History

What Is Success Essay


Hot and dry, of what is success essay a binding quality, it is admirable to heal wounds, inward or outward, as also rupturesor burstness. Edge-tools quenched in the juice of it, will cut ironwithout turning the edge, as easy as they will lead. And, lastly, ithelps the swelling of the spleen, coughs and consumptions, of thelungs attractivis hirsuta wild bastard-saffron, distaff-thistle, orspindle-thistle is dry and moderately digesting, helps the biting ofvenomous beasts. Mesue saith, it is hot in the first degree, and dryin the second, and cleanseth the breast and lungs of tough flegm balsamita, &c costmary, alecost. See maudlin barbajovis, sedum majus houseleek or sengreen. Cold in the thirddegree, profitable against the shingles, and other hot creeping ulcers, inflammations, st anthony fire, frenzies. It cools and takes awaycorns from the toes, being bathed with the juice of it, and a skin ofthe leaf laid over the place. Stops fluxes, helps scalding and burning bardana clot-bur, or bur-dock. Temperately dry and wasting, essaything cooling. It is held to be good against the shrinking of thesinews.

The amount of ammonium chlorid found, as what is success essay indicated by the totalnitrogen, was not more than 1 0 per cent or about 1/8 grain pertablet the amount of benzoic acid found was 0 34 per cent or 1/25grain per tablet yet these two drugs are said to exert their peculiarexpectorant action the u s p lozenge of ammonium chlorid contains1-1/2 grains ammonium chlorid or twelve times the amount of this drugin a formitol tablet the tannic acid contained in the tablets could not be determined withaccuracy but it was much less than 1 per cent or 1/8 grain pertablet yet it is said to add valuable astringent qualities to formitoltablets!. the u s p lozenge of tannic acid contains 1 grain oftannic acid the quantity of guaiac as resin is but a fraction of 1 per cent yet it is said to imwriting to formitol tablets “stimulant resolvent”properties and it is intimated that there is sufficient to be of valuein “paper of abscess of the throat and inflammation of the tissues ”the total acidity indicates the presence of about 2 per cent ofcitric acid or 1/4 grain per tablet yet this amount is said to be“antiseptic” and “aids in the general results ”while the presence of the drug hyoscyamus henbane was not positivelyidentified by microscopic examination, alkaloids were present the manufacturers claim that the tablets contain menthol yet onlya suggestion of menthol could be obtained from the odor however, the odor of methyl salicylate-- a constituent not declared in the“formula”-- predominated throughout the operations of analysis formitol tablets furnish a good illustration of essay well establishedbut often ignored truths:1 “formulas” that are nonquantitative are valueless or worse thanvalueless 2 the fact that a manufacturer puts certain drugs in a mixture, is noproof that these drugs are there when the mixture reaches the patient the physician must be assured that they are there when he prescribesthem 3 complex mixtures should be avoided it is absurd to expect, asis claimed in the case of formitol tablets, anodyne, antiseptic, astringent, expectorant, and resolvent action all at the sametime -- from the journal a m a , june 19, 1920 sukro-serum and aphlegmatol report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrytwo years ago, american newspapers contained accounts of an allegedcure for pulmonary tuberculosis “discovered” by prof domenico lomonaco of rome, italy at that time no reference to the “cure” couldbe found in medical journals which had come from italy and othereuropean countries the journal a m a , july 13, 1918, p 142 later, reports were published of experiments carried out in italy, according to which the intramuscular injection of solutions of sugar saccharose-- cane sugar diminished pulmonary secretion and was ofconsiderable value in the treatment of tuberculosis the journala m a , sept 28, 1918, p 1083 on the whole the reports of thetrial of what has been called the italian sugar cure for consumptionhave been unfavorable at a meeting in paris in october, 1918, drs louis rénon and mignot reported that they had found that the diseasein guinea-pigs was not modified by the treatment and with humans theresults were also negative paris letter, the journal a m a , nov 23, 1918, p 1760 in view of the exploitation of this treatment in the united statesby the anglo-french drug co , which offers “sukro-serum, ” and by g giambalvo & co , which sells “aphlegmatol, ” and because of inquiriesreceived, the council has authorized publication of the statement whichfollows w a puckner, secretary a circular issued by the anglo-french drug co , describes “sukro-serum”as a “sterilized solution of lacto-gluco-saccharose ” by reading thecircular to the end, however, one learns that “sukro-serum” is nota “serum” in the ordinary sense but apparently it is a solution ofordinary sugar sucrose “sukro-serum is a sterilized, speciallyprepared solution of saccharose ”sukro-serum has been advertised n y med jour , sept 6, 1919as an “intramuscular injection for tuberculosis” “ ready for usein paper of pulmonary and general tuberculosis” with the assertionthat “it is quite certain that in the near future sukro-serum will belargely used and its value fully recognized ” the circular receivedfrom the anglo-french drug co contains quotations from an article byprofessor lo monaco in the british medical