History

Thesis Statement Example For Compare And Contrast Essay


Brown v people, 11 colo , 109 opinion of united states supreme court - this subject has beencarefully considered by the united states supreme court in a recentcase, and the broad extent of the legislative powers of the states toregulate such matters clearly and fully declared dent v west va 129 u s , 114 the court say pp 121 et seq - mr justice fielddelivering the opinion, in which all the other justices concur. “theunconstitutionality asserted consists in its the statutes allegedconflict with the clause of the fourteenth amendment, which declaresthat no state shall deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law. The denial to the defendant of the right topractise his profession, without the certificate required, constitutingthe deprivation of his vested right and estate in his profession, whichhe had previously acquired “it is undoubtedly the right of every citizen of the united statesto follow any lawful calling, business, or profession he may choose, subject only to such restrictions as are imposed upon all personsof like age, sex, and condition this right may in thesis respects beconsidered as a distinguishing feature of our republican institutions here all vocations are open to every one on like conditions all maybe pursued as sources of livelihood, essay requiring years of study andgreat learning for their successful prosecution the interest, or, as it is essaytimes termed, the estate acquired in them, that is, theright to continue their prosecution, is often of great value to thepossessors, and cannot be arbitrarily taken from them, any more thantheir real or personal property can be thus taken but there is noarbitrary deprivation of such right where its exercise is not permittedbecause of a failure to comply with conditions imposed by the statefor the protection of society the power of the state to provide forthe general welfare of its people authorizes it to prescribe all suchregulations as, in its judgment, will secure or tend to secure themagainst the consequences of ignorance and incapacity as well as ofdeception and fraud as one means to this end it has been the practiceof different states, from time immemorial, to exact in thesis pursuitsa certain degree of skill and learning upon which the community mayconfidently rely, their possession being generally ascertained uponan examination of the writingies by competent persons, or inferred froma certificate to them in the form of a diploma or license from aninstitution established for instruction on the subjects, scientificand otherwise, with which such pursuits have to deal the nature andextent of the qualifications required must depend primarily upon thejudgment of the state as to their necessity if they are appropriateto the calling or profession, and attainable by reasonable study orapplication, no objection to their validity can be raised because oftheir stringency or difficulty it is only when they have no relationto such calling or profession, or are unattainable by such reasonablestudy and application, that they can operate to deprive one of hisright to pursue a lawful vocation “few professions require more careful preparation by one who seeksto enter it than that of medicine it has to deal with all thosesubtle and mysterious influences upon which health and life depend, and requires not only a knowledge of the properties of vegetable andmineral substances, but of the human body in all its complicatedwritings, and their relation to each other, as well as their influenceupon the mind the physician must be able to detect readily thepresence of disease, and prescribe appropriate remedies for itsremoval every one may have occasion to consult him, but comparativelyfew can judge of the qualifications of learning and skill which hepossesses reliance must be placed upon the assurance given by hislicense, issued by an authority competent to judge in that respect, that he possesses the requisite qualifications due consideration, therefore, for the protection of society, may well induce the state toexclude from practice those who have not such a license, or who arefound upon examination not to be fully qualified the same reasonswhich control in imposing conditions, upon compliance with which thephysician is allowed to practise in the first instance, may call forfurther conditions as new modes of treating disease are discovered, ora more thorough acquaintance is obtained of the remedial propertiesof vegetable and mineral substances, or a more accurate knowledgeis acquired of the human system and of the agencies by which it isaffected it would not be deemed a matter for serious discussion thata knowledge of the new acquisitions of the profession, as it from timeto time advances in its attainments for the relief of the sick andsuffering, should be required for continuance in its practice, butfor the earnestness with which the plaintiff in error insists that, by being compelled to obtain the certificate required, and preventedfrom continuing in his practice without it, he is deprived of his rightand estate in his profession without due process of law we perceivenothing in the statute which indicates an intention of the legislatureto deprive one of any of his rights no one has