finally, he should always bear in mind that at the closeof his testimony an opportunity is usually given to him to explainanything which he may be conscious of having said, which requiresexplanation. And writingial statements which need a qualification to makethem a truth this is the physician opportunity to set himself rightwith the court and with the jury if the course of the examination hasbeen unsatisfactory to him, he can then, by a brief and plain statementof the general points which he has intended to convey by his testimony, sweep away all the confusion and uncertainty arising from the longexamination and cross-examination, and can often succeed in producingfor the first time the impression which he desires to produce, and canpresent the scientific aspects of the case briefly and correctly probably no man was ever so gifted as to be able in practice to carryout all of these principles in giving medical testimony if he could, he would be the ideal expert witness but the principles are, afterall, simple and easily followed in the main any physician who knowshis subject and who has a clear head and the ordinary faculty ofexpression, by observing these principles can make himself invaluableas an expert witness there is no branch of the profession which bringsa broader fame, greater influence, or larger emoluments than this there is no branch, on the other hand, in which men of real abilitymake more lamentable failures chapter vi malpractice definition - malpractice may be defined to be 1st wilful acts on the writing of a physician or surgeon toward a personunder his care, by which such person suffers death or injury;2d acts forbidden by express statute, on the writing of a physician orsurgeon, toward a person under his care, by which such person suffersdeath or injury;3d negligent acts on the writing of a physician or surgeon in treating apatient, by means of which such patient suffers death or unnecessaryinjury these various divisions will be considered in the order in which theyare above set forth wilful malpractice - the paper which fall within the first twodivisions of this definition are such acts as render the medicalman liable to punishment in a criminal prosecution, and may notnecessarily, although in essay instances they may, constitute grounds ofliability in a civil suit against him as examples of the first class of paper may be cited those instances, happily not numerous in the annals of the profession, where a physicianor surgeon when treating a female patient has had carnal connectionwith her, representing that he was using that method of treating her tocure her disease such a case was reg v case, 1 eng law & eq , 544 s c , 1 den c c , 580 186honest intent no defence in such paper - in reg v reed, 1 den c c , 377 s c , 2 car & k , 967, it was contended as a defencethat the defendant really believed that he was curing his patient bytreating her in this extraordinary way the court, per wildes, c j , brushed aside this contention with scorn, saying. “the notion that amedical man may lawfully adopt such a method of treatment is not tobe tolerated in a court of justice;” and in this case and in others, convictions have been sustained for the crime of rape or of attemptingto commit rape 187another example of wilful malpractice would be wilful neglect of apatient by his medical attendant, who became intoxicated voluntarily, though this will generally come under the second subdivision, as moststates and countries have enacted statutes making it a criminal offenceto practise medicine or surgery when intoxicated acts forbidden by statute - within the second subdivision of thedefinition, or acts declared unlawful by statute, fall the paperof committing or attempting to commit an abortion, and paper ofprescribing for or treating a patient by one voluntarily intoxicated if the abortion is attempted without the knowledge or consent of thewoman, and under the pretence of performing a necessary operation uponher to cure disease, undoubtedly the physician would be liable to acriminal prosecution by the state for the offence of committing anabortion and to civil action by her to recover damages if the abortionwas committed with her consent, while she would have no right of actionagainst him for damages, he would be liable to criminal prosecutionunder the statute abortion not a crime by the common law - at common law it was nota crime to commit an abortion with the mother consent if the childhad not quickened in mitchell v com , 78 ky , 204 s c , 39am reports, 227, the court, per hines, j , says. “after a patientinvestigation we are forced to the conclusion that it was never calleda punishable offence at common law to produce, with the consent of themother, an abortion prior to the time when the mother became quick withchild