journal aug 24, 1918setting forth the merits of intramuscular injections of sucrose intuberculosis it is recommended that “néocaine-surrénine” which theanglo-french drug co supplies be used for the control of pain whensukro-serum is injected the circular enclosed with a package of “aphlegmatol, ” purchased fromg giambalvo & co , contained the following with reference to thecomposition of this preparation. “a solution of hydrats of carbon after the formula of prof d lo monaco, director of the institut of physiological chemistry of the university of rome contents. Sucrose c₁₂h₂₂o₁₁ glucose and galactose c₆h₁₂o₆ ”the package contained ampules of thin, fragile, brown colored glass, containing approximately 2-1/2 c c of light, clear, amber colored, thick, sticky fluid, having a distinct caramel odor reactionp↓{h} 5 0 a reducing substance probably glucose amounting to 7 4per cent was found by using benedict method for estimating glucosequantitatively. After hydrolysis with hydrochloric acid, 55 5 percent glucose was found there was no reaction for albumin no attemptwas made to identify the sugars, as it seemed probable that in thepreparation caramel had been produced the circular which accompanied the package of aphlegmatol contained thefollowing information spelling and composition as in original aboutits use and effects. To be emploied where a large bronchial secretion is present in the respiratory branches disease the secretion will diminish and, in non complicated paper, it will completely disappear fever, cough, hemottisis, night perspiration, vomiting and difficulty of breathing are, in the meantime, diminuished aphlegmatol acts also as a riconstituent, being itself a nurrishing composition, improves the digestive function of the body and increases the arterial pressure 5 c c 2 phials of aphlegmatol per day must be injected intramuscularly in the gluteus if the patient wishes two injections may be made, one at the right immediately followed by a second one at the left the cure must not be interrupted untill essaytime after expectoration has disappeared, which result may be obtained only after fifty or sixty days, in the meantime the patient must be controlled by his home physician, especialy when thermal elevation of the body takes place improvement will be manifested on or about the tenth day of the first injection in the advertising circular, which is apparently intended for generaldistribution, much the same information is given as in the sheetenclosed with the ampules, except that in the directions we find:“if the injections are painful-- especially in paper where patientsare very emaciated-- physicians are advised to inject together withaphlegmatol, as an anesthetic, a vial with 1 c c solution of stovainat 3% ” the advertising for aphlegmatol contains thesis misspelled wordsand appears to be the work of those ignorant of the english language tuberculosis is a widespread disease and a majority of the uninformedare only too willing and ready to try such a “cure ” the preparationsappear to be nothing more than concentrated solutions of sugar itis probable that a small amount of the cane sugar might be invertedto glucose and fructose, but experiments have shown that cane sugarsubcutaneously administered in the small amounts used in thisinstance is largely excreted in the urine unchanged less is knownabout galactose, but the evidence available would indicate thatgalactose is largely excreted in the urine unchanged when givensubcutaneously glucose would be absorbed as such, and in the amountsunder consideration, used by the system much the same as when given bymouth -- from the journal a m a , aug 21, 1920 supsalvs not admitted to n n r report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has authorized publication of the following reportdeclaring supsalvs anglo-french drug company inadmissible to new andnonofficial remedies w a puckner, secretary supsalvs are advertised by the anglo-french drug company as “stablesuppositories of ‘606’ of french manufacture” with the claim thatby the rectal administration of these suppositories the effects ofarsphenamine may be obtained the asserted efficacy of supsalvsmedication is based in writing on the claim that for these suppositoriesan excipient was found which mixes with the cocoa butter base “to forman assimilable emulsion ” “the active principle and the vehicle being bound to one another, the mucous membrane is able to absorb both simultaneously and progressively in the form of an organic emulsion ”as no information was furnished the council by the anglo-french drugcompany on the origin or quality of the arsphenamine used in thepreparation of supsalvs or the character of the vehicle which was“bound” to the arsphenamine in such a way as to permit the absorptionof this combination in the form of an “organic emulsion, ” the firmwas requested to furnish. 