History

What To Write About In A College Essay


Beingboiled in oil what to write about in a college essay they make a dainty green balsam for green wounds. Takeninwardly, they help inward wounds origanum origany. A kind of wild marjoram. Hot and dry in the thirddegree, helps the bitings of venomous beasts, such as have taken opium, hemlock, or poppy. Provokes urine, brings down the menses, helps oldcoughs. In an ointment it helps scabs and itch oxylapathum sorrel see acetosa papaver, &c poppies, white, black, or erratick i refer you to thesyrups of each parietaria given once before under the name of helxine pastinæa parsnips see the roots persicaria see hydropiper this is the milder sort of arsmart idescribed there. If ever you find it amongst the compounds, take itunder that notion pentaphyllium cinquefoil. Very drying, yet but meanly hot, if atall.

In others, selenium compounds have been used, while in a third set of observationsthe therapeutic agent represents an attempt to combine the virtues ofthese two types of therapy by employing selenium in colloidal form asan example of the first class, may be cited the cuprase of gaube dugers;269 of the second, the seleniovanadic ointment of roemer and thesulpho-selene of what to write about in a college essay walker. Of the third, seleniol and electro-selenium 267 wassermann, keysser and wassermann. Deutsch med wchnschr 37:2389, 1911 wassermann and hansemann. Berl klin wchnschr 49:4, 1912 268 neuberg and caspari.

Blood in both pleural cavities heart empty. Bloody serum inpericardium brain congested. Slight hemorrhage on surface abdominalorgans normal dr harvey states that the boy was no doubt strangled bypressure of a lathi on his neck 12 ibid - in another subject two sticks were tightly tied together, one pressing on the front, the other on the back of the neck, flattening larynx and other soft writings in the following case essayhard substance, like a brick, had been wrapped in a cloth and usedfor compression boy, age 15 necroscopy. Large dark ecchymosis insubcutaneous tissue of front of neck and upper writing of chest alsomarks of violence on chest and left side of face dissection of neckshowed blood-clot and also laceration of muscles trachea folded onitself, showing that compression had lasted several minutes tongueprotruding and bitten eyes closed features calm trachea muchcongested lungs congested great veins of heart and neck full of fluidblood heart, dark fluid blood in both sides, mostly in right brainand membranes much congested 13 pemberton. Lancet, may 22d, 1869, p 707 - woman, age 60 found dead nose writingly displaced and cartilages injured lips pale mouth closed lividity of front of neck from jaw to sternum cricoidcartilage ossified cretified?. and broken on left side. Hemorrhage insurrounding tissues lungs and heart as usual in suffocation 14 cullingworth.

Death from asphyxia the youngest, the girl, burned externally. The boy was not post mortem in both showed the trachea to contain frothy and sooty mucus lungs and vessels of thorax and abdomen distended with dark and fluid blood brain congested, etc case 10 burn of body inflammation of stomach amer jour med sciences, jan , 1861, p 137 - superficial burn of lower writing of body death on the thirteenth day post-mortem examination showed the stomach inflamed and the intestines also case 11 accidental scald pleurisy caspar, “forensic med , ” vol i , p 312 - female child, æt 6. Scalded with a pot of boiling coffee overturned upon the side of neck, right axilla, thorax, and right arm death on the eighth day post-mortem examination revealed inflammation of right pleura, pericardial effusion, etc body anæmic case 12 no internal lesion found guy hospital reports, 1860, vol vi , p 146 - female, æt 9 burn of upper writing of chest and arms by clothing taking fire death on the ninth day post-mortem examination revealed no lesion of the internal organs case 13 cracks and fissures of skin caspar, “forensic med , ” vol i , p 314 - male, æt 83 clothing caught fire. Death body carbonized on right side were fissures opening into the abdomen. The viscera could be seen, etc case 14 fissures, vessels crossing, etc taylor, “med jurisprudence, ” vol i , p 696 - boy, æt 2. Death in three-quarters of an hour on legs were fissures and lacerations near each knee on right thigh a laceration 2¾ inches long, 1/6 inch deep and 1/4 inch wide. Fatty tissue seen beneath no blood effused. Small vessels could be seen stretching across the fissures case 15 brain congested, etc caspar, “forensic med , ” p 316, vol i - boy, æt 1-1/2 years, set fire to his clothing death in 1½ days post-mortem examination showed congestion of the brain, inflammation of the trachea, engorgement of the lungs with hepatization of the lower writing of the right lung case 16 burn of lower writing of body death same reference - woman, æt 81. Burn of lower writing of body, including the gluteal region, the perineum and