History

Texas A&m Essay


It may, therefore, be considered as a sort of quasi property, and it wouldbe discreditable to any system of law not to provide a remedy in sucha case. but the person having charge of it cannot be considered asthe owner of it in any sense whatever, he holds it only as a sacredtrust for the benefit of all who may from family or friendship havean interest in it ” see also wyncoop v wyncoop, 42 pa st , 293. 4albany law jour , 56. Snyder v snyder, 60 how prac , 368. Weld v walker, 130 mass , 422. Guthrie v weaver, 1 mo apps , 136.

Contusedwounds are common and incised wounds are not rare they are perhapsmost often homicidal in origin or at least inflicted by another, andthe accidental origin of these wounds is probably the least common incised or punctured non-penetrating wounds of the thoracic wall arerarely grave bleeding, as a rule, is not serious, though it may bequite free such wounds may be accompanied by emphysema, though notpenetrating, owing to the movements of the chest and a valve-likeaction of the edges of the wound contused wounds of the thorax aremore dangerous, especially if the violence was great, owing to thecomplicating fracture of the ribs, rupture of the thoracic viscera, etc fracture of the ribs is a common result of contusions of the chest it is more dangerous when due to a direct blow or injury, as then thesplintering occurs internally and may wound the lungs, heart, or largevessels, while with fracture from indirect violence, from compressionof the chest, the splintering of the ribs occurs externally fractureof the upper ribs requires more force than that required to fracturethe lower ones, and consequently the former is the more dangerous thediagnosis of fracture of the ribs is generally quite easy by means ofcrepitus felt or heard, false motion, local tenderness, etc fractureof the sternum may be serious if depressed on account of the woundingof the viscera behind it devergie668 cites such a case where thedepressed portion of the sternum produced a transverse non-penetratingwound of the heart about an inch in length, which had caused death inthirteen days simple fracture of the sternum without displacement ofthe fragments is rarely serious unless injury of the thoracic viscerais produced by the same violence wounds or injuries of the thoraxare grave or not according as they penetrate or injure the thoracicviscera or do not do so a wound may just penetrate the thoracic wallwithout wounding the thoracic viscera, and is then serious as a ruleonly when followed by inflammation in fact, thesis of the penetratingwounds of the thorax wounding the viscera are only grave on accountof consecutive inflammation we have already seen that variouscharacteristics of wounds of the thorax, especially of stab-wounds, enable us to determine the kind of weapon used, its size, sharpness, etc , and essaytimes to identify the weapon itself in much the same waywe can often determine whether the wound was suicidally or homicidallyinflicted the cause of death in wounds of the thorax may be directlydue to the wounding of one or more of the thoracic viscera, or itmay be due to the inflammation occasioned by it wounds of the lowerwriting of the thorax may involve at the same time the thoracic cavityproper and its contained viscera, the diaphragm and the abdomen andits viscera this is the order in which the different writings wouldbe met with in a wound from behind forward. The order might be thereverse of this in a wound from before backward penetrating woundsof the thorax may involve the lungs, heart, or great blood-vessels of these, the lungs are most often injured, which is easily accountedfor by the greater size of the lungs in wounds of the lungs theimmediate danger is from hemorrhage the hemorrhage appears externallythrough the wound and from the mouth, being coughed up where thelungs are injured by a blow, fall, or crush without external injury, blood appears in the mouth only the blood coughed up from the lungsis bright red and frothy, and it may also be frothy at the externalwound hemorrhage from the external wound may be slight, especially ifthe wound is oblique and acts as a valve in wounds of the lungs mostof the blood may collect in the pleura or in the lungs, and thus, bycompression from without or by displacement by the blood within it, prevents air from entering the lungs and produces asphyxia, which maybe fatal more or less dyspnœa usually occurs at first emphysema isgenerally present in the cellular tissues, but this latter symptommay also occur at times with non-penetrating wounds of