History

Service Dissertation


“stearns’ wine is a safe medicine for the young, middle-aged and old it is a safeguard to the family health ”it is not necessary to discuss either these all-embracing claims asto the therapeutic efficacy of the service dissertation mixture or the fallacies presentedin favor of cod-liver extract and peptonate of iron the councilreaffirms the opinion that whatever therapeutic value cod liver mayhave resides chiefly, if not entirely, in its fatty constituents the journal, oct 9, 1909. Reports council pharm and chem , 1909, p 115 a confirmation of this opinion has recently been furnished bythe investigations of prof j p street the journal a m a , feb 20, 1915, p 638 of several cod liver cordials, one of which vinollike stearns’ wine, is described as a wine of cod liver extract withpeptonate of iron stearns’ wine is essentially an alcoholic stimulant it is not “asafe medicine for the young, middle-aged and old ” the unwarrantedtherapeutic claims and the recommendations for its indiscriminate usebring it into conflict with rules 4 and 6 the council voted thatstearns’ wine be held ineligible for inclusion in n n r -- fromreports of council on pharmacy and chemistry, 1915, p 177 protonuclein and protonuclein beta report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council had adopted the following report and authorized itspublication w a puckner, secretary protonuclein, with other products of reed and carnrick, was examinedby the council in 1907 and found ineligible for admission to new andnonofficial remedies according to the patent specifications, it isprepared “from the thyroid and thymus glands, brain pineal glandsand pituitary body, bone-marrow, pancreas, spleen, liver, salivaryglands, brunner glands, lieberkühn follicles and peptic glands ”these various glandular bodies, it is said, are dried at a temperaturebelow 130 f preferably between 100 and 110. The fat is removed byether, the dried glands disintegrated, the connective tissue removedby sifting and the resulting powder coated with an ether solution ofbenzoin and mixed with milk sugar the dose is three to ten tablets 9to 30 grains daily protonuclein beta is said to be produced by the addition toprotonuclein of an equal amount of nucleoplasm and protoplasm of thespleen the dose is from two cubes each 5 grains three times a day tothree cubes four times a day 30 to 60 grains daily special advantages over ordinary nuclein are attributed toprotonuclein, in which, it is claimed, certain unaltered cells remainthat are more easily assimilated by the leukocytes than are ordinaryproteins, thus leading to a multiplication of cells in the earlyadvertising protonuclein was claimed to be. “ an exact physiological product derived from the lymphoid structures of the body without the use of chemical agents so delicate is protonuclein that any chemical agent is liable to disturb its cellular activity ”after its examination of the product in 1907 the journal, oct 5, 1907, p 1198, the council concluded that any distinction betweenthe action of protonuclein and that of ordinary nuclein was purelyspeculative and highly improbable “if the active ingredients arereally so unstable that they are destroyed by all chemical agents, asclaimed, it seems impossible that the activity would be preserved whenprotonuclein is given by mouth and therefore subjected to the veryprofound changes of digestion ”at that time the importance of thyroid as an ingredient had not beenemphasized the following year, however, hunt and seidell the journala m a , oct 24, 1908 reported the results of an investigationwhich showed that protonuclein was a diluted thyroid preparation, asskilfully disguised as in the antifats rengo and marmola hunt laterpointed out the journal, feb 1, 1913, p 384 that the amount ofnuclein contained in a dose of protonuclein probably would not have theslightest effect, especially when given by mouth the following are extracts from the protonuclein advertising matter. “for cancer, infectious fevers measles, scarlet fever, typhoid and septicaemia and as a prophylactic ” “protonuclein. An ideal prophylactic for all infectious diseases ” “a true alterative and tissue builder ” “the value of protonuclein depends upon its ability to increase cell power and promote tissue strength it is therefore needed whenever the organism is below the normal standard, more especially in anaemia, typhoid, neoplasms and as a prophylactic ”all the foregoing claims and recommendations are supposed to be basedon certain alleged discoveries which the council has previouslycharacterized as “a tissue of vague speculations in direct conflictwith the known facts of physiologic chemistry ” as for the third claim, hunt and seidell have commented on the danger of recommending thyroid, the most powerful tissue-destroying drug known, as a “tissue builder ”protonuclein beta, it is said.