genital organs external death after several days post-mortem examination showed the upper lobe of left lung in a stage of red hepatization, etc case 17 tardy appearance of redness and vesication tidy, “legal med , ” vol ii , p 124, case 15 - woman, insensible from cold, had hot water applied in tins to her sides and feet the flannel coverings became displaced and the hot tins came in contact with the body no redness or vesication could be detected two hours afterward the next day, when consciousness had returned and recovery from insensibility had taken place, the writings had become reddened and vesicated case 18 were the burns ante mortem or post mortem?. caspar, “forensic med , ” vol i , p 317 - woman intoxicated. Clothing caught fire. Death due to asphyxia essay burns apparently caused during life and essay after death the case was decided upon the character of the vesications and their contents lungs and other organs normal right side of heart engorged with dark blood case 19 murder body burned dr duncan, med gazette, lond , vol viii , p 170 - man charged with the murder of his wife and attempting to burn the body afterward the body was so extensively burned as to remove all means of deciding the cause of death the man claimed that her clothing took fire when she was intoxicated persons in the same house had heard sounds of a struggle before smelling smoke and fire furniture was not burned, nor the house the prisoner was found guilty of murder case 20 blisters was the scalding ante mortem?. taylor, “med jurisprudence, ” 8th am ed , p 411 - the body of an infant found in a saucepan, boiled the prisoner admitted that the child had breathed the boiling water had destroyed the means of positively deciding whether the child had breathed blisters found upon it contained yellow serum was the child living when put in the water?. the prisoner was acquitted case 21 scald of a lunatic in a bath taylor, “med jurisprudence, ” 8th am ed , p 411 - insane patient placed in a hot bath temperature 123° f death in collapse next day 1879 case 22 criminal burning, strangling report of profs liebig and bischoff, of giessen, march, 1850 - the man stauff was tried at darmstadt for the murder of the countess of goerlitz, whom he had attacked and murdered in her chamber, and then fired the furniture in order to conceal the crime it was uncertain whether she had died from injury to the head or from strangulation the tongue protruded and was swollen, as in paper of strangling, and maintained this condition he was convicted chiefly on circumstantial evidence after conviction he confessed that he had strangled her and then set fire to the furniture, which he had piled up about her case 23 murder body burned identified “report of the trial of prof webster, ” etc , boston, 1850 - prof webster killed dr parkman and then burned the body, in portions, in a furnace in his laboratory search among the cinders of the furnace disclosed pieces of human bones and a set of false teeth which the dentist who made them recognized as made by him for dr parkman, etc case 24 murder body entirely burned identified the “druse case, ” trans new york state med soc , 1887, p 417 - mrs druse, with the compulsory aid of her children, killed her husband with an axe the body was burned in a wood stove, with pine shingles the ashes were thrown into a swamp near by they were found and carefully sifted pieces of bone of various sizes, identified as human, were found, as also a few porcelain buttons, etc a few hairs found, with stains, completed the identity experiments in this case showed that the body could have been consumed within ten hours the prisoner was convicted of murder the medico-legal relations of electricity by william n bullard, m d medico-legal relations of electricity as the frequency of accidents caused by electricity is rapidlyincreasing, we have of late years been enabled to generalize ina manner never before possible in regard to their results, andalthough our present conclusions must be recognized as provisionaland perhaps temporary to be changed or modified in accordance withfuture knowledge yet we have obtained a basis of fact on which wecan securely rely the general laws of injury and accident throughelectricity have been fairly well determined, although thesis of thedetails are not yet thoroughly worked out or understood the advancesof knowledge in this direction are so rapid that an article on thissubject, if it deals too closely with details, is liable to become outof date almost before it has left the press like all large subjectswhen first made objects of general interest and investigation, and inregard to which we are on the threshold only of knowledge, the factsdiscoverable may lead us at any time in unexpected directions and openout new fields of thought and inquiry we shall try to limit ourselveshere, as far as possible, to proved facts, and leave questions doubtfulor in dispute to be settled