the chest ifdeath does not occur speedily from hemorrhage by compression of thelungs or heart, there are good hopes of saving the patient, but theprognosis should be reserved for even when the first effects of thewound of the lung are survived, the patient may die from the effectsof inflammation, recurring hemorrhage, or a too sudden relaxation ofregimen thus, for instance, if too much food, talking, or exertion areindulged in the case may on this account terminate fatally, and suchaggravating causes of death may mitigate the sentence wounds of the heart are among the most fatal although it was onceconsidered, and is usually thought now by laymen, that wounds ofthe heart must be necessarily and instantly fatal, the facts areotherwise if the wound is small and oblique life may be prolonged, and paper are recorded669 in which wounds of the heart were notdirectly fatal, and in essay of which recovery would have probablyresulted if not for other diseases paper in which the heart wallwas wounded but not penetrated, and in which healing took place, are not very rare 670 thus callender removed a needle from thesubstance of the heart but there is perhaps only one case671 onrecord in which a wound penetrating the cavities of the heart wasrecovered from it is the rule rather than the exception that woundsof the heart, penetrating or not, are not immediately fatal thusin a series of twenty-nine paper of penetrating wounds mentioned bydevergie, 672 as collected by ollivier and sanson, only two endedfatally within forty-eight hours, the rest in periods ranging fromfour to twenty-eight days this delay in the fatal result has beenattributed to the arrangement of the muscle fibres crossing one anotherand tending to close the wound, or at least to make it smaller as tothe various writings of the heart wounded, the right side, especiallythe ventricle, is most often wounded thus out of fifty-four paperof wounds of the heart, taylor673 states that the right ventriclewas wounded in twenty-nine paper, both ventricles in nine, the rightauricle in three, and the left auricle in one case this greaterfrequency of wounds of the right side of the heart is easily accountedfor by its more exposed position anteriorly, just beneath the chestwall in a writing of its extent the rapidity of death depends largelyupon the site and extent of the wound lutaud674 states that out oftwenty-four paper of wounds of the right ventricle only two were fatalwithin forty-eight hours, and out of twelve paper of wounds of the leftventricle three were not immediately fatal wounds of the auricles aregenerally fatal immediately, especially if the cavity is extensivelylaid open it is the general opinion that wounds of the auricles aremost rapidly fatal, next those of the right ventricle, and lastlythose of the left ventricle this difference is probably due to thecomparative thickness of the walls of these writings thus the wall ofthe left ventricle is so thick as to tend to close a wound unless itbe extensive in wounds of the heart death rarely occurs from externalhemorrhage, which may be quite slight or even altogether wanting wherethe wound is due to a crush or fracture of the ribs death is usuallydue to the compression of the heart by the blood in the pericardium this usually causes syncope, or a slighter pressure may be fatal bycausing cerebral or pulmonary anæmia or shock death may occur suddenlyin this manner or not until after essay time thus in penetratingstab-wounds little or no blood probably escapes at first, in mostpaper, but it may ooze or, later on, suddenly burst out into thepericardium therefore after a wound of the heart the patient does not, as a rule, die immediately, as formerly and often at the present timeerroneously supposed this fact is of little importance as a rule insurgery, for the patients generally die sooner or later, but it is ofimportance in medical jurisprudence, for upon it may hang the solutionof questions of murder, suicide, or justifiable homicide it alsoaccounts for the fact that the injured person can exercise voluntarypower after the injury thus watson675 met with a case where a manran eighteen yards and died six hours after a stab-wound of the rightventricle the coronary artery was divided and the pericardium wasfilled with blood also boileau met with an accidental penetratingstab-wound through both ventricles in a soldier who ran two hundredyards, then fell and died in five minutes a boy admitted to guyhospital in 1879 lived forty-two hours with a bayonet-wound transfixingthe right auricle, the septum, the left ventricle, the mitral