History

The Art Of The Personal Essay


Therefore it is good for suchas are shrunk up. It dissolves aposthumes, hard swellings, and helpsmange in the hands and legs, outwardly applied in a pultis galen alchymilla ladies-mantle is hot and dry, essay say in the seconddegree, essay say in the third. Outwardly it helps wounds, reduceswomen breasts that hang down. Inwardly, helps bruises, and ruptures, stays vomiting, and the fluor albus, and is very profitable for suchwomen as are subject to miscarry through cold and moisture alkanna privet hath a binding quality, helps ulcers in the mouth, isgood against burnings and scaldings, cherishes the nerves and sinews;boil it in white wine to wash the mouth, and in hog grease forburnings and scaldings amaracus, majorana marjoram essay say ’tis hot and dry in the seconddegree, essay advance it to the third sweet marjoram, is an excellentremedy for cold diseases in the brain, being only smelled to helpssuch as are given to much sighing, easeth pains in the belly, provokesurine, being taken inwardly. You may take a dram of it at a time inpowder outwardly in oils or salves, it helps sinews that are shrunk;limbs out of joint, all aches and swellings coming of a cold cause angelica is hot and dry in the third degree.

Redistilled alcohol was treated with a small amount of sodium hydroxide for twenty-four hours, then again distilled the color standard was made by dissolving 0 116 gm of dried sodium salicylate in water, adding 1 minim of glacial acetic acid, and making up to 1, 000 c c each c c represents 0 1 mg of salicylic acid 209 209 this standard is essaywhat similar to the one proposed by t w thoburn and paul j hanzlik, j biol chem , 23, 175 the ferric chloride solution was made by diluting 1 c c ferric chloride fecl₃ 6h₂o test solution u s p with 99 c c of water the diluted solution must be freshly prepared each day with one exception, all of the commercial specimens examined respondedsatisfactorily to the above test showing less than 1 writing salicylicacid in 1, 000 writings acetylsalicylic acid the individual results aregiven in the accompanying table melting point and salicylic acid determinations melting point free salicylic acid brand corrected colorimetrically acetylsalicylic acid, 130 0-131 0° colored, but showing p w r 1 less than 0 1 per cent acetylsalicylic acid, 130 0-131 0° no color millikin2 acetylsalicylic acid, 129 0-130 0° no color millikin2 5-grain capsules acetylsalicylic acid, 128 0-129 0° a colored, but showing less millikin, 1 than 0 1 per cent a 5-grain capsules3 125 5-126 5° b considerably more than 0 1 per cent b acetylsalicylic acid, 131 0-132 0° no color squibb2 acetylsalicylic acid 131 0-132 0° no color aspirin, 1 monsanto acetylsalicylic acid, 130 5-131 5° colored, but showing less m c w 1 than 0 1 per cent acetylsalicylic acid, 131 5-132 5° colored, but showing less m c w 1 than 0 1 per cent acetylsalicylic acid, 131 0-132 0° colored, but showing less m c w 1 than 0 1 per cent aspirin, bayer1 before patent 131 5-132 5° no color expired aspirin, bayer1 4 after patent 128 5-129 5° colored, but showing less expired than 0 1 per cent aspirin, bayer1 4 after patent 129 5-130 5° colored, but showing less expired than 0 1 per cent aspirin, lehn 130 5-131 5° 0 1 per cent and fink2 aspirin, lehn 130 5-131 5° colored, but showing less and fink2 than 0 1 per cent aspirin, lehn 131 0-132 0° colored, but showing less and fink1 than 0 1 per cent 1 obtained on the open market 2 obtained from manufacturer 3 one-third of the capsules a contained a white powder. Two-thirds of the capsules b contained a pink powder having strong odor of acetic acid and not complying with the tests 4 not described in “new and nonofficial remedies, 1917”. The other products are other testsnew and nonofficial remedies, 1917, requires that acetylsalicylic acidshall form a clear solution with warm sodium carbonate solution.

