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Wellthen, we will take it for a general water for all physick aqua caponis or capon water college take a capon the guts being pulled out, cut in pieces, thefat being taken away, boiled in a sufficient quantity of spring-waterin a close vessel, take of this broth three pounds borrage andviolet-water, of each a pound and a half, white wine one pound, redrose leaves two drams and an half, the flowers of borrage, violets andbugloss, of each one dram, pieces of bread, hot out of the oven, halfa pound, cinnamon bruised, half an ounce, distil it in a glass stillaccording to art culpeper the simples are most of them appropriated to the heart, and in truth the composition greatly nourishes and strengthens suchas are in consumptions, and restores lost strength, either by feversor other sickness. It is a sovereign remedy for hectic fevers, andmarasmos, which is nothing else but a consumption coming from them letsuch as are subject to these diseases, hold it for a jewel aqua limacum magistr or water of snails college take of the juice of ground ivy, colt-foot, scabious, lungwort, of each one pound and a half, the juice of purslain, plantain, ambrosia, paul bettony, of each a pound, hog blood, whitewine, of each four pounds, garden snails, two pound, dried tobaccoleaves eight, powder of liquorice two ounces, of elecampane half anounce, of orris an ounce, cotton seeds an ounce and a half, the greatercold seeds, annis seeds of each six drams, saffron one dram, theflowers of red roses, six pugils, of violets and borrage, of each fourpugils, steep them three days warm, and then distil them in a glassstill, in sand culpeper it purges the lungs of flegm and helps consumptions there if you should happen to live where no better nor readier medicine canbe gotten, you may use this aqua scordii composita or compound water of scordium college take of the juice of goat rue, sorrel, scordium, citrons, of each one pound, london treacle, half a pound, steep it three days, and distil it in sand culpeper a tasterful taken in the morning, preserves from ill airs aqua mariæ college take of sugar candy a pound, canary wine six ounces, rosewater four ounces. Boil it well into a syrup, and add to it imperialwater two pounds, ambergreese, musk, of each eighteen grains, saffronfifteen grains, yellow sanders infused in imperial water, two drams;make a clear water of it aqua papaveries composita or poppy water compound college take of red poppies four pounds, sprinkle them with whitewine two pounds, then distil them in a common still, let the distilledwater be poured upon fresh flowers and repeated three times. To whichdistilled water add two nutmegs sliced, red poppy flowers a pugil, sugar two ounces, set it in the sun to give it a pleasing sharpness;if the sharpness be more than you would have it, put essay of the samewater to it which was not set in the sun aqua juglandium composita or walnut water compound college take of green walnuts a pound and an half, radish roots onepound, green asarabacca six ounces, radish seeds, six ounces let allof them, being bruised, be steeped in three pounds of white wine forthree days, then distilled in a leaden still till they be dry tinctures tinctura croci or tincture of saffron college take two drams of saffron, eight ounces of treacle water, digest them six days, then strain it culpeper see the virtues of treacle water, and then know that thisstrengthens the heart essaything more, and keeps melancholy vapoursthence by drinking a spoonful of it every morning tinctura castorii or tincture of castoreum college take of castoreum in powder half an ounce, spirit ofcastoreum half a pound, digest them ten days cold, strain it, and keepthe liquor for tincture culpeper a learned invention!. ’tis essaything more prevalent thanthe spirit tinctura fragroram or tincture of strawberries college take of ripe wood-strawberries two pounds, put them ina phial, and put so much small spirits of wine to them, that it mayovertop them the thickness of four fingers, stop the vessel close, andset it in the sun two days, then strain it, and press it but gently;pour this spirit to as thesis fresh strawberries, repeat this six times, at last keep the clear liquor for your use culpeper a fine thing for gentlemen that have nothing else to dowith their money, and it will have a lovely look to please their eyes tinctura scordii or tincture of scordium college take of the leaves of scordium gathered in a dry time, half a pound, digest them in six pounds of small spirits of wine, in avessel well stopped, for three days, press them out gently, and repeatthe infusion three times, and keep the clarified liquor for use so is made tincture of celandine, rest-harrow, and rosa-solis culpeper see the herbs for the virtues, and then take notice thatthese are better for cold stomachs, old bodies tinctura theriacalis vulgo aqua theriacalis ludg per infus or tincture of treacle college take of canary wine often times distilled, vinegar in whichhalf an ounce of rue seeds have been boiled, two pounds choice treacle, the best mithridate, of each half a pound. Mix them and set them in thesun, or heat of a bath, digest them, and keep the water for use tinctura cinnamoni, vulgo, aqua clareta cinnam or tincture of cinnamon college take of bruised cinnamon two ounces, rectified spirits ofwine two pounds, infuse them four days in a large glass stopped withcork and bladder, shake it twice a day, then dissolve half a pound ofsugar candy by itself in two pounds of rose water, mix both liquors, into which hang a nodule containing, ambergris half a scruple, muskfour grains tinctura viridis or a green tincture college take of verdigris, half an ounce, auripigmentum sixdrams, alum three drams, boil them in a pound of white wine till halfbe consumed, adding, after it is cold, the water of red roses, andnightshade, of each six ounces culpeper this was made to cleanse ulcers, but i fancy it not aqua aluminosa magistralis college take of plantain and red rose water, of each a pound, rochalum and sublimatum, of each two drams. Let the alum and sublimatum, being in powder, boil in the waters, in a vessel with a narrow mouthtill half be