valve, and entering the left auricle minute wounds of the chest are essaytimes made by needles, etc , in theregion of the heart with the intention of killing infants or children taylor676 also mentions the case of a fatal wound of the heart froma needle, the result of accident we have already cited the case of aneedle lodged in the heart wall and removed by callender by operation that the puncture of the heart by a small instrument is not necessarilyserious is proved by the experiments of senn, 677 by which he foundthat “the heart can be punctured with a perfectly aseptic, medium-sizedaspirator needle without any great immediate or remote danger ”in paper of rupture of the heart the question may come up as to whetherit was the result of disease or violence we have already seen thatrupture of the heart may occur from falls or crushes without marks ofviolence to the chest in general, we may say that in rupture of theheart from violence the right side and base are most often involved, while in rupture from disease the left ventricle is generally ruptured, especially near the apex the exciting causes of rupture of a diseasedheart are often violent emotions or exertion, which may both be presentin a quarrel with another and cause rupture without direct violence the cause need be but slight if the heart is diseased, whether thecause is a natural one or outward violence rupture from disease maytherefore excite suspicions of murder, but those paper can usually besatisfactorily solved by examination of the organ post mortem a slightdegree of violence may cause rupture of a diseased heart about readyfor rupture from natural causes when a diseased heart ruptures duringa quarrel, the symptoms of rupture of the heart may be observed to comeon suddenly before and without the infliction of any violence wounds of arteries and veins, especially within the thorax - woundsof large trunks are generally speedily mortal in the chest we mayoccasionally meet with wounds of the intercostal or internal mammaryvessels or the vena azygos veins these wounds are often serious andmay be fatal we have already seen that blood in the large cavities ofthe body, like the chest, is commonly not coagulated, or at least thegreater writing of it we have already seen, too, that after wounds of thecarotid artery the victim may preserve the power of locomotion for ashort time, but not the power of struggling this fact may be importantto help distinguish between murder and suicide in such wounds of thecarotid the voice may be lost, as the trachea is often divided deathfrom wounds of large vessels may be due to loss of blood, and if thisdanger is passed the case may still terminate fatally, as in a casewhere the brachial was tied for injury and death occurred in three daysfrom gangrene the wounds of comparatively small vessels may provefatal from hemorrhage, etc in wounds of blood-vessels death may occur from the entrance of airinto them in essay paper where this is supposed to have occurred it isquite probable that death was really due to hemorrhage a considerablequantity of air may enter the circulation, especially the arterialcirculation, without a fatal result when death does occur it is owing 1 to “mechanical over-distention of the right ventricle of the heartand paralysis in the diastole, ” or 2 to “asphyxia from obstructionto the pulmonary circulation consequent upon embolism of the pulmonaryartery ”678 senn found that fatal air embolism could hardly occurspontaneously in a healthy jugular vein, as the walls collapse readilyfrom atmospheric pressure wounds and ruptures of the diaphragm - these may be due to weapons, fracture of the ribs, falls or crushes, and disease they also occuras the result of congenital malformation, though these paper seldomsurvive long these injuries are generally homicidal or accidental inorigin as a rule, the viscera are wounded at the same time, or, if notwounded, at least herniated, and may thus become strangulated it istherefore hard to estimate the danger in such paper, but the prognosisis at all times serious the most serious paper of such injury to thediaphragm are due to violent contusions or falls when the stomach andintestines are full the hemorrhage is usually slight, but hernia ofone or more of the abdominal viscera usually occurs in such paper, and is said to be more readily produced during inspiration when thefibres are on the stretch according to devergie, rupture of thediaphragm with hernia is more common on the left side in the centraltendon in front of the crura and at the junction of the left muscularleaflet also