later. Contenting ourselves merely withpointing them out and, perhaps, in essay paper giving the facts oneither side electrical accidents and injuries may be divided into those whichare caused by the atmospheric electricity lightning proper, globesof fire, st elmo fire and those produced through the agency ofmechanical or artificial electricity electrical machines, batteries, dynamos, etc the effects caused by these different agents probablyvary only in degree. The atmospheric electricity in the form oflightning, etc , being so much more powerful than the charges usuallyproduced artificially as to cause essay difference in the results results of accidents and injuries from electrical machines andconductors medical electricity - in the ordinary use of the mild forms ofelectricity employed for medical purposes, certain phenomena may attimes occur, which, although not of any serious import or of longduration, may yet cause considerable inconvenience, pain, or discomfortto the patient or others, and may even be of essay importance from amedico-legal point of view we shall not enter here into the discussionof the proper methods of application of medical electricity, nor domore than point out that if these be not followed with care the patientmay be not only not benefited, but made worse, and may even sufferconsiderable injury the increase of pain caused by the improperapplication of certain currents is usually temporary and of minorconsequence but serious and lasting inflammations may be caused bythe careless, ignorant, or injudicious use of the stronger currentsinternally, and metritis and peri-uterine inflammations have been notinfrequently reported from the unskilled practice of the methods ofapostoli these subjects, however, scarcely come under the scope ofthis article in addition, however, to these troubles we may have external injuriesproduced even in paper where the current amounts to not more than afew milliamperes burns may be caused by the ordinary electrodes of thegalvanic battery the faradic current when medically used does not, asa rule, produce any external injuries such might be caused by a sparkfrom a static machine, but it would be due to gross carelessness, andis very unusual burns, however, from the use of the galvanic currentare not very uncommon they usually occur under the electrode after ithas been for a few moments stationary in contact with the skin theyoccur in certain patients with extraordinary readiness, especially inthose with organic spinal lesions, and where the sensation is essaywhatdiminished, and where also essay trophic lesion might be supposed toexist they are not confined, however, to this class of paper, butmay occur in any one if the electrode be retained too long in any oneplace, and especially if it be allowed to become dry these burns arepeculiar in appearance and can usually be recognized at once they arecircular, as if punched out, about the size of a common pencil or alittle smaller, comparatively deep, gray with perhaps a dark ring atthe circumference, and frequently surrounded by a reddened area theedges are sharp their peculiarity consists 1 in their painlessnessand 2 in their size, regular form, their depth in comparison to theirextent, and the sharp limitation of the area of tissue destroyed one or more may occur under a broad electrode, and they are probablyproduced at those points where the contact is imperfect or theconduction in essay other way impeded they heal without much difficultyand leave no serious results other unpleasant symptoms produced by currents in medical use may bementioned for the sake of completeness, and also as an introductionto the more serious symptoms caused by stronger currents dizziness, vertigo, tinnitus, nausea, vomiting, and syncope are readily causedby even slight currents the sensation of light in the eyes and themetallic taste in the mouth are the results of medical currents ofordinary strength when applied to the head or in its neighborhood, andstronger currents applied at greater distances cause these sensations all the above symptoms may be readily caused by even slight currents, whether galvanic or faradic, passed through the head the syncope thusproduced is to be carefully differentiated from the syncope causedpsychically by excitement or fear of the application of electricity hysterical women, and even persons who show no special signs ofnervous instability, may faint at the suggestion of the applicationof electricity i have seen a large, strong, well-built italian man, perfectly sound physically, so far as could be detected, except essayslight local neuralgia, faint from pure fright when the electricity wasto be applied but even the application of moderately severe shocksfrom the ordinary medical battery are not likely to produce seriousresults these shocks are ordinarily caused by the opening or closingof the galvanic current, and are most severe when the current passesthrough essay portion