consumed, when it has stood five days, strain it physical wines vinum absynthitis or wormwood wine college take a handful of dried wormwood, for every gallon ofwine, stop it in a vessel close, and so let it remain in steep. So isprepared wine of rosemary flowers, and eye-bright culpeper it helps cold stomachs, breaks wind, helps the windcholic, strengthens the stomach, kills worms, and helps the greensickness rosemary-flower wine, is made after the same manner it is good againstall cold diseases of the head, consumes flegm, strengthens the gums andteeth eye-bright wine is made after the same manner it wonderfully clearsthe sight being drank, and revives the sight of elderly men. A cup ofit in the morning is worth a pair of spectacles all other wines are prepared in the same manner the best way of taking any of these wines is, to drink a draught ofthem every morning you may, if you find your body old or cold, makewine of any other herb, the virtues of which you desire. And make itand take it in the same manner vinum cerassorum nigrorum or wine of black cherries college take a gallon of black cherries, keep it in a vessel closestopped till it begin to work, then filter it, and an ounce of sugarbeing added to every pound, let pass through hippocrates’ sleeve, andkeep in a vessel close stopped for use vinum helleboratum or helleborated wine college take of white hellebore cut small, four ounces, spanishwine two pounds, steep it in the sun in a phial close stopped, in thedog days, or other hot weather vinum rubellum college take of stibium, in powder, one ounce, cloves sliced twodrams, claret wine two pounds, keep it in a phial close shut vinum benedictum college take of crocus metallorum, in powder, one ounce, mace onedram, spanish wine one pound and an half, steep it vinum antimoniale or antimonial wine college take of regulus of antimony, in powder, four ounces, steepit in three pounds of white wine in a glass well stopped, after thefirst shaking let the regulus settle culpeper these last mentioned are vomits, and vomits are fittingmedicines for but a few, the mouth being ordained to take innourishment, not to cast out excrements, and to regulate a man bodyin vomiting.

Ibid 48:1535 may 4 1907;ibid 48:1614 may 11 1907, and ibid 49:1992 dec 8 1917 antimeristem-schmidtessay, possibly thesis, of our readers have received a letter fromcologne, gerthesis, from the “bakteriologisch-chemisches laboratoriumwolfgang schmidt ” the letter someone to help me with my homework contains a circular directing theattention of american physicians to “antimeristem-schmidt ” it alsocontains essay advertising leaflets one physician in sending thismaterial to the journal writes. “a copy of the enclosed circulars has been sent to thesis of the physicians in this city, and probably elsewhere perhaps it has already been called to your attention let us be as liberal as possible with our recent enemies the sooner the old channels of scientific communication are re-opened, the better but let us not allow such blatant commercialism from a foreign country to go unprotested, any more than we should if it were from our own ”it should be noted in passing that the envelop in which the wolfgangschmidt letter came has on its face a rubber-stamped impress to theeffect. “concerns cancer treatment ” the circular letter declares thatby means of antimeristem-schmidt “either a cure or improvement has beeneffected in numerous inoperable paper” of malignant tumors americanphysicians are asked “to employ the preparation when occasion arises”and are assured that “every medical man in city or country will beable to carry out treatment without preliminary knowledge ” with theletter are two leaflets discussing the use and administration of theproduct. One contained what was called a “synopsis of essay of the morerecent publications regarding the employment of antimeristem-schmidt ininoperable malignant tumors ” the “recent” publications comprised threearticles published in 1910 and one published in 1912!. Antimeristem-schmidt was rather widely exploited essay six or sevenyears ago as was explained in the journal, march 8, 1913, p 766, itis a preparation claimed to be useful in the treatment of inoperablecancer and as a supplementary treatment after operations for cancer the treatment is founded on a theory advanced by one o schmidt thatthe cause of cancer is found in a fungus, mucor racemosus, which, schmidt at first asserted, carried a protozoon which he regarded asthe real cause of the disease the vaccine is said to be prepared fromcultures from this fungus while schmidt claims that he has been ableto produce cancer by means of the organism, scientific research has notverified his claims extensive clinical trials have shown the treatmentto be without effect the journal also advised its readers on april 19, 1913, that no license for the sale of antimeristem-schmidt had beengranted by the treasury dewritingment and, therefore, its importation intothis country was prohibited neither the therapeutic nor the legalstatus of the product has been changed since then -- from the journala m a , dec 6, 1919 antiphlogistineto the editor:-- last september, my chief, dr j s millard, received a letter from the denver chemical mfg co , manufacturers of“antiphlogistine ” this letter purported to quote thesis large commercialconcerns as testifying to the value of antiphlogistine recently, idoubted the veracity of these claims and wrote to essay of those quoted i quote from the original letter of the antiphlogistine company. “the surgeon to the electric light and electric railroad company in new orleans says that antiphlogistine is the finest thing he has ever used in burns, especially flash and brush burns “the physician to the new york edison co makes a similar statement he says that the application gives speedy relief and the burns heal quickly without scars ”i wrote to dr john woodman, the physician to the new york edison co , who replied in writing as follows. “the denver chemical manufacturing company have no authority to quote me i gave antiphlogistine a thorough trial, and found it had a very limited use, and i cannot recommend it for burns ”again, the antiphlogistine letter said.

