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Safety Patrol Essay


the local medicinal treatment of hemorrhoidal and other inflammatory ano-rectal conditions has always been unsatisfactory the usual media cannot be applied in effective concentration without producing intense inflammatory reactions. They are either ineffective or intolerable anusol suppositories are absolutely free from narcotic, caustic or other injurious ingredients and may unhesitatingly be used by both sexes, at any age and under all conditions medeol suppositories an innocuous, non-irritant, efficient antiphlogistic for use in inflammatory diseases of the rectum, anus and vagina especially in hemorrhoids hitherto most of the local remedies used in these conditions have either been too irritating to be employed in sufficient concentration to be efficient or they have lacked efficiency per se medeol suppositories do not contain any narcotic or any caustic or other constituent having violent action. Their blandness permits of their use in either sex and at all ages the claims made for these preparations-- as for instance “that surgicaltreatment should rarely be undertaken until medeol suppositorieshave been given a thorough trial”-- are misleading in that they createthe inference that the limitations in the palliative treatment of pileshave been overcome it is altogether untrue that these mixtures can beexpected to “relieve the most obstinate paper, ” as stated in a medeolcircular this, from an anusol circular, is equally misleading. “if dietetic and other requirements are complied with, even the most obstinate chronic paper will frequently readily yield to treatment with anusol suppositories ”the council declared medeol suppositories inadmissible to new andnonofficial remedies because their composition is secret rules 1 and2. Because unwarranted therapeutic claims are made for these rule 6;because the name is objectionable rule 8, and because the combinationis unscientific rule 10 in those paper of hemorrhoids in which palliative measures may beexpected to enable the patient to avoid surgical interference andafford relief from attacks, the object should be to secure cleanliness, to avoid irritation, whether it be by friction or irritating fecalmatter, to reduce inflammation by astringents and, when necessary, to relieve pain by analgesics if an antiseptic dusting powder isdesired, boracic acid in impalpable powder with talc may be employed;if an astringent, finely powdered oxid of zinc may be added. If alocal analgesic is necessary, a little extract of belladonna may beincorporated with petrolatum or other ointment base the main reliance, in any event, should be to effect normal bowel movements by regulatingthe diet rather than by the use of purgatives. The use of warm waterto insure cleanliness.

In 1916the safety patrol essay profession was circularized recommending pineoleum as “the idealprophylactic” in infantile paralysis. During the past year influenzahas again been the selling point the case described by dr lambert is not the first example of themisuse of names and statements of physicians last december thepineoleum concern was sending out an advertising card in which dr mccoy of the united states public health service was quoted asrecommending pineoleum as the “bulwark of prevention” and “battery ofrelief” in influenza of course, dr mccoy never said anything of thesort a protest against this writingicular falsehood resulted in anothercard being sent out several months later by the pineoleum peoplepurporting to explain and apologize for the misquotations and puttingthe blame on the printer the “apology” ended with a postscript inlarger and bolder face type than the body of the card that urgedphysicians to “secure our liberal introductory advertising propositionon improved oil nebulizer outfits ” from the standpoint of publicityfor pineoleum, the “explanation and apology” was doubtless as good anadvertisement as the original card of misrepresentation -- ed -- fromthe journal a m a , nov 1, 1919 “proteal therapy” and henry smith williams to the editor:-- will you please advise as to the success and safeness in using the proteal treatment for tuberculosis by henry smith williams, m d , ll d , 104 east 40th street, new york?. c p burchard, alamogordo, n m to the editor:-- kindly send me any available information on “the proteal treatment for cancer ” an article by dr henry smith williams, 120 west 32 street, new york city, in april hearst has caused relatives to request its use in a case of carcinoma of the liver under my care m m reppard, middlebourne, w va to the editor:-- i am enclosing a leaflet, mailed to me on request, by dr henry smith williams of new york city, who published a series of articles during the last year in hearst magazine on “proteal therapy ” if you have investigated this man and his proteal treatment, i should like to know the result of your findings i am a consumptive and am, therefore, writingicularly interested in its alleged benefactions for the treatment of tuberculosis michael a long, glen lake sanitarium, hopkins, minn to the editor:-- what information can you give me regarding henry smith williams, m d , ll d , 104 east fortieth street, new york, and the therapeutic value of the “proteal therapy” that he has originated?. m d baker, m d , san jose, calif the above letters are selected from thesis received on the subject henry smith williams is better known