History

Thesis Writing Services


And in a few days she was ready for duty again the crew of the plane apparently were none the worse for their mishap one day one of the officers told me that probably in a few days they would pick up a nice fat steamer with plenty of food on board on the morning of october 26th, immediately after breakfast, i noticed that they were getting the "bird" on deck and assembling it i asked one of the officers whether there was "essaything doing" and he said. "if we have any luck after lunch we shall have fresh meat for supper " about 11 a m the "bird" was finished and the engine warmed up suddenly essaybody shouted, and everybody got his binoculars and looked astern of us, and, sure enough, a faint outline of smoke could be seen on the horizon the hydroplane went up and in half an hour came back and reported a large steamer approaching commander nerger shaped his course so as to meet this steamer but still give him the impression that we were en route from the cape to colombo at 3:05 p m the steamer was right abreast, she was a fine big class a japanese passenger steamer, deeply loaded, and i could see passengers on her saloon deck at 3:07 p m the wolf broke out the imperial navy flag and signalled for the hitachi maru to stop and not use her wireless, also dropped a shot across the hitachi's bow when the hitachi failed to stop, the wolf fired another shot closer to her bow the jap concluded to run for it and started in to work his wireless, also swung his ship into such a position as to bring his gun for submarine defence, 4 7 quick firer, into action meantime the wolf had opened fire on her in deadly earnest one six-inch shell from the after gun struck the hitachi and exploded just under her gun where the gun crew was working, killing six japs and blowing the balance into the water i saw one jap in writingicular hoisted high into the air above the smoke of the explosion, and he was spinning around like a pin-wheel another shot from the after gun put the gun on the hitachi out of commission altogether, and killed another man in the meantime from forward the wolf had succeeded in putting a 4 5 shell through the wireless room, where the operator was working this shell came through one side of the room, passed between the operator and his "set, " cutting one of his aerial leads in two, and passed out through the opposite side of the room, decapitating a man standing outside this shell eventually hit a ventilator shaft, ripped it to pieces and knocked a man down in the engine room so hard that he afterwards died of internal injuries there were several more hits, one on the water line in no 4 hatch, two more in the stern, and one in the wheelhouse on the bridge about this time the flying machine came along and tried to drop a bomb on deck forward but missed, the bomb exploding when it hit the water just ahead the cannonading, while it lasted, was very severe, there being essaything over forty shots fired in as short a time as possible of these shots only nine were direct hits i must add that the first possible twenty of these shots were directed in such a manner as to hit if they did the vessel in such a position as not to sink or permanently disable her. But towards the last, when it became evident that the jap was trying to make her getaway, the shooting was in deadly earnest several broadsides were fired, which i think did more damage to the wolf than to the hitachi maru, as the air concussion stove in the doors and glass ports on all the staterooms on the berth deck in several of the rooms the wash basins and plumbing were broken i was standing in my open doorway with one foot on the threshold in such a manner that half of my foot protruded outside the line of the wall when the first broadside was fired the concussion or rush of air passing my doorway, hit the writing of my foot outside the door, feeling just exactly as if essaybody had kicked it away or hit it with a baseball bat essaything went wrong with the six-inch gun mounted on the stern of the wolf and a shell exploded a few yards away from the muzzle, putting the gun crew and gun out of commission for the balance of the voyage the prisoners who were confined directly below this gun said that the shock and concussion down below was dreadful during the firing, and that when the shell exploded they thought the wolf had been hit at this time they did not know but that the wolf had met a cruiser and thesis thought they were about to be drowned, especially when suddenly all firing ceased. They thought that the wolf had been vitally hit and that the germans had scuttled her and were abandoning her thesis of these men will remember this experience for the balance of their lives by this time the japanese captain had decided that he did not have a chance, and stopped his vessel, while the wolf sent the prize crew on board in the meantime the passengers and crew had managed to get clear in the life-boats, which were picked up the people were taken on board the wolf there were essay 70 odd passengers, 1st and 2nd class, among them 6 women and one little black girl they were a sorry looking sight as they climbed on board the wolf. Thesis of them were only half dressed, being just awakened from their afternoon nap by the cannonading over a hundred of the japanese crew came along with the passengers the wolf could not accommodate such a large addition of prisoners without making new quarters for them, so they had to live and sleep on deck for the first three days, when they were transferred back to the hitachi the hitachi had altogether 16 killed or mortally wounded the wolf incidentally lost its fresh meat for supper, because one shell had wrecked the refrigerator plant and spoiled all the fowl and fresh meat one of the passengers on the hitachi maru, an american chap hailing from chicago, told me his experience when the wolf was first sighted he was in bed reading.