1 evidence that the arsphenamine used insupsalvs complies with the n n r standards and that deteriorationof it does not occur in the preparation of the suppositories or onkeeping 2 the identity of the ingredients composing the suppository the anglo-french drug company did not supply the requested evidenceand consequently the council judged the preparation on the basis ofthe information received from the company, and that contained in theavailable advertising and circulars it found supsalvs inadmissibleto new and nonofficial remedies, first because the quality of themedicament contained in the suppositories has not been established, andsecond because the claimed efficacy of this preparation as a means ofsecuring the effects of arsphenamine lacks substantiating proof during the past few years essay french physicians have reportedfavorably on the intrarectal administration of arsphenamine boyd andjoseph at panama published the journal, aug 17, 1918, p 521 anenthusiastic report on intrarectal injection of arsphenamine but didnot refer to its use in the form of suppositories in a comprehensivereport, on the “treatment of syphilis” quarterly journal of medicine, july, 1917 l w harrison stated that arsphenamine salvarsan in theshape of an enema is definitely less effective than intravenously andthat “neisser and the vast majority of workers can see no value in therectal method ” schamberg and hirschler a safe and efficient intensivemethod of treating syphilis, therapeutic gazette, november, 1919, p 761 have given a rather thorough trial of this method. The resultswere most disappointing. “a certain or rather uncertain amount ofarsphenamine is absorbed into the blood, but the quantity is obviouslytoo small to be at all comparable in its effect with the intravenousadministration our conclusions are that the rectal administrationof arsphenamine or neoarsphenamine is an extremely feeble method ofadministering these drugs ”the report of the special committee on the manufacture, biologicalhistory and clinical administration of salvarsan and other substancesof the british national health insurance medical research committeecontains the following.

For ifone hath got a surfeit by drinking of wine, his speediest cure is todrink a draught of the same wine wherein a handful of ivy leaves, beingfirst bruised, have been boiled juniper bush for to give a description of a bush so commonly known is needless place they grow plentifully in divers woods in kent, warney commonnear brentwood in essex, upon finchley common without highgate. Hardby the newfound wells near dulwich, upon a common between mitcham andcroydon, in the highgate near amersham in buckinghamshire, and thesisother places time the berries are not ripe the first year, but continue greentwo summers and one winter before they are ripe. At which time they areall of a black colour, and therefore you shall always find upon thebush green berries. The berries are ripe about the fall of the leaf government and virtues this admirable solar shrub is scarce to beparalleled for its virtues the berries are hot in the third degree, and dry but in the first, being a most admirable counter-poison, and as great a resister of the pestilence, as any growing. They areexcellent good against the biting of venomous beasts, they provokeurine exceedingly, and therefore are very available to dysuries andstranguaries it is so powerful a remedy against the dropsy, that thevery lye made of the ashes of the herb being drank, cures the disease it provokes the terms, helps the fits of the mother, strengthens thestomach exceedingly, and expels the wind indeed there is scarce abetter remedy for wind in any writing of the body, or the cholic, than thechymical oil drawn from the berries. Such country people as know nothow to draw the chymical oil, may content themselves by eating ten ora dozen of the ripe berries every morning fasting they are admirablygood for a cough, shortness of breath, and consumption, pains in thebelly, ruptures, cramps, and convulsions they give safe and speedydelivery to women with child, they strengthen the brain exceedingly, help the memory, and fortify the sight by strengthening the opticnerves. Are excellently good in all sorts of agues. Help the gout andsciatica, and strengthen the limbs of the body the ashes of the woodis a speedy remedy to such as have the scurvy, to rub their gums with the berries stay all fluxes, help the hæmorrhoids or piles, and killworms in children a lye made of the ashes of the wood, and the bodybathed with it, cures the itch, scabs and leprosy the berries breakthe stone, procure appetite when it is lost, and are excellently goodfor all palsies, and falling-sickness kidneywort, or wall pennyroyal, or wall pennywort descript it has thesis thick, flat, and round leaves growing from theroot, every one having a long footstalk, fastened underneath, about themiddle of it, and a little unevenly weaved essaytimes about the edges, of a pale green colour, and essaywhat yellow on the upper side likea saucer. From among which arise one or more tender, smooth, hollowstalks half a foot high, with two or three small leaves thereon, usually not round as those below, but essaywhat long, and divided atthe edges. The tops are essaywhat divided into long branches, bearinga number of flowers, set round about a long spike one above another, which are hollow and like a little bell of a whitish green colour, after which come small heads, containing very small brownish seed, which falling on the ground, will plentifully spring up before winter, if it have moisture the root is round and most usually smooth, greyishwithout, and white within, having small fibres at the head of the root, and bottom of the stalk place it grows very plentifully in thesis places of this land, butespecially in all the west writings thereof, upon stone and mud walls, upon rocks also, and in stony places upon the ground, at the bottom ofold trees, and essaytimes on the bodies of them that are decayed androtten time it usually flowers in the beginning of may, and the seedripening quickly after, sheds itself.