Help the rickets, beingapplied to the belly and sides. Applied to the navel, they give presentease to the fits of the mother. They take away cold aches in the jointsapplied to them. Boiled, the liquor absolutely and speedily cures scabsand itch.

Therefore we commend it as a wholeessay medicine for soundnessof body, preservation of health, and vigour of mind thus galen acetum theriacale, norimberg or treacle vinegar college take of the service dissertation roots of celandine the greater, one ounceand a half. The roots of angelica, masterwort, gentian, bistort, valerian, burnet, white dittany, elecampane, zedoary, of each one dram, of plantain the greater one dram and a half, the leaves of mousear, sage, scabious, scordium, dittany of crete, carduus, of each half anhandful, barks and seeds of citrons, of each half a dram, bole amoniacone dram, saffron three drams, of these let the saffron, hart-horn, dittany, and bole, be tied up in a rag, and steeped with the thingsbefore mentioned, in five pints of vinegar, for certain days by atemperate heat in a glass well stopped, strain it, and add six drams ofthe best treacle to it, shake it together, and keep it for your use acetum theriacale or treacle vinegar college add to the description of treacle water, clove-gilliflowerstwo ounces, lavender flowers an ounce and a half, rose, and elderflower vinegar, of each four pounds, digest it without boiling, threedays, then strain it through hippocrates’ sleeve culpeper see treacle water for the virtues, only this is more cool, a little more fantastical decoctions decoctum commune pro clystere or a common decoction for a clyster college take of mallows, violets, pellitory, beets, and mercury, chamomel flowers, of each one handful, sweet fennel seeds half anounce, linseeds two drams, boil them in a sufficient quantity of commonwater to a pound culpeper this is the common decoction for all clysters, accordingto the quality of the humour abounding, so you may add what simples, orsyrups, or electuaries you please. Only half a score linseeds, and ahandful of chamomel flowers are added decoctum epythimi or a decoction of epithimum college take of myrobalans, chebs, and inds, of each half anounce, stœchas, raisins of the sun stoned, epithimum, senna, of eachone ounce, fumitory half an ounce, maudlin five drams, polipodium sixdrams, turbith half an ounce, whey made with goat milk, or heifermilk four pounds, let them all boil to two pounds, the epithimumexcepted, which boil but a second or two, then take it from the fire, and add black hellebore one dram and an half, agerick half a dram, sal gem one dram and an half, steep them ten hours, then press it stronglyout culpeper it purges melancholy, as also choler, it resists madness, and all diseases coming of melancholy, and therefore let melancholypeople esteem it as a jewel decoctum sennæ gereonis or a decoction of senna college take of senna two ounces, pollipodium half an ounce, gingerone dram, raisins of the sun stoned two ounces, sebestens, prunes, ofeach twelve, the flowers of borrage, violets, roses, and rosemary, ofeach two drams, boil them in four pounds of water till half be consumed culpeper it is a common decoction for any purge, by adding othersimples or compounds to it, according to the quality of the humour youwould have purged, yet, in itself, it chiefly purges melancholy decoctum pectorale or a pectoral decoction college take of raisins of the sun stoned, an ounce, sebestens, jujubes, of each fifteen, dates six, figs four, french barley oneounce, liquorice half an ounce, maiden-hair, hyssop, scabious, colt-foot, of each one handful, boil them in three pounds of watertill two remain culpeper the medicine is chiefly appropriated to the lungs, and therefore causes a clear voice, a long wind, resists coughs, hoarseness, asthmas, &c you may drink a quarter of a pint of it everymorning, without keeping to any diet, for it purges not i shall quote essay syrups fitting to be mixed with it, when i come tothe syrups decoctum trumaticum college take of agrimony, mugwort, wild angelica, st john wort, mousear, of each two handfuls, wormwood half a handful, southernwood, bettony, bugloss, comfrey the greater and lesser, roots and all, avens, both sorts of plantain, sanicle, tormentil with the roots, the buds ofbarberries and oak, of each a handful, all these being gathered in mayand june and diligently dried, let them be cut and put up in skins orpapers against the time of use, then take of the forenamed herbs threehandfuls, boil them in four pounds of conduit water and two pounds ofwhite wine gently till half be consumed, strain it, and a pound ofhoney being added to it, let it be scummed and kept for use culpeper if sight of a medicine will do you good, this is as liketo do it as any i know syrups altering syrups culpeper reader, before we begin with the writingicular syrups, ithink