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As the meseraik veins are placed to discern whatnourishment is proper for the liver to convert into blood in essay veryfew men, and but a few, and research paper writer online in those few, but in few instances thesetwo tasters agree not, and that is the reason essay men covet meats thatmake them sick, viz the taste craves them, and the meseraik veinsreject them. In quality hot and moist, and is ruled by jupiter the feeling is deputed to no writingicular organ, but is spread abroad, over the whole body. Is of all qualities, hot, cold, dry, and moist, and is the index of all tangible things. For if it were only hot alone, it could not feel a quality contrary, viz cold, and this might bespoken of other qualities it is under the dominion of venus, essaysay, mercury. A thousand to one, but it is under mercury the four administering virtues are, attractive, digestive, retentive, and expulsive the attractive virtue is hot and dry, hot by quality, active, orprincipal, and that appears because the fountain of all heat isattractive, viz the sun dry by a quality passive, or an effect ofits heat. Its office is to remain in the body, and call for what naturewants it is under the influence of the sun, say authors, and not undermars, because he is of a corrupting nature, yet if we cast animwritingial eye upon experience, we shall find, that martial men callfor meat none of the least, and for drink the most of all other men, although thesis times they corrupt the body by it, and therefore i seeno reason why mars being of the same quality with the sun, shouldnot have a share in the dominion it is in vain to object, that theinfluence of mars is evil, and therefore he should have no dominionover this virtue. For then, 1 by the same rule, he should have no dominion at all in the body ofman 2 all the virtues in man are naturally evil, and corrupted by adamfall this attractive virtue ought to be fortified when the moon is infiery signs, viz aries and sagitary, but not in leo, for thesign is so violent, that no physic ought to be given when the moon isthere. and why not leo, seeing that is the most attractive sign ofall.

But whether with this herb or not, i know not also i have read and it seems to be essaywhat probable that the herb, being gathered as i shewed before, and the elements draw awriting from itby art of the alchymist, and after they are drawn awriting rectified, theearthly quality, still in rectifying them, research paper writer online added to the terra damnata as alchymists call it or terra sacratisima as essay philosopherscall it the elements so rectified are sufficient for the cure of alldiseases, the humours offending being known and the contrary elementgiven. It is an experiment worth the trying, and can do no harm the lesser celandine, usually known by the name of pilewort and fogwort i wonder what ailed the ancients to give this the name celandine, which resembles it neather in nature nor form. It acquired the name ofpilewort from its virtues, and it being no great matter where i set itdown, so i set it down at all, i humoured dr tradition so much, as toset him down here descript this celandine or pilewort which you please doth spreadthesis round pale green leaves, set on weak and trailing branches whichlie upon the ground, and are flat, smooth, and essaywhat shining, and inessay places though seldom marked with black spots, each standing on along foot-stalk, among which rise small yellow flowers, consisting ofnine or ten small narrow leaves, upon slender foot-stalks, very likeunto crowsfoot, whereunto the seed also is not unlike being thesis smallkernels like a grain of corn essaytimes twice as long as others, of awhitish colour, with fibres at the end of them place it grows for the most writing in moist corners of fields andplaces that are near water sides, yet will abide in drier ground ifthey be a little shady time it flowers betimes, about march or april, is quite gone bymay. So it cannot be found till it spring again government and virtues it is under the dominion of mars, and beholdhere another verification of the learning of the ancients, viz thatthe virtue of an herb may be known by its signature, as plainly appearsin this. For if you dig up the root of it, you shall perceive theperfect image of the disease which they commonly call the piles it iscertain by good experience, that the decoction of the leaves and rootswonderfully helps piles and hæmorrhoids, also kernels by the ears andthroat, called the king evil, or any other hard wens or tumours here another secret for my countrymen and women, a couple of themtogether. Pilewort made into an oil, ointment, or plaister, readilycures both the piles, or hæmorrhoids, and the king evil.