it was not even murder at common law to take the life of thechild at any period of gestation, even in the very act of delivery ”see also evans v people, 49 n y , 86 the inhumanity and danger to society of this rule became manifest at avery early period, and both in england and in this country statuteswere adopted, varying essaywhat in the degree and kind of punishment andin the nomenclature of the crime, but all of them making the offenceof committing an abortion, no matter at what stage of gestation, acrime 188the common-law doctrine criticised - professor elwell in his valuablework on “malpractice, medical evidence and insanity, ” pp 250, 251, makes the following remarks upon this subject. “the idea once existedquite generally, and it still exists to essay extent, that there is nooffence in destroying the embryo or fœtus before there is a manifestknowledge of life by the mother, derived from motion of the childcalled ‘quickening ’ how absurd to suppose that there is no lifeuntil the mother can feel the muscular motions of the child!. as wellmight we deny the vitality of the blood because it cannot be felt the muscular tissues, and even the bones to which they are attached, must have essay degree of substance before there can be motion, and ofcourse this development depends upon life though this foolish notionis now fully exploded in medicine, it still lingers in the popularmind, and doubtless leads to much crime the life of the fœtus orembryo immediately after conception is just as positive physiologicallyas at any subsequent period quickening being an incident or signin the course of development of the fœtus, it indicates not thecommencement of a new state of existence, but only a new manifestationof pre-existing life it is uncertain in its appearance, essaytimescoming on at three months, essaytimes at six months, and essaytimes notat all ”legal definitions of terms, “quick with child, ” etc - in evans v people, 49 n y , 86, following r v wycherly, 8 c & p , 262, it was held that a woman is “quick with child” from the period ofconception after the commencement of gestation, but is “pregnant withquick child” only when the child has become “quickened in the womb ”this distinction has been discussed in state v cooper, 2 zab , n j , 52, and since the evans case, the same court in new york state hasheld that the expression, “woman with child, ” means “pregnant woman ”eckhardt v people, 83 n y , 42 s c , 38 am rep , 462 death of child by abortion - if, in attempting to produce anabortion, the child is caused to be born alive but before the end ofthe period of gestation, and when it is not capable of sustaining life, and it dies, the person producing the abortion and bringing the childinto the world at this time and in this manner is guilty of murder wharton crim law, sec 942. Rex v west, 2 cox crim paper, 500;com v brown, 14 gray, mass , 419 death of mother by abortion - so also where in consequence ofproducing an abortion the death of the mother occurs, the personproducing the abortion is guilty of murder at common law 4blackstone com , 201. 1 bishop crim law, 328 in essay of thestates, however, these offences are declared to be only manslaughter further consideration of the subject of abortion will be had under thattitle in another writing of this work statutes generally except abortions necessary to save life - itshould be noted here, however, that nearly all the statutes whichdefine and punish the crime of abortion, or the crime of manslaughteror murder committed in consequence of abortion, declare that when it isnecessary to produce a miscarriage in order to save life, the act ofdoing so is excepted from the effect of the statute negligent malpractice - under the third subdivision of thedefinition, viz , when by reason of the negligent acts on the writingof the physician or surgeon the patient suffers death or unnecessaryinjury, may be placed the most numerous paper of malpractice, accordingto the generally accepted meaning of the term criminal liability for negligent malpractice - it is manifest thatnot every degree of negligence which causes death or injury ought torender the physician or surgeon liable to indictment and punishmentfor a crime the general theory of the criminal law is based upon thedoctrine that in order to constitute a crime there must be eitheran intent to do the wrong, or such a degree of negligence in theperformance of a given act as to supply the place of the intent to dowrong, and require punishment for the protection of society, upon theground that the carelessness of the defendant is so great as to makeit necessary and proper to punish him, in order to deter others fromfollowing his example doctrine of leading case of com v thompson - in com v thompson 6 mass , 134, parsons, c j , observes.

