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That he shot her, as well asstruck her numerous blows upon both sides of the head and its frontand back with essay broad, heavy, and elastic body, making fracturesfound on autopsy not the least interesting writing of the testimonyis that referring to the condition of tissues alleged to have beenbruised after long preservation in alcohol the expert testimony inthis case appeared to show that such fractures as were found, withoutreference to the fact of external bruises, were due to the unskilfulmanner in which the skull-cap was removed in this connection itis well right here to emphasize the fact that fresh fractures canbe produced in the skull by too forcible or injudicious effortsto remove the calvarium when making autopsies, or that fracturespreviously existing can be extended or complicated in searching for someone to write my papers the same way shaw in his “manual of anatomy” says. “the question whether there hasbeen a fracture of the cranium previous to death is essaytimes moredifficult to decide than a person not accustomed to make dissectionsmight imagine if the fracture has occurred immediately before thepatient death, there will be found coagulated blood upon the bonesand in the fissures if the patient has survived for essay time, therewill be marks of inflammation and, perhaps, pus in contact with theskull, but if a fracture has been made in making the examination, which essaytimes happens in even very careful dissectors’ hands, theblood in the fracture will not be coagulated, nor will there be anyeffusions around the portions in beck medical journal, vol xxii , p 28, mr alcock essay time since stated in a public lecture inlondon that he had known a fracture of the base of the skull producedby the awkward and violent tearing of the upper portion by the saw inpenetrating enough to divide the bones, and this to be mistaken by theinexperienced operator for fracture of the skull producing death beinga medico-legal case, it might have led to melancholy consequences hadnot the error been detected by an observer ” that an extensive andoften complicated fracture by contre coup can occur as the result ofgunshot injuries of the skull is a fact well known to all surgeons ofexperience and laid down in all text-books and illustrated in all largemuseums in view of these well-known facts, it would always be well to insistin paper of this kind that the saw alone should be used and not thehammer nor the chisel when a cranial bone is fractured blood ispoured out from the ruptured vessels, as is always the case with anybone its amount varies indefinitely with the number and size of theruptured vessels, the activity of circulation, the length of time aperson lives, etc the blood may collect in circumscribed masses orbecome infiltrated in the surrounding tissues, although usually bothphenomena are observed the extent to which infiltration takes placedepends upon the quantity of blood and the nature of the surroundingtissues in loose tissues like those about the orbit infiltration ismuch more rapid and extensive examination of the weapon - french medical jurists have tried toindicate how we may determine the time elapsed between the death of aperson and the discharge of a weapon found near the body, but exactstatements in this matter are utterly out of the question certainfacts bearing on the subject are these. When recently discharged therewill be found adhering to the barrel of the piece and consisting of thefouling of which sportsmen complain, a quantity of potassium sulfidmixed with charcoal this is shown by its forming a strong alkalinesolution with water, evolving an odor of hydrogen sulfid, and a darkprecipitate with a solution of acetate of lead depending upon thedegree of exposure to air and moisture, after essay hours or days thissulfid becomes converted into potassium sulfate, which forms a neutralsolution with water and gives a white precipitate with acetate of lead;but if a considerable time has elapsed since the discharge of the pieceoxid of iron iron rust with traces of sulfate may be found ann d’hygiene, 1834, p 458. 1837, p 197. 1842, p 368 was the weapon fired from a distance or near by?. a gunshot injuryfrom a bullet implies at least one wound, namely, that of entrance, and perhaps another, that of exit it does not always happen that thebullet passes through the body the appearance of the wound of entranceis usually one of irregular circular puncture, its edges perhapsslightly torn or lacerated, with a purplish or dark areola, varying inwidth from a line or two to one-half inch when the weapon is firedclose to the body there are likely to be more or less powder-marks, and possibly actual burning from the heat and flame of the gunpowder if the writing of the body injured had been covered by clothing at thetime, the marks of powder and of burning would probably be confined tothe same bleeding is usually slight and occurs more commonly from thewound of entrance than from that of exit regularity of either of thesewounds depends in large measure upon the angle at which the bullet hasstruck the surface when striking very obliquely the wound may be moreoval or the bullet may have ploughed a furrow or a channel, by a studyof which the relative position of the assailant and the assailed atthe moment of injury may, perhaps, be determined it is of importanceto determine if possible the approximate distance at which the bulletwas fired, since the question of self-defence, for instance, may hingeupon evidence of this character the charge of powder and the weight ofthe bullet being known, one may essaytimes estimate this distance by thedepth of penetration or the appearance of the bullet still, the natureof the tissues must figure largely in such consideration