It is also good for sore mouths and gums that are swollen, and to fasten loose teeth camerarius saith, the distilled water usedby essay, took away the pain of their teeth, when all other remediesfailed, and the thickened juice made into pills with the powder of gumtragicanth and arabic, being taken, prevails much to help those thatmake bloody water applied to the gout it eases pains thereof, andhelps the hardness of the sinews, if it come not of the cramp, or acold cause primroses they are so well known, that they need no description of the leaves ofprimroses is made as fine a salve to heal wounds as any that i know;you shall be taught to make salves of any herb at the latter end of thebook. Make this as you are taught there, and do not you that have anyingenuity in you see your poor neighbours go with wounded limbs whenan halfpenny cost will heal them privet descript our common privet is carried up with thesis slender branchesto a reasonable height and breadth, to cover arbours, bowers andbanquetting houses, and brought, wrought, and cut into so thesis forms, of men, horses, birds, &c which though at first supported, growsafterwards strong of itself it bears long and narrow green leaves bythe couples, and sweet smelling white flowers in tufts at the end ofthe branches, which turn into small black berries that have a purplishjuice with them, and essay seeds that are flat on the one side, with ahole or dent therein place it grows in this land, in divers woods time our privet flowers in june and july, the berries are ripe inaugust and september government and virtues the moon is lady of this it is little usedin physic with us in these times, more than in lotions, to wash soresand sore mouths, and to cool inflammations, and dry up fluxes yetmatthiolus saith, it serves all the uses for which cypress, or the eastprivet, is appointed by dioscorides and galen he further saith, thatthe oil that is made of the flowers of privet infused therein, and setin the sun, is singularly good for the inflammations of wounds, andfor the headache, coming of a hot cause there is a sweet water alsodistilled from the flowers, that is good for all those diseases thatneed cooling and drying, and therefore helps all fluxes of the bellyor stomach, bloody-fluxes, and women courses, being either drank orapplied. As all those that void blood at the mouth, or any other place, and for distillations of rheum in the eyes, especially if it be usedwith them queen of the meadows, meadow sweet, or mead sweet descript the stalks of these are reddish, rising to be three feethigh, essaytimes four or five feet, having at the joints thereof largewinged leaves, standing one above another at distances, consisting ofthesis and essaywhat broad leaves, set on each side of a middle rib, beinghard, rough, or rugged, crumpled much like unto elm leaves, havingalso essay smaller leaves with them as agrimony hath essaywhat deeplydented about the edges, of a sad green colour on the upper side, andgreyish underneath, of a pretty sharp scent and taste, essaywhat likeunto the burnet, and a leaf hereof put into a cup of claret wine, givesalso a fine relish to it at the tops of the stalks and branches standthesis tufts of small white flowers thrust thick together, which smellmuch sweeter than the leaves. And in their places, being fallen, comecrooked and cornered seed the root is essaywhat woody, and blackish onthe outside, and brownish within, with divers great strings, and lesserfibres set thereat, of a strong scent, but nothing so pleasant as theflowers and leaves, and perishes not, but abides thesis years, shootingforth a-new every spring place it grows in moist meadows that lie mostly wet, or near thecourses of water time it flowers in essay places or other all the three summermonths, that is, june, july, and august, and the seed is ripe soonafter government and virtues venus claims dominion over the herb it isused to stay all manner of bleedings, fluxes, vomitings, and womencourses, also their whites. It is said to alter and take away the fitsof the quartan agues, and to make a merry heart, for which purpose essayuse the flowers, and essay the leaves it helps speedily those thatare troubled with the cholic. Being boiled in wine, and with a littlehoney, taken warm, it opens the belly. But boiled in red wine, anddrank, it stays the flux of the belly outwardly applied, it helps oldulcers that are cankerous, or hollow fistulous, for which it is by thesismuch commended, as also for the sores in the mouth or secret writings theleaves when they are full grown, being laid on the skin, will, in ashort time, raise blisters thereon, as tragus saith the water thereofhelps the heat and inflammation in the eyes the quince tree descript the ordinary quince tree grows often to the height andbigness of a reasonable apple tree, but more usually lower, andcrooked, with a rough bark, spreading arms, and branches far abroad the leaves are essaywhat like those of the apple tree, but thicker, broader, and full of veins, and whiter on the under side, not dentedat all about the edges the flowers are large and white, essaytimesdashed over with a blush the fruit that follows is yellow, being nearripe, and covered with a white freeze, or cotton. Thick set on theyounger, and growing less as they grow to be thorough ripe, bunched outoftentimes in essay places, essay being like an apple, and essay a pear, of a strong heady scent, and not durable to keep, and is sour, harsh, and of an unpleasant taste to eat fresh. But being scalded, roasted, baked, or preserved, becomes more pleasant place and time it best likes to grow near ponds and water sides, and is frequent through this land. And flowers not until the leaves become forth the fruit is ripe in september or october government and virtues old saturn owns the tree quinces when theyare green, help all sorts of fluxes in men or women, and cholericlasks, casting, and whatever needs astriction, more than any wayprepared by fire. Yet the syrup of the juice, or the conserve, are muchconducible, much of the binding quality being consumed by the fire;if a little vinegar be added, it stirs up the languishing appetite, and the stomach given to casting. Essay spices being added, comfortsand strengthens the decaying and fainting spirits, and helps the liveroppressed, that it cannot perfect the digestion, or corrects choler andphlegm if you would have them purging, put honey to them instead ofsugar. And if more laxative, for choler, rhubarb.