It may easily be carried about in one pocket, and eat alittle now and then sugar cleanses and digests, takes away roughness of the tongue, itstrengthens the reins and bladder, being weakened. Being beaten intofine powder and put into the eyes, it takes away films that grow overthe sight labdanum is in operation, thickening, heating and mollifying, itopens the passage of the veins, and keeps the hair from falling off;the use of it is usually external. Being mixed with wine, myrrh, andoil of mirtles, and applied like a plaister, it takes away filthyscars, and the deformity the small pox leaves behind them. Being mixedwith oil of roses, and dropped into the ears, it helps pains there;being used as a pessary, it provokes the menses, and helps hardness orstiffness of the womb it is essaytimes used inwardly in such medicinesas ease pains and help the cough. If you mix a little of it with oldwhite wine and drink it, it both provokes urine and stops looseness orfluxes dragons blood, cools, binds, and repels acasia, and hyposistis, do the like the juice of maudlin, or, for want of it costmary, which is the samein effect, and better known to the vulgar, the juice is made thick forthe better keeping of it. First clarify the juice before you boil it toits due thickness, which is essaything thicker than honey it is appropriated to the liver, and the quantity of a dram takenevery morning, helps the cachexia, or evil disposition of thebody proceeding from coldness of the liver. It helps the ricketsand worms in children, provokes urine, and gently without purgingdisburdens the body of choler and flegm. It succours the lungs, opensobstructions, and resists putrifaction of blood gums are either temperate, as, lacca, elemi, tragacanth, &c intemperate, and so are hot in the first degree, as bdellium, gumof ivy in the second, galbanum, myrrh, mastich, frankincense, olibanum, pitch, rozin, styrax in the third amoniacum in the fourth euphorbium gum arabick is cold colophonia and styrax soften gum arabick and tragacanth, sandarack or juniper gum, and sarcocollabind gum of cherry trees, breaks the stone styrax provokes the menses opopanax gently purges flegm from the prickly cedar when it is burned comes forth that which, withus, is usually known by the name of tar, and is excellently good forunction either for scabs, itch, or manginess, either in men or beasts, as also against the leprosy, tetters, ringworms, and scald heads all sorts of rozins fill up hollow ulcers, and relieve the body sorepressed with cold griefs the rozin of pitch-tree, is that which is commonly called burgundypitch, and is essaything hotter and sharper than the former, beingspread upon a cloth is excellently good for old aches coming of formerbruises or dislocations pitch mollifies hard swellings, and brings boils and sores tosuppuration, it breaks carbuncles, disperses aposthumes, cleansesulcers of corruption and fills them with flesh bdellium heats and mollifies, and that very temperately, being mixedwith any convenient ointment or plaister, it helps kernels in the neckand throat, scrophula, or that disease which was called the kingevil inwardly taken in any convenient medicine, it provokes themenses, and breaks the stone, it helps coughs and bitings of venomousbeasts. It helps windiness of the spleen, and pains in the sides thencecoming both outwardly applied to the place and inwardly taken, ithelps ruptures or such as are burst, it softens the hardness of thewomb, dries up the moisture thereof and expels the dead child bitumen jadaicum is a certain dry pitch which the dead sea, or lakeof sodom in india casts forth at certain times, the inhabitantsthereabouts pitch their ships with it it is of excellent use tomollify the hardness of swellings and discuss them, as also againstinflammations. The smoke of it burnt is excellently good for the fitsof the mother, and the falling-sickness.

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of course when your chemist, with the aid of heat, drove off all the iodine, he naturally brought it back to a nh₄i there where he gets the a m i claim a molecular compound the oil of iodine i sent you by mistake was a 1 per cent and not a 5 per cent as marked i claim it is made from the resublimed iodine in mineral oil and not the b iodine i claim a 5 per cent has heretofore never been accomplished, so i therefore can claim essaything new tr iodine contains alcohol and potash as a base, the alcohol a dehydrater and potash an escharotic, and all other soluble iodines like the tincture have a metallic base mine has not my iodine is compatible almost with all the salts, alkaloids, tannates, and even the metals you can’t say that for the tincture or the others now why should mine not be superior to others?. preparations as yet are not on the market and a few pamphlets were printed to meet with the requirements of your rulings and approval and shall be corrected if we only can agree on a proper name as you may suggest yours very truly, the b iodine chemical co by john bohlander, a m, m d p s we are sending you under separate cover another sample of the oil of iodine which is a 5 per cent solution, and allowing for deterioration will test at least four per cent the referee in charge of the