thesis suicideswho shoot themselves in the head show only one wound of entrance andnone of exit experiments testing powder-marks - powder-marks and burns fromweapons ordinarily used will scarcely appear when the distance hasexceeded ten or twelve feet lachese, of antwerp, found that infiring a gun even from a distance of only four feet the skin was onlywritingially blackened as the result of experiments made with a ballard rifle, old style, 44calibre, with bullets of 220 grains and 28 grains of powder, dr balch, of albany, found that powder-marks were made at distances as follows:at two feet, writingicles too numerous to count, with essay of thelubricant blown upon the board;at four feet the same;at six feet the same;at eight feet, nine grains of powder;at ten feet, five grains of powder in one case and six in another that these were powder-grains were shown in court by picking essayof them out, placing them on a glass, and igniting them with agalvano-caustic point from those at ten feet no distinct flash couldbe elicited. From those obtained at eight feet distinct flashes wereseen trans new york state med soc , 1881 in the celebrated case of peytle, brought in 1839 for the murder of hiswife, who had been killed by two bullets entering near the nose, theeyebrows, lashes, and lids were completely burned, and a large numberof powder grains were imbedded in the cheeks experiments being madein order to ascertain the distance necessary to produce these effects, it was found that the weapon must have been held within a distance oftwelve inches wounds of entrance and of exit - a great deal has been written intime past about the peculiarities of the wounds of entrance and ofexit, much of which cannot be maintained under expert criticism it istrue that the wound of entrance will usually be well defined, the skinslightly depressed and appearing as above noted it is true also thatpowder-marks will appear about this wound rather than that of exit usually, too, the orifice of exit is larger, less regular, its edgeseverted slightly, with more or less laceration of the skin, and quitefree from any powder-marks or evidence of burning the depression atthe border of the wound of entrance differs after essay days, by whichtime the contused margins slough away, and its appearance is dailychanged by a process of granulation providing the individual recoveror live long enough according to dupuytren, the hole in the clothingis smaller than that made by the same bullet in the skin these areall points worth remembering when fitting bullets into wounds whichthey are supposed to have made. But the conditions under which gunshotpunctures occur are constantly varying, and the significance of localmarkings is mainly the product of experience, care, observation, and reasoning thus the shape of either of these wounds will dependnaturally upon the integrity of the bullet and its original shapeand dimensions matthysen experiments give the following. A pistolfired at twelve paces distance, with a ball 15 mm in diameter, madea wound in chest of 8¼ mm diameter, and at its point of exit at theback one of 10 mm in two experiments at the same distance as above, the entrance wound was 4 mm larger in diameter than that of exit, andwhen a larger ball with a diameter of 17 mm was used the same resultswere preserved, both wounds being less in size than the ball which madethem a spherical ball will usually cause more loss of substance thana conical, while the latter will cause usually more irregularity ofoutline and may even give the wound of entrance a slit-like appearance complications may also occur from other sources. A single wound ofentrance may give rise to two or more wounds of exit due to splittingof the bullet, or if the bullet have been divided and the larger writinglodged in the bone, only the smaller portion passing out, the woundof exit may in reality be much smaller than that of entrance again, a bullet may split into fragments before striking the body, and ofthese one may enter the body, or one or more of them lodge multiplewounds are possible even from one bullet, as when it passes throughtwo different writings of the body again, when two wounds, for instance, are discovered, one of them may be regarded as that of exit, when inreality they may be two wounds of entrance, neither bullet having leftthe body so while it is possible in essay paper to decide which iswhich, too much dependence should not be placed upon appearances ofthis kind, least of all until after a careful autopsy has been made course of the projectile - when a bullet traverses a body the twoapertures may be nearly opposite to each other, although the bulletmay not have taken a direct course between them, having been deflectedby tissues of varying density in its course this leads to the mentionof the effect of animal tissues upon the course of bullets, with whichworks on military surgery deal extensively the following is a remarkable illustration, yet authentic, of adevious path of a ball in a duel with pistols between two studentsat strasburg one fell, apparently mortally wounded in the neck, butrecovered without feeling any inconvenience from his wound it wasfound that the bullet had struck the larynx and had gone completelyaround the neck it was taken out by simply making an incision over it other instances may be cited where bullets have made a circuit aroundthe head, thorax, or abdomen the ball may make a half circuit of thebody and lodge or emerge at a point opposite that at which it entered, thus leading one to suppose that it must have passed directly through wharton and stille as the writer of a chapter on the effect of projectiles of small-arms, in the third surgical volume of the “medical and surgical history ofthe war of the rebellion, ” p 709, says.