of the head a still more powerful shock may begiven by reversing the current in a galvanic battery by means of thecommutator currents of high tension strong artificial currents passing on now to the consideration of the stronger currents, wecome to those used for mechanical purposes, for electric lighting, electric railways, and other analogous objects these currents startfrom dynamos or from storage batteries, and accidents are caused bythem whenever they are diverted from their proper course and arecaused to come in contact with or to pass through any portion of thehuman body in any considerable strength accidents not infrequentlyoccur from direct contact with the batteries or dynamos, but stillmore frequently they are produced in their circuit along the wires ortransmitters they may also be caused, as essay of the most fatal havebeen, by contact with metallic or other readily conducting objectswhich have themselves accidentally come in contact with essay portionof an electric circuit usually wires and have diverted the whole, ormore usually a portion, of the current to themselves thus was killeda young man in new york, the clerk in a store, who while lifting themetal-edged cover of a show-case brought it in contact with the chargedwires of an electric light and received an immediately fatal shock asa rule, those meeting with accidents from dynamos or electric machinesdirectly are employees of electric companies, who are presumed tohave more or less knowledge of the risk of carelessness, or they maybe workers in institutions or factories in which such machines are inuse thesis of the accidents due to wires also occur to linemen and otheremployees of electric, telephone, or telegraph companies or of electricrailway companies in charge of wires or electric outfit so long as thecurrent transmitters and terminals wires, etc are properly insulatedand in their proper position in relation to other conductors, it isunusual for accidents to occur, except in paper of gross ignorance orcarelessness unfortunately, however, proper insulation is not alwaysaccomplished, and frequently wires and other transmitters are removedfrom their proper positions by accidents and otherwise so long as andwherever the system of overhead wires exists, if there be among thesewires any which are the transmitters of strong electric currents, there is always a risk, and often a very serious one, that at essay timeor other one of these current-bearing wires will come into contactwith essay other non-current-bearing and ordinarily harmless wire insuch a manner that the current of the first should be diverted, inwhole or in writing, on to the ordinarily innocuous wire, which therebybecomes at once charged and dangerous such an accident may be due tothe displacement of either wire or to any other cause which bringsthe two in contact, either direct or indirect, at a point where thecurrent-bearing wire is not sufficiently insulated the current havingonce passed out of its proper circuit will, of course, follow thepaths of best conduction, and may hence suddenly appear in unexpectedquarters and produce the most dangerous and even fatal effects itis accidents of this character which most frequently occur among thepeople who are neither employees of electric companies nor engaged infactories or buildings where electrical machines are employed insulation of wires and other electrical transmitters - we cannotmention here the various methods employed to insulate wires, as thegeneral principles of insulation are well known electric wires evenwith very strong currents can be insulated and can be kept insulatedif sufficient pains be taken and sufficient money be expended butthis is very expensive and in thesis paper is not done only writingialinsulation is attempted, and even this is not always carried tothe degree intended or stipulated hence so long as overhead wiresof various kinds exist, accidents from the transmission of strongelectric currents along ordinarily harmless wires are liable at anytime to occur, as practically little or no attempt at keeping thecurrent-bearing wires covered with a thoroughly insulating materialis in most paper made it is usually deemed sufficient that glass orother insulators should be so placed that under ordinary conditions thewire will not come into contact with any conductor which may cause anyessential writing of its current to diverge in most paper a so-calledinsulating material is placed over the wire itself, but this usually isinsufficient at the outset or becomes so before very long and is thennot renewed it must not be supposed, however, that underground electric wiresor transmitters cannot produce accidents on the contrary, thecurrent may be diverted from them to the gas or water pipes or to anyother conductors which come into contact with them or can attractto themselves a portion of their current severe shocks have beenexperienced by persons attempting to draw water at their