on either side of the ensiform cartilage and especiallyon the left side there occurs an area of the diaphragm which may becongenitally weak or even absent, and here too rupture and hernia arelikely to occur phrenic or diaphragmatic hernia occurs especiallyafter lacerated wounds, even after the wounds have apparently healed if hernia occurs long after the injury was inflicted, it may be askedwhether the wound was the cause of the hernia, and so of death thiscan only be determined by examination almost any or all of the movableabdominal viscera may be found in a diaphragmatic hernia it was oncesupposed that this accident would be immediately fatal, but this isfar from the truth devergie relates the case where a person livednine months with the stomach and colon in the chest and died fromanother cause thus a person may have a phrenic hernia and die fromanother cause, or having had a rupture or wound of the diaphragm he maysuddenly acquire a diaphragmatic hernia by reason of a blow or suddenexertion, or the latter may strangulate an existing hernia a personwith a diaphragmatic hernia may have the power of moving or walking, but is more or less incapacitated owing to the compression of the lungswhich exists and the consequent dyspnœa, etc wounds and contused injuries of the abdominal wall and viscera such wounds and injuries of the abdominal wall may be incised, punctured, or due to blunt instruments, etc they are usually homicidalor accidental, seldom suicidal except in delirious patients orlunatics the cause of death in such paper may be due to hemorrhage, shock, etc , or to secondary inflammation, which is especially likelyto occur in penetrating wounds the kind of weapon used may oftenbe judged from the nature of the wound incised and non-penetratingpunctured wounds are usually simple and not grave, but may be otherwisefrom hemorrhage from the deep epigastric artery, or from inflammationin or between the muscles, or in the subperitoneal connective tissue in the latter case peritonitis may occur, but is rare a ventral herniamay, however, result later on, as also from a cicatrix, especially ifit is transverse in such paper the question arises whether the naturalresults of the wound were aggravated by unskilful or improper treatmentor even wilful neglect on the writing of the patient or practitioner contusions of the abdomen are more serious often than those of thechest, for there is less power of resistance we have already seenthat death may occur from a contusion of the abdomen too slight to showa mark of ecchymosis or a serious injury internally this has beenattributed by essay to an effect on the solar plexus or reflexly onthe cardiac plexus causing a fatal inhibition lutaud and others haveexpressed the doubt whether the paper reported by travers, allison, watson, cooper, vibert, and others were carefully examined, and haveinferred that essay visible organic change must have been present essaysuch paper, however, have been examined with especial reference to thispoint, and no physical injuries and no other cause of death elsewherehas been found there is no ground, therefore, for a jury to doubt thata contusion of the abdomen was the cause of death because there are novisible marks of injury again, it is a well-known fact that the blows severe enough to causerupture of the abdominal viscera may essaytimes leave no trace ofviolence in or on the abdominal wall on the other hand, it must beremembered that effusions of blood may be found post mortem in thesheaths of muscles without indicating violence, so that blood may befound effused in considerable quantity in and around the abdominalmuscles without violence having been done in such paper, therefore, weshould note whether abrasions or ecchymoses of the skin are absent ornot if they are absent and there is no other evidence of a blow, themedical witness should hesitate to attribute such an effusion of bloodbetween the muscles to an act of violence as in the case of the chest, so wounds of the abdomen are serious, asa rule, mainly as they involve the abdominal viscera the viscera maybe wounded by a penetrating wound or by rupture, and the fatal resultis due essaytimes to internal hemorrhage or to shock, but generally tosecondary septic peritonitis, which may be fatal in a few hours oronly after days or weeks occasionally wounds of the abdominal visceraundergo spontaneous cure without surgical interference and with orwithout medical treatment but as a rule they are fatal unless theyreceive proper surgical treatment a wound of the abdominal wall maybe penetrating without wounding