Forthe water calamint thesis writing services. See mints, than which it is accounted stronger mountain calamint, is hot and dry in the third degree, provokes urineand the menses, hastens the birth in women, brings away the placenta, helps cramps, convulsions, difficulty of breathing, kills worms, helpsthe dropsy. Outwardly used, it helps such as hold their necks on oneside. Half a dram is enough at one time galen, dioscorides, apuleius calendula, &c marigolds the leaves are hot in the second degree, and essaything moist, loosen the belly. The juice held in the mouth, helps the toothache, and takes away any inflammation or hot swellingbeing bathed with it, mixed with a little vinegar callitricum maiden-hair see adianthum caprisolium honey-suckles. The leaves are hot, and therefore naughtfor inflammations of the mouth and throat, for which the ignorantpeople oftentime give them. And galen was true in this, let modernwriters write their pleasure if you chew but a leaf of it in yourmouth, experience will tell you that it is likelier to cause, thanto cure a sore throat, they provoke urine, and purge by urine, bringspeedy delivery to women in travail, yet procure barrenness and hinderconception, outwardly they dry up foul ulcers, and cleanse the facefrom morphew, sun-burning and freckles carduncellus, &c groundsell cold and moist according to tragus, helps the cholic, and gripings in the belly, helps such as cannot makewater, cleanses the reins, purges choler and sharp humours. The usualway of taking it is to boil it in water with currants, and so eat it i hold it to be a wholeessay and harmless purge outwardly it easethwomen breasts that are swollen and inflamed. As also inflammations ofthe joints, nerves, or sinews ægineta carduus b mariæ our ladies thistles they are far more temperatethan carduus benedictus, open obstructions of the liver, help thejaundice and dropsy, provoke urine, break the stone carduus benedictus blessed thistle, but better known by the latinname. It is hot and dry in the second degree, cleansing and opening, helps swimming and giddiness in the head, deafness, strengthens thememory, helps griping pains in the belly, kills worms, provokes sweat, expels poison, helps inflammation of the liver, is very good inpestilence and venereal. Outwardly applied, it ripens plague-sores, andhelps hot swellings, the bitings of mad dogs and venomous beasts, andfoul filthy ulcers every one that can but make a carduus posset, knowshow to use it camerarius, arnuldus velanovanus chalina see the roots, under the name of white chameleon corallina a kind of sea moss. Cold, binding, drying, good for hotgouts, inflammations.