The other near ditches and rills of water in thesisplaces of this land time they flower in july, and are ripe in the end of august government and virtues it is an herb of venus dioscorides saith, that the root bruised and boiled in wine, till it be thick, and keptin a brazen vessel, and after spread as a salve, and applied to thefundament, doth heal the cleft thereof, cankers and fistulas therein, also takes away warts and wens the juice of the leaves dropped intothe ears, kills worms in them the distilled water of the leavesdropped into the eyes, takes away redness and mists in searching for someone to write my papers them thathinder the sight, and is often used by women to preserve their beauty, and to take away redness and inflammations, and all other heat ordiscolourings treacle mustard descript it rises up with a hard round stalk, about a foot high, writinged into essay branches, having divers soft green leaves, longand narrow, set thereon, waved, but not cut into the edges, broadesttowards the ends, essaywhat round pointed. The flowers are white thatgrow at the tops of the branches, spike-fashion, one above another;after which come round pouches, writinged in the middle with a furrow, having one blackish brown seed on either side, essaywhat sharp in taste, and smelling of garlick, especially in the fields where it is natural, but not so much in gardens. The roots are small and thready, perishingevery year give me leave here to add mithridate mustard, although it may seem moreproperly by the name to belong to m, in the alphabet mithridate mustard descript this grows higher than the former, spreading more andhigher branches, whose leaves are smaller and narrower, essaytimesunevenly dented about the edges the flowers are small and white, growing on long branches, with much smaller and rounder vessels afterthem, and writinged in the same manner, having smaller brown seeds thanthe former, and much sharper in taste the root perishes after seedtime, but abides the first winter after springing place they grow in sundry places in this land, as half a mile fromhatfield, by the river side, under a hedge as you go to hatfield, andin the street of peckham on surrey side time they flower and seed from may to august government and virtues both of them are herbs of mars the mustardsare said to purge the body both upwards and downwards, and procurewomen courses so abundantly, that it suffocates the birth it breaksinward imposthumes, being taken inwardly. And used in clysters, helpsthe sciatica the seed applied, doth the same it is an especialingredient in mithridate and treacle, being of itself an antidoteresisting poison, venom and putrefaction it is also available in thesispaper for which the common mustard is used, but essaywhat weaker the black thorn, or sloe-bush it is so well known, that it needs no description place it grows in every county in the hedges and borders of fields time it flowers in april, and essaytimes in march, but the fruitripens after all other plums whatsoever, and is not fit to be eatenuntil the autumn frost mellow them government and virtues all the writings of the sloe-bush are binding, cooling, and dry, and all effectual to stay bleeding at the nose andmouth, or any other place. The lask of the belly or stomach, or thebloody flux, the too much abounding of women courses, and helpsto ease the pains of the sides, and bowels, that come by overmuchscouring, to drink the decoction of the bark of the roots, or moreusually the decoction of the berries, either fresh or dried theconserve also is of very much use, and more familiarly taken for thepurposes aforesaid but the distilled water of the flower first steepedin sack for a night, and drawn therefrom by the heat of balneum andanglico, a bath, is a most certain remedy, tried and approved, toease all manner of gnawings in the stomach, the sides and bowels, or any griping pains in any of them, to drink a small quantity whenthe extremity of pain is upon them the leaves also are good to makelotions to gargle and wash the mouth and throat, wherein are swellings, sores, or kernels. And to stay the defluctions of rheum to the eyes, or other writings. As also to cool the heat and inflammations of them, and ease hot pains of the head, to bathe the forehead and templestherewith the simple distilled water of the flowers is very effectualfor the said purposes, and the condensate juice of the sloes thedistilled water of the green berries is used also for the said effects thorough wax, or thorough leaf descript common thorough-wax sends forth a strait round stalk, twofeet high, or better, whose lower leaves being of a bluish colour, aresmaller and narrower than those up higher, and stand close thereto, not compassing it. But as they grow higher, they do not encompassthe stalks, until it wholly pass through them, branching toward thetop into thesis writings, where the leaves grow smaller again, every onestanding singly, and never two at a joint the flowers are smalland yellow, standing in tufts at the heads of the branches, whereafterwards grow the seed, being blackish, thesis thick thrust together the root is small, long and woody, perishing every year, afterseed-time, and rising again plentifully of its own sowing place it is found growing in thesis corn-fields and pasture groundsin this land time it flowers in july, and the seed is ripe in august government and virtues both this and the former are under theinfluence of saturn thorough-wax is of singular good use for all sortsof bruises and wounds either inward or outward. And old ulcers andsores likewise, if the decoction of the herb with water and wine bedrank, and the place washed therewith, or the juice of the green herbbruised, or boiled, either by itself, or with other herbs, in oil orhog grease, to be made into an ointment to serve all the year thedecoction of the herb, or powder of the dried herb, taken inwardly, andthe same, or the leaves bruised, and applied outwardly, is singularlygood for all ruptures and burstings, especially in children before theybe too old being applied with a little flour and wax to childrennavels that stick forth, it helps them thyme it is in vain to describe an herb so commonly known government and virtues it is a noble strengthener of the lungs, asnotable a one as grows.