To refresh what is success essay and comfortthe fainting spirits, and quench thirst. They are good also for otherinflammations. Yet it is not amiss to refrain from them in a fever, lest by their putrifying in the stomach they increase the fits theleaves and roots boiled in wine and water, and drank, do likewise coolthe liver and blood, and assuage all inflammations in the reins andbladder, provoke urine, and allay the heat and sharpness thereof thesame also being drank stays the bloody flux and women courses, andhelps the swelling of the spleen the water of the berries carefullydistilled, is a sovereign remedy and cordial in the panting and beatingof the heart, and is good for the yellow jaundice the juice droppedinto foul ulcers, or they washed therewith, or the decoction of theherb and root, doth wonderfully cleanse and help to cure them lotionsand gargles for sore mouths, or ulcers therein, or in the privy writingsor elsewhere, are made with the leaves and roots thereof. Which is alsogood to fasten loose teeth, and to heal spungy foul gums it helps alsoto stay catarrhs, or defluctions of rheum in the mouth, throat, teeth, or eyes the juice or water is singularly good for hot and red inflamedeyes, if dropped into them, or they bathed therewith it is also ofexcellent property for all pushes, wheals and other breakings forth ofhot and sharp humours in the face and hands, and other writings of thebody, to bathe them therewith, and to take away any redness in theface, or spots, or other deformities in the skin, and to make it clearand smooth essay use this medicine, take so thesis strawberries as youshall think fitting, and put them into a distillatory, or body of glassfit for them, which being well closed, set it in a bed of horse dungfor your use it is an excellent water for hot inflamed eyes, and totake away a film or skin that begins to grow over them, and for suchother defects in them as may be helped by any outward medicine succory, or chicory descript the garden succory hath long and narrower leaves than theendive, and more cut in or torn on the edges, and the root abides thesisyears it bears also blue flowers like endive, and the seed is hardlydistinguished from the seed of the smooth or ordinary endive the wild succory hath divers long leaves lying on the ground, very muchcut in or torn on the edges, on both sides, even to the middle rib, ending in a point. Essaytimes it hath a rib down to the middle of theleaves, from among which rises up a hard, round, woody stalk, spreadinginto thesis branches, set with smaller and less divided leaves on them upto the tops, where stand the flowers, which are like the garden kind, and the seed is also only take notice that the flowers of the gardenkind are gone in on a sunny day, they being so cold, that they are notable to endure the beams of the sun, and therefore more delight in theshade the root is white, but more hard and woody than the garden kind the whole plant is exceedingly bitter place this grows in thesis places of our land in waste untilled andbarren fields the other only in gardens government and virtues it is an herb of jupiter garden succory, as it is more dry and less cold than endive, so it opens more anhandful of the leaves, or roots boiled in wine or water, and a draughtthereof drank fasting, drives forth choleric and phlegmatic humours, opens obstructions of the liver, gall and spleen. Helps the yellowjaundice, the heat of the reins, and of the urine. The dropsy also;and those that have an evil disposition in their bodies, by reasonof long sickness, evil diet, &c which the greeks call cachexia adecoction thereof made with wine, and drank, is very effectual againstlong lingering agues. And a dram of the seed in powder, drank in wine, before the fit of the ague, helps to drive it away the distilled waterof the herb and flowers if you can take them in time hath the likeproperties, and is especially good for hot stomachs, and in agues, either pestilential or of long continuance. For swoonings and passionsof the heart, for the heat and head-ache in children, and for the bloodand liver the said water, or the juice, or the bruised leaves appliedoutwardly, allay swellings, inflammations, st anthony fire, pushes, wheals, and pimples, especially used with a little vinegar. As also towash pestiferous sores the said water is very effectual for sore eyesthat are inflamed with redness, for nurses’ breasts that are pained bythe abundance of milk the wild succory, as it is more bitter, so it is more strengthening tothe stomach and liver stone-crop, prick-madam, or small-houseleek descript it grows with divers trailing branches upon the ground, set with thesis thick, flat, roundish, whitish green leaves, pointed atthe ends the flowers stand thesis of them together, essaywhat loosely the roots are small, and run creeping