Causing paralysis a combinationof numbers 1 and 2 is usually found in suicidal hanging. And probablyall of them in homicidal and judicial hanging the more protected theair-passages are from pressure the greater writing will coma or syncopehave in the cause of death mackenzie, 802 as the result of examination of 130 suicidal hangings, says that 119 died of asphyxia, 8 of asphyxia and apoplexy, 2 ofsyncope, and 1 of apoplexy alone coutagne803 thinks œdema of thelungs, “œdema carminé, ” has an important writing in causing death the following conditions tend to produce asphyxia. A tight ligature, or a loose ligature above the hyoid bone to produce coma, a looseligature pressing against the hyoid bone or larynx, especially acretified larynx to both asphyxia and congestion of brain, a ligaturejust beneath the lower jaw, or around lower writing of neck hofmann804 states that when the ligature is placed between the larynxand hyoid bone, the base of the tongue is pushed upward against theposterior wall of the pharynx, completely stopping respiration andcausing asphyxia taylor805 states that if the rope presses on orabove the larynx, the air-passages are not so completely closed aswhen pressure is below the larynx in the latter case death would beimmediate. In the former a slight amount of respiration might continue the instantaneous loss of consciousness is due, not to asphyxia alone, but to compression of the large vessels, especially the carotids, against the transverse processes of the vertebræ, causing rupture ofthe middle and inner coats, and at the same time compression of thejugular veins and pneumogastric nerves immediate unconsciousness willalmost certainly follow compression of the pneumogastrics he alsobelieves that the loss of consciousness and of power of self-helpoccur at the moment that the noose is tightened around the neck thereis no record of any one who attempted suicide by hanging seeking torecover himself, although no doubt essay would have done so if thespeedy unconsciousness had not prevented hofmann mentions the case ofa man who was found hanging, and with a loaded revolver in his hand, apparently having intended to shoot as well as hang himself, but lostconsciousness before he had time to discharge the revolver accordingto him the causes of death are three. Occlusion of the air-passages, interruption of passage of blood to brain, and compression ofpneumogastric nerves von buhl806 experimented on cadavers and concluded that in hanging, the epiglottis and arytenoids are pressed over the glottis, and thetongue and the œsophagus against the vertebræ, causing death byapnœa when the trachea was isolated from the vessels and tied, theair-passages below became dilated and the lungs emphysematous andanæmic the heart continued to beat and blood to circulate the vertebral arteries being much smaller than the carotids, thecirculatory disturbance in the brain is not adjusted with sufficientpromptness compression of the pneumogastrics, according towaller, 807 has caused subjects to fall to the ground as if struck bylightning he holds that the unconsciousness in hanging is the resultof the compression of the pneumogastric nerves and not of the arteries thanhöfer808 knew a student who had acquired a certain dexterity incompressing these nerves one day he compressed the two nerves, hispulse stopped and he became unconscious thanhöfer809 tried bilateralcompression of pneumogastrics in a young man sentenced to be executed the pulse fell at once and the heart soon stopped. The eyes were fixedand glassy it was essay time before he regained consciousness and fortwo days there was malaise hofmann says that the compression irritates and, in a higher degree, paralyzes the pneumogastric nerves and causes disturbance of the actionof the heart faure810 denies that the constriction of the vessels of the neck hasany effect in the production of symptoms811 coutagne believes that the pressure on the pneumogastric nerve is a factor in causing death he hung two dogs. In one the pneumogastric nerves were dissected out and placed in front of the ligature. This dog no 1 lived a quarter of an hour and died of pure asphyxia with efforts at inspiration continued to the end the other dog no 2, in which the nerves were compressed, died in five minutes in both, the abdominal organs were congested and the cavities of the heart were full the lungs of the first were dry and uniformly red. Of the second were resisting, crepitant, and quite œdematous no subpleural ecchymoses in either the experiments on animals by corin812 led him to conclude that pressure on the pneumogastrics caused increased frequency of the heart-beat and slowing of respiration pellier813 considers the subject quite fully it would appear that the pressure on the pneumogastrics disposes to stop the action of the heart and cause rapid, perhaps instant death the pressure on the carotids causes cerebral anæmia and is then only a secondary cause