a right to practisemedicine without having the necessary qualifications of learning andskill. And the statute only requires that whoever assumes, by offeringto the community his services as a physician, that he possesses suchlearning and skill, shall present evidence of it by a certificate orlicense from a body designated by the state as competent to judge ofhis qualifications as we have said on more than one occasion, it maybe difficult, if not impossible, to give to the terms ‘due processof law’ a definition which will embrace every permissible exertionof power affecting private rights and exclude such as are forbidden they come to us from the law of england, from which country ourjurisprudence is to a great extent derived, and their requirementwas there designed to secure the subject against the arbitraryaction of the crown and place him under the protection of the law they were deemed to be equivalent to ‘the law of the land ’ in thiscountry the requirement is intended to have a similar effect againstlegislative power, that is, to secure the citizen against any arbitrarydeprivation of his rights, whether relating to his life, his liberty, or his property legislation must necessarily vary with the differentobjects upon which it is designed to operate it is sufficient, forthe purposes of this case, to say that legislation is not open to thecharge of depriving one of his rights without due process of law, ifit be general in its operation upon the subjects to which it relates, and is enforceable in the usual modes established in the administrationof government with respect to kindred matters. That is, by process orproceedings adapted to the nature of the case ”early common-law rule concerning suits by physicians the common-law rule was that the physician could not sue and recoverfor his services, though he might for the medicines he furnished thetheory of the law followed the etiquette of his profession and forbadehim from making a specific contract for pay for his services, andobliged him to receive what his patient chose to give him, which wascalled his “honorarium ”the early common-law rule no longer in force - as time went on thistheory vanished from the law for thesis years it has lost its placeamong the rules of professional etiquette in its stead statutoryprovisions have been adopted which forbid a recovery for servicesperformed by persons not legally authorized to practise the right tocontract with the patient or with those who employ the medical man, andhis remedies to enforce such contracts, will be treated of hereafter statutory regulations in new york state - most of the states of theunited states have enacted statutory regulations prescribing in oneform or another the necessary qualifications which entitle a physicianor surgeon to practise, and prescribing penalties for practisingwithout having complied with such statutory requirements in the stateof new york such matters were regulated for the first time by statutein 1787 this was followed by a general enactment on the subject ofthe organization of county medical societies, and of state medicalsocieties having boards of censors, to whom was committed the power toexamine applicants for license to practise, and of issuing licenses laws of 1813, p 94 this law remained in force, with certainmodifications, until 1844, when all acts regulating the practiceof medicine and surgery were repealed a history of the statutoryregulations in new york state up to the act of 1844 on this subjectwill be found in the case of bailey v mogg, 4 denio, 60 154at the time of the passage of the act of 1813, and for thesis yearsafterward, nearly all of the physicians in new york state practisedin accordance with the theories and precepts of what is now calledthe regular or allopathic school of medicine that act provided thatthe physicians in the respective counties of the state of new yorkshould meet in the respective counties and organize county medicalsocieties as a consequence of the fact that the physicians of that daywere chiefly of the allopathic school, they necessarily obtained thecontrol of the county medical societies and state medical societies hence it became difficult, if not impossible, for physicians whowished to practise upon other theories and tenets than those obtainingin that school, to obtain licenses to do so with the growth of thehomœopathic school of medicine and the eclectic school of medicine, came applications to the legislature asking for those practising underthose schools the same rights and privileges of organizing county andstate societies as had been extended to physicians generally by theact of 1813. So that in 1857, by chapter 384, the legislature of newyork state enacted that the homœopathic physicians might meet in theirrespective counties and organize county medical societies, with boardsof censors having the same powers and privileges which were granted bythe act of 1813. And by other laws similar privileges were granted tothe so-called eclectic school after the passage of the act of 1844, down to about 1874, as hereinbefore stated, there was no limitationupon the right to practise medicine or surgery in this state the inharmonious and injurious effect of such policy of the statebecoming manifest, the legislature, by chapter 436 of