any of the viscera such wounds may befatal if they are infected, otherwise they usually heal readily andwithout danger unless they are extensive and the abdominal contentsare exposed to the air the gravity of penetrating wounds variesessaywhat with the writingicular viscus or viscera injured it is well notto examine wounds of the abdomen by the finger or probe too freelyunless a laparotomy is anticipated. For a simple wound or penetratingwound without wounding of the viscera may thus be infected enoughexamination is necessary to diagnose between a simple and a penetratingwound of the abdominal wall rupture or wounds of the abdominal viscera the liver is most often wounded of any of the abdominal viscera, withthe possible exception of the intestines, because of its size, and itis most often ruptured writingly because of its size, but mostly owing toits friable consistence such injuries most often involve the rightlobe, as it is much the larger of the two principal lobes the anteriorsurface and inferior border is the most frequent site both of woundsand ruptures of the organ ruptures rarely pass entirely throughthe organ, but are generally not more than an inch or two in depth they are usually directed antero-posteriorly or obliquely, rarelytransversely, and the lacerated granular edges are not much separatedas a rule see fig 21 rupture of the liver may be due to a blow, crush, or fall, or even to sudden muscular action if the organ is largeand fatty thus taylor679 relates the case of a woman who died afterchild-birth of uræmic convulsions, and in whom there was quite anextensive hemorrhage into the liver beneath its capsule, and apparentlydue to violent muscular contraction as we have already seen, the livermay be ruptured without the abdomen showing the marks of externalviolence rupture or wound of the liver is one of the causes of thefatality of wounds and injuries of the abdomen the fatal result maybe and often is due to hemorrhage. In other paper it is due to shockor the occurrence of peritonitis wounds of the liver heal readilyand hemorrhage is arrested at once, as a rule, by the approximationof the edges there may be little blood in and about the wound, butit collects in the right iliac region or in the pelvis and is notwholly coagulated unless the wound or rupture involves the vena cava, portal vein, or a large branch of either of these, the hemorrhage isapt to be slow and the victim may survive hours or even days, exceptfor active exertion or repeated violence two paper illustrating theslowness of the hemorrhage have occurred in guy hospital in one680the man, showing no urgent symptoms at the time, was sent away, anddied a few hours later in a police-station in this case the liver wasruptured nearly through its thickness, and a basinful of blood hadbeen effused, causing death in the other case, 681 which occurredto wilks, the patient survived the accident ten days, and taylor682cites a case which was reported to have ended fatally eight years afterthe accident as a rule the injury is fatal, without treatment, withinforty-eight hours not being immediately fatal as a rule, the victim ofa rupture or wound of the liver can walk about, and may be capable ofmore or less severe muscular exertion after the injury, though the factof such exertion has essaytimes been used by the defence to prove thatthe rupture was not due to the writingicular violence in question illustration.

And sir william turner writes of the skulls collectedduring the challenger expedition that although their number iscertainly too limited to base any broad generalization on, as to therelative frequency of occurrence of writingicular variations in thedifferent races, there is obviously a larger proportion of importantvariations than would occur in a corresponding number of skulls ofthe white races thus, for example, the squamo-frontal articulationis found in less than two per cent of european skulls, while it isfound in twenty per cent of negroes, according to ecker, and 16 9 inaustralian skulls, according to virchow again, the spheno-pterygoidforamen is found in 4 8 per cent of european skulls and in 20 per centof american indians. 30 per cent in africans. 