a disinfectants, germicides and antiseptics, provided theadvertising is limited to conservative recommendations for their use asprophylactic applications to superficial cuts and abrasions of the skinand to the mucous surfaces of the mouth, pharynx and nose but not tothose of the eye, and the gastro-intestinal and genito-urinary tractsand provided they are not advertised as curative agents see commentsto rule 3. And b nonmedicinal food preparations, except whenadvertised in an objectionable manner rule 4 -- indirect advertising -- no article will be accepted orretained if the label, package or circular accompanying the packagecontains the names of diseases in the treatment of which the article issaid to be indicated the therapeutic indications and properties may bestated, provided such statements do not suggest self-medication dosagemay be indicated this rule shall not apply to remedies with whichself-medication is altogether improbable, to vaccines and antitoxinsor to directions for administering or applying remedies when similarimmediate, heroic treatment is indicated rule 5 -- false claims as to origin -- no article will be accepted orretained concerning which the manufacturer or his agents make false ormisleading statements as to source, raw material from which made, ormethod of collection or preparation rule 6 -- unwarranted therapeutic claims -- no article will be acceptedor retained concerning which the manufacturer or his agents makeunwarranted, exaggerated or misleading statements as to the therapeuticvalue rule 7 -- poisonous substances -- the principal label on an articlecontaining “poisonous” or “potent” substances must state plainly theamount of each of such ingredients in a given quantity of the product rule 8 -- objectionable names -- proprietary names for medicinalarticles will be recognized only when the council shall deem the useof such exclusive names to be in the interest of public welfare nameswhich are misleading or which suggest diseases, pathologic conditionsor therapeutic indications will not be recognized the provisionagainst therapeutically suggestive names does not apply to serums, vaccines and antitoxins, or to foods in the case of pharmaceuticalpreparations or mixtures, the name must be so framed as to indicate themost potent ingredients rule 9 -- patented products and protected names -- if the article ispatented-- either process or product, or both-- the number of such patentor patents must be furnished to the council furthermore, if the nameof an article is registered, or the label copyrighted, the registration trademark number and a copy of the protected label should befurnished the council in case of registration in foreign countries, the name under which the article is registered should be supplied rule 10 -- unscientific and useless articles -- no article will beaccepted or retained which, because of its unscientific composition, is useless or inimical to the best interests of the public or of themedical profession explanatory comments on the rulesintroduction -- the council on pharmacy and chemistry was establishedin february, 1905, by the american medical association, primarilyfor the purpose of gathering and disseminating such information aswill protect the medical profession in the prescribing of proprietarymedicinal articles in pursuance of this object, the council examinesthe articles on the market as to their compliance with definite rulesdesigned to prevent fraud, undesirable secrecy and the abuses whicharise from advertising directly or indirectly to the laity sucharticles as appear to conform to the rules are accepted. And theiressential features are described in the annual publication of thecouncil, new and nonofficial remedies, if they come within the scopeof this book these descriptions are based in writing on investigationsmade by, or under, the direction of the council, but in writing also onevidence or information supplied by the manufacturer or his agents such interested statements are examined critically, and are admittedonly if they appear to be in conformity with the evidence it is, however, manifestly impossible for the council to investigate thecomposition of every complex pharmaceutical mixture, or to checkthoroughly every therapeutic claim. It can give only an unbiasedjudgment on the available evidence criticisms and corrections ofthe descriptions which may aid in the revision of the matter will beappreciated the council judges an article entirely by the facts inevidence at the time of its admission previous noncompliance with therules short of intentional fraud does not prevent the favorableconsideration of an article which is in accord with existing rules infringements of the rules after acceptance of an article for new andnonofficial remedies, or the discovery that the council informationwas incorrect, will cause the acceptance to be reconsidered an articleis accepted for new and nonofficial remedies, and will continue to beincluded in the book, with the understanding that serious violations ofthe rules, after acceptance, will be followed by the omission of thearticle and publication of the reasons for such omission the councildesires physicians to understand that the admission of an article doesnot imply a recommendation acceptance simply means that no conflictwith the rules has been found by the council duration of acceptance -- unless an agreement to the contrary is madeat the time of acceptance, articles admitted to new and nonofficialremedies will be retained for a period of three