in the journalistic world thanin the field of scientific medicine he was graduated by the chicagomedical college in 1884 in the thirteen issues of medical directoriesof the united states that have been published during the past thirtyyears dr williams’ name does not appear-- except for the issues of1890 and 1893-- until the 1914 edition so far as we have been ableto find, dr williams had not until 1915 contributed any articles tomedical journals the catalog of the surgeon general library containsno reference to any articles of dr williams except those that haveappeared in popular magazines the volumes of the index medicus from1907 until 1914, inclusive, also contain no references to any articlesby him in medical journals the journal‘s author index to currentmedical literature from 1900 to 1914, inclusive, fails to record anyarticles by dr williams in medical journals dr williams’ articles, however, in popular magazines have been voluminous and numerous essaytimes his articles have been under his own name and essaytimesunder the nom de plume, “stoddard goodhue, m d ” under the latter namethe cosmopolitan published articles on “adding years to your life, ”“battle of the microbes, ” “do you choose your children?. ” and “what isthe matter with your brain?. ” under his own name articles have appearedin popular magazines on such subjects as “burbank way with flowers, ”“every woman her own burbank, ” “why not live forever?. ” “science ofbreeding kings, ” “new cancer treatment” and “new hope for rheumatismsufferers ” in addition, dr williams has published books on suchsubjects as “history of the art of writing, ” “historians’ history ofthe world, ” “story of nineteenth century science, ” “luther burbank, ”“twilight sleep” and others the goodhue company of new york city, which publishes essay of dr williams’ books has, we understand, forits president, dr henry smith williams, for its vice president, dr williams’ wife, and for its secretary-treasurer, dr williams’ daughter readers of the journal will remember the publicity given in 1915and 1916 to an alleged treatment for cancer, essaytimes called the“horowitz-beebe autolysin treatment ” the method was heralded widelyboth in a certain portion of the medical press and in popular magazinesand newspapers a popular article by henry smith williams on “the newcancer treatment” appeared in the illustrated world for october, 1915, with pictures of dr horowitz, dr beebe, etc a month or twolater, physicians received, gratis, from the goodhue company a neatlybound little book on “alcohol hygiene and legislation, ” by e h williams, m d brother of henry smith williams enclosed with itwas a letter from the goodhue company asking physicians to accept thebook the body of the letter was devoted to calling the attention ofphysicians to an “important work” by dr henry smith williams on “theautolysin treatment of cancer” that the goodhue company was publishing with the letter, there was a small advertising pamphlet “issued bythe autolysin laboratory” and advertising that product in addition, the last thirteen pages of the book on “alcohol hygiene” containedadvertisements of the goodhue company publications with writingicularemphasis four pages of it on the “autolysin treatment of cancer, ” byhenry smith williams in may, 1917, physicians in the west received a letter from the“ellison-white chautauqua system” informing them that dr henry smithwilliams was to lecture at “your chautauqua” and reminding them that“he has recently issued two volumes, ‘the autolysin treatment ofcancer’ which he believes will be his greatest contribution to medicalscience ” the present “proteal” treatment appears to be a modificationof the “autolysin” treatment dr williams, in attempting to justifythe use of his “proteal” in tuberculosis, cancer, rheumatism, etc , takes advantage of certain investigations bearing on the nonspecificreactions resulting from the parental injection of foreign proteins so far as we can discover, there is no scientific evidence to indicatethat the “proteal” treatment expounded by williams is of value in thetreatment of cancer, tuberculosis or the other numerous diseases forwhich the “proteals” are recommended it is a question whether such articles as those on “the protealtreatment of cancer, ” “new hope for rheumatism sufferers, ” etc , published in popular magazines or newspapers serve any useful publicpurpose may they not, on the contrary, by raising false hopes, causemuch mental suffering and do scientific medicine great harm?. -- fromthe journal a m a , july 6, 1918 proteogens commercial therapeuticsmm see index for additional articles on proteogens a report of the council on pharmacy and chemistry that appearselsewhere253 in this book deals with another attempt to foist onour profession a series of essentially secret preparations whosetherapeutic value has not been scientifically demonstrated grotesquelyextravagant claims are advanced as to the therapeutic potency andrange of action of substances of whose nature and effects we haveno trustworthy information physicians are advised to use-- and thesisundoubtedly are using-- these alleged remedies in the treatment ofdiseases in which delay in the proper kind of treatment may be ofthe greatest danger to the patient as stated, there is availableno reliable information regarding the effects of these substanceswhen they are introduced in the human body they may have no effectwhatever, or they