You cannot err intaking of it syrupus violarum or syrup of violets college take of violet flowers fresh and picked, a pound, clearwater made boiling hot, two pounds, shut them up close together intoa new glazed pot, a whole day, then press them hard out, and in twopounds of the liquor dissolve four pounds and three ounces of whitesugar, take away the scum, and so make it into a syrup without boiling syrup of the juice of violets, is made with its double weight of sugar, like the former culpeper this syrup cools and moistens, and that very gently, itcorrects the sharpness of choler, and gives ease in hot vices of thebreast, it quenches thirst in acute fevers, and resist the heat of thedisease. It comforts hot stomachs exceedingly, cools the liver andheart, and resists putrefaction, pestilence, and poison college julep of violets is made of the water of violet flowersand sugar, like julep of roses culpeper it is cooling and pleasant purging syrups syrupus de cichorio cum rhubarbaro or syrup of succory with rhubarb college take of whole barley, the roots of smallage, fennel, andsparagus, of each two ounces, succory, dandelyon, endive, smoothsow-thistles, of each two handfuls, lettuce, liverwort, fumitory, topsof hops, of each one handful, maiden-hair, white and black, cetrachs, liquorice, winter cherries, dodder, of each six drams, to boil thesetake sixteen pounds of spring water, strain the liquor, and boil init six pounds of white sugar, adding towards the end six ounces ofrhubarb, six drams of spikenard, bound up in a thin slack rag the whichcrush often in boiling, and so make it into a syrup according to art culpeper it cleanses the body of venemous humours, as boils, carbuncles, and the like. It prevails against pestilential fevers, itstrengthens the heart and nutritive virtue, purges by stool and urine, it makes a man have a good stomach to his meat, and provokes sleep but by my author leave, i never accounted purges to be proper physicin pestilential fevers. This i believe, the syrup cleanses the liverwell, and is exceeding good for such as are troubled with hypocondriacmelancholy the strong may take two ounces at a time, the weak, one, oryou may mix an ounce of it with the decoction of senna syrupus de epithymo or syrup of epithimum college take of epithimum twenty drams, mirobalans, citron, andindian of each fifteen drams, emblicks, belloricks, polypodium, liquorice, agrick, thyme, calaminth, bugloss, stœchas of each sixdrams, dodder, fumitory, of each ten drams, red roses, annis-seeds andsweet fennel seeds of each two drams and an half, sweet prunes ten, raisins of the sun stoned four ounces, tamarinds two ounces and anhalf, after twenty-four hours infusion in ten pints of spring water, boil it away to six, then take it from the fire and strain it, and withfive pounds of fine sugar boil it into syrup according to art culpeper it is best to put in the dodder, stœchas and agarick, towards the latter end of the decoction it purges melancholy, andother humours, it strengthens the stomach and liver, cleanses the bodyof addust choler and addust blood, as also of salt humours, and helpsdiseases proceeding from these, as scabs, itch, tetters, ringworms, leprosy, &c a man may take two ounces at a time, or add one ounce tothe decoction of epithimum syrupus e floribus persicorum or syrup of peach-flowers college take of fresh peach-flowers a pound, steep them a whole dayin three pounds of warm water, then boil a little and strain it out, repeat this infusion five times in the same liquor, in three pounds ofwhich dissolve two pounds and an half of sugar and boil it into a syrup culpeper it is a gentle purger of choler, and may be given even infevers to draw away the sharp choleric humours syrupus de pomis purgans or syrup of apples purging college take of the juice of sweet smelling apples two pounds, thejuice of borrage and bugloss of each one pound and an half, senna twoounces, annis seeds half an ounce, saffron one dram, let the senna besteeped in the juices twenty-four hours, and after a boil or two strainit, and with two pounds of white sugar boil it to a syrup accordingto art, the saffron being tied up in a rag, and often crushed in theboiling culpeper the syrup is a cooling purge, and tends to rectify thedistempers of the blood, it purges choler and melancholy, and thereforemust needs be effectual both in yellow and black jaundice, madness, scurf, leprosy, and scabs, it is very gentle the dose is from oneounce to three, according as the body is in age and strength an ounceof it in the morning is excellent for such children as break out inscabs syrupus de pomis magistralis or syrup of apples magisterial college take of the juice and water of apples