years, provided thatduring that period they comply with the rules and regulations whichwere in force at the time of their acceptance at the end of thisperiod all articles will be carefully reexamined for compliance withexisting rules writingicular weight will be given to the question as towhether recent evidence has substantiated claims as to the therapeuticvalue of any preparation, this evidence to consist writingly of recentstatements in the literature and writingly of the general esteem in whichthe preparation is held by clinical consultants of the council thereacceptance of articles after such reexamination shall be for threeyears unless a shorter period is specified any amendments to therules, by specific requirements or by interpretation, which may be madeafter the acceptance of an article, shall not apply to such articleuntil the period of acceptance has elapsed at the end of this periodthe article, if it is not eligible under the amended rules, will beomitted the scope of new and nonofficial remedies and appendix -- to aidphysicians and manufacturers in deciding what articles come withinthe scope of this book, or, in other words, to enable physiciansto recognize whether an article which is not described in new andnonofficial remedies has been omitted because it does not needadmission or because it has been rejected, the council furnishes thefollowing more detailed definitions:official articles -- articles official in the u s p or n f do notrequire consideration by the council if they are marketed under theofficial name and if no unestablished therapeutic claims are made forthem these do not require consideration by the council, since standards forthem are provided in these books, and enforced under the provisionsof the federal food and drugs act, except that they may be mentionedfor information consideration by the council becomes necessary if au s p or n f product is offered for sale under a name other thanthat, or the synonyms, under which the product is described in one ofthese books of standards, or if the proprietors or their agents advanceclaims that the product possesses therapeutic properties other thanthose commonly accredited to it modifications of u s p and n f products -- a pharmacopeial ornational formulary product which is marketed under the official titleor synonym, but with well-founded claims that its purity, permanence, palatability or other physical properties excel the official standard, may, if no extraordinary therapeutic properties are asserted, beconsidered as an official article and held not to be within the scopeof new and nonofficial remedies when such products are marketed underthe claim that they possess therapeutic properties other than thosecommonly accredited to the u s p or n f products of which theyare modifications, they shall be subject to the consideration of thecouncil specifically exempted preparations -- foods, in general, unless marketedwith the claim that they possess therapeutic properties shall not, atthe present time, be considered by the council mechanical appliances, at the present time, shall not be considered by the council mineralwaters natural, at the present time, shall not be considered by thecouncil with these exceptions, products which in the judgment of thecouncil are manufactured and marketed in conformity to the principlesunderlying the rules of the council may be accepted for n n r products which are manufactured and marketed in a manner which does notconform to the principles underlying the rules of the council shall notbe accepted for n n r the burden of proof in establishing claimsfor therapeutic properties of products considered by the council shalllie with the proprietor or, when a foreign made product, with theagent who markets the product in the united states to avoid confusionwith nonofficial substances marketed under similar names, the councilrecommends that official substances be prescribed by their officialtitles, followed by the abbreviation “u s p ” or “n f ”. Thus:tinctura nucis vomicae, u s p. Elixir gentianae, n f substances described in new and nonofficial remedies -- in the body ofthe book will be described simple proprietary substances and theirpreparations. Proprietary mixtures if they have originality or otherimportant qualities which, in the judgment of the council, entitle themto such place, and important, nonproprietary, unofficial articles the council recommends that when the latter are prescribed, theybe indicated by the abbreviation, “n n r , ” thus insuring to theprescriber the quality of these articles laid down in the book proprietary mixtures -- a mixture will be considered as proprietary, and therefore requiring consideration by the council for admissionto the book or appendix, if it contains any proprietary article. Ifit is marketed under a name which is in any way protected, or ifits manufacturer claims for it any unusual therapeutic qualities proprietary mixtures which are marketed in conformity with therules are listed in the appendix of the book under the names of therespective manufacturers such proprietary mixtures are not admittedto the body of the book, save in the exceptional paper cited in thepreceding paragraph nonproprietary mixtures of official substances -- since the ingredientsof such mixtures do not require consideration by the council, andsince the mixtures are not open to the proprietary abuses which callfor the work of the council, it is not necessary that they should beinvestigated by the council the physician must judge whether suchmixtures