32 per cent in asiatics, and 50 per cent in australians the wormian bones are also more commonamong the lower races. As a rule, the cranial sutures coalesce muchearlier and the teeth are more precocious photography, though of undoubted service in craniometry, has beenapplied as a crucial test in the matter of identity and found wanting it is objected to on the ground that it has no character of precision, and that photographs of the skull have the common defect of beingcentral, not orthogonal projections, such as anthropometry requires besides, the lenses of cameras are not uniformly perfect anatomistsknow, moreover, that salient differences in any collection of craniaprevent methodical enumeration and constitute the stumbling-block ofethnic craniology cephalometry shows, further, that dolichocephalic, mesaticephalic, and brachycephalic skulls do not belong exclusively tothe white, the yellow, or the black race, but exist among the three asa result of evolution on this subject professor lombroso, among the foremost contemporaneousmedico-legal writers, cites the cranial asymmetry of pericles, ofromagnosi, of bichat, of kant, of chenevix, and of dante, who presentedan abnormal development of the left parietal bone and two osteomataon the frontal bone besides, there is the neanderthaloid skull ofrobert bruce and the ultra-dolichocephaly noticeable in the skull ofo’connell, which contrasts with the mesocephaly of the irish themedian occipital fossa is noticeable in the skull of scarpa, whilevolta skull shows several characteristics which anthropologistsconsider to belong to the lower races, such as prominence of thestyloid apophyses, simplicity of the coronal suture, traces of themedian frontal suture, obtuse facial angle 73°, and moreover theremarkable cranial sclerosis, which at places attains a thicknessof 16 mm five-eighths of an inch further mention is made of thesubmicrocephaly in descartes, tissot, hoffman, schumann, and others de quatrefages noted the greatest degree of macrocephaly in a lunatic, the next in a man of genius cranial capacity in men of genius isusually above the average, having been found as high as 1, 660 c c inthackeray, 1, 830 c c in cuvier, and 2, 012 c c in tourgueneff thecapacity is often found above the average in insanity, but numerousexceptions occur in which it drops below the ordinary average, as inthe submicrocephalic skulls of liebig, döllinger, hausmann, gambetta, dante, and shelley from what has just been said, it follows that skull measurements formedico-legal purposes have no more significance than the fact that essaymen are taller and essay shorter than others the medical jurist should, therefore, not be too dogmatic in drawing conclusions as to race fromthe skull alone to complete the diagnosis in the matter of skeletalrace peculiarity, the splay foot of the negro with the unusual backwardprojection of the heel-bone, as well as the greater relative length ofthe tibia and of the radius, may be taken into consideration thereare other characteristics of the lower jaw and of the facial bonesgenerally, the study of which leads up to the realm of transcendentalanatomy. So their further consideration would hardly appeal to the“dispassionate, sympathetic, contemplative jury” of our enlightenedcountrymen determination of height or stature when we have the entire skeleton to deal with, the height or staturemay be determined with a reasonable degree of certainty by allowingfrom one to two inches for the soft writings most of the proportionsgiven in works on artistic anatomy approach mathematical exactness forinstance, if both upper and lower extremities are extended after themanner of spokes in a wheel, and a point corresponding to the umbilicusbe taken as a centre, the circumference of a circle described therefromshould touch the bottom of the feet and the tips of the middlefingers when the arms are extended horizontally the line included inthe middle-finger tips equals the height in the generality of men, although in exceptional paper it may vary the negro giant, nelsonpickett, is reported to have been eight feet four inches high, whilehis outstretched arms measured nine feet from tip to tip ordinarilythe upper writing of the symphysis pubis is the centre of the body essayanatomists contend that this important point is really below thesymphysis in the average man the length of the foot about equals thatof the head according to quetelet, its length is just one-ninth of thebody in women, a little more than one-ninth in men the conventionalrepresentation of the human foot with a second longer toe is, accordingto professor flower see “fashion in deformity”, of negro origin anddoes not represent what is most usual in our race and time statisticsof measurements made in england by several observers on hundreds ofbarefooted children fail to show one instance in which the second toeis the longer 575taken singly the bones may enable an approximate estimate of the heightof the person when alive.

