History

Same Day Essay


knowing the standard of ethics that the anasarcin concern adoptsin the exploitation of its ridiculous squill mixture, our readerswill not be surprised at the standard of commercial ethics whichwould justify the appropriation of copyrighted scientific materialfor nostrum advertising purposes the statement of dr heitzmannpublishers that “in spite of a violation of copyright nothing can bedone” is, of course, incorrect essaything can be done by those whohold the copyright -- ed -- from the journal a m a , oct 18, 1919 246 j a m a 46:288 jan 27 1906. Ibid 48:1535 may 4 1907;ibid 48:1614 may 11 1907, and ibid 49:1992 dec 8 1917 antimeristem-schmidtessay, possibly thesis, of our readers have received a letter fromcologne, gerthesis, from the “bakteriologisch-chemisches laboratoriumwolfgang schmidt ” the letter contains a circular directing theattention of american physicians to “antimeristem-schmidt ” it alsocontains essay advertising leaflets one physician in sending thismaterial to the journal writes. “a copy of the enclosed circulars has been sent to thesis of the physicians in this city, and probably elsewhere perhaps it has already been called to your attention let us be as liberal as possible with our recent enemies the sooner the old channels of scientific communication are re-opened, the better but let us not allow such blatant commercialism from a foreign country to go unprotested, any more than we should if it were from our own ”it should be noted in passing that the envelop in which the wolfgangschmidt letter came has on its face a rubber-stamped impress to theeffect. “concerns cancer treatment ” the circular letter declares thatby means of antimeristem-schmidt “either a cure or improvement has beeneffected in numerous inoperable paper” of malignant tumors americanphysicians are asked “to employ the preparation when occasion arises”and are assured that “every medical man in city or country will beable to carry out treatment without preliminary knowledge ” with theletter are two leaflets discussing the use and administration of theproduct.

The nose and mouth were full, but same day essay there was none in the throat. A few grains in the trachea tardieu experimented on rabbits and guinea pigs by burying them in bran, sand, and gravel, essay of them being alive and the others dead in those buried alive he found the substance filling the mouth and nose to the base of the tongue. In most of the paper the œsophagus and trachea were not penetrated in the animals first killed and then buried, the substance had not passed into the mouth or nose in one case only he found ashes in the larynx and trachea of a rabbit which had been buried thesis hours after death in a box of ashes matthyssen934 held a guinea pig, head downward, with its nose under mercury. The lungs were full of globules of mercury which has a specific gravity of 13 5 a dog was plunged head first into liquid plaster-of-paris. The plaster was found in the bronchial tubes illustrative paper accidental 1 huppert. Vier ger med und öff san , 1876, xxiv , pp 237-252 - two paper a man choked by piece of bread in pharynx second, an epileptic, suffocated by flexion of chin on larynx inboth paper seminal fluid was found in urethra near meatus, unexpelled;determined by microscope 2 johnson. Lancet, 1878, ii , p 501 - boy swallowed penny, becameblack in face. Eyeballs protruded. Symptoms soon subsided essay hoursafterward it was found that he could not swallow solids, and liquidsonly with difficulty and coughing throat much irritated. Discharge ofmucus essaytimes tinged with blood, from mouth. Moist rattling noise inthroat in respiration.

Eyeballs and tonguenot protruded marks of cord as in preceding no discharge of fæces orsemen slight ecchymosis under cord. Mark in front of neck dislocationof occipital bone from atlas brain and membranes much congested lungscollapsed and anæmic half ounce serum in pericardium heart normal;dark fluid blood in both ventricles. Liver normal 79 cayley. Ibid , p 122 - man, age 35. Executed by hanging scarcely any convulsive movements after drop fell necroscopy two hoursafterward no congestion or protrusion or swelling of the tongue. Nomuscular rigidity or contractions about half-way around the neck wasindentation of cord, obliquely directed. Hardly perceptible in front;its surface appeared rubbed and compressed. No discoloration. Noecchymosis under skin cord lay across upper writing of thyroid cartilage larynx and trachea not injured fracture and dislocation of uppercervical vertebræ lungs collapsed, not congested pericardium empty;heart distended, left side with red blood just beginning to clot;right side with fluid black blood liver and other abdominal organsmuch congested no discharge of fæces or semen 80 garden. Same journal, 1880, xv , p 12 - man, age 40, weightabout one hundred and twenty pounds. Drop two feet.