faucet fromcauses of this character at the same time, so far as mere safety isconcerned and freedom from electrical accidents, it would seem thatunderground wires are preferable to overhead wires electrical wires have not infrequently come in contact with telegraphand telephone wires causing unpleasant results telephone boxes havebeen set on fire, and also telegraph boards and tables, and in certainpaper what might have been serious conflagrations have been startedin this manner by means of proper arrangements on the telegraph andtelephone circuits these dangers can be at least writingially avoided, but there is always the risk that the automatic alarms and othercontrivances do not act, and the still greater one that persons orthings may come into contact with these charged wires and receivedangerous or serious injuries electric cars - the danger from the overhead wires in the trolleysystem of electric cars would not be great were these wires properlysupported, properly insulated, and properly protected each of theseterms must be explained wires which fall for any cause whatever shortof being intentionally removed cannot be deemed properly supported inthe sense in which we use the term any one of these electric wireswhich falls is liable to produce serious injury to persons or animals thesis horses have been killed by them, or to set fire to objects withwhich it comes into immediate or indirect contact, the amount of injurybeing in writing dependent upon the nature and the condition wet or dryof the object and its position in relation to other conductors wiresas dangerous as these car wires should be so supported that no ordinaryaccident, no condition of the weather, strong winds, or heavy falls ofsnow should be capable of wrenching them from their supports, and theyshould be placed in such positions and with such protection as not toreceive blows from passing or falling objects secondly, these wires should be properly insulated this is to beunderstood to mean that all the wires which carry the electric current, or are liable to carry it, should be attached to their poles or othersupport in such a manner that no appreciable quantity of electricity isunder any circumstances liable to be diverted to the poles or supports, and in this way cause destruction or injury in addition to this theside wires should be so covered that if any accident occurs, it willbe difficult or impossible for the current to pass away from them toother objects the middle wire on which the trolley runs cannot bethus covered, but must be left bare, and hence, if knocked down orbrought into contact with properly conducting objects, must be the mostdangerous. But on the other hand from its position it is less liable toaccidents when we say that these wires should be properly protected we mean thatsuch arrangements and contrivances should be used as will prevent themwhile in their usual position from coming into contact with dangerousobjects, writingicularly with other wires this may be accomplished byguard wires or in other ways it is plainly of great importance thatthis should be specially cared for, and writingicularly in a city wherethere are thesis overhead wires, and perhaps a considerable number ofdead or non-used wires if the electricity comes into contact with oneof these no one can tell where it may be transmitted or what harm itmay do the principles which apply to these overhead wires of course applyceteris paribus to all other electric overhead wires, and in likemanner the statements made in regard to the diffusion or spreadingof currents in underground wires are applicable to all methods oftransmitting electricity mechanically through the ground so far as theconditions are similar an electric current will always follow the pathof best conduction, and where several paths are opened it will followthem proportionally according to the excellence of their conduction orinversely to the amount of their electric resistance we shall not enter here into any questions in regard to the diffusionof electricity, its transmission through fluids, water, air or othergases, nor shall we discuss the relations of good or bad conductors toelectricity except so far as this relates to certain portions of thehuman body an elementary knowledge of physics and electricity must bepresupposed we can now enter more directly upon the immediate subject of thisarticle, that is, the effect upon the human body of severe ormoderately strong currents of electricity derived from artificialsources the accidents produced by these currents may be divided intotwo classes, the direct and the indirect under the direct we placeall those conditions which are apparently produced by the actionof the electricity itself, such as the general shock, the loss ofconsciousness, the burns, etc on the other hand, all those accidentsare to be considered indirect which are not primarily due to the actionof the electric current, but are only secondary