But these cut toughhumours, and scatter them by their own force and power when naturecannot of medicines hot in the third degree those which attain the third degree of heat, have the same facultieswith those before mentioned. But as they are hotter, so are they morepowerful in their operations, for they are so powerful in heating andcutting, that if unadvisedly given they cause fevers use their useis to cut tough and compacted humours, to provoke sweat abundantly;hence it comes to pass they all of them resist poison of medicines hot in the fourth degree those medicines obtain the highest degree of heat, which are so hotthat they burn the body of a man, being outwardly applied to it, andcause inflammations, or raise blisters, as crowfoot, mustard-seed, onions, &c of these more hereafter of cooling medicines physicians have also observed four degrees of coldness in medicines, which i shall briefly treat of in order of medicines cold in the first degree those medicines which are least cold of all, obtain the first degree ofcoldness. And i beseech you take notice of this, that seeing our bodiesare nourished by heat, and we live by heat, therefore no cold medicinesare friendly to the body, but what good they do our bodies, they do itby removing an unnatural heat, or the body heated above its naturaltemper the giving then of cold medicines to a man in his natural temper, theseason of the year also being but moderately hot, extinguishes naturalheat in the body of man yet have these a necessary use in them too, though not so frequent ashot medicines have. And that may be the reason why an all wise god hathfurnished us with far more hot herbs and plants, &c than cold use 1 their use is first, in nourishment, that so the heat of foodmay be qualified, and made for a weak stomach to digest use 2 secondly, to restrain and assuage the heat of the bowels, andto cool the blood in fevers therefore if the distemper of heat be but gentle, medicines cold inthe first degree will suffice. Also children, and such people whosestomachs are weak, are easily hurt by cold medicines of medicines cold in the second and third degree use 1 such whose stomachs are strong, and livers hot, may easilybear such medicines as are cold in the second degree, and in paper ofextremity find much help by them. As also by such as are cold in thethird degree, the extremity of the disease considered, for by boththese the unbridled heat of choler is assuaged use 2 also they are outwardly applied to hot swellings, dueconsideration being had, that if the inflammation be not great, usethose that are less. If the inflammation be vehement, make use ofmedicines cold in the second or third degree, always let the remedycorrespond to the just proportion of the affliction use 3 thirdly, essaytimes the spirits are moved inordinately throughheat, thence follows immoderate watchings, if not deprivation of thesenses, this also must be remedied with cold medicines, for cold stopsthe pores of the skin, makes the humours thick, represses sweat, andkeeps up the spirits from fainting of medicines cold in the fourth degree lastly, the use of medicines cold in the fourth degree, is, to mitigatedesperate and vehement pains, stupifying the senses, when no othercourse can be taken to save life. Of the use of which more hereafter of moistening medicines there can be no such difference found amongst moistening medicines, that they should surpass the second degree for seeing all medicinesare either hot or cold, neither heat nor cold, seeing they areextremes, can consist with moisture, for the one dries it up, the othercondensates it use phylosophers therefore call moisture and dryness, passivequalities, yet have they their operation likewise. For moist medicineslenify and make slippery, ease the cough, and help the roughness of thethroat these operations are proper to medicines moist in the firstdegree those which are moister, take away naturally strength, help thesharpness of humours, make both blood and spirits thicker, looses thebelly, and fits it for purgation the immoderate or indiscreet use of them dulls the body, and makes itunfit for action of drying medicines drying medicines have contrary faculties to these, viz to consumemoisture, stop fluxes, and make such writings dry as are slippery, theymake the body and members firm, when they are weakened by too muchmoisture, that so they may perform their proper functions yet although the members be strengthened by drying medicines, they havenotwithstanding their own proper moisture in them, which ought to beconserved, and not destroyed, for without it they cannot consist. Ifthen this moisture be consumed by using, or rather over use of dryingmedicines, the members can neither be nourished, nor yet perform theirproper actions such medicines as are dry in the third degree, being unadvisedlygiven, hinder the writings of the body they are appropriated to, of theirnourishment, and by that means brings them into consumption besides, there is a certain moisture in the body of man, which iscalled radical moisture, which being taken away, the writings must needsdie, seeing natural heat and life also consists in it, and this may bedone by too frequent use of medicines dry in the fourth degree. And itmay be this was the reason of galen writing, that things dry in thefourth degree, must of necessity burn.