good to advertise thee of these few things, which concern thenature, making, and use of syrups in general 1 a syrup is a medicineof a liquid body, compounded of decoction, infusion, or juice, withsugar or honey, and brought by the heat of the fire, into the thicknessof honey 2 because all honey is not of a thickness, understand newhoney, which of all other is thinnest 3 the reason why decoctions, infusions, juices, are thus used, is, because thereby, first, they willkeep the longer secondly, they will taste the better 4 in boilingsyrups have a great care of their just consistence, for if you boilthem too much they will candy, if too little, they will sour 5 allsimple syrups have the virtues of the simples they are made of, and arefar more convenient for weak people, and delicate stomachs syrupus de absinthio simplex or syrup of wormwood simple the college take of the clarified juice of common wormwood, clarified sugar, of each four pounds, make it into a syrup accordingto art after the same manner, are prepared simple syrups of betony, borrage, bugloss, carduus, chamomel, succory, endive, hedge-mustard, strawberries, fumitory, ground ivy, st john wort, hops, mercury, mousear, plantain, apples, purslain, rasberries, sage, scabious, scordium, houseleek, colt-foot, paul bettony, and other juices notsour culpeper see the simples, and then you may easily know both theirvirtues, and also that they are pleasanter and fitter for delicatestomachs when they are made into syrups syrupus de absinthio compositus or syrup of wormwood compound college take of common wormwood meanly dry, half a pound, red rosestwo ounces, indian spikenard three drams, old white wine, juice ofquinces, of each two pounds and an half, steep them a whole day in anearthen vessel, then boil them gently, and strain it, and by adding twopounds of sugar, boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper mesue is followed verbatim in this. And the receipt isappropriated to cold and flegmatic stomachs, and it is an admirableremedy for it, for it strengthens both stomach and liver, as alsothe instruments of concoction, a spoonful taken in the morning, isadmirable for such as have a weak digestion, it provokes an appetite toone victuals, it prevails against the yellow iaundice, breaks wind, purges humours by urine syrupus de acetosus simplex or syrup of vinegar simple college take of clear water four pounds, white sugar five pounds, boil them in a glazed vessel over a gentle fire, scumming it till halfthe water be consumed, then by putting in two pounds of white winevinegar by degrees, perfect the syrup culpeper that is, only melt the sugar with the vinegar over thefire, scum it, but boil it not syrupus acetosus simplicior or syrup of vinegar more simple college take of white sugar five pounds, white wine vinegar twopounds, by melting it in a bath, make it into a syrup culpeper of these two syrups let every one use which he finds byexperience to be best. The difference is but little they both of themcut flegm, as also tough, hard viscous humours in the stomach. Theycool the body, quench thirst, provoke urine, and prepare the stomachbefore the taking of a vomit if you take it as a preparative for anemetic, take half an ounce of it when you go to bed the night beforeyou intend it to operate, it will work the easier, but if for any ofthe foregoing occasions, take it with a liquorice stick syrupus acetosus compositus or syrup of vinegar compound college take of the roots of smallage, fennel, endive, of eachthree ounces, the seeds of annis, smallage, fennel, of each one ounce, of endive half an ounce, clear water six pounds, boil it gently in anearthen vessel till half the water be consumed, then strain and clarifyit, and with three pounds of sugar, and a pound and a half of whitewine vinegar, boil it into a syrup culpeper this in my opinion is a gallant syrup for such whosebodies are stuffed either with flegm, or tough humours, for it opensobstructions or stoppings both of the stomach, liver, spleen, andreins. It cuts and brings away tough flegm and choler, and is thereforea special remedy for such as have a stuffing at their stomach syrupus de agno casto or syrup of agnus castus college take of the seeds of rue and hemp, of each half a dram, of endive, lettice, purslain, gourds, melons, of each two drams, offleawort half an ounce, of agnus castus four ounces, the flowers ofwater lilies, the leaves of mints, of each half a handful, decoctionof seeds of lentils, and coriander seeds, of each half an ounce, threepounds of the decoction, boil them all over a gentle fire till twopounds be consumed, add to the residue, being strained, two ounces ofjuice of lemons, a pound and a half of white sugar, make it into asyrup according to art culpeper a pretty syrup, and good for little syrupus de althæa or syrup of marsh-mallows college take of roots of marsh-mallows, two