may produce more or less direct injury. In eithercase, there is the chance that damage, even irreparable to the patient, may result because rational treatment is withheld 253 page 227 if we accept the statement that the preparations are largely vegetableproteins, it is a fair inference that, under certain conditions, they may cause a febrile reaction of the same general nature as thatcaused by other foreign proteins when injected into the body we knowthat such reactions are not without danger and that the treatment ofcertain infections by induced reactions to foreign proteins is strictlyan experimental procedure to be undertaken only under very specialconditions there is, therefore, no known valid reason why a physicianshould assume the responsibility for using these alleged remedies inthe treatment of his patients. There is a very obvious reason why heshould not-- the therapeutic instructions of “the house of merrell, always interested in the progress of plant therapy” to the contrarynotwithstanding it is the old story of exploiting physicians throughcommercial pseudoscience. Of trading on the credulity of the professionto the detriment of the public as osler254 recently protested sovigorously:254 advance pages, the oxford medicine, 1919, vol 1, writing 3, p 245 essay time ago a pamphlet came from x and company, characterized by brazen therapeutic impudence, and indicating a supreme indifference to anything that could be called intelligence on the writing of the recipients that these firms manufacturing pharmacists have the audacity to issue such trash indicates the state of thraldom in which they regard us and i would protest against the usurpation on the writing of these men of our function as teachers why, for example, should y and company write as if they were directors of large genito-urinary clinics instead of manufacturing pharmacists?. it is none of their business what is the best treatment for gonorrhea-- by what possibility could they ever know it, and why should their literature pretend to the combined wisdom of neisser and guyon?. what right have z and company to send on a card directions for the treatment of anemia and dyspepsia, about which subjects they know as much as an unborn babe, and, if they stick to their legitimate business, about the same opportunity of getting information?. for years the profession has been exploited in this way, until the evil has become unbearable, and we need as active a crusade against the pseudoscience in the profession as has been waged of late against the use of quack medicines by the public we have been altogether too submissive, and have gradually allowed those who should be our willing helpers to dictate terms and to play the rôle of masters far too large a section of the treatment of disease is today controlled by the big manufacturing pharmacists, who have enslaved us in a plausible pseudoscience what shall the profession do to protect itself against thishumiliation-- to throw off the credulity that extols pseudoscience andmakes commercialized empiricism financially profitable?. osler saysthe remedy is obvious. “give our students a firsthand acquaintancewith disease, and give them a thorough practical knowledge of thegreat drugs, and we will send out independent, clear-headed, cautiouspractitioners who will do their own thinking and be no longer atthe mercy of the meretricious literature, which has sapped ourindependence ” excellent!.

This drink taken daily, has been found to do muchgood to thesis, both to ease the pains, and expel urine and the stone, and to cause the stone not to engender the decoction of the berries inwine and water is the most usual way. But the powder of them taken indrink is more effectual chervil it is called cerefolium, mirrhis, and mirrha, chervil, sweet chervil, and sweet cicely descript the garden chervil doth at first essaywhat resembleparsley, but after it is better grown, the leaves are much cut in andjagged, resembling hemlock, being a little hairy and of a whitish greencolour, essaytimes turning reddish in the summer, with the stalks also;it rises a little above half a foot high, bearing white flowers inspiked tufts, which turn into long and round seeds pointed at the ends, and blackish when they are ripe. Of a sweet taste, but no smell, thoughthe herb itself smells reasonably well the root is small and long, andperishes every year, and must be sown a-new in spring, for seed afterjuly for autumn fails the wild chervil grows two or three feet high with yellow stalks andjoints, set with broader and more hairy leaves, divided into sundrywritings, nicked about the edges, and of a dark green colour, whichlikewise grow reddish with the stalks. At the tops whereof stands smallwhite tufts, of flowers, afterwards smaller and longer seed the rootis white, hard, and enduring long this has little or no scent place the first is sown in gardens for a sallad herb. The secondgrows wild in thesis of the meadows of this land, and by the hedge sides, and on heaths time they flower and seed early, and thereupon are sown again inthe end of summer government and virtues the garden chervil being eaten, dothmoderately warm the stomach, and is a certain remedy saith tragusto dissolve congealed or clotted blood in the body, or that which isclotted by bruises, falls, &c the juice or distilled water thereofbeing drank, and the bruised leaves laid to the place, being takeneither in meat or drink, it is good