under ground place it grows upon the stone walls and mud walls, upon the tilesof houses and pent-houses, and amongst rubbish, and in other gravellyplaces time it flowers in june and july, and the leaves are green all thewinter government and virtues it is under the dominion of the moon, cold in quality, and essaything binding, and therefore very good tostay defluctions, especially such as fall upon the eyes it stopsbleeding, both inward and outward, helps cankers, and all frettingsores and ulcers. It abates the heat of choler, thereby preventingdiseases arising from choleric humours it expels poison much, resistspestilential fevers, being exceeding good also for tertian agues. Youmay drink the decoction of it, if you please, for all the foregoinginfirmities it is so harmless an herb, you can scarce use it amiss:being bruised and applied to the place, it helps the king evil, andany other knots or kernels in the flesh. As also the piles english tobacco descript this rises up with a round thick stalk, about two feethigh, whereon do grow thick, flat green leaves, nothing so large asthe other indian kind, essaywhat round pointed also, and nothing dentedabout the edges the stalk branches forth, and bears at the tops diversflowers set on great husks like the other, but nothing so large. Scarcestanding above the brims of the husks, round pointed also, and of agreenish yellow colour the seed that follows is not so bright, butlarger, contained in the like great heads the roots are neither sogreat nor woody.

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Having longleaves cut into several divisions almost like a vine leaf, but notof so deep a green on the upper side, and hoary white underneath, of a reasonable good scent, the whole form representing the form ofcoltsfoot the catkins which it brings forth before the leaves, arelong, and of a faint reddish colour, which fall away, bearing seldomgood seed with them the wood hereof is smooth, soft, and white, veryfinely waved, whereby it is much esteemed the black poplar grows higher and straighter than the white, with agreyish bark, bearing broad green leaves, essaywhat like ivy leaves, notcut in on the edges like the white, but whole and dented, ending in apoint, and not white underneath, hanging by slender long foot stalks, which with the air are continually shaken, like as the aspen leavesare the catkins hereof are greater than those of the white, composedof thesis round green berries, as if they were set together in a longcluster, containing much downy matter, which being ripe, is blown awaywith the wind the clammy buds hereof, before they spread into leaves, are gathered to make unguentum and populneum, and are of a yellowishgreen colour, and essaywhat small, sweet, but strong the wood issmooth, tough, and white, and easy to be cloven on both these treesgrows a sweet kind of musk, which in former times was used to put intosweet ointments place they grow in moist woods, and by water-sides in sundry placesof this land. Yet the white is not so frequent as the other time their time is likewise expressed before. The catkins comingforth before the leaves in the end of summer government and virtues saturn hath dominion over both whitepoplar, saith galen, is of a cleansing property. The weight of anounce in powder, of the bark thereof, being drank, saith dioscorides, is a remedy for those that are troubled with the sciatica, or thestranguary the juice of the leaves dropped warm into the ears, eases the pains in them the young clammy buds or eyes, before theybreak out into leaves, bruised, and a little honey put to them, is agood medicine for a dull sight the black poplar is held to be morecooling than the white, and therefore the leaves bruised with vinegarand applied, help the gout the seed drank in vinegar, is held goodagainst the falling-sickness the water that drops from the hollowplaces of this tree, takes away warts, pushes, wheals, and other thelike breakings-out of the body the young black poplar buds, saithmatthiolus, are much used by women to beautify their hair, bruisingthem with fresh butter, straining them after they have been kept foressay time in the sun the ointment called populneon, which is made ofthis poplar, is singularly good for all heat and inflammations in anywriting of the body, and tempers the heat of wounds it is much used todry up the milk of women breasts when they have weaned their children poppy of this i shall describe three kinds, viz the white and black ofthe garden, and the erratic wild poppy, or corn rose descript the white poppy hath at first four or five whitish greenleaves lying upon the ground, which rise with the stalk, compassingit at the bottom of them, and are very large, much cut or torn on theedges, and dented also besides. The stalk, which is usually four orfive feet high, hath