ounces, the roots ofgrass asparagus, liquorice, raisins of the sun stoned, of each halfan ounce, the tops of mallows, marsh-mallows, pellitory of the wall, burnet, plantain, maiden-hair white and black, of each a handful, redcicers an ounce, of the four greater and four lesser cold seeds, ofeach three drams, boil them in six pounds of clear water till fourremain, which being strained, boil into a syrup with four pounds ofwhite sugar culpeper it is a fine cooling, opening, slipery syrup, and chieflycommendable for the cholic, stone, or gravel, in the kidneys or bladder syrupus de ammoniaca or syrup of ammoniacum college take of maudlin and cetrach, of each four handfuls, commonwormwood an ounce, the roots of succory, sparagus, bark of caper roots, of each two ounces, after due preparation steep them twenty-four hoursin three ounces of white wine, radish and fumitory water, of each twopounds, then boil it away to one pound eight ounces, let it settle, in four ounces of which, whilst it is warm, dissolve by itself gumammoniacum, first dissolved in white wine vinegar, two ounces, boil therest with a pound and an half of white sugar into a syrup, adding themixtures of the gum at the end culpeper it cools the liver, and opens obstructions both of it andthe spleen, helps old surfeits, and such like diseases, as scabs, itch, leprosy, and what else proceed from the liver over heated you may takean ounce at a time syrupus de artemisia or syrup of mugwort college take of mugwort two handfuls, pennyroyal, calaminth, origanum, bawm, arsmart, dittany of crete, savin, marjoram, germander, st john wort, camepitis, featherfew with the flowers, centaury theless, rue, bettony, bugloss, of each a handful, the roots of fennel, smallage, parsley, sparagus, bruscus, saxifrage, elecampane, cypress, madder, orris, peony, of each an ounce, juniper berries, the seeds oflovage, parsley, smallage, annis, nigella, carpobalsamum or cubebs, costus, cassia lignea, cardamoms, calamus aromaticus, the roots ofasarabacca, pellitory of spain, valerian, of each half an ounce, beingcleansed, cut, and bruised, let them be infused twenty-four hours infourteen pounds of clear water, and boiled till half be consumed, beingtaken off from the fire, and rubbed between your hands whilst it iswarm, strain it, and with honey and sugar, of each two pounds, sharpvinegar four ounces, boil it to a syrup, and perfume it with cinnamonand spikenard, of each three drams culpeper it helps the passion of the matrix, and retains it inits place, it dissolves the coldness, wind, and pains thereof. Itstrengthens the nerves, opens the pores, corrects the blood, itcorrects and provokes the menses you may take a spoonful of it at atime syrupus de betonica compositus or syrup of bettony compound college take of bettony three handfuls, marjoram four handfuls anda half, thyme, red roses, of each a handful, violets, stœchas, sage, of each half a handful, the seeds of fennel, annis, and ammi, of eachhalf an ounce, the roots of peons, polypodium, and fennel, of each fivedrams, boil them in six pounds of river water, to three pounds, strainit, and add juice of bettony two pounds, sugar three pounds and a half, make it into a syrup culpeper it helps diseases coming of cold, both in the head andstomach, as also such as come of wind, vertigos, madness. It concoctsmelancholy, it provokes the menses, and so doth the simple syrup morethan the compound syrupus byzantinus, simple college take of the juice of the leaves of endive and smallage, of each two pounds, of hops and bugloss, of each one pound, boil themtogether and scum them, and to the clarified liquor, add four pounds ofwhite sugar, to as much of the juices, and with a gentle fire boil itto a syrup syrupus byzantinus, compound college take of the juices so ordered as in the former, fourpounds, in which boil red roses, two ounces, liquorice half an ounce, the seeds of annis, fennel, and smallage, of each three drams, spikenard two drams, strain it, and to the three pounds remaining, add two pounds of vinegar, four pounds of sugar, make it into a syrupaccording to art culpeper they both of them viz both simple and compoundopen stoppings of the stomach, liver, and spleen, help the ricketsin children, cut and bring away tough flegm, and help the yellowjaundice you may take them with a liquorice stick, or take a spoonfulin the morning fasting syrupus botryos or syrup of oak of jerusalem college take of oak of jerusalem, hedge-mustard, nettles, of eachtwo handfuls, colt-foot, one handful and a half, boil them in asufficient quantity of clear water till half be consumed. To two poundsof the decoction, add two pounds of the juice of turnips baked in anoven in a close pot, and with three pounds of white sugar, boil it intoa syrup culpeper this syrup was composed against coughs, shortness ofbreath, and other the like infirmities of the breast