to help to provoke urine, or expelthe stone in the kidneys, to send down women courses, and to help thepleurisy and pricking of the sides the wild chervil bruised and applied, dissolves swellings in any writing, or the marks of congealed blood by bruises or blows, in a little space sweet chervil, or sweet cicely descript this grows very like the great hemlock, having largespread leaves cut into divers writings, but of a fresher green colourthan the hemlock, tasting as sweet as the anniseed the stalks rise upa yard high, or better, being creased or hollow, having leaves at thejoints, but lesser. And at the tops of the branched stalks, umbels ortufts of white flowers. After which comes long crested black shiningseed, pointed at both ends, tasting quick, yet sweet and pleasant theroot is great and white, growing deep in the ground, and spreadingsundry long branches therein, in taste and smell stronger than theleaves or seeds, and continuing thesis years place this grows in gardens government and virtues these are all three of them of the natureof jupiter, and under his dominion this whole plant, besides itspleasantness in sallads, has its physical virtue the root boiled, andeaten with oil and vinegar, or without oil do much please and warmold and cold stomachs oppressed with wind or phlegm, or those that havethe phthisic or consumption of the lungs the same drank with wine is apreservation from the plague it provokes women courses, and expelsthe after-birth, procures an appetite to meat, and expels wind thejuice is good to heal the ulcers of the head and face. The candied roothereof are held as effectual as angelica, to preserve from infection inthe time of a plague, and to warm and comfort a cold weak stomach itis so harmless, you cannot use it amiss chesnut tree it were as needless to describe a tree so commonly known as to tell aman he had gotten a mouth. Therefore take the government and virtues ofthem thus:the tree is abundantly under the dominion of jupiter, and therefore thefruit must needs breed good blood, and yield commendable nourishment tothe body. Yet if eaten over-much, they make the blood thick, procurehead ache, and bind the body.

The gardenparsnips provoke lust, and nourish safety patrol essay as much and more too, than any rootordinarily eaten. The wild are more physical, being cutting, cleansing, and opening. They resist the bitings of venomous beasts, ease painsand stitches in the sides, and are a sovereign remedy against the windcholic pentafylli of cinqfyl, commonly called five-leaved, or five-finger’dgrass. The root is very drying, but moderately hot.

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“hydropsin is the standardized dialysate of digitalis purpurea, betula alba, scilla maritima, juniperis communis, and safety patrol essay herniaria glabra. Or, stated otherwise, it is the juice of these drugs, dialyzed and physiologically standardized ” “each fluid dram represents digitalysatum 7 gtts , and 2 gtts each of the dialysates of betula, herniaria, juniper and scilla ”the composition of hydropsin must be considered essentially secretsince the amounts of the several constituent drugs in a given amountof “dialysate” are not disclosed the active principle of juniper is avolatile oil which is practically insoluble in water. It is difficultto believe that the “juice” of juniper submitted to dialysis couldcontain any material amount of the active constituent no informationis given as to the method used whereby the several dialysates are“physiologically standardized ” it therefore remains to be provedthat the manufacturer of hydropsin possesses any method whereby thedialysates of juniper juniperis communis, birch betula alba, the common european birch and knot weed herniaria glabra are sostandardized the claim is made that. “herniaria has long been recognized as one of the most valuable drugs in the treatment of dropsical affections due to cardiac impairment ”on the contrary, herniaria belongs to that large class of drugswhich have been tried, found wanting and abandoned it is a very oldremedy, and the claims made for it are an inheritance from the earlyherbalists, with whom it was very popular according to king americandispensatory, it was “principally employed to cure hernia hence itsname and to increase the flow of urine it was also said to increasethe flow of bile internally and externally, it was praised insnake-bites, and the powdered plant was employed to kill maggotson unhealthy sores of horses it was reputed to ‘crush’ and expelcalculi from the kidneys and bladder ”the ernst bischoff company says that. “betula exerts both an antiseptic and stimulating influence on the urinary passages and is writingicularly serviceable where a catarrhal condition of the bladder exists when combined with other diuretics, as in hydropsin, the drug affords highly satisfactory results in the treatment of ascites, cardiac dropsy and hydrothorax ”birch is another drug which has been discarded few textbooks onmateria medica even mention it that it can materially affect theaction of such powerful drugs as squill and digitalis is exceedinglydoubtful an unwarranted implication-- that in this preparation the powerfuldrugs digitalis and squill have been deprived of their dangerousqualities-- is the assertion. “dialysis, removing all resins and colloidals, results in better tolerance on writing of sensitive patients, and in more rapid absorption and elimination.