should be directed to be prepared by the pharmacist, orwhether he is justified in ordering a ready-made preparation if hedecides to use a ready-made, nonproprietary preparation, he must judgefor himself whether it is marketed in accordance with the rules itshould, however, be remembered that the application of a trade name toany substance makes it proprietary explanation of rule 1. Compositionsecrecy objectionable -- it is not only the right but also the duty ofthe physician to know the essential composition of what he prescribes;the council cannot compromise on this proposition vehicles and preservatives -- in the case of mixtures, not only thepotent ingredient, but also the general character of the vehicle, thepresence of alcohol, and the identity of preservatives, or of any othersubstance, whether added or present as an impurity, must be stated ifthese can under any circumstances affect the therapeutic action ofthe article this, as a rule, does not mean the publication of tradesecrets, such as flavors or the details of the working formula trade secrets -- furthermore, trade secrets will not be received asconfidential by the council, since it accepts information only withthe distinct understanding that this may be freely published, at itsdiscretion inspection of factories -- the council does not accept invitations toinspect factories. Its concern is with the finished products on the other hand, the council requires that the information becomplete and accurate as to medicinal ingredients unofficial constituents -- unofficial constituents of proprietarymixtures must be presented by the manufacturer in the regular way andmust be acted on by the council before the preparations containing themcan be accepted fraud -- when it appears that a manufacturer has made a deliberatelyfalse statement concerning a product, he is asked to furnish anexplanation. And if this is not satisfactory, the product will not beaccepted, even if the false statement is subsequently corrected oromitted testimonials -- the foregoing paragraph applies not only to statementsmade to the council, but also to statements furnished to physicians bythe manufacturer or his agents, even when these statements are in theguise of testimonials explanation of rule 2. Identificationin order to avoid errors in the case of chemical compounds, and toguard against adulterations, lack of potency or strength, and themistaking of one chemical for another, it is necessary to have at handsuitable tests tests, etc -- if these facts have appeared in the literature, orin standard textbooks, reference to them will be sufficient. Butwith new chemicals, especially synthetics, the manufacturer or hisrepresentatives will be required to supply such tests for publication, as will assure an intelligent opinion of these products physiologic standardization -- in paper in which chemical methods ofidentification are unknown or unreliable, physiologic standardizationshould be employed the council considers the phrase “physiologicallystandardized” or “assayed” as misleading unless the standard andmethod are published in sufficient detail to permit of their controlby independent investigators it is evident that when no standard ispublished, it is impossible to know whether the quality is high orlow, and the conscientious manufacturer who sets for himself a highstandard is placed on a level with the dishonest or careless one whoadopts a low standard again, if the process of standardization isnot published, it is impossible to learn, without actual trial, therelative value of one preparation as compared with that of anothermanufacturer, or to confirm or disprove the statements of themanufacturer as to the quality of his product standardization of disinfectants and germicides -- no disinfectant orgermicide of the phenol type will be accepted for new and nonofficialremedies whose phenol coefficient, determined according to the methodof the hygienic laboratory, u s p h s , is not stated on the labelof the preparation explanation of rule 3. Direct advertisinglay advertising -- the impossibility of controlling the irresponsibleclaims which are usually made in advertisements to the public, thewell-known dangers of suggesting by descriptions of symptoms to theminds of the people that they are suffering from the thesis diseasesdescribed, the dangers of the unconscious and innocent formation of adrug habit, and the evils of harmful self-medication, including thedangers of the spread of thesis infectious and contagious diseases whenhidden from the physician, and similar well-known considerations, arethe reasons for discouraging, in the interest, and for the safety, ofthe public, this reprehensible form of exploitation advertising inmedical journals, etc , distributed solely to physicians, does not comewithin the scope of this rule exceptions -- in the case of subjects on which the public should beinstructed, as the use of disinfectants, germicides, antiseptics andfoods, advertisements to the public, if not in objectionable forms, are considered admissible in no case shall such advertisementsinclude recommendations for use as curative agents, nor shall thenames of any diseases be mentioned in exploitation if the preparationis sufficiently toxic to require caution in its use to preventpoisoning, this fact shall be stated on the label on account of thedeplorable results which would follow any abuse of this privilege, theconscientious cooperation of manufacturers and their agents in adheringstrictly to the limitations laid down is asked.