proceeding ofcold, for which if you can get it you may take it with a liquoricestick syrupus capillorum veneris or syrup of maiden-hair college take of liquorice two ounces, maiden-hair five ounces, steep them a natural day in four pounds of warm water, then aftergentle boiling, and strong straining, with a pound and a half of finesugar make it into a syrup culpeper it opens stoppings of the stomach, strengthens the lungs, and helps the infirmities of them this may be taken also either witha liquorice stick, or mixed with the pectoral decoction like syrup ofcoltsfoot syrupus cardiacus, vel julepum cardiacum or a cordial syrup college take of rhenish wine two pounds, rose water two ounces anda half, cloves two scruples, cinnamon half a dram, ginger two scruples, sugar three ounces and a half, boil it to the consistence of a julep, adding ambergris three grains, musk one grain culpeper if you would have this julep keep long, you may put inmore sugar, and yet if close stopped, it will not easily corruptbecause it is made up only of wine, indeed the wisest way is to orderthe quantity of sugar according to the palate of him that takes it itrestores such as are in consumptions, comforts the heart, cherishes thedrooping spirits, and is of an opening quality, thereby carrying awaythose vapours which might otherwise annoy the brain and heart. You maytake an ounce at a time, or two if you please syrupus infusionis florum cariophillorum or syrup of clove-gilliflowers college take a pound of clove-gilliflowers, the whites being cutoff, infuse them a whole night in two pounds of water, then with fourpounds of sugar melted in it, make it into a syrup without boiling culpeper this syrup is a fine temperate syrup. It strengthens theheart, liver, and stomach. It refreshes the vital spirits, and is agood cordial in fevers.

in the very next issue the atlantajournal-record of medicine apologized thus editorially. “in our september issue, gray glycerine tonic comp was inadvertently included in a list that seemed to be under the ban of the government and very likely an injustice has been done the purdue frederick company which we desire to undo as far as possible ”did the editor mean by “inadvertently included, ” that he would haveomitted “gray glycerine tonic” from the government list had henoticed it in time?. if so, on what grounds?. it is a fact that “grayglycerine tonic” was one of the “fifty falsely labeled medicines”. Itis also a fact that it is one of the products that government officialsand the federal courts have declared to be sold under claims that are“false, fraudulent and misleading ” if “gray glycerine tonic” wasfraudulently exploited-- and the government and the courts have sodeclared it-- why is it necessary for the editor of a medical journal toapologize to his subscribers for having told them so?. -- editorial fromthe journal a m a , jan 1, 1916 hagee cordial of cod liver oil“under the deceptive heading ‘making cod liver oil palatable, ’ thecharlotte medical journal in its december issue prints a boost for‘cord ext ol morrhuae comp hagee, ’ or, as it is generally knownto the drug trade, ‘hagee cordial of cod liver oil ’“the boost intimates that this is a preparation in which cod liver oilhas in essay way been rendered palatable, and then goes on to say thatthis is a cod liver oil product which has not suffered the least lossof those essential elements which make the crude oil such a high-classreconstructive “at first sight one might question whether a cod liver oil productwhich contains absolutely no cod liver oil had not suffered the lossof essential elements but a closer reading discloses a significantqualification, namely, the phrase, ‘those elements which make thecrude oil such a high-class reconstructive ’“the boost is misleading from beginning to end the manufacturers havenot succeeded in this preparation in ‘making cod liver oil palatable, ’nor does their preparation in any way possess the virtues of cod liveroil these claims have again and again been refuted, but they continueto be published-- at a price but rarely in reputable medical journals ”the above is quoted from the weekly bulletin of the dewritingmentof health of the city of new york the bulletin is issued for theenlightenment of the public -- from the journal a m a , jan 8, 1916 hypno-bromic compounda physician in vermont writes. “this is simply a word of inquiry-- and of possible warning to other practitioners-- regarding a preparation known as hypno-bromic compound manufactured by h k wampole & co this compound is dispensed by druggists without prescription and contains in each ounce. “cannabis indica 1 gr “morphin 1/4 gr “potassium bromid 48 gr “hyoscyamus 1 gr “chloral hydrate 96 gr “i have at the present time three young women who are addicts to this preparation as the result of thoughtless prescriptions from physicians this mixture evades the