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Epilepsy and high blood pressure testimonials arepresented as to results in most of these conditions 90 secretogen, report of the council on pharmacy and chemistry, j a m a , may 1, p 1518, 1915 a quantity of “secretogen” and “elixir secretogen” was bought inthe open market, and the preparations were tested on suitablyprepared dogs the tablets were ground, thoroughly macerated with thesolvent used water, normal salt solution, alcohol, or 0 4 per cent hydrochloric acid, and filtered if hydrochloric acid was used, thepulverized tablets were boiled with it, in the manner that secretin ismade from duodenal mucosa, and the preparations neutralized previousto injection the injections were made in from 15 to 20 c c of thesolvent all the operations were carried on immediately before theexperiment, and as rapidly as possible, so as to avoid oxidation theelixir secretogen was injected directly, without dilution table 7 -- summary of typical experiments showing the absence ofsecretin in “secretogen” and “elixir secretogen” except in occasionaltests when administered in enormous dosesdogs under ether anesthesia | | secretion of pancreatic juice in drops, | quantity of | following intravenous injection exp | secretogen -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - no | and elixir | | secretogen in | | | secretogen |control -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- |control | used* |10 c c |distilled|0 4%| 70% |0 9%|elixir|10 c c | |secretin| water |hcl |alcohol|nacl| |secretin -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - 1 |secretogen, | | | | | | | | 1 tablet. | 109 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 59 | elixir, | | | | | | | | 15 c c | | | | | | | 1 |secretogen, | | | | | | | | 6 tablets | | | 0 | | | | 2 |secretogen, | | | | | | | | 3 tablets. | 16 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 1 ?. | 16 | elixir, | | | | | | | | 15 c c | | | | | | | 3 |secretogen, | | | | | | | | 5 tablets | | |1 ?. | | | | 4 |secretogen, | | | | | | | | 25 tablets | 14 | |1 ?. | | | | 8 5 |secretogen, | | | | | | | | 100 tablets | 110 | | | | 21 | | 67 6 |secretogen, | | | | | | | | 100 tablets;| 19 | | 5 | | 1 | 2 ?. | 8 | elixir, | | | | | | | | 125 c c | | | | | | | 7 |elixir, | | | | | | | | 50 c c | | | | | | 1 ?.

But it has been held that they constitute no exception 252testamentary causes - in new york it was long supposed that thepolicy uc essay help of the law excepted probate proceedings. It was so held bythe surrogate of new york city;253 and also by the general termof the supreme court, 254 by which it was stated that the practicehad prevailed for a half-century in will paper, 255 but the courtof appeals, 256 has decided that testamentary paper constitute noexception to the rule, the judge who delivered the opinion statingthat there is no more reason for allowing secret ailments of a patientto be brought to light in a contest over his will than in any othercase, and that if mischief be wrought by the law the remedy lies withthe legislature and not with the courts the legislature has sinceafforded the remedy, 257 but not to the extent of adopting the rule ofthe earlier paper in indiana, in an action to set aside a will, thetestimony of the testator physician has been excluded 258 and inmichigan and missouri it seems that testamentary paper are no exceptionto the general rule 259lunacy and habitual drunkenness - it has been claimed in new yorkthat inquisitions of lunacy are an exception, and recently it has beenheld that the alleged lunatic physician may testify as to his mentalcondition because no one is better qualified to testify, 260 but thisdecision seems to be at variance with the principle of the decisionsof the court of appeals with reference to testamentary paper, andpresents no satisfactory reason for a distinction in a similar case inthe supreme court, chambers, it was held that a medical attendant at anasylum could not testify 261 it has also been held that a physiciancannot make an affidavit as to the appearance and condition of hispatient to support a petition for the appointment of a committee forhim as an habitual drunkard 262fraud - still another class of actions in which contending principleshave been invoked to make an exception in the law of privilege, isactions on life-insurance contracts the contract of insurance isuberrimæ fidei, and the defence of fraud in the application isfrequently interposed to defeat a claim under a policy medicaltestimony would often be the most satisfactory evidence to establishthe fraud, and efforts have been made to introduce it under thatexcuse, but without avail in the case of dilleber vs home lifeinsurance company, in the supreme court of new york at generalterm, 263 the question seems to have been directly before thecourt, and davis, p j , dissenting, insisted that the suppressionof a physician testimony ought not to be permitted so as to coverup a fraud, but the majority of the court held otherwise. The casewas subsequently overruled, but not on the ground urged by justicedavis 264 the number of insurance paper in which the rule has beenenforced seems to leave it beyond question that it will not be relaxedfor the purpose of establishing fraud, 265 although that announcementhas not been specifically made there seems