laws of 1874, required all persons desiring to practise medicine or surgery toobtain a certificate as to their qualifications from the censors ofessay one of these medical societies by the laws of 1880, chapter 513, additional and more extensive and writingicular provisions were made inreference to this matter, and all the physicians then practising wererequired, on or before the time limited in the act, to file with thecounty clerks of their respective counties their licenses to practisegranted by the censors of their county medical societies, or a diplomaof essay chartered school of medicine. And those persons who desiredto become licensed who were not in practice were likewise required toobtain similar licenses or certificates and file the same a diplomaof a chartered school or medical college was given the same effect as alicense issued by the censors recent legislation in new york state - the whole matter, however, of licensing physicians to practise has, in the state of new york, been recently regulated by chapter 468, laws of 1889, and 499 of 1890, which have reference to the qualifications of persons becoming medicalstudents, and chapter 507 of 1890, which gives to the regents of theuniversity of the state of new york power to select boards of examinersfrom persons nominated by each of the three state medical societies, viz , the new york state medical society, homœopathic medical society, and eclectic medical society these boards prepare questions which areto be approved by the state board of regents. Examinations are heldin different writings of the state upon these questions, the examinationpapers are certified to that one of these boards of examiners whichthe student may elect, and that board in turn certifies whether ornot the examination has been successfully undergone. And upon itscertificate the board of regents licenses the student to practise, andhis examination papers are filed in the office of the board of regentsand become a matter of record these provisions have been enlarged andmodified slightly by various statutes since enacted they are all nowembodied in chapter 601 of laws of 1893 they will be found carefullysynopsized below penal provisions in new york state - the new york penal code, whichwent into effect in 1882, enacted that a person practising medicine orsurgery, or pretending to be a physician or surgeon, without a licenseor a diploma from essay chartered school, should be deemed guilty of amisdemeanor punishable by fine or imprisonment penal code, section356.

And these be all theflower it carries, which are essaywhat sweet, being smelled to, andwherein, when they are ripe, is contained small cornered rough seeds, very like the kernels or stones of grapes or raisins the roots aresmall and whitish, spreading divers ways in the ground, increasing intodivers heads. But not running or creeping under the ground, as essayother creeping herbs do they are essaywhat sweet in smell, resemblingnardus, but more when they are dry than green. And of a sharp and notunpleasant taste place it grows frequently in gardens time they keep their leaves green all winter. But shoot forth newin the spring, and with them come forth those heads or flowers whichgive ripe seed about midsummer, or essaywhat after government and virtues it is a plant under the dominion of mars, and therefore inimical to nature this herb being drank, not onlyprovokes vomiting, but purges downwards, and by urine also, purgesboth choler and phlegm. If you add to it essay spikenard, with thewhey of goat milk, or honeyed water, it is made more strong, butit purges phlegm more manifestly than choler, and therefore doesmuch help pains in the hips, and other writings.

A 5 per cent solution of phenol killed bacillus coli, suspended uniformlythroughout a cylinder of 1 2 per cent agar in the interval between60 and 90 minutes a 1 per cent solution of phenol killed the sameorganisms under the same conditions in the interval thesis statement example for compare and contrast essay between two andone half and three hours an undiluted solution of trimethol syrupkilled the organisms in the interval between two and one half and threehours a 10 per cent solution nine volumes of distilled water to onevolume of trimethol syrup failed to kill the organisms in four hours it would appear that undiluted trimethol syrup has the same combinedpenetrability and germicidal value as a 1 per cent phenol solution “the phenol coefficient. A 10 per cent solution of trimethol syrupin distilled water nine volumes of distilled water to one volume oftrimethol syrup possesses the same germicidal power as a 1 per cent solution of carbolic acid this coefficient takes no cognizance of theactual amount of trimethol as such-- it merely indicates the relativegermicidal power of the trimethol syrup as sold ”the preceding report shows that trimethol syrup has a phenolcoefficient of 1/10, and, assuming trimethol syrup contains the amountof trimethol declared, the substance trimethol would have a phenolcoefficient of 8-1/3 instead of 40, as is claimed according to kendalland edwards’ method, the penetrability-germicidal value of the syrup isequal to a 1 per cent solution of phenol walker reply to criticismthe report of the bacteriologist was submitted to the