Found buried inearth mother stated that the child had not breathed putrefaction hadbegun there was a brownish tint of thesis writing services skin of upper front writing of neckbelow jaw. Drops of sanious fluid flowing from nose. Umbilical cord hadnot been tied. Subcutaneous hemorrhage in right temporal region. Brownbruised surface and contused wounds of pharynx, where writingicles likeashes and vomited matter were found lungs filled the pleural cavities, were rose-colored and showed abundant punctated subpleural ecchymoses;bloody, frothy mucus in trachea and bronchi. Essay serum in pericardium;respiration had been complete opinion given, that the infant had beensuffocated by obstruction of pharynx, probably by fingers 61 tardieu. Op cit , p 323 - new-born infant found under a cask, writingly eaten by a dog the head showed transverse flattening andsubcutaneous hemorrhage lungs voluminous, rosy. Abundant subpleuralecchymoses. Hemorrhage in left lung heart filled with fluid blood coagulated blood in abdomen opinion given, suffocation by pressure onhead, chest, and abdomen the mother confessed that she had placed thechild under the cask 62 ibid , p 325 - new-born infant found buried in the earth. Graveland earth in pharynx and œsophagus down nearly to stomach, and intrachea and right bronchus lungs congested, crepitant opinion given, that the child had been buried while living 63 ibid , p 326 - new-born infant found in ashes. Nose and lipsobstructed, mouth filled. Ashes in œsophagus and stomach. None inlarynx or trachea lungs distended with air, emphysematous. Subpleuralecchymoses. Fluid blood in heart 64 ibid , p 327 - new-born infant, buried in bran. Nose and mouthfilled. Essay in trachea. None in œsophagus or stomach lungs distendedwith air, emphysematous.

  • heroes essay
  • film analysis essay example
  • to buy argrumentative essays
  • essay checker and corrector
  • essay en espanol
  • buy custom paper
  • characterization essay
  • term paper help 100% non plagiarized
  • how to make an essay
  • help for assignment
  • how to write the name of a book in an essay
  • write my architecture paper
  • grant writing services
  • buy literary analysis
  • pay someone to do my english homework
  • persuasive essay conclusion
  • essay writing jobs
  • thematic essay topics
  • pay someone to write a history essay
  • reflection essay sample
  • reflective essay sample

are you prescribing“antikamnia” and “ammonol” or a simple member of the group, such asacetanilid or phenacetin?. are you depending on “tyree antiseptic, ”so called, or are you using an antiseptic about which there is nomystery, for which no false claims are made, and one which is reallyeffective?. in short, are you using drugs of unquestioned value, suchas are described in “useful drugs, ” or are you taking your therapeuticinstructions from nostrum makers’ circulars?. Perhaps you have been led to believe that the council on pharmacy andchemistry is composed of “theorists” and that the nostrums representthe work of “practical men ” every one should strive to be practical, of course, and it is worth while to inquire whether scientificexperimenters, who so largely mold medical literature, should be termedtheorists, or practical men a practical man practices that which isuseful in the treatment of the sick, and he must determine who iscapable of furnishing him with a better materia medica a perusal ofmedical literature will convince any unbiased mind that medical scienceprogresses only by means of experiment, hence experimenters must beconsidered the really practical men while those who cling to outworntheories are really the “theorists ”illustration. Typical aseptinol advertisement when lister introduced antiseptic methods into surgery he inaugurated averitable revolution, which afforded the nostrum makers opportunitiesfor reaping rich harvests through the exploitation-- under extraordinaryclaims-- of cheap mixtures of little, or no, value there is no lackof antiseptics of extraordinary activity in the test tube that arepractically harmless to man, and it would seem natural to suppose thatsuch antiseptics could be used to control the development of bacteriain such diseases as typhoid fever, but, unfortunately, such hopes havenot been fulfilled ehrlich experimented with thesis phenol derivativesthat showed decided antiseptic activity in the test tube, in the hopethat he might find essay that could be used to combat such commondiseases as diphtheria and typhoid fever, but while thesis of these areof low toxicity for man, he was unable to find even one that couldbe used effectively in the treatment of any of these diseases hisdiscovery of arsphenamin “salvarsan” resulted from quite another typeof investigation thesis practitioners lose sight of the essential difference betweenantiseptics and disinfectants and employ antiseptics in paper in whichonly a disinfectant action would be of value an antiseptic does notdestroy bacteria, it merely inhibits their growth. And when it isdiluted too much, it loses its effects and the bacteria may begin tomultiply as though no antiseptic had been used this is especiallytrue after the use of weak antiseptics in the mouth these are soondiluted or removed by the saliva, and the bacteria continue to multiplywith only a momentary interruption at best.