no reason that the ruleshould be relaxed in that regard when it is not relaxed to establishthe crime of the patient. Though the mischief that may be done in suchpaper is apparent 266the witness - the statutory provisions as to the professionalstatus of the witness whose testimony is excluded have already beenshown 267 the facts which establish the relation of physicianand patient will be treated later 268 the witness is a member ofa profession, but there is very little discussion in the paper asto what constitutes a physician or surgeon 269 the language ofthe statutes as well as their policy and intent has been said toplainly embrace a physician who casually or in any way attends andprescribes for a patient, whether he be a family physician or the usualmedical attendant or not 270 the spirit of the acts would protectcommunications made to any person attending the patient in the acceptedcapacity of physician or surgeon wherever that might have happened, though the letter would confine it in essay instances to duly authorizedor duly licensed persons it does not seem to have been establishedwhether such authority or license must have been granted under thelaws of the state where the trial is conducted, nor how the severalstatutes apply to communications made elsewhere, especially in statesor countries where authority or license to practise is not required bylaw it has been said with reference to the new york law that it isabsolutely necessary that the witness should be a duly qualifiedphysician;271 and it has been held that the words “duly authorized”mean those persons who are not prohibited by the penal code frompractising, so that an unlicensed physician may be compelled todisclose confidential communications 272 whether the same rule wouldbe applied with reference to information obtained in another state bya physician duly authorized to practise there although prohibited frompractising in new york, is a question that is suggested as a casewithin the reason of the law but outside of its letter, and one whichdoes not seem to have been answered in new york, in an action by a physician for compensation for hisservices, it was held that a person who merely answered for a physicianat his office in his absence, and was not himself a physician, is not awitness whose testimony is privileged 273in missouri it has been held that a drug and prescription clerk isnot a privileged witness 274 the question arose in the same state, whether a dental surgeon is forbidden to testify under the statute, butits determination was not essential to the judgment and it was leftunanswered 275to establish the privilege it is necessary that the person who insistsupon it to exclude testimony should show by competent evidence that thewitness belongs to the class privileged under the law 276 but wherethe physician testified that he was a regular practising physician andattended in that capacity, and he was not examined further as to hisdue authority, it was held that a failure to produce his license couldnot be urged on appeal as reason for compelling him to testify 277the court said that if the privilege were the physician he might, ifthe objection were taken, be required to prove by the best evidencethat he was duly authorized, but as it is the patient privilege, inthe absence of objection to the sufficiency of the proof, the patientis entitled to the benefit of the presumption that the physician hadthe license which the law requires to entitle him to practise waiver of the privilege who may waive - those states in which the law provides for a waiverhave been enumerated;278 in others the courts have determined thatthe privilege of waiving is implied in the reason for the law inindiana it has been held that although the statute contains in termsan absolute prohibition, it creates no absolute incompetency andthe privilege may be waived by the person for whose benefit it ismade or his legal representative 279 under the michigan law itwas claimed that the physician is forbidden to reveal confidenceseven though he have his patient consent, but it has been held thatthe law only creates a privilege on the same footing with otherprivileged communications, which the public has no interest insuppressing when there is no desire for suppression on the writing ofthe person concerned 280 in missouri too the patient may waive theprivilege 281the protection vouchsafed by the law is designed for the benefit of thepatient, and therefore the physician himself cannot waive it 282 thepatient can disclose his own physical condition if he so desires 283but the physician cannot refuse to testify if the patient waives theprivilege 284the patient can waive the privilege during his life 285as it existed prior to 1891 the new york law provided that theprohibition should operate unless it was expressly waived upon thetrial or examination by the patient 286 this was interpreted to meanthat the patient himself was the only person who could make a waiver;and that, therefore, the possibility of waiver ceased with the deathof the patient, while the privilege of secrecy continued unabated, so that those claiming under the deceased patient could not waivethe privilege, nor insist upon the testimony of the physician, eventhough their interests were in jeopardy on account of his silence 287it seems, however, that a patient can during