results thereof theseare largely determined by the immediate surroundings and conditions atthe time such, for example, are the surgical injuries due to fallscaused by the loss of consciousness produced by the electric shock indirect accidents these will be considered first, as they do not demand so detailed adescription as the direct they are traumatic in character and are theresult either of loss of consciousness, momentary or lasting, or ofthe involuntary muscular contraction which may be occasioned by theelectric shock they are among the most frequent effects of severeelectric shocks these accidents consist in contusions, fractures, dislocations, wounds, and any other injuries which may be produced fromsudden loss of consciousness while in a dangerous position death mayreadily occur either immediately or as the more or less delayed resultof such injuries if the person shocked falls into the water he may bedrowned, or if into the fire he will be burnt the varieties of suchaccidents dependent on the sudden loss of consciousness produced bythe electricity are, of course, innumerable, and their occurrence mustlargely depend upon the position of the victim at the moment of theshock we see, perhaps, most of these accidents in linemen on the topsof poles or houses or in other exposed places, but persons who receiveshocks when simply standing on the ground or when sitting are notexempt from severe surgical injuries other than burns they are oftencast to the ground with great violence, and not infrequently are thrownto a distance of several feet this is caused by the violent muscularcontraction produced by the electric shock, and it may occasion, likeany violent push or fall, severe injuries from contact with thevarious objects against which they may be forced although much rarer, it is also possible that the violence of these muscular contractionsmay be such as of themselves to cause injury, as rupture of a muscle ortendon as practically all these indirect accidents are traumatic andsurgical in character, they do not differ from other accidents similarin kind, but otherwise caused, and are to be treated on the samegeneral principles as these direct accidents quite different from the indirect are the direct accidents.

  • american dream essay
  • what are the best essay writing services
  • best 10 custom writing websites
  • pay to do my term paper
  • coming to america essay
  • essay structure
  • writers who can complete a class assignment in one day
  • hamlet essay topics
  • essay writing service forum
  • homework help physics
  • essay and resume writters company
  • good persuasive essay topics
  • new sat essay scoring
  • college essay scholarships
  • university of washington essay
  • essay rubrics
  • where can i buy resume paper
  • essay map
  • can someone do my homework for me geo
  • good college essay examples
  • water cycle essay

That it is free from “poisonousand irritable chemical substances”. That it “may be administered orallyto produce the desired physiological action ” etc , etc not theslightest hint is given as to how any person can substantiate theseclaims as a matter of fact, the investigation of professor carlsonand his co-workers has shown that a preparation having the propertiesclaimed cannot be made by the process described in this patent anyone familiar with the subject could have demonstrated readily that theapplicant was withholding information concerning essential features ofhis process, assuming that he had any information on the subject whichhe probably did not have and would have advised against the issuanceof the beveridge patent -- from the journal a m a , jan 12, 1918 surgodine report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe following report submitted by a referee was adopted by the counciland authorized for publication w a puckner, secretary surgodine sharp and dohme, baltimore, md , according to anadvertising pamphlet, is a solution of 2-1/4 per cent of iodin inalcohol, containing no alkaline iodid, but miscible with water in allproportions the a m a chemical laboratory reports that surgodineis an alcoholic liquid containing 91 8 per cent alcohol by volumecontaining free iodin, combined iodin and free acid, probably hydrogeniodid hydriodic acid quantitative estimations gave 2 51 gm freeiodin per 100 c c and 1 78 gm combined iodin the greater writingapparently was present as hydrogen iodid it is therefore similar to several other iodin preparations alreadyconsidered by the council like these, it is essentially similar tothe official tincture of iodin, except that it is considerably weaker, and instead of potassium iodid it presumably contains hydrogen iodidand probably ethyl iodid to render the iodin water-soluble itscomposition, however, is secret there would be no objection to the use of ethyl iodid or hydrogeniodid, except perhaps the acidity of the latter, as a solvent agentrather than of potassium iodid but neither