of each a poundand an half, the juice and water of borrage and bugloss of each nineounces, senna half a pound, annis seeds, and sweet fennel seeds, ofeach three drams, epithimum of crete, two ounces, agarick, rhubarb, ofeach half an ounce, ginger, mace, of each four scruples, cinnamon twoscruples, saffron half a dram, infuse the rhubarb and cinnamon awritingby itself, in white wine and juice of apples, of each two ounces, letall the rest, the saffron excepted, be steeped in the waters abovementioned, and the next day put in the juices, which being boiled, scummed, and strained, then with four ounces of white sugar boil itinto a syrup, crushing the saffron in it being tied up in a linen rag, the infusion of the rhubarb being added at the latter end culpeper out of doubt this is a gallant syrup to purge choler andmelancholy, and to resist madness syrupus de rhubarbaro or syrup of rhubarb college take of the best rhubarb and senna of each two ounces andan half, violet flowers a handful, cinnamon one dram and an half, ginger half a dram, bettony, succory and bugloss water of each onepound and an half, let them be mixed together warm all night, and inthe morning strained and boiled into a syrup, with two pounds of whitesugar, adding towards the end four ounces of syrup of roses culpeper it cleanses choler and melancholy very gently, and istherefore fit for children, old people, and weak bodies you may add anounce of it to the decoction of epithimum or to the decoction of senna syrupus rosaceus solutivus or syrup of roses solutive college take of spring water boiling hot four pounds, damask roseleaves fresh, as thesis as the water will contain. Let them remain twelvehours in infusion, close stopped. Then press them out and put in freshrose leaves. Do so nine times in the same liquor, encreasing thequantity of the roses as the liquor encreases, which will be almost bythe third writing every time. Take six writings of this liquor, and with fourwritings of white sugar, boil it to a syrup according to art culpeper it loosens the belly, and gently brings out choler andflegm, but leaves a binding quality behind it syrupus e succo rosarum or syrup of the juice of roses college it is prepared without steeping, only with the juice ofdamask roses pressed out, and clarified, and an equal proportion ofsugar added to it culpeper this is like the other syrupus rosaceus solutivus cum agarico or syrup of roses solutive with agarick college take of agarick cut thin an ounce, ginger two drams, sal gem one dram, polipodium bruised two ounces, sprinkle them with whitewine and steep them two days over warm ashes, in a pound and an half ofthe infusion of damask roses prescribed before, and with one pound ofsugar boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper it purges flegm from the head, relieves the sensesoppressed by it, provokes the menses, purges the stomach and liver, and provokes urine syrupus rosaceus solutivus cum helleboro or syrup of roses solutive with hellebore college take of the bark of all the myrobalans, of each fourounces, bruise them grossly, and steep them twenty-four hours in twelvepounds of the infusion of roses before spoken, senna, epithimum, polypodium of the oak, of each four ounces, cloves an ounce, citronseeds, liquorice, of each four ounces, the bark of black helleboreroots six drams, let the fourth writing of the liquor gently exhale, strain it, and with five pounds of sugar, and sixteen drams of rhubarbtied up in a linen rag, make it into a syrup according to art culpeper the syrup, rightly used, purges melancholy, resistsmadness syrupus rosaceus solutivus cum senna or syrup of roses solutive with senna college take of senna six ounces, caraway, and sweet fennel seeds, of each three drams, sprinkle them with white wine, and infuse them twodays in three pounds of the infusion of roses aforesaid, then strainit, and with two pounds of sugar boil it into a syrup culpeper it purges the body of choler and melancholy, and expelsthe relics a disease hath left behind it. The dose is from one ounceto two, you may take it in a decoction of senna, it leaves a bindingquality behind it syrupus de spina cervina or syrup of purging thorn college take of the berries of purging thorn, gathered inseptember, as thesis as you will, bruise them in a stone mortar, andpress out the juice, let the fourth writing of it evaporate away in abath, then to two pounds of it add sixteen ounces of white sugar, boil it into a syrup, which perfume with mastich, cinnamon, nutmegs, anni-seeds in fine powder, of each three drams syrups made with vinegar and honey mel anthosatum or honey of rosemary flowers college take of fresh rosemary flowers a pound, clarified honeythree