his lifetime waive theprivilege, the waiver to take effect after his death 288 the expresswaiver required by the statute may be given by the patient attorney, because of the nature of the attorney agency in conducting an actionfor the patient 289none of the other statutes are in the exact terms of the new yorkstatute, but those of california, colorado, idaho, minnesota, montana, nevada, north dakota, ohio, oregon, south dakota, utah, washington, and wyoming provide that the testimony shall not be given unless thepatient consent. In iowa, the waiver provided for is that of theperson in whose favor the prohibition is made. And in nebraska, ofthe writingy in whose favor the provision is enacted in indiana, the privilege extends beyond the death of the patient, andit may be waived by the writingy who may be said to stand in the place ofthe deceased and whose interests may be affected by the disclosure 290in michigan, what the patient may do in his lifetime, those whorepresent him after his death may also do for the protection ofthe interests which they claim under him 291 in missouri therepresentatives of the patient may waive;292 and where the disputeis between devisees and heirs at law all claiming under a deceasedpatient, either the devisees or heirs may call the attending physicianof the testator as a witness regarding information acquired by him inhis professional attendance 293 in nevada it has been said that theparents of a seven-year-old infant, may waive for the infant 294objections to the admission of privileged communications. When andby whom made - having considered who can waive the privilege, itis material to discuss also the question who may insist upon theenforcement of the law if the protection were only enforced on theclaim of privilege by the patient, the very object of the statuteswould be defeated in the large majority of instances because of theabsence of the patient and every one interested in his behalf toassert his right it rests, therefore, with any writingy to raise theobjection and assert the prohibition but it seems that the physicianhimself, unless a writingy, cannot make the objection 295 it seems tohave been thought in essay of the paper that the right to insist uponthe enforcement of the law is coupled with an interest derived fromthe patient this idea started from the language used in the earlypaper enforcing the privilege at the instance of those claiming underdeceased patients;296 and it led to essay confusion where the rightof representatives to waive the privilege was denied. But it seemsto be clear that the right to object differs from the right to waivein that the latter is necessarily and logically dependent upon therelation between the patient and his representative, while the formeris obviously suggested as the best method of enforcing the law inindiana it has been said that the statute gives to the representativeof a deceased patient the right to object;297 but that this is notby reason of the relationship appears from another case in the samestate, where on an application for a new trial the court voluntarilyrefused to grant one for newly discovered evidence disclosed to itby a physician affidavit, on the ground that if the patient shouldobject in the new trial the evidence would be excluded 298 in thisstate it has been held that the widow of the patient cannot object tothe disclosure, if his administrator with the will annexed waives theprivilege 299in michigan it has been said that the physician cannot avail himselfof the statute for his own benefit. But that was in a case where thecommunication was not really of the privileged class 300 in newyork, in proceedings to which a physician was a writingy an examinationof his books of account before trial has been refused on the ground ofprivilege, and for the same reason a motion to direct a physician toturn his books of account over to a receiver has been denied 301in montana it has been said that when the patient consents no one elsecan object to the reception of the physician testimony 302in new york it has been said that the benefits of the law are to bedispensed alike to those familiar with and those ignorant of itsexistence and applicability, and it is therefore no reason to refuseits enforcement, that the patient did not know that his communicationwas privileged 303but, as in other paper of the receipt of improper evidence, it wouldseem that the objection should be made at the time it is offered, andif the objection is not then made, it will not avail to raise it lateror on appeal 304 it should not be prematurely made 305 in newyork where in pursuance of a special feature of practice in probateproceedings, 306 certain witnesses are regarded as the surrogatewitnesses though produced at the instance of the contestant, and thecontestant, after giving notice that the evidence of physicians as suchwitnesses was material, refused to examine them, and the surrogaterequired the proponent to suggest a line of examination, it was heldthat it did not lie with the contestant to object to the physicians’testimony as privileged, because she had lost her right to object bygiving notice that the evidence of those witnesses on these points wasmaterial 307objection cannot be raised in the progress of an examination after theforbidden testimony has been in writing received without objection.