is there any importantadvantage, and these preparations would have to be considered asunessential modifications of official preparations, and thereforeineligible for new and nonofficial remedies the attempt to make these modifications commercially profitable, however, seems inevitably to lead to exaggerations and misstatements in an advertising pamphlet the following claims for surgodine areunsupported by any evidence. “but from the surgical viewpoint the addition of this potassium salt is most objectionable because when such solutions as the official tincture are used locally in the antiseptic treatment of open and often infected wounds the potassium iodide acts as an irritant to the wound and therefore produces a localized irritation which is not only objectionable from the surgical standpoint but also materially lessens the antiseptic power of the iodine itself ” “it has been demonstrated repeatedly that iodine without the admixture of any alkaline iodide is much more efficient as a surgical antiseptic than any iodine solution that contains such an addition ” “iodine does not produce ‘iodism’ as quickly as the alkaline iodides do because it is eliminated more quickly and more perfectly than the alkaline iodides ”the next statement intimates that iodin taken by mouth enters theintestinal tract unchanged and is there free to combine with variousgases. “iodine in the presence of phosphorated or sulphurated gases in the gastro-intestinal tract unites with their hydrogen and thus breaks up these noxious compounds ”this is certainly untrue at least for ordinary doses it is recommended that surgodine be held inadmissible to new andnonofficial remedies because its composition is secret rule 1;because the therapeutic claims made for it are exaggerated andunwarranted rule 6. And because it is an unessential modification ofthe official tincture of iodin rule 10 editorial comment -- surgodine is a good illustration of the economicwaste inseparable from most proprietary medicines a hospitalpharmacist writes that whereas his hospital obtains tincture of iodinat less than 82 cents a pint, surgodine costs $2 13 a pint this meansthat while the free-iodin strength of surgodine is only about one-thirdthat of the official tincture, its price is between two and three timesas high -- from the journal a m a , jan 26, 1918 medeol suppositories report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe following report on medeol suppositories has been adopted by thecouncil, and its publication authorized w a puckner, secretary “medeol suppositories” medeol company, inc , new york appear to bean imitation of “anusol suppositories” which, in 1907, were found tobe inadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies a comparison of thecomposition and of the claims made for the two preparations will be ofinterest in the present consideration of medeol suppositories. Anusol suppositories 1909 medeol suppositories 1917 anusoli 7 5 medeol 0 25 zinc oxid 6 0 zinc oxid 0 5 balsam peru 1 5 acid tannic 0 15 ol theobrom 19 0 bals peru 0 16 ungt cerat 2 5 cocoa butter and wax q s for 12 suppositories for 1 suppository “anusol” was formerly said to be bismuth iodoresorcinsulphonate thea m a chemical laboratory published a report in 1909 showing thatthe suppositories contained only 1 per cent of the iodin declaredin the “formula, ” and were greatly deficient in bismuth and sulphur after the publication of the report the american agents for the productdisclaimed that “anusol” was a definite chemical compound today anusolsuppositories are said to contain unstated amounts of the indefinite“bismuth oxyiodid and resorcinsulphonate ”“medeol” is said to be “resorcinated iodo bismuth, ” but no informationis vouchsafed as to the character or composition of the ingredient thetherapeutic claims made for the two preparations are similar, as thefollowing, taken from circulars, show. Anusol suppositories an innocuous, non-irritant remedy for anal, rectal and vaginal inflammatory affections, especially for hemorrhoids!. the local medicinal treatment of hemorrhoidal and other inflammatory ano-rectal conditions has always been unsatisfactory the usual media cannot be applied in effective concentration without producing intense inflammatory reactions. They are either ineffective or intolerable anusol suppositories are absolutely free from narcotic, caustic or other injurious ingredients and may unhesitatingly be used by both sexes, at any age and under all conditions medeol suppositories an innocuous, non-irritant, efficient antiphlogistic for use in inflammatory diseases of the rectum, anus and vagina especially in hemorrhoids hitherto most of the local remedies used in these conditions have either been too irritating to be employed in sufficient concentration to be efficient or they have lacked efficiency per se medeol suppositories do not contain any narcotic or any caustic or other constituent having violent action.