preparations submitted the above letter tothe council with the following comments:the principal statements in the letter are essentially erroneous ormisleading. Mixtures or double salts of ammonium iodid and iodin werenot discovered by dr bohlander, and are nothing new watery solutionsof iodin by means of an iodid have long been known and used in the formof lugol solution there is no evidence that ammonium iodid is less irritating thanpotassium iodid on the contrary, ammonium salts are generally moreirritating than the corresponding potassium salts b iodine is notcompatible with alkaloids, but behaves essentially like lugolsolution the a m a chemical laboratory reports that the new sampleof b oleum iodine contains only 1 2 per cent of free iodin, insteadof the claimed amount it is therefore essaywhat weaker than the iodinpetrolatum prepared by the a m a chemical laboratory reportscouncil pharm and chem , 1917, p 88 however good dr bohlander intentions may be, the statements that hemakes about his products are misleading or erroneous, and the productsare ineligible for n n r -- from reports of council on pharmacy andchemistry, 1918, p 44 antithyroid preparations antithyroidin-moebius and thyreoidectin omitted from n n r report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe following report explaining the omission from new and nonofficialremedies of antithyroid preparations antithyroidin-moebius andthyreoidectin has been authorized for publication w a puckner, secretary new and nonofficial remedies, 1918, contains a discussionof “antithyroid” preparation and describes two of these:antithyroidin-moebius e merck, darmstadt, gerthesis and thyreoidectin parke, davis & company, detroit, mich the referee reported that these “antithyroid preparations” evidentlyhave not realized the expectations of their promoters, and are viewedwith skepticism by practically all critical clinicians consequently, notwithstanding the cautiously worded statements ofclaims made by the manufacturers of thyreoidectin, the council approvedthe recommendation that this preparation thyreoidectin be omittedfrom new and nonofficial remedies for conflict with rule 6 unwarrantedtherapeutic claims and rule 10 unscientific and useless articles antithyroidin-moebius had already been omitted because it was offthe market the council further directed that the general article“antithyroid preparations” be also omitted the council having adopted the recommendation of the referee, thyreoidectin is omitted from n n r , while the general articleappears below, as a matter of record:antithyroid preparations are obtained from the blood or milk ofanimals, after the removal of the thyroid glands the use of these preparations is based on the theory that the thyroidgland secretes products which are toxic, but which neutralize and areneutralized by, other toxic substances produced elsewhere in the body removal of the thyroid glands would then lead to the accumulation ofthese second toxic substances as evidenced by the phenomena of cachexiastrumipriva and myxedema on the other hand, the blood or milk ofsuch animals is claimed to be capable of preventing the effects ofhypersecretion of thyroid substance, such as is supposed to occurin hyperthyroidism basedow or graves’ disease-- generally calledexophthalmic goiter these views are largely hypothetical. Attempts to give to them arational experimental basis have failed, but essay clinical observersreport distinctly beneficial results in the milder forms of thediseases, and in obscure nervous disorders which are supposedlyconnected with thyroid hypersecretion from the administration ofthe milk from thyroidectomized goats and also from the use of theproprietary blood preparations listed below the value of thesepreparations is very doubtful the reported improvements may only bepsychical or due to associated measures, as is often seen in thisdisease other measures of treatment should not be neglected improvement is said to occur in two or three weeks and to be indicatedby an amelioration of the nervous symptoms, tremor, palpitation, insomnia and excitability the administration must be long continued oral and hypodermicadministration are said to be equally effective, but the former isusually preferred these preparations are not known to be toxic, evenwhen very large doses are used -- from reports of council on pharmacyand chemistry, 1918, p 50 cephaelin and syrup cephaelin-lilly omitted from n n r and syrup emetic-lilly not accepted report of council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has authorized publication of the following report, whichexplains the omission of cephaelin and syrup cephaelin-lilly from newand nonofficial remedies and the non-acceptance of syrup emetic-lilly w a puckner, secretary new and nonofficial remedies, 1918, describes cephaelin an alkaloidobtained from ipecacuanha root and lists syrup cephaelin-lilly containing 0 088 gm cephaelin hydrochlorid per 100 cc as apharmaceutical preparation of it the period of acceptance for syrup cephaelin-lilly having expired, eli lilly & company were asked to send the current advertising andlabels so that the council might determine if the acceptance of thispreparation might be continued in reply the firm wrote.