levy814 does not think the action of the pneumogastrics is sufficiently well known tidy states that a dog lived for three hours suspended by a rope placedabove an opening in the windpipe. And that smith815 mentions the caseof a criminal who was hung. Chovet tried to save the man by making anopening in the trachea before the execution and introducing a smalltube the man was alive forty-five minutes after the drop, but couldnot be resuscitated, although the surgeon bled him in a small proportion of paper of hanging, homicidal and judicial, death occurs by dislocation of the spine this is said to have beenfirst noticed by the celebrated louis, who states that the parisexecutioner was in the habit of giving a violent rotary movement tothe body of the convict as the trap was sprung, causing a dislocationof the odontoid process and compression of the cord and almost instantdeath taylor816 says that for dislocation the body must be heavy andthe fall long and sudden devergie817 found this to occur in abouttwo per cent of paper it is said that the paris hangman placed theslip-knot under the chin in front, which is as dr haughton suggests death may occur from secondary causes after apparent recovery. Fromcongestion of brain and other lesions of the nervous system. These mayprove fatal at remote periods fracture of the odontoid process according to m de fosse is morecommon than dislocation, and the giving away of the intervertebralsubstance more likely than either of the others the phrenic andother respiratory nerves are likely to be paralyzed. The vertebral andcarotid arteries may be ruptured the medulla oblongata is also likelyto be fatally injured death may also occur from hemorrhage upon thecord, causing pressure besides the ropes used as ligatures in judicial hanging, almost everyconceivable article that could be made into the semblance of a cord hasbeen used by suicides. Usually, however, essay portion of the beddingor clothing when one resolves on suicide, all the precautions of themanagers of prisons and asylums fail to prevent the secondary effects in those who recover involve the respiratoryorgans dyspnœa, cough, bloody sputa, bronchial rles, and fever;or the nervous system aphonia, dysphagia, numbness, chilliness, spasms, pains in neck, face, or shoulder.

Syrups are made to keep, decoctions only for present use. Foryou can hardly keep a decoction a week at any time. If the weather behot, not half so long 2 decoctions are made of leaves, roots, flowers, seeds, fruits orbarks, conducing to the cure of the disease you make them for. Are madein the same manner as we shewed you in syrups 3 decoctions made with wine last longer than such as are made withwater. And if you take your decoction to cleanse the passages of theurine, or open obstructions, your best way is to make it with whitewine instead of water, because this is penetrating 4 decoctions are of most use in such diseases as lie in the passagesof the body, as the stomach, bowels, kidneys, passages of urine andbladder, because decoctions pass quicker to those places than any otherform of medicines 5 if you will sweeten your decoction with sugar, or any syrup fit forthe occasion you take it for, which is better, you may, and no harm 6 if in a decoction, you boil both roots, herbs, flowers, and seedtogether, let the roots boil a good while first, because they retaintheir virtue longest. Then the next in order by the same rule, viz 1 barks 2 the herbs 3 the seeds 4 the flowers 5 the spices, ifyou put any in, because their virtues come soonest out 7 such things as by boiling cause sliminess to a decoction, as figs, quince-seed, linseed, &c your best way is, after you have bruisedthem, to tie them up in a linen rag, as you tie up calf brains, andso boil them 8 keep all decoctions in a glass close stopped, and in the coolerplace you keep them, the longer they will last ere they be sour lastly, the usual dose to be given at one time, is usually two, three, four, or five ounces, according to the age and strength of the patient, the season of the year, the strength of the medicine, and the qualityof the disease chapter v of oils 1 oil olive, which is commonly known by the name of sallad oil, isuppose, because it is usually eaten with sallads by them that love it, if it be pressed out of ripe olives, according to galen, is temperate, and exceeds in no one quality 2 of oils, essay are simple, and essay are compound 3 simple oils, are such as are made of fruits or seeds by expression, as oil of sweet and bitter almonds, linseed and rape-seed oil, &c ofwhich see in my dispensatory 4 compound oils, are made of oil of olives, and other simples, imagineherbs, flowers, roots, &c 5 the way of making them is this. Having bruised the herbs or flowersyou would make your oil of, put them into an earthen pot, and to two orthree handfuls of them pour a pint of oil, cover the pot with a paper, set it in the sun about a fortnight or so, according as