And if the said drink be continued longer, it issaid that it cures the stone. It is found good against the frenchpox the roots bruised and applied outwardly, help the kernels ofthe throat, commonly called the king evil. Or taking inwardly, andapplied to the place stung or bitten by any serpent, heal it speedily if the roots be bruised, and boiled in old hog grease, or saltedlard, and broken bones, thorns &c remaining in the flesh, they donot only draw them forth, but heal up the place again, gathering newflesh where it was consumed the juice of the leaves dropped into theear, helps imposthumes therein the distilled water of the whole herb, when the leaves and stalks are young, is profitable drank for all thepurposes aforesaid. And helps the melancholy of the heart, and isavailable in quartan and quotidian agues. As also for them that havetheir necks drawn awry, and cannot turn them without turning theirwhole body eyebright descript common eyebright is a small low herb, rising up usuallybut with one blackish green stalk a span high, or not much more, spread from the bottom into sundry branches, whereon are small andalmost round yet pointed dark green leaves, finely snipped about theedges, two always set together, and very thick. At the joints with theleaves, from the middle upward, come forth small white flowers, markedwith purple and yellow spots, or stripes. After which follow smallround heads, with very small seed therein the root is long, small andthready at the end place it grows in meadows, and grassy land government and virtues it is under the sign of the lion, and solclaims dominion over it if the herb was but as much used as it isneglected, it would half spoil the spectacle maker trade. And a manwould think, that reason should teach people to prefer the preservationof their natural before artificial spectacles. Which that they may beinstructed how to do, take the virtues of eyebright as follows the juice or distilled water of eyebright, taken inwardly in white wineor broth, or dropped into the eyes for divers days together, helps allinfirmities of the eyes that cause dimness of sight essay make conserveof the flowers to the same effect being used any of the ways, it alsohelps a weak brain, or memory this tunned up with strong beer, thatit may work together, and drank, or the powder of the dried herb mixedwith sugar, a little mace, and fennel seed, and drank, or eaten inbroth. Or the said powder made into an electuary with sugar, and taken, has the same powerful effect to help and restore the sight, decayedthrough age. And arnoldus de ville nova saith, it hath restored sightto them that have been blind a long time before fern descript of this there are two kinds principally to be treated of, viz the male and female the female grows higher than the male, butthe leaves thereof are smaller, and more divided and dented, and ofas strong a smell as the male. The virtue of them are both alike, andtherefore i shall not trouble you with any description or distinctionof them place they grow both in heaths and in shady places near thehedge-sides in all counties of this land time they flower and give their seed at midsummer the female fern is that plant which is in sussex, called brakes, theseed of which essay authors hold to be so rare. Such a thing there is iknow, and may be easily had upon midsummer eve, and for ought i know, two or three days after it, if not more government and virtues it is under the dominion of mercury, bothmale and female the roots of both these sorts of fern being bruisedand boiled in mead, or honeyed water, and drank, kills both the broadand long worms in the body, and abates the swelling and hardness ofthe spleen the green leaves eaten, purge the belly of choleric andwaterish humours that trouble the stomach they are dangerous for womenwith child to meddle with, by reason they cause abortions the rootsbruised and boiled in oil, or hog grease, make a very profitableointment to heal wounds, or pricks gotten in the flesh the powder ofthem used in foul ulcers, dries up their malignant moisture, and causestheir speedier healing fern being burned, the smoke thereof drivesaway serpents, gnats, and other noiessay creatures, which in fennycountries do in the night time, trouble and molest people lying intheir beds with their faces uncovered. It causes barrenness osmond royal, or water fern descript this shoots forth in spring time for in the winter theleaves perish divers rough hard stalks, half round, and yellowish, orflat on the other side, two feet high, having divers branches of wingedyellowish green leaves on all sides, set one against another, longer, narrower, and not nicked on the edges as the former from the top ofessay of these stalks grow forth a long bush of small and more yellow, green, scaly aglets, set in the same manner on the stalks as the leavesare, which are accounted the flowers and seeds the root is rough, thick and scabby.