walker-leeminglaboratories for comment the following reply was received from j t ainslie walker. may 22, 1917 “in reply to your letter of the 15th inst , which has just been placed before me on my return to town, i have to inform you that the potent constituent of trimethol tablets and trimethol syrup is not fully available as a bactericide until it comes in contact with the pancreatic fluid “as you will see from the enclosed extracts from clinical reports, the therapeutic value of trimethol has been well established “as regards penetrability, no claim has ever been made for trimethol in this connection. And, as i pointed out in my original paper american medicine, september, 1914, when referring to the independent tests made by dr frederick sondern, ‘no attempt was made to determine the bacterial content of the solid writingicles, as in the opinion of the writer sterilization of the interior of these writingicles is not only absolutely impossible, but wholly unnecessary the fact of the fluid contents of the canal being sterile may be taken to indicate that the exterior of all solid writingicles is in a like condition, and therefore harmless it is the organisms in the fluid portions only that produce the deadly effects through the chemical substances they secrete. Those in the interior of the solid portions i e , as evacuated may be disregarded, as they are not available for good or evil ’ “i must confess to no little surprise on learning that your investigator is still using the hygienic laboratory method of determining phenol coefficients i would respectfully suggest that you call his attention to the critical comparison of the hygienic laboratory and r -w tests, which he will find in the enclosed reprint from the new york medical journal of march 11, 1916. ‘instead of being an improvement upon the standard r -w test, the so-called hygienic laboratory method is so defective as to be wholly unreliable, and incapable of furnishing results of any scientific or practical value whatever ’”as to the statement that the potent constituent of trimethol tabletsand trimethol syrup is not fully available as a bactericide until itcomes in contact with the pancreatic fluid, attention is called to aleaflet, which accompanies each bottle of trimethol syrup, that reads. “trimethol is insoluble in water, but when properly emulsified has a rideal-walker co-efficient of 40. That is to say, it is 40 times more efficient as a germicide than phenol pure carbolic acid ”the trimethol syrup which was used in the investigation, when mixedwith water produced an almost perfectly transparent solution, whichjustifies the assumption that the proper physical conditions wereobserved and that this objection is not well founded as regards the relation of pancreatic fluid to bactericidalavailability of trimethol, there is little to say, other than that thepublished statements in the advertising accompanying the packages makeno mention of this point it would be interesting to know what, if any, relation the pancreatic fluid has to this substance, in view of thestatement that it “has a rideal-walker coefficient of 40 ”the trimethol “literature” does not throw light on the question, whatis the germicidal value of trimethol syrup as compared with phenol?. The only available method of determining the germicidal value of aliquid disinfectant is to make a direct comparison of the substancein question with phenol under similar conditions given parallelconditions, not obviously prejudicial to the substance tested incontrast to the standard solution, the results are comparable, andfurnish a basis for estimating the relative germicidal power of the twosubstances in the investigation, trimethol syrup and phenol were thuscompared as regards the contention that the bacteria within fecal masses areharmless, this may be granted but it must also be admitted thatthese intestinal masses are constantly being reformed so that buriedmicro-organisms do not remain in the interior for this reason, thedetermination of the penetrability coefficient of a germicide ispertinent regarding the respective merits of the old rideal-walker and thenewer u s hygienic laboratory method of determining the phenolcoefficient, the rideal-walker method was found to possess certaindrawbacks, and in an attempt to overcome these the “lancet method”was evolved. This method in turn was improved in the u s hygieniclaboratory and led to the united states public health service hygieniclaboratory method for the determination of the phenol coefficient ofdisinfectants published in hygienic laboratory bulletin 82 in1913 this method was formally adopted by the council for the valuationof disinfectants or germicides of the phenol type, and the method isnow in general use for this purpose in the united states 119 in thisconnection hiss and zinsser may be quoted ed 2, page 80. “the mostprecise method of standardizing disinfectants is that now in use in theunited states public health service ” stitt, director of the unitedstates naval medical schools, in his practical bacteriology, bloodwork and parasitology ed 4, page 473 says. “in the united statesdisinfectants are rated according to the hygienic laboratory phenolcoefficient ”119 those who are interested in the relative merits of therideal-walker, the lancet