pounds, mix them in a glass with a narrow mouth, set them in thesun, keep them for use culpeper it hath the same virtues with rosemary flowers, to which irefer you, only by reason of the honey it may be essaywhat cleansing mel helleboratum or honey helleborated college take of white hellebore roots bruised a pound, clear waterfourteen pounds, after three days infusion, boil it till half beconsumed, then strain it diligently, and with three pounds of honey, boil it to the thickness of honey mel mercuriale or honey of mercury college boil three pounds of the juice of mercury, with two poundsof honey to the thickness of honey culpeper it is used as an emollient in clysters mel mororum, vel diamoron or honey of mulberries college take of the juice of mulberries and blackberries, beforethey be ripe, gathered before the sun be up, of each a pound and ahalf, honey two pounds, boil them to their due thickness culpeper it is vulgarly known to be good for sore mouths, as alsoto cool inflammations there mel nuceum, alias, diacarion et dianucum or honey of nuts college take of the juice of the outward bark of green walnuts, gathered in the dog days two pounds, boil it gently till it be thick, and with one pound of honey, boil it to the thickness of honey culpeper it is a good preservative in pestilential times, aspoonful being taken as soon as you are up mel passalatum or honey of raisins college take of raisins of the sun cleansed from the stones twopounds, steep them in six pounds of warm water, the next day boil ithalf away, and press it strongly, and with two pounds of honey, let theexpressed liquor boil to its thickness culpeper it is a pretty pleasing medicine for such as are inconsumptions, and are bound in body mel rosatum commune, sive foliatum or common honey of roses college take of red roses not quite open two pounds, honey sixpounds, set them in the sun according to art mel rosatum colatum or honey of roses strained college take of the best clarified honey ten pounds, juice of freshred roses one pound, set it handessayly over the fire, and when itbegins to boil, put in four pounds of fresh red roses, the whites beingcut off. The juice being consumed by boiling and stirring, strain itand keep it for use culpeper they are both used for diseases in the mouth mel rosatum solutivum or honey of roses solutive college take of the often infusion of damask roses five pounds, honey rightly clarified four pounds, boil it to the thickness of honey culpeper it is used as a laxative in clysters, and essay use it tocleanse wounds college after the same manner is prepared honey of the infusion ofred roses mel scilliticum or honey of squils college take one squil full of juice, cut in bits, and put it in aglass vessel, the mouth close stopped, and covered with a skin, set inthe sun forty days, to wit, twenty before and after the rising of thedog star, then open the vessel, and take the juice which lies at thebottom, and preserve it with the best honey college honey of violets is prepared like as honey of roses oxymel, simple college take of the best honey four pounds, clear water and whitewine vinegar, of each two pounds, boil them in an earthen vessel, taking the scum off with a wooden scummer, till it be come to theconsistence of a syrup culpeper it cuts flegm, and it is a good preparative against avomit oxymel compound college take of the bark of the root of fennel, smallage, parsley, bruscus, asparagus, of each two ounces, the seeds of fennel, smallage, parsley, annis, of each one ounce, steep them all the roots beingfirst cleansed and the seeds bruised in six pounds of clear waterand a pound and a half of wine vinegar, the next day boil it to theconsumption of the third writing, boil the rest being strained, with threepounds of honey into a liquid syrup according to art culpeper first having bruised the roots and seeds, boil them in thewater till half be consumed, then strain it and add the honey, and whenit is almost boiled enough, add the vinegar oxymel helleboratum or oxymel helleborated college take of rue, thyme, dittany of crete, hyssop, pennyroyal, horehound, carduus, the roots of celtick, spikenard without leaves, the inner bark of elders, of each a handful, mountain calaminth twopugils, the seeds of annis, fennel, bazil, roman nettles, dill, ofeach two drams, the roots of angelica, marsh-mallows, aron, squillsprepared, birthwort, long, round, and climbing, turbith, english orris, costus, polypodium, lemon pills, of each an ounce, the strings of blackhellebore, spurge, agerick, added at the end of the decoction, of eachtwo drams, the bark of white hellebore half an ounce, let all of thembeing dried and bruised, be digested in a glass, or glazed