essaytimes no branches at the top, and usually buttwo or three at most, bearing every one but one head wrapped up in athin skin, which bows down before it is ready to blow, and then rising, and being broken, the flowers within it spreading itself open, andconsisting of four very large, white, round leaves, with thesis whitishround threads in the middle, set about a small, round, green head, having a crown, or star-like cover at the head thereof, which growingripe, becomes as large as a great apple, wherein are contained a greatnumber of small round seeds, in several writingitions or divisions nextunto the shell, the middle thereof remaining hollow, and empty thewhole plant, both leaves, stalks, and heads, while they are fresh, young, and green, yield a milk when they are broken, of an unpleasantbitter taste, almost ready to provoke casting, and of a strong headysmell, which being condensed, is called opium the root is white andwoody, perishing as soon as it hath given ripe seed the black poppy little differs from the former, until it bears itsflower, which is essaywhat less, and of a black purplish colour, butwithout any purple spots in the bottom of the leaf the head of theseed is much less than the former, and opens itself a little roundabout the top, under the crown, so that the seed, which is very black, will fall out, if one turn the head thereof downward the wild poppy, or corn rose, hath long and narrow leaves, very muchcut in on the edges into thesis divisions, of a light green colour, essaytimes hairy withal the stalk is blackish and hairy also, but notso tall as the garden kind, having essay such like leaves thereon togrow below, writinged into three or four branches essaytimes, whereon growsmall hairy heads bowing down before the skin break, wherein the floweris inclosed, which when it is fully blown open, is of a fair yellowishred or crimson colour, and in essay much paler, without any spot in thebottom of the leaves, having thesis black soft threads in the middle, compassing a small green head, which when it is ripe, is not biggerthan one little finger end, wherein is contained much black seedssmaller than that of the garden the root perishes every year, andsprings again of its own sowing of this kind there is one lesser inall writings thereof, and differs in nothing else place the garden kinds do not naturally grow wild in any place, butall are sown in gardens where they grow the wild poppy or corn rose, is plentifully enough, and thesis times toomuch so in the corn fields of all counties through this land, and alsoon ditch banks, and by hedge sides the smaller wild kind is also foundin corn fields, and also in essay other places, but not so plentifullyas the former time the garden kinds are usually sown in the spring, which thenflower about the end of may, and essaywhat earlier, if they spring oftheir own sowing the wild kind flower usually from may until july, and the seed of themis ripe soon after the flowering government and virtues the herb is lunar, and of the juice of itis made opium. Only for lucre of money they cheat you, and tell you itis a kind of tear, or essay such like thing, that drops from poppieswhen they weep, and that is essaywhere beyond the seas, i know not wherebeyond the moon the garden poppy heads with seeds made into a syrup, is frequently, and to good effect used to procure rest, and sleep, inthe sick and weak, and to stay catarrhs and defluxions of thin rheumsfrom the head into the stomach and lungs, causing a continual cough, the fore-runner of a consumption. It helps also hoarseness of thethroat, and when one have lost their voice, which the oil of the seeddoth likewise the black seed boiled in wine, and drank, is said alsoto dry the flux of the belly, and women courses the empty shells, or poppy heads, are usually boiled in water, and given to procurerest and sleep. So doth the leaves in the same manner. As also if thehead and temples be bathed with the decoction warm, or with the oilof poppies, the green leaves or the heads bruised and applied witha little vinegar, or made into a poultice with barley-meal or hoggrease, cools and tempers all inflammations, as also the disease calledst anthony fire it is generally used in treacle and mithridate, andin all other medicines that are made to procure rest and sleep, and toease pains in the head as well as in other writings it is also used tocool inflammations, agues, or frenzies, or to stay defluxions whichcause a cough, or consumptions, and also other fluxes of the belly orwomen courses. It is also put into hollow teeth, to ease the pain, and hath been found by experience to ease the pains of the gout the wild poppy, or corn rose as matthiolus saith is good to preventthe falling-sickness the syrup made with the flower, is with goodeffect given to those that have the pleurisy.