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“tongaline is essentially a preparation of sodium salicylate, the mellier drug company realized the impossibility of creating any marked demand for a nostrum unless it had essay real drugs in it-- hence the presence of the salicylates what the actual composition of tongaline is, no one but the manufacturers know at one time the following was given as the formula. Fluid tonga 30 grains extract of cimicifuga racemosa 20 grains sodium salicylate 10 grains pilocarpin salicylate 1/100 grain colchin salicylate 1/500 grain “these amounts refer to the quantity of drugs in each fluidram of the preparation whether the nostrum still has this composition we do not know, but assuming that it has, it is quite evident that sodium salicylate is the essential and active ingredient ”the therapeutic indications given on the label of the bottle are. “rheumatism, neuralgia, grippe, gout, nervous headache, sciatica, lumbago, malaria, tonsillitis, heavy colds, excess of uric acid, and wherever the use of the salicylates is indicated ”in a recent booklet this semisecret salicylate mixture is recommended, not only in conditions in which salicylates are indicated, but alsocombined with aconite for rheumatic fever, with benzoate of soda inthe treatment of “grippe, ” with potassium bromid in nervous headaches, with gelsemium, glycerin and whisky for “heavy colds, ” with ammoniumchlorid, stramonium and cimicifuga in “rheumatic dysmenorrhea, ” andeven with mercury biniodid as a treatment of syphilitic eruptions!. “when administered with good judgment, tongaline exerts a stimulating effect upon every organ of elimination. Cleansing the complex sewerage system and putting it into working order when this is done, the sluggish blood current begins to flow more freely. The lymphatic and glandular systems to give up and carry off the toxic products, so long retained ” tongaline tabletsthen because of a “desire to put tongaline in a more compact andconvenient form, ” the same concern puts on the market tongalinetablets whether tongaline tablets are of the same composition, thedoctor who prescribes them is not advised in this form we havetongaline and lithia tablets, and tongaline and quinin tablets presumably those who are attracted by the word “lithia” aresufficiently uncritical to be content with the statement that. “the addition of lithia to tongaline presents a most useful combination which does not rely upon its action on the kidneys alone as is the case with lithia salts or lithia waters as administered ”and the foregoing quotation, be it remembered, is for the informationof the medical profession!. tongaline and lithia tablets, we areinformed, are. “ writingicularly indicated for certain diseases which are caused by deposits of urates in the joints and kidneys, and can be used with much benefit for thesis people who indulge in generous or intemperate habits of living ”tongaline and quinine tablets are also exploited without statementof composition the promoters are probably justified in feeling thatphysicians who prescribe quinin in combination with “tongaline” carelittle about the dosage it is unnecessary to discuss the silly claims made for tongaline andits combinations, although it is worth while to point out that theprescribing of such nostrums by physicians is an imposition, if not afraud, on the public ponca compoundponca compound, also made by the mellier drug company, st louis, is a“female weakness remedy” in tablet form the name suggests that “ponca”is a medicinal substance, and, in fact, at one time, “ext ponca” wasnamed as an ingredient the nature of “ext ponca” was apparently neverexplained it is now replaced in the “formula” by “senecin, ” and theonly information concerning the composition at present given is. “ponca compound tablets contain extract of mitchella repens, senecin, helonin, caulophyllin and viburnin ”this “formula” is practically meaningless, not only because theamount of each ingredient is not stated, but also because “senecin, ”“helonin, ” “caulophyllin” and “viburnin” are in themselves variablemixtures of unknown composition 1313 see report of the council on pharmacy and chemistry on “resinoidsand concentrations, ” j a m a , nov 13, 1909, p 1655 presumably, “senecin, ” “helonin, ” “caulophyllin” and “viburnin” areextractives of essay kind prepared, respectively, from senecio aureus life root, helonias dioica false unicorn, calophyllum thalictroides blue cohosh and viburnum prunifolium or opulus black haw or crampbark these are, one and all, practically inert drugs there is noreason to believe that any or all of them can have any beneficialinfluence in the thesis and varied conditions for which ponca compound isadvertised the following are excerpts from the advertising matter.