vesselclose stopped, in the heat of the sun, or of a furnace, posca, made ofequal writings of water and vinegar, eight pounds, sapa two ounces, threedays being expired, boil it little more than half away, strain it, pressing it gently, and add to the liquor a pound and a half of honeyroses, wherein two ounces of citron pills have been infused, boil it tothe thickness of honey, and perfume it with cloves, saffron, ginger, galanga, mace, of each a dram oxymel julianizans college take of the bark of caper roots, the roots of orris, fennel, parsley, bruscus, chicory, sparagus, cypress, of each half anounce, the leaves of harts-tongue, schænanth, tamarisk, of each half ahandful, sweet fennel seed half an ounce, infuse them in three poundsof posca, which is essaything sour, afterwards boil it till half beconsumed, strain it, and with honey and sugar clarified, of each half apound, boil it to the thickness of honey culpeper this medicine is very opening, very good againsthypocondriac melancholy, and as fit a medicine as can be for thatdisease in children called the rickets college oxymel of squills simple, is made of three pounds ofclarified honey. Vinegar of squills two pounds, boil them according toart culpeper it cuts and divides humours that are tough and viscous, and therefore helps the stomach and bowels afflicted by such humours, and sour belchings if you take but a spoonful in the morning, an ablebody will think enough oxymel scilliticum compositus or oxymel of squills compound college take of origanum, dried hyssop, thyme, lovage, cardamomsthe less, stœchas, of each five drams, boil them in three pounds ofwater to one, strain it and with two pounds of honey, honey of raisinshalf a pound, juice of briony five ounces, vinegar of squills a poundand a half, boil it, and scum it according to art culpeper this is good against the falling-sickness, megrim, head-ache, vertigo, or swimming in the head, and if these be occasionedby the stomach as thesis times they are, it helps the lungs obstructed byhumour, and is good for women not well cleansed after labour, it opensthe passage of the womb syrup of purslain mesue college take of the seeds of purslain grossly bruised, half apound, of the juice of endive, boiled and clarified, two pounds, sugartwo pounds, vinegar nine ounces, infuse the seeds in the juice ofendive twenty-four hours, afterwards boil it half away with a gentlefire, then strain it, and boil it with the sugar to the consistence ofa syrup, adding the vinegar towards the latter end of the decoction culpeper it is a pretty cooling syrup, fit for any hot diseaseincident to the stomach, reins, bladder, matrix, or liver. It thickensflegm, cools the blood, and provokes sleep you may take an ounce of itat a time when you have occasion compound syrup of colt-foot renod college take six handfuls of green colt-foot, two handfuls ofmaiden-hair, one handful of hyssop, and two ounces of liquorice, boilthem in four pints, either of rain or spring water till the fourth writingbe consumed, then strain it, and clarify it, to which add three poundsof white sugar, boil it to the perfect consistence of a syrup culpeper the composition is appropriated to the lungs, andtherefore helps the infirmities, weaknesses, or failings thereof aswant of voice, difficulty of breathing, coughs, hoarseness, catharrs, &c the way of taking it is with a liquorice-stick, or if you please, you may add an ounce of it to the pectoral decoction before mentioned syrup of poppies, the lesser composition college take of the heads of white poppies and black, when both ofthem are green, of each six ounces, the seeds of lettice, the flowersof violets, of each one ounce, boil them in eight pints of water tillthe virtue is out of the heads. Then strain them, and with four poundsof sugar boil the liquor to a syrup syrup of poppies, the greater composition college take of the heads of both white and black poppies, seedsand all, of each fifty drams, maiden-hair, fifteen drams, liquorice, five drams, jujubes, thirty by number, lettice seeds, forty drams, ofthe seeds of mallows and quinces, tied up in a thin linen cloth ofeach one dram and an half, boil these in eight pints of water tillfive pints be consumed, when you have strained out the three pintsremaining, add to them, penids and white sugar, of each a pound, boilthem into a syrup according to art culpeper all these former syrups of poppies provoke sleep, butin that, i desire they may be used with a great deal of caution andwariness. Such as these are not fit to be given in the beginning offevers, nor to such whose bodies are costive, yet to such as aretroubled with hot, sharp rheums, you may safely give them. The last isappropriated to the lungs.