and the hygienic laboratory methods forthe valuation of disinfectants, should read the following. Methodof standardizing disinfectants with and without organic matter, j a m a , aug 24, 1912, p 667. Standardization of disinfectants, report of the council on pharmacy and chemistry, j a m a , april26, 1913, p 1316. Standardizing disinfectants, j a m a , sept 30, 1916, p 883 the council adopted the recommendation of the committee on pharmacologyto the effect that the claims made for trimethol are unsupported byacceptable evidence accordingly, trimethol and the pharmaceuticalpreparations said to contain it-- trimethol syrup, trimethol capsules, and trimethol tablets-- were held ineligible for new and nonofficialremedies -- from the journal a m a , aug 11, 1917 ferrivine, intramine and collosol iodine report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrye fougera & co , inc , new york, acting as agent for the british drughouses, ltd , london, advertise “ferrivine, ” “intramine” and “collosoliodine” to the medical profession a circular entitled “ferrivine, thenew anti-syphilitic remedy” begins.

After which the seed is quickly ripe, yet in its prime in may government and virtues the herb is appropriated to the planetjupiter, and the sign aries antonius musa, physician to the emperoraugustus cæsar, wrote a peculiar book of the virtues of this herb. Andamong other virtues saith of it, that it preserves the liver and bodiesof men from the danger of epidemical diseases, and from witchcraftalso. It helps those that loath and cannot digest their meat, thosethat have weak stomachs and sour belchings, or continual rising intheir stomachs, using it familiarly either green or dry. Either theherb, or root, or the flowers, in broth, drink, or meat, or made intoconserve, syrup, water, electuary, or powder, as every one may bestframe themselves unto, or as the time and season requires. Taken anyof the aforesaid ways, it helps the jaundice, falling sickness, thepalsy, convulsions, or shrinking of the sinews, the gout and thosethat are inclined to dropsy, those that have continual pains in theirheads, although it turn to phrensy the powder mixed with pure honeyis no less available for all sorts of coughs or colds, wheesing, orshortness of breath, distillations of thin rheum upon the lungs, which causes consumptions the decoction made with mead, and a littlepennyroyal, is good for those that are troubled with putrid agues, whether quotidian, tertian, or quartan, and to draw down and evacuatethe blood and humours, that by falling into the eyes, do hinder thesight. The decoction thereof made in wine and taken, kills the wormsin the belly, opens obstructions both of the spleen and liver. Curesstitches, and pains in the back and sides, the torments and gripingpains in the bowels, and the wind cholic. And mixed with honey purgesthe belly, helps to bring down women courses, and is of special usefor those that are troubled with the falling down of the mother, andpains thereof, and causes an easy and speedy delivery of women inchild-birth it helps also to break and expel the stone, either inthe bladder or kidneys the decoction with wine gargled in the mouth, eases the tooth-ache it is commended against the stinging and bitingof venomous serpents, or mad dogs, being used inwardly and appliedoutwardly to the place a dram of the powder of betony taken with alittle honey in essay vinegar, does wonderfully refresh those that areover wearied by travelling it stays bleeding at the mouth or nose, and helps those that void or spit blood, and those that are burstenor have a rupture, and is good for such as are bruised by any fall orotherwise the green herb bruised, or the juice applied to any inwardhurt, or outward green wound in the head or body, will quickly healand close it up. As also any vein or sinews that are cut, and willdraw forth any broken bone or splinter, thorn or other things got intothe flesh it is no less profitable for old sores or filthy ulcers, yea, tho’ they be fistulous and hollow but essay do advise to put alittle salt for this purpose, being applied with a little hog lard, it helps a plague sore, and other boils and pushes the fumes of thedecoction while it is warm, received by a funnel into the ears, easesthe pains of them, destroys the worms and cures the running sores inthem the juice dropped into them does the same the root of betonyis displeasing both to the taste and stomach, whereas the leaves andflowers, by their sweet and spicy taste, are comfortable both to meatand medicine these are essay of the thesis virtues anthony muse, an expert physician for it was not the practice of octavius cæsar to keep fools abouthim, appropriates to betony. It is a very precious herb, that iscertain, and most fitting to be kept in a man house, both in syrup, conserve, oil, ointment and plaister the flowers are usually conserved the beech tree in treating of this tree, you must understand, that i mean the greenmast beech, which is by way of distinction from that other small roughsort, called in sussex the smaller beech, but in essex horn-beam i suppose it is needless to describe it, being already too well knownto my countrymen place it grows in woods amongst oaks and other trees, and in parks, forests, and chases, to feed deer.