cereals, pulses, etc. Wheat, maize, rice, whole grain wheat germ wheat, maize, bran linseed, millet dried peas, lentils, etc soy beans, haricot beans germinated pulses or cereals vegetables and fruits. Cabbage, fresh raw cabbage, fresh cooked cabbage, dried very slight cabbage, canned very slight swede rutabaga raw expressed juice lettuce spinach dried carrots, fresh raw carrots, dried very slight beetroot, raw, expressed juice less than potatoes, raw potatoes, cooked beans, fresh, scarlet runners, raw onions, cooked at least lemon juice, fresh lemon juice, preserved lime juice, fresh lime juice, preserved very slight orange juice, fresh raspberries apples bananas very slight tomatoes canned nuts miscellaneous. Yeast, dried yeast, extract and autolyzed ?. malt extract in essay specimens our knowledge of vitaminscommenting on the trend of medical research concerning vitamins, thelatest report of the british medical research council says:the present situation is a curious one, upon which posterity willprobably look back with great interest we still have almost noknowledge of the nature of these elusive food substances or of theirmode of action, but we have gained empiric knowledge already of thegreatest practical value for the prevention of scurvy and of othergrave diseases and for the promotion of health and beauty in thepopulation this statement, it will be noted, emphasizes the foundation on whichrests our present use of vitamins from time to time the journalhas commented on our lack of actual knowledge of these mysterioussubstances, emphasizing writingicularly the generally accepted fact thatthe taking of a well-balanced diet results in providing the individualwith such vitamins as are necessary to his growth and nutrition lastweek appeared a brief report of a meeting of the chicago medicalsociety devoted to this subject, and it was gratifying to have theconservative view which the journal has emphasized substantiated bythesis of those who took writing in the discussion moreover, the britishmedical journal, in its leading editorial for february 11, reiteratesthat an abundant supply of vitamins exists in all fresh vegetables, and that a considerable quantity occurs in milk and meat, providedthe latter substances are obtained from animals fed on fresh foods “a normal adult, ” it says, “living on an ordinary diet containing areasonable proportion of fresh vegetables is, therefore, certain ofobtaining a plentiful supply of vitamins ” of all the mass of evidencewhich has accumulated relative to these substances, this fact is thepoint of greatest importance it is, however, very unfortunately, the one point which those commercially inclined are unwilling torecognize -- editorial from the journal a m a , march 11, 1922 the demand for vitaminsthus the british medical journal in its current issue:in spite of the fact that ordinary fresh foods are the simplest, cheapest and richest sources of vitamins, the public apparently demandsto be supplied with vitamins in the form of medicinal products the public “demands” vitamins in pill form!. why?. for the same reasonthat the public, lay or medical, demands thesis things today that itdoes not need-- because the whole trend of modern advertising is towardcreating demands, rather than supplying needs vitamin concentratesare being “demanded” by the public because shrewd and forward-looking“patent medicine” exploiters are using all the subtle arts of modernadvertising to convince the public that it is in serious danger ofvitamin starvation, and that the only hope lies in buying thesealleged concentrates to make up a hypothetical deficiency it seemsinconceivable that a rational man would pay a tremendously high pricefor certain food factors which are already present in his ordinarydiet but he will.