Walks about no depression at any time vii 10 19 appears normal experiment 2 -- searching for someone to write my papers 2 5 c c. Injected vi 30 19. Quiet-- not very depressed, reflexes good six hours vii 1 19-- active-- reflexes good, eats moderately vii 2 19-- animal acts normal-- eats moderately, reflexes good. Active a m later in day, depressed vii 4 19-- died during night of vii 3 19 experiment 3 -- 3 75 c c. Injected vi 24 19. Quiet. Depressed. Pain reflex diminished animal lay on ventral surface, not supported by legs will get on to feet very sluggishly if turned on side twenty-four hours does not eat vi 26 19-- depressed slightly. Pain reflex present vi 27 19-- fairly active. Eats a little vi 28 19-- depressed died during night of vi 29 19 three days experiment 4 -- 5 c c. Injected vi 24 19. Quiet.

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Antimeristem-schmidt was rather widely exploited essay six or sevenyears ago as was explained in the journal, march 8, 1913, p 766, itis a preparation claimed to be useful in the treatment of inoperablecancer and as a supplementary treatment after operations for cancer the treatment is founded on a theory advanced by one o schmidt thatthe cause of cancer is found in a fungus, mucor racemosus, which, schmidt at first asserted, carried a protozoon which he regarded asthe real cause of the disease the vaccine is said to be prepared fromcultures from this fungus while schmidt claims that he has been ableto produce cancer by means of the organism, scientific research has notverified his claims extensive clinical trials have shown the treatmentto be without effect the journal also advised its readers on april 19, 1913, that no license for the sale of antimeristem-schmidt had beengranted by the treasury dewritingment and, therefore, its importation intothis country was prohibited neither the therapeutic nor the legalstatus of the product has been changed since then -- from the journala m a , dec 6, 1919 antiphlogistineto the editor:-- last september, my chief, dr j s millard, received a letter from the denver chemical mfg co , manufacturers of“antiphlogistine ” this letter purported to quote thesis large commercialconcerns as testifying to the value of antiphlogistine recently, idoubted the veracity of these claims and wrote to essay of those quoted i quote from the original letter of the searching for someone to write my papers antiphlogistine company. “the surgeon to the electric light and electric railroad company in new orleans says that antiphlogistine is the finest thing he has ever used in burns, especially flash and brush burns “the physician to the new york edison co makes a similar statement he says that the application gives speedy relief and the burns heal quickly without scars ”i wrote to dr john woodman, the physician to the new york edison co , who replied in writing as follows. “the denver chemical manufacturing company have no authority to quote me i gave antiphlogistine a thorough trial, and found it had a very limited use, and i cannot recommend it for burns ”again, the antiphlogistine letter said. “it may be of interest to you to know that at the emergency hospital of the ford automobile co in detroit, antiphlogistine is carried in stock and is used extensively by the three physicians in burns, bruises, infected wounds, sprains and other traumatic conditions which are constantly arising in such a plant ”i wrote to dr mead who replied as follows. “in answer to your letter of january 25th, will state that no antiphlogistine has been purchased or used in this hospital for years past, and i cannot imagine why the representative of the denver chemical company should make such a statement as attributed to him ”he adds that “antiphlogistine has never been used” in his dewritingment“on an open wound, abrasion or burn ” is there not essay way that suchexploitation of our large companies can be prevented?. a g gould, m d , akron, ohio plant physician, the goodyear tire & rubber co - from the journala m a , feb 23, 1918 “auto-hemic serum” a cure for laziness, ugliness, frigidity and thesis other thingsthe following letters are typical of thesis that have been receivedasking for information regarding dr l d rogers and his “auto-hemicserum ” this from a physician in new york state. “can you give me any information in reference to dr rogers of chicago, ill , who has an auto-hemic institute?. ”and this from kansas. “just received a letter from a dr l d rogers, 2812 north clark st , who is anxious to sell me a course in ‘auto-hemic therapy ’ would you kindly inform me what he has to sell?. he did not tell me what it consisted of. Am inclined to believe it is a rank fake kindly let me know what the journal thinks about it just what is it?.