the sun is inhotness. Then having warmed it very well by the fire, press out theherb, &c very hard in a press, and add as thesis more herbs to the sameoil. Bruise the herbs i mean not the oil in like manner, set them inthe sun as before. The oftener you repeat this, the stronger your oilwill be. At last when you conceive it strong enough, boil both herbsand oil together, till the juice be consumed, which you may know by itsbubbling, and the herbs will be crisp. Then strain it while it is hot, and keep it in a stone or glass vessel for your use 6 as for chymical oils, i have nothing to say here 7 the general use of these oils, is for pains in the limbs, roughnessof the skin, the itch, &c as also for ointments and plaisters 8 if you have occasion to use it for wounds or ulcers, in two ouncesof oil, dissolve half an ounce of turpentine, the heat of the firewill quickly do it. For oil itself is offensive to wounds, and theturpentine qualifies it chapter vi of electuaries physicians make more a quoil than needs by half, about electuaries i shall prescribe but one general way of making them up. As foringredients, you may vary them as you please, and as you findoccasion, by the last chapter 1 that you may make electuaries when you need them, it is requisitethat you keep always herbs, roots, flowers, seeds, &c ready dried inyour house, that so you may be in a readiness to beat them into powderwhen you need them 2 it is better to keep them whole than beaten. For being beaten, they are more subject to lose their strength. Because the air soonpenetrates them 3 if they be not dry enough to beat into powder when you need them, dry them by a gentle fire till they are so 4 having beaten them, sift them through a fine tiffany searce, that nogreat pieces may be found in your electuary 5 to one ounce of your powder add three ounces of clarified honey;this quantity i hold to be sufficient if you would make more or lesselectuary, vary your proportion accordingly 6 mix them well together in a mortar, and take this for a truth, youcannot mix them too much 7 the way to clarify honey, is to set it over the fire in a convenientvessel, till the scum rise, and when the scum is taken off, it isclarified 8 the usual dose of cordial electuaries, is from half a dram to twodrams. Of purging electuaries, from half an ounce to an ounce 9 the manner of keeping them is in a pot 10 the time of taking them, is either in a morning fasting, andfasting an hour after them. Or at night going to bed, three or fourhours after supper chapter vii of conserves 1 the way of making conserves is two-fold, one of herbs and flowers, and the other of fruits 2 conserves of herbs and flowers, are thus made.

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In other research paper writer online words, was it suicidal or homicidal?. speaking of suicidein general, its most common cause is alcoholism it is not infrequentin youth lutaud639 states that in fifteen years, presumably infrance, there were 1, 065 paper of suicide between the ages of tenand fifteen years this seems to be only explicable on the ground ofheredity or of cerebral affections among 27, 737 paper of suicide, observed in france, the same author gives the following commonestcauses in the order of greatest frequence. Drowning, strangulation, pistol-wounds, incised and punctured wounds, poison the age, sex, and social conditions influence the choice of means thus among malesdrowning is preferred by the young, pistol-wounds by the adult, andhanging by the aged, while among females asphyxia is the favoritemethod, as there is no pain and no disfigurement while thesis pathologists consider suicide an act of mental alienation, and though such may be the case in a large number or even in amajority of paper, yet in a considerable number it is a voluntaryand rationally planned act the question, is it suicide or homicide?. May be put in all paper of death by cutting instruments, and in thesisfrom other kinds of wounds it is often, if not generally, impossibleto answer it with absolute certainty it is hardly suitable for themedical witness to try to reconstruct the scene of the crime from themedical facts, for he should abstain from everything not medical andshould distinguish that which is positively proven from that which ismerely probable suicides often leave a letter or essay such indication to show that thewound was self-inflicted if such is not the case, the question as tothe cause of the wound may or may not be medical if the question isa medical one, there are certain points to notice as to the wound, such as its nature, situation, direction, and the number andextent of the wounds, from which we are to form an opinion thereare also other circumstances which furnish evidence and thus assist usin answering the question this evidence is furnished by the weapon, the signs of struggle, the examination of the clothes and body of thedeceased and the accused, the position and