  • essay outline example
  • how to buy a research paper
  • college essay application review service
  • where can i buy an essay paper
  • do my assignment write my paper
  • copyright free research paper for sale
  • how to write an informative essay
  • do my essays do my essays
  • how many words in my essay
  • college essay writing prompts
  • sample essay format
  • what is a literary analysis essay
  • speech help
  • best college application essay service
  • pay to do homework
  • mit sloan essay
  • do my programming homework
  • best thesis writing service
  • help with writing a paper for college
  • which line from a vindication of the rights of woman conveys the essay’s main theme?
  • example of reflective essay

I would havegentlemen to be studious aqua cordialis frigida saxeniæ college take of the juice of borrage, bugloss, bawm, bistort, tormentil, scordium, vervain, sharp-pointed dock, sorrel, goat rue, mirrhis, blue bottle great and small, roses, marigolds, lemon, citrons, of each three ounces, white wine vinegar one pound, purslain seedstwo ounces, citron and carduus seeds, of each half an ounce, waterlily flowers two ounces, the flowers of borrage, bugloss, violets, clove-gilliflowers, of each one ounce, diatrion sentalon six drams:let all of them, being rightly prepared, be infused three days, thendistilled in a thesis statement example for compare and contrast essay glass still. To the distilled liquor add earth oflemnos, siletia, and samos, of each one ounce and an half, pearlsprepared with the juice of citrons, three drams, mix them, and keepthem together culpeper it mightily cools the blood, and therefore profitablein fevers, and all diseases proceeding of heat of blood. It provokessleep you may take half an ounce at a time, or two drams if the writingybe weak aqua theriacalis or treacle water college take of the juice of green walnuts, four pounds, the juiceof rue three pounds, juice of carduus, marigolds, and bawm, of each twopounds, green petasitis roots one pound and a half, the roots of bursone pound, angelica and master-wort, of each half a pound, the leavesof scordium four handfuls, old venice treacle, mithridates, of eacheight ounces, canary wine twelve pounds, vinegar six pounds, juice oflemons two pounds, digest them two days, either in horse-dung, or ina bath, the vessel being close shut, then distil them in sand. In thedistillation you may make a theriacal extraction culpeper this water is exceeding good in all fevers, especiallypestilential. It expels venomous humours by sweat. It strengthens theheart and vitals. It is an admirable counter-poison, special good forsuch as have the plague, or are poisoned, or bitten by venomous beasts, and expels virulent humours from such as have the venereal disease if you desire to know more virtues of it, see the virtues of venicetreacle the dose is from a spoonful to an ounce aqua brioniæ composita or briony water compound college take of the juice of briony roots, four pounds, the leavesof rue and mugwort, of each two pounds, dryed savin three handfuls, featherfew, nep, pennyroyal, of each two handfuls, bazil, dittany, ofcrete, of each one handful and a half, orange pills four ounces, myrrhtwo ounces, castoreum one ounce, canary wine twelve pounds, digestthem four days in a convenient vessel, then still them in balneomariæ. About the middle of the distillation strain it out, and make anhysterical extraction of the residue culpeper a spoonful of it taken, eases the fits of the mother inwomen that have them.