working of the harrison act and may be dispensed freely at the discretion of the druggist and, as a result, these three paper of mine have been able, by visiting at the various drug stores in town, to keep an ample supply on hand at all times ”“hypno-bromic compound” is more than an unscientific mixture. It isa dangerous product and should not be sold indiscriminately over thedrug counter before the harrison narcotic law went into effect, “hypno-bromic compound” contained half a grain of morphin sulphate tothe ounce instead of its present one-fourth grain physicians rememberthat section 6 of the harrison law contains a joker-- put over bythe “patent medicine” interests-- that exempts proprietary remediescontaining one-fourth grain of morphin or less to the ounce from therestrictions of that act while it is illegal for a physician to writea prescription which contains morphin, no matter how small the amount, unless he conforms in all ways to the requirements of the harrisonnarcotic law, “patent medicine” concerns can sell indiscriminatelynostrums containing morphin up to this amount and the public can buythem without let or hindrance no reputable druggist would sell alayman over 700 grains of chloral hydrate or 2 grains of morphin or 8grains of extract of cannabis indica, without a prescription, yet, thedruggist may hand over 8 ounce bottles of hypno-bromic compound whichcontain 768 grains of choral hydrate, 2 grains of morphin sulphate, 8grains of extract of cannabis indica, 8 grains of hyoscyamus and 384grains of potassium bromid!. physicians who prescribe such products ashypno-bromic compound and druggists who indiscriminately sell suchstuff are disgracing two honorable professions -- from the journala m a , feb 7, 1920 intravenous compound loffler its composition and the peculiar methods by which it is exploitedfor essay time past inquiries have been received regarding charles lymanloffler, his post-graduate course in intravenous therapy and especiallyrelative to “intravenous compound loffler ” for instance, a physicianwrites. “can you tell me anything about the physicians drug syndicate they are pushing the sale of thymozene and offering one hundred dollars’ worth of stock fully paid and non-assessable, free to those sending in their order, and also a copy of dr loffler lectures on the blood ”and from another physician. “what do you know of charles loffler, m d , and his intravenous compound?. a few evenings ago a man who appeared to be about 40 years old came to my office and tried to interest me in the above-mentioned article. He claimed to be dr charles loffler of chicago with him was a young lady whom he introduced as miss b-- -- miss b-- -- said that she had been with dr x-- -- a physician of high standing in los angeles for two months and that he was using the intravenous compound. Also quoted other physicians his whole layout looks quackish, and were it not for the fact that he showed me a letter that appeared to be from dr x-- -- , i should not have given him a second thought ”and this also. “charles loffler, m d , or his agent was traveling around inducing one m d in each town to take up his methods of blood examination and treatment and with a little advertising of blood examinations free the doctor selected gets quite a run of patronage ”another physician writes. “my attention has been called by another physician to loffler intra-venous compound may i trouble you to give me any information that you may have with regard to its composition and its value as a therapeutic agent?. ”c l loffler does business from rooms 1101-1102, venetian bldg , chicago, the location of the “intravenous chemical co , ” the“physicians drug syndicate” and the “ma-oze chemical co ” of these, more later the journal has in its files a large amount of materialregarding loffler a brief résumé of that writing of the material dealingwith loffler professional activities will be given for the purposeof allowing physicians to evaluate the scientific status of loffler“lectures, ” “post-graduate courses, ” his therapeutic “discoveries” andhis products it seems that loffler was reared in yankton, s d in 1898-1899, loffler was a senior student at john creighton medical college, but, for reasons that need not be gone into here, he was never graduated he received a diploma from barnes medical college in 1900, and in thesame year was licensed to practice in south dakota in 1902 he was atle mars, iowa. In 1904 his name appears in the medical directory, undersioux falls, s d , as “specialist in chronic troubles ” the intravenous company in coloradocharles l loffler “specialty” is “intravenous medication ” in1912 and 1913, as the intravenous company of colorado springs, hewas sending out a booklet entitled “consumption ” this describedthe alleged marvelous results to be obtained in the treatment oftuberculosis by the use of “intravenous compound”.