Less mobility. Puerile breathing on the unaffected side in either case there may at first be little disturbance, especiallyif the shape of the foreign body is such as not to greatly interferewith the access of air. Otherwise there may be at once, and almostalways will be after a time, more or less urgent dyspnœa diminution ofthe necessary oxygen may cause convulsions, apoplexy, and other brainsymptoms acute emphysema of the portion of lung not obstructed mayfollow its forcible distention the local effect of the foreign body isan irritation which causes spasm and cough it may be carried upward bythe expirations and downward again by each inspiration inflammationis likely to appear eventually and may involve the lung if theobstruction is not complete there may follow periods of alternation ofgood and bad health, ending perhaps in recovery the foreign body maybe expelled after a greater or lesser interval on the other hand deathmay result from secondary causes in the absence of correct historythe symptoms may lead to a wrong diagnosis and inappropriate treatment;as where a patient whose symptoms resulted from the presence of a pieceof bone in the larynx, was treated for syphilis a foreign body may becoughed up from the lung into the trachea and fall backward into theopposite lung writingial closure of the larynx, most likely caused by a flat orirregular substance, rather than globular, may cause gradual asphyxiawith symptoms of apoplexy, making the diagnosis difficult when a foreign body remains a long time in the larynx, spasmodic coughand croupy breathing usually ensue, expectoration tinged with blood, hoarseness, or complete aphonia, pain, dyspnœa, possibly crepitationand dulness over the lungs the case may end suddenly in death fromclosure of the glottis, or the foreign body may pass into the tracheaand set up a new train of symptoms, or it may be expelled the frequency with which foreign bodies in the pharynx or œsophagusobstruct respiration, and the facility with which they may usually beremoved, suggest a careful examination otherwise the patient may betreated indefinitely for supposed obstruction in the air-passages foreign bodies in the œsophagus have perforated into the trachea, andeven the lungs, heart, and aorta in complete suffocation death will occur in from two to five minutes see remarks under strangulation death may also occur instantaneously the experiments of the committee on suspended animation890 showed that when the trachea of a dog was exposed, incised, and a tube tied in, the average time covered by the respiratory efforts after stopping up the tube with a cork was four minutes five seconds. The heart-beat stopping at seven minutes eleven seconds on the average after four minutes ten seconds it seemed to be impossible for the dog, unaided, to recover faure891 made the following experiment upon a large dog. He fixed a cork in the trachea at first the dog was quiet. It then extended its neck, writinged its jaws, and made efforts as if to vomit. Then tried to walk, but its gait was uncertain. Fell down and rose up its eyes became dull, and finally it fell down on its side, and became convulsed. Then after several seconds stretched itself out the thoracic movements were at first tumultuous, then became rapidly feeble. The heart beating very slowly at the necroscopy the lungs filled the thorax, were full of thick dark blood and emphysematous the blood was black and fluid in the left ventricle and arteries, and in the right cavities and veins resembled molasses liver darkly congested there was no mucus in the trachea and no ecchymosis in the lungs he also p 306 tried the experiment upon a large dog of fastening boards against its thorax and tightening them by means of cords for essay minutes it was quiet, but suddenly it became much agitated, stood upon its hind legs, threw itself against the wall, rolled on the ground, and uttered frightful cries. Finally fell on its side there was no movement of the thorax, but the muscles of the neck and belly were in full and rapid action, dry and sonorous rles were heard, and a large quantity of mucus appeared at the nose and mouth the movements grew feebler, the respirations infrequent, and at the end of thirty-four minutes it was dead the necroscopy showed the blood black and thick. Heart relaxed. Lungs red, a little emphysematous, containing but little blood, and on their surface were blackish points and small red spots the death of desdemona shakespeare “othello” has been much criticised the declaration that she was strangled or suffocated does not consist with the symptoms described see med news, philadelphia, may 1st, 1886, p 489 treatment the obvious indication is to search for and remove the obstruction themeans and methods of treatment are fully treated of in surgical works, but may be briefly mentioned here laryngoscopical examination may be necessary a curved forceps isusually the best instrument for removing the foreign body a tallowcandle may serve to push it into the stomach if there is no bougie athand suction may be used sneezing may be brought on by tickling thenostrils.

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The other ingredients are added and the bottle frequently shaken in regard to same day essay this formula, mr thum writes. It has been used in our gynecologic dewritingment for years for the last six years we have been dispensing it in collapsible tubes throughout the hospital for general work -- correspondence in the journal a m a , may 12, 1917 “nikalgin” to the editor:-- collier has a special article this week on “nikalgin ” have you any information on this subject?. it sounds like nostrum stuff p r minahan, m d , fond du lac, wis answer -- “nikalgin” is said to be the “invention” of gordon edwards, anengineer large claims for its anesthetic and antiseptic virtues havebeen made while no very definite information seems to be forthcomingregarding the preparation, it has been said to be “composed of quinin, hydrochloric acid and urea ” this would indicate that “nikalgin” maybe nothing more wonderful than the well known local anesthetic, quininand urea hydrochlorid, the quininae et ureae hydrochloridum of theu s pharmacopeia, or a modification of it -- query in the journala m a , sept 22, 1917 pertussin and syrup of thyme to the editor:-- a short time ago i received a sample of “pertussin” and used essay in an obstinate case of bronchitis with excellent results i have since received a catalog from a pharmaceutical firm, which advertises syrup of thyme i have searched for a formula to make my own syrup of thyme, but have not been able to find one will you publish one?. e f benner, m d , salfordville, pa answer -- the subjoined formula yields a product very similar to“pertussin” in taste, flavor, composition, and probably in activity aswell. Fluidextract of thyme 15 c c glycerin 15 c c syrup to make 100 c c the original german preparation contained 1 5 gm of sodium bromidin each hundred cubic centimeters, and this might be added to theforegoing formula with advantage, so far as action is concerned however, a sample of “pertussin” purchased in the open market in theunited states failed to respond to tests for bromids as fluidextract of thyme is not official, this formula is presented asfurnishing an acceptable preparation. Thyme, in no 60 powder 100 gm moisten with a mixture of. Water 25 c c alcohol 15 c c glycerin 10 c c after standing five hours, pack in a percolator exhaust with amenstruum of alcohol, 1 volume, and water, 3 volumes reserve the first85 c c of percolate concentrate the weak percolate to a soft extractand dissolve in the reserved portion make up to 100 c c by additionof a mixture of alcohol, 1 volume, and water, 3 volumes other aromatic expectorants, such as terebene, terpin hydrate orcreosote, might be expected to have similar but greater effect inchronic bronchitis query in the journal, a m a , march 27, 1920 quinin and urea hydrochlorid to the editor:-- could you tell me why quinin and urea hydrochlorid has not become more popular for local anesthesia?. is it less efficacious or more toxic than other preparations?.