And, further, inorganic iron, such asferrous carbonate, serves the purpose admirably when iron is indicated with the acceptance of these well established facts, all the art of the personal essay possibleexcuse for the therapeutic employment of pepto-mangan in place of ironvanished. But as plain and simple as this fact is, the unnecessary andexpensive pepto-mangan continues to be prescribed by physicians whowill not take the slight trouble to investigate the claims for thisnostrum false and misleading claimsthere is not merely a difference of opinion between the exploiters andthe council, but there has been also actual misrepresentation in theexploitation of this nostrum to physicians this has been shown onmore than one occasion about twelve years ago, the m j breitenbachcompany, the proprietors of pepto-mangan, claimed that the report ofthe commission that had been appointed for the investigation of anemiain porto rico “would alone suffice to establish pepto-mangan at once asthe foremost hematinic known ” examination of the report showed thatthe commission made no such claims. On the contrary the commissionprotested against this misrepresentation j a m a 45:1099 oct 7 1905 illustration. From the new york medical journal undaunted by this exposure of their methods, the breitenbach companylater sent out a statement of results purporting to have been obtainedby one mateo m gillen, in the treatment of infantile anemia onrandall island in new york city at the instance of the journalthe hospital records in these paper were examined, and it was foundthat the pretended report was little more than a tissue of falsehood j a m a 48:1197 april 6 1907 about two years ago the council reported that while the statementsjust referred to were no longer made, they had never been definitelyadmitted by the breitenbach company to be erroneous, and thatpepto-mangan was then being exploited to the public indirectly council reports, 1914, p 121 we reproduce an advertisement that has been appearing weekly in thenew york medical journal for several months one can only supposethat this advertisement was intended to mislead physicians, and itwould be an insult to the intelligence of the average reader toattempt any detailed discussion of it, but enough has been said toshow how misleading the statements are one should note writingicularlythe advice-- old as the nostrum business itself-- contained in theadvertisement, to prescribe an original bottle the reason for suchadvice is simple experience has shown that when original bottles aredispensed patients soon learn to buy the nostrum without consulting thephysician, for they shrewdly suspect that he knows no more about thepreparation than they, and that he gets his information from preciselythe same sources that are available to them they are obviously right in truth, the physician who prescribes pepto-mangan as a hematinicshows ignorance of the most rudimentary facts of iron therapy, and theintelligent patient soon perceives his limitations illustration. A newspaper advertisement of pepto-mangan the problem of iron therapythe investigation of the problems of iron therapy and its utilizationin the formation of hemoglobin forms one of the most brilliant chaptersin pharmacologic research, and there is no better established fact intherapeutics than that any organic or inorganic preparation of ironthat does not irritate the stomach may be employed effectively when theadministration of iron is indicated “useful drugs” contains a listof iron preparations that are suitable for all conditions which callfor iron, and the clinician may rest assured that he will never haveoccasion to go outside that list to prescribe any substitute as a matter of fact, it seems probable that the very number ofavailable iron preparations has served to cause confusion, thusaffording an opportunity for the nostrum maker to introduce hissuperfluous compounds it may be difficult at times to select thepreparation of iron best suited to the individual patient. And it isthis difficulty that has led the clinician to listen to the seductiveclaims made for the various pretended substitutes for iron oneshould approach the question of choosing the proper form of iron fortherapeutic use with the recognition of the fact that there is nosuch thing as a substitute for iron in the formation of hemoglobin, that there are no ideal forms of iron other than those found in thefoodstuffs further, the clinician cannot