The candied roothereof are held as effectual as angelica, to preserve from infection inthe time of a plague, and to warm and comfort a cold weak someone to help me with my homework stomach itis so harmless, you cannot use it amiss chesnut tree it were as needless to describe a tree so commonly known as to tell aman he had gotten a mouth. Therefore take the government and virtues ofthem thus:the tree is abundantly under the dominion of jupiter, and therefore thefruit must needs breed good blood, and yield commendable nourishment tothe body. Yet if eaten over-much, they make the blood thick, procurehead ache, and bind the body. The inner skin, that covers the nut, isof so binding a quality, that a scruple of it being taken by a man, orten grains by a child, soon stops any flux whatsoever. The whole nutbeing dried and beaten into powder, and a dram taken at a time, is agood remedy to stop the terms in women if you dry chesnuts, only thekernels i mean both the barks being taken away, beat them into powder, and make the powder up into an electuary with honey, so have you anadmirable remedy for the cough and spitting of blood earth chesnuts they are called earth-nuts, earth chesnuts, ground nuts, ciper-nuts, and in sussex pig-nuts a description of them were needless, for everychild knows them government and virtues they are essaything hot and dry in quality, under the dominion of venus, they provoke lust exceedingly, and stirup to those sports she is mistress of. The seed is excellent good toprovoke urine. And so also is the root, but it doth not perform itso forcibly as the seed doth the root being dried and beaten intopowder, and the powder made into an electuary, is as singular a remedyfor spitting and pissing of blood, as the former chesnut was for coughs chickweed it is so generally known to most people, that i shall not troubleyou with the description thereof, nor myself with setting forth theseveral kinds, since but only two or three are considerable for theirusefulness place they are usually found in moist and watery places, by woodsides, and elsewhere time they flower about june, and their seed is ripe in july government and virtues it is a fine soft pleasing herb under thedominion of the moon it is found to be effectual as purslain to allthe purposes whereunto it serves, except for meat only the herbbruised, or the juice applied with cloths or sponges dipped thereinto the region of the liver, and as they dry, to have it fresh applied, doth wonderfully temperate the heat of the liver, and is effectualfor all imposthumes and swellings whatsoever, for all redness in theface, wheals, pushes, itch, scabs.

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If you applythe herb to the privities, it draws forth the dead child it helps someone to help me with my homework theyellow jaundice, spleen, and gravel in the kidneys dioscorides saithit helps such as are bitten by a venomous beast, whether it be takeninwardly, or applied to the wound. Nay, he saith further, if any onethat hath newly eaten it, do but spit into the mouth of a serpent, theserpent instantly dies it stays the flux of the belly, kills worms, helps the fits of the mother its decoction made in wine, and drank, strengthens the back, and eases the pains thereof. It helps bruisesand falls, and is as gallant a remedy to drive out the small pox andmeasles as any is. An ointment made of it, is excellent for greenwounds, pricks or thrusts adder tongue or serpent tongue descript this herb has but one leaf, which grows with the stalka finger length above the ground, being flat and of a fresh greencolour. Broad like water plantain, but less, without any rib in it;from the bottom of which leaf, on the inside, rises up ordinarilyone, essaytimes two or three slender stalks, the upper half whereofis essaywhat bigger, and dented with small dents of a yellowish greencolour, like the tongue of an adder serpent only this is as useful asthey are formidable the roots continue all the year place it grows in moist meadows, and such like places time it is to be found in may or april, for it quickly perisheswith a little heat government and virtues it is an herb under the dominion of the moonand cancer, and therefore if the weakness of the retentive faculty becaused by an evil influence of saturn in any writing of the body governedby the moon, or under the dominion of cancer, this herb cures it bysympathy. It cures these diseases after specified, in any writing of thebody under the influence of saturn, by antipathy it is temperate in respect of heat, but dry in the second degree thejuice of the leaves, drank with the distilled water of horse-tail, isa singular remedy for all manner of wounds in the breast, bowels, orother writings of the body, and is given with good success to those thatare troubled with casting, vomiting, or bleeding at the mouth or nose, or otherwise downwards the said juice given in the distilled waterof oaken-buds, is very good for women who have their usual courses, or the whites flowing down too abundantly it helps sore eyes of theleaves infused or boiled in oil, omphacine or unripe olives, set in thesun four certain days, or the green leaves sufficiently boiled in thesaid oil, is made an excellent green balsam, not only for green andfresh wounds, but also for old and inveterate ulcers, especially if alittle fine clear turpentine be dissolved therein it also stays andrefreshes all inflammations that arise upon pains by hurts and wounds what writings of the body are under each planet and sign, and also whatdisease may be found in my astrological judgment of diseases. And forthe internal work of nature in the body of man. As vital, animal, natural and procreative spirits of man. The apprehension, judgment, memory.