Never from thestatements of others the conclusions uc essay help commonly relate to whetherdeath was due to natural or unnatural causes. If to unnatural causes, what are the facts which lead the examiner to this opinion as theconclusions are intended to form a summary of the whole report, theymust be brief and tersely stated personal identity, including the methods used for its determination in the dead and living by irving c rosse, a m , m d , f r g s eng , professor of nervous diseases, georgetown university. Membre du congrès international d’anthropologie criminelle, etc personal identity general considerations identity is the determination of the individuality of a person injurisprudence the term is applied to the recognition of a person who isthe object of a judicial action the establishment of the individualityof a person is known as absolute identity. While the relations of aperson with essay writingicular act is known as relative identity the great number and variety of facts concerned in the investigationof questions of identity are of considerable gravity and importance intheir juridical bearing, and at the same time they are among the mostinteresting and most useful of the applications of modern medicine tothe purposes of the law 569among the varied researches of legal medicine looking to aninterpretation of facts, no other question occurs in which the solutiondepends more upon morphological and anatomical knowledge, and none ismore dependent upon purely objective, visible, tangible facts personal identity often constitutes the entire subject-matter ofdispute in a civil case upon it may depend the question of absence orof marriage, of kinship or of filiation involving the possession ofan estate, in which case the court often requires the most subtle ofscientific evidence to assist in its decision thesis anthropologicaland medical facts, now appropriated by criminology and penal science, are useful in proving not only the present but in attesting futureidentity, thereby preventing in great measure the dissimulation ofprisoners, deserters, false claimants to life insurance, fraudulentpensioners, and the like such matters are of daily occurrence the special agents of the u s pension office detect and cause the punishment of thesis fraudulentclaimants stratagems and conspiracies to defraud life-insurancecompanies go much further than mere substitution instead of a“fraudulent” a positive death may come up for investigation, and inorder to defraud an insurance company of a large amount, a body mayeven be procured by homicide to consummate the deception, as was donein the goss-udderzook tragedy near baltimore in 1872 a celebrated case now before the supreme court of the united states andinvolving the question of personal identity is that of the mutual lifeinsurance company of new york, the new york life insurance company, andthe connecticut mutual life insurance company of hartford, connecticut consolidated, plaintiffs in error, vs sallie e hillmon it is pre-eminently in criminal trials that the personal identity ofthe victim often constitutes an essential connecting link before itcan move, the law requires, at the outset, proof of the individualityof both the author of a crime and of the victim i shall, therefore, not touch upon such elusive individuals as charlie ross and jackthe ripper, but limit my remarks to a synthetical exposition of thebest-known facts regarding identification of the dead body and theinterpretation of its organic remains the identity of a living person, or even our own identity, is often adifficult point to establish it may also require medical evidence, oftentimes of a most involved character, to establish the fact ofdeath hence the medico-legal process of connecting a dead body, orthe remains or traces of the same, with a human being once known tohave lived and moved on earth, is beset with difficulties that may giverise to still greater antagonisms of evidence the question of personalidentity is one of the hardest that could possibly come before a court celebrated paper and judicial errors have given it great notoriety there are consequently few questions in forensic medicine that requiremore attention and sagacity, and none upon which the medical legistshould pronounce with more reserve and circumspection medical men areabsolutely the only persons qualified to assist in resolving thereally delicate question of personal identity.

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Allg wien med zeit , 1870, xv , pp 192-214 - man, age 60 suicide by hanging or homicide. Opinion, that it was the former 34 van haumeder. Wien med woch , 1882, xxxii , pp 531-533 - suicide by hanging or homicide there were thesis wounds inthe head. These occurred during the delirium of typhus 35 maschka. “sammlung gericht gutacht , ” etc prag, leipzig, 1873, p 137 - boy, age 9. Found dead in sitting position injuries on neckand elsewhere question, had he hung himself or been choked?. were theinjuries inflicted before or after death?. opinion, suicide 36 ibid , p 144 - boy, age 13 found hanging in sitting position question whether murder, suicide, or accident opinion, suicide 37 ibid , p 149 - woman, age 60. Found hanging, sitting position suicide or homicide opinion, suicide 38 ibid , p 156 - woman, age 30. Found hanging opinion, suicide 39 ibid , p 165 - man, age 63 suicide by hanging, or homicide bystrangling?.