avoid the disadvantagesinherent in all forms of iron that he can prescribe, and he musttherefore seek that which seems best suited for the individual patient bunge estimated the amounts of iron present in various foods. And atable based on this, and other data, is given in “pharmacology ofuseful drugs” published by the american medical association ordinaryfoods in an ample diet contain enough iron to supply the normal dailyloss, which amounts to only a few milligrams, but thesis persons whohave poor appetites take an insufficient amount of iron in their foodand become anemic in such paper the additional iron required can besupplied best by adding spinach, eggs, apples, or other iron-rich foodto the dietary essay iron combinationswilliam hunter discusses the subject of anemia and its treatment atconsiderable length in the “index of treatment, ” ed 6, pp 17-37, and gives thesis prescriptions containing iron for use under differentconditions. And while it is unnecessary to reproduce all of these here, a few may be given in order to suggest suitable methods of prescribingiron when it cannot be given in sufficient amounts in the food in chlorosis hunter advises that that form of iron which experience hasshown to be least disturbing to the patient stomach should be used, and he suggests separate stomachic mixtures to be used simultaneously, not mixed with the iron itself when constipation exists-- and this is avery common accompaniment of chlorosis-- he gives the following aperientiron combination. gm or c c ℞  ferrous sulphate |25 gr iv magnesium sulphate 4| ʒ i aromatic sulphuric acid |5 ♏ vii tincture of ginger |7 ♏ x compound infusion of gentian b p q s , ad 30| ℥ ithis, constituting a single dose, is to be taken twice daily-- at11 a m and 6 p m a little compound tincture of gentian andwater may be used in place of the compound infusion of the britishpharmacopeia he modifies this essaywhat as occasion demands by usingsodium sulphate and adding sodium bicarbonate which converts thesulphate of iron into ferrous carbonate and adds 10 minims of spiritof chloroform to act as a stomachic hunter also suggests the use of pills of aloes and iron in place ofthe mixture described above, and when constipation has been corrected, the aloes may be omitted and the pill of ferrous carbonate alone maybe used for the iron hunter comment regarding this pill is, “verysatisfactory ”the same form of iron is available in the compound iron mixture, formerly official, which hunter says is exceedingly good in thiscountry the compound solution of iron and ammonium acetate, bashammixture, so called, has long enjoyed a wide reputation as causing verylittle disturbance of the stomach, and the homely tincture of ferricchlorid is probably useful in a large majority of paper in which thestomach is not especially irritable we may say with assurance that one of the forms suggested herewill suffice for practically every case in which it is necessaryto reinforce the amount of iron available in the food by essaypharmaceutical preparation if these do not satisfy your requirements, consult a really competent pharmacist and enlist his aid in devisinga mixture especially suited to your individual patient -- from thejournal a m a , dec 29, 1917 article iv cactina pilletsthis preparation may be considered briefly in view of the recentdiscussion in this series of articles of the pharmacology of thedigitalis group and the principles of treatment in cardiovasculardisease the manufacturers maintain that cactina is wholly unlikedigitalis, and that is the truth, as we shall show. But since theyclaim that it is useful in certain conditions of the heart in whichdigitalis is commonly employed by well informed clinicians, it isnecessary to consider its cardiac actions-- or its lack of them!. it isdifficult to determine just what action cactina is supposed to exert onthe heart for example, one advertisement contains the following. “cactina pillets a gentle cardiac tonic that supports and sustains the heart through its capacity to improve cardiac nutrition ”just how the cardiac nutrition is to be improved without an improvedcoronary circulation is not explained it would be interesting to knowin what other way this is to be accomplished, and how an improvedcoronary circulation can be induced without acting on the heart orvessels but that is what digitalis does, and you should remember thatcactina is so very different from digitalis!. then again.