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The products of these manufactured by the h m alexander company being listed as dosage forms it having becomenecessary to omit the preparations of the alexander company see page138 the referee recommended that the general articles of “dixontubercle bacilli extract” and “dixon suspension of dead tuberclebacilli” also be omitted he reported that no other firm appears tobe marketing these products and that they had not been shown to be ofspecial value the council accepted the recommendation and directed the omission asproposed in accordance with the procedure of the council, these havebeen transferred to the annual council reports for reference and appearbelow w a puckner, secretary dixon tubercle bacilli extract -- an extract of tubercle bacillidissolved in normal saline solution see “fluid of dixon, ” medicalnews, jan 17, 1891 dixon suspension of dead tubercle bacilli -- a suspension inphysiologic salt solution of dead tubercle bacilli which havebeen defatted by prolonged treatment with alcohol and ether see“possibility of establishing tolerance for tubercle bacilli, ” medicalnews, oct 19, 1889 -- from reports of council on pharmacy andchemistry, 1917, p 140 formosol report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrysunshine formosol the formosol chemical company, formerly thesunshine chemical company, cleveland, ohio is claimed to contain18 per cent formaldehyd in a solution of soap it is thereforevery similar to veroform germicide which was deleted from new andnonofficial remedies because of the low phenol coefficient reported bythe hygienic laboratory of the united states service dissertation public health service thejournal, nov 22, 1913, p 1920 the council voted that in view of thehygienic laboratory finding that formaldehyd has a low germicidalvalue, the manufacturers of formosol be required to produce definiteevidence of the degree of germicidal value for this product in submitting the preparation to the council, it was claimed thatformosol had “all properties peculiar to formaldehyde ” thisconservative tone was, however, not maintained in the form-letterssubmitted these contain the following unwarranted statements. “as the name implies, formosol is a formaldehyde preparation, which embodies all the innate antiseptic merits and eliminates all the ill features of the world greatest disinfectant ” “the elimination of all the destructive elements and the incorporation of all the established therapeutic virtues of formaldehyde, have been scientifically blended in formosol ” “formosol is unique in the sphere of antisepsis because of its peculiar healing properties as diametrically opposed to irritation to the tissue of mucous membrane ” “formosol may be used for the thousand niceties of modern antisepsis, but is specific in gynecology and obstetrics and is indicated in dermatology ” italics not in original “the constant use of formosol is to develop a habit sympathetic to ethics ” “to prescribe formosol is a great step toward personal hygiene, a duty of the medical fraternity to the laity ” italics not in original the trade package recommends the use of formosol “for cuts, wounds, ulcers, abscesses ” this is a conflict with rule 4 the council heldformosol in conflict with rules 4 and 6, and advised the manufacturersthat formosol is refused admission to new and nonofficial remediesuntil they submit evidence establishing the degree of antiseptic andgermicidal efficiency, and justify the quotations listed above. Oruntil these and any other existing conflicts with the rules have beenremoved after submission of this report to the formosol chemical company thecouncil authorized its publication -- from reports of council onpharmacy and chemistry, 1917, p 145 iodolene, a solution of iodin in liquid petrolatum, inadmissible to n n r report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council was asked to consider a solution of iodin in liquidpetrolatum, said to be prepared from gulf coast petroleum by a specialprocess it was to be marketed as “iodolen” provided the councilfound the preparation admissible to new and nonofficial remedies thepreparation was claimed to contain over 1 5 per cent free iodin thefollowing claims were made.