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Being snuffed up in thenose, it helps spasmus cynicus, which is a wrying the mouth aside;it helps noise in the art of the personal essay the ears being dropped into them, it provokesthe menses, and helps the biting of venomous beasts. It is a mostgallant oil to strengthen the body, the back being anointed with it;strengthens the muscles, they being chafed with it. Helps head-ache, the forehead being rubbed with it moschelæum, or, oil of musk college take two nutmegs, musk one dram, indian leaf or mace, spikenard, costus, mastich, of each six drams, styrax calamitis, cassialignea, myrrh, saffron, cinnamon, cloves, carpobalsamum or cubebs, bdellium, of each two drams, pure oil three pounds, wine three ounces, bruise them as you ought to do, mix them, and let them boil easily, till the wine be consumed, the musk being mixed according to art afterit is strained culpeper it is exceeding good against all diseases of cold, especially those of the stomach, it helps diseases of the sides, theybeing anointed with it, the stranguary, cholic, and vices of thenerves, and afflictions of the reins oleum nardinum or, oil of nard college take of spikenard three ounces, marjoram two ounces, woodof aloes, calamus aromaticus, elecampane, cypress, bay leaves, indianleaf or mace, squinanth, cardamoms, of each one ounce and a half, bruise them all grossly, and steep them in water and wine, of eachfourteen ounces, oil of sesamin, or oil of olives, four pounds andan half, for one day. Then perfect the oil by boiling it gently in adouble vessel oleum populeum nicholaus college take of fresh poplar buds three pounds, wine four pounds, common oil seven pounds two ounces, beat the poplar buds very well, then steep them seven days in the oil and wine, then boil them in adouble vessel till the wine be consumed, if you infuse fresh buds onceor twice before you boil it, the medicine will be the stronger, thenpress out the oil and keep it culpeper it is a fine cool oil, but the ointment called by thatname which follows hereafter is far better ointments more simple unguentum album, or, white ointment college take of oil of roses nine ounces, ceruss washed inrose-water and diligently sifted, three ounces, white wax two ounces, after the wax is melted in the oil, put in the ceruss, and make itinto an ointment according to art, add two drams of camphire, madeinto powder with a few drops of oil of sweet almonds, so will it becamphorated culpeper it is a fine cooling, drying ointment, eases pains, anditching in wounds and ulcers, and is an hundred times better withcamphire than without it unguentum egyptiacum college take of verdigris finely powdered, five writings, honeyfourteen writings, sharp vinegar seven writings, boil them to a justthickness, and a reddish colour culpeper it cleanses filthy ulcers and fistulas forcibly, and notwithout pain, it takes away dead and proud flesh, and dries unguentum anodynum or, an ointment to ease pain college take of oil of white lilies, six ounces, oil of dill, andchamomel, of each two ounces, oil of sweet almonds one ounce, duckgrease, and hen grease, of each two ounces, white wax three ounces, mix them according to art culpeper its use is to assuage pains in any writing of the body, especially such as come by inflammations, whether in wounds or tumours, and for that it is admirable unguentum ex apio or, ointment of smallage college take of the juice of smallage one pound, honey nine ounces, wheat flower three ounces, boil them to a just thickness culpeper it is a very fine, and very gentle cleanser of wounds andulcers liniment of gum elemi college take of gum elemi, turpentine of the fir-tree, of each oneounce and an half, old sheep suet cleansed two ounces, old hoggrease cleansed one ounce. Mix them, and make them into an ointmentaccording to art culpeper it gently cleanses and fills up an ulcer with flesh, itbeing of a mild nature, and friendly to the body unguentum aureum college take of yellow wax half a pound, common oil two pounds, turpentine two ounces, pine rozin, colophonia, of each one ounce and anhalf, frankincense, mastich, of each one ounce, saffron one dram, firstmelt the wax in the oil, then the turpentine being added, let them boiltogether. Having done boiling, put in the rest in fine powder, letthe saffron be the last and by diligent stirring, make them into anointment according to art basilicon, the greater college take of white wax, pine rozin, heifer suet, greek pitch, turpentine, olibanum, myrrh, of each one ounce, oil five ounces, powder the olibanum and myrrh, and the rest being melted, make it intoan ointment according to art basilicon, the less college take of yellow wax, fat rozin, greek pitch, of each half apound, oil nine ounces. Mix them together, by melting them according toart culpeper both this and the former, heat, moisten, and digest, procure matter in wounds, i mean brings the filth or corrupted bloodfrom green wounds. They clense and ease pain ointment of bdellium college take of bdellium six drams, euphorbium, sagapen, of eachfour drams, castoreum three drams, wax fifteen drams, oil of elder orwall-flowers, ten drams, the bdellium, and sagapen being dissolved inwater of wild rue, let the rest be united by the heat of a bath unguentum de calce or, ointment of chalk college take of chalk washed, seven times at least, half a pound, wax three ounces, oil of roses one pound, stir them all togetherdiligently in a leaden mortar, the wax being first melted by a gentlefire in a sufficient quantity of the prescribed oil culpeper it is exceeding good in burnings and scaldings unguentum dialthæ or, ointment of marsh-mallows college take of common oil four pounds, mussilage of marsh-mallowroots, linseed, and fenugreek seed two pounds. Boil them together tillthe watery writing of the mussilage be consumed, then add wax half a pound, rozin three ounces, turpentine an ounce, boil them to the consistenceof an ointment, but let the mussilage be prepared of a pound of freshroots bruised, and half a pound of each of the seeds steeped, andboiled in eight pounds of spring water, and then pressed out see thecompound unguentum diapompholygos college take of oil of nightshade sixteen ounces, white wax, washed, ceruss, of each four drams, lead burnt and washed, pompholixprepared, of each two ounces, pure frankincense one ounce. Bring theminto the form of an ointment according to art culpeper this much differing from the former, you shall have thatinserted at latter end, and then you may use which you please unguentum enulatum or, ointment of elecampane college take of elecampane roots boiled in vinegar, bruised andpulped, one pound, turpentine washed in their decoction, new wax, ofeach two ounces, old hog grease salted ten ounces, old oil fourounces, common salt one ounce, add the turpentine to the grease, wax, and oil, being melted, as also the pulp and salt being finely powdered, and so make it into an ointment according to art unguentum enulatum cum mercurio or, ointment of elecampane with quick-silver, college is made of the former ointment, by adding two ounces ofquick-silver, killed by continual stirring, not only with spittle, orjuice of lemons, but with all the turpentine kept for that intent, andwriting of the grease, in a stone mortar culpeper my opinion of this ointment, is briefly this. It wasinvented for the itch, without quick-silver it will do no good, withquick-silver it may do harm unguentum laurinum commune or, ointment of bays common college take of bay leaves bruised one pound, bay berries bruisedhalf a pound, cabbage leaves four ounces, neat-foot oil five pounds, bullock suet two pounds, boil them together, and strain them, that soit may be made into an ointment according to art unguentum de minie sive rubrum camphora or, ointment of red lead college take of oil of roses one pound and an half, red lead threeounces, litharge two ounces, ceruss one ounce and an half, tutty threedrams, camphire two drams, wax one ounce and an half, make it into anointment according to art, in a pestle and mortar made of lead culpeper this ointment is as drying as a man shall usually readof one, and withal cooling, therefore good for sores, and such as aretroubled with defluctions unguentum e nicotiona, seu peto or, ointment of tobacco college take of tobacco leaves bruised, two pounds, steep them awhole night in red wine, in the morning boil it in fresh hog grease, diligently washed, one pound, till the wine be consumed, strain it, andadd half a pound of juice of tobacco, rozin four ounces, boil it to theconsumption of the juice, adding towards the end, round birthwort rootsin powder, two ounces, new wax as much as is sufficient to make it intoan ointment according to art culpeper it would take a whole summer day to write the writingicularvirtues of this ointment, and my poor genius is too weak to give itthe hundredth writing of its due praise. It cures tumours, imposthumes, wounds, ulcers, gun-shot, stinging with nettles, bees, wasps, hornets, venomous beasts, wounds made with poisoned arrows, &c unguentum nutritum, seu trifarmacum college take of litharge of gold finely powdered, half a pound, vinegar one pound, oil of roses two pounds, grind the litharge ina mortar, pouring to it essaytimes oil, essaytimes vinegar, till bycontinual stirring, the vinegar do no more appear, and it come to awhitish ointment culpeper it is of a cooling, drying nature, good for itching ofwounds, and such like deformities of the skin unguentum ophthalmicum or, an ointment for the eyes college take of bole-ammoniac washed in rose water, one ounce, lapis calaminaris washed in eye bright water, tutty prepared, of eachtwo drams, pearls in very fine powder half a dram, camphire half ascruple, opium five grains, fresh butter washed in plantain water, asmuch as is sufficient to make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it is exceeding good to stop hot rheums that fall downinto the eyes, the eyelids being but anointed with it unguentum ex oxylapatho or, ointment of sharp-pointed dock college take of the roots of sharp-pointed dock boiled in vinegaruntil they be soft, and then pulped, brimstone washed in juice oflemons, of each one ounce and an half, hog grease often washed injuice of scabious, half a pound, unguentum populeon washed in juice ofelecampane, half an ounce.