attitude of the body, andany organic lesions, etc , predisposing to suicide the nature of the wound bears upon the question of the homicidal orsuicidal origin in the following way. Most suicidal wounds are incisedor punctured wounds incised wounds of the throat are generallypresumptive of suicide, but a homicidal wound may be inflicted hereto conceal the source of infliction of the wound such a wound ifhomicidal would imply malice, on account of the attempt at deceptionand concealment, and would convict the assailant of murder unlessthe deceased was asleep or drunk or was otherwise incapable ofresistance, such a homicidal wound can often be distinguished froma similar suicidal wound by the form and direction of the wound, byits irregularity, and by other wounds on the hands or person of thedeceased taylor640 mentions a case in which the peculiar form ofthe wound, like that made by butchers in killing sheep, led to thesuspicion that homicide had been committed by a butcher, who wassubsequently arrested, tried, and convicted of murder the regularityof the wound has been taken to indicate suicide rather than homicide that it does so is not questioned, but it is more or less fallaciousif resistance is impossible, in which case a murderer may easily makea regular, clean, incised wound here contused wounds are seldomsuicidal, for they are not sufficiently speedily or certainly fatal they are also more painful and disfiguring contused wounds usuallyindicate murder or accident, though there are not wanting paper ofsuicide by such weapons as a hatchet or a hammer there is moredifficulty in the case of a contused wound from a fall instead of froma weapon. For here we have to decide whether the fall was accidental, suicidal, or homicidal the nature of the wound is of little assistancein the case of insane or delirious patients, who may commit suicide inthe most unusual and curious manner taylor641 relates the case of a delirious patient in guy hospital, in 1850, who tore away the whole of the abdominal muscles from thelower writing of the anterior abdominal wall if the case had not occurredin the hospital or where there were witnesses of the deed, the natureof the wound would have indicated homicide except for the delirium the following case, quoted by the same author, illustrates a wound ofvery unusual nature and situation, which might have been taken fora homicidal wound with intent to conceal as far as the situation ofthe wound was concerned the wound was accidental and occurred in thefollowing way a girl fifteen years old jumped on to her uncle kneewhile he was holding a stick between his legs which she did not notice the stick passed up her anus, but she withdrew it and went on playing, though she complained of pain on the following night acute symptomsof peritonitis set in, and she died of it in forty-eight hours onpost-mortem examination a rent was found in the anterior writing of therectum penetrating the peritoneal cavity the situation or position of the wound - a suicidal wound must be insuch a position that the deceased could have inflicted it himself suchwounds are, therefore, generally anteriorly or laterally situated the“site of election” for suicidal wounds is the neck for incised woundsand the chest, especially in the region of the heart, for puncturedwounds the situation of suicidal wounds, of lunatics, etc , shows allkinds of fantasies the mere situation does not suffice to distinguishsuicidal wounds, as a murderer may simulate a suicidal wound forpurposes of concealment essay regard a wound in the back as proofagainst suicidal origin, but it is not so much the situation of a woundas the situation taken in connection with the direction which furnishesthe proof against suicide in such wounds as a rule, a suicidal wound, besides being in an accessible writing of thebody, is also in a writing commonly known to be rapidly mortal, as theneck and heart but suicidal wounds are not always in the situationwhich is anatomically best for being rapidly fatal concealed wounds orwounds in inaccessible writings presumptive of murder may be suicidal andso placed to impute them to another and give rise to the suspicion ofmurder the blood-vessels of the arms and legs may be selected as thesite of a suicidal wound this situation is often regarded as uncommon, though the writer has met with it in one or more paper of attemptedsuicide it is illustrated in the famous case of abdul aziz, the sultanof turkey he was found dead under suspicious circumstances with twooblique, ragged wounds at the bend of each elbow, directed from abovedownward and from within outward the joint on the left side waspenetrated, while only the skin and veins were involved on the rightside death was due to bleeding from the ulnar artery and the veins the clothing was soaked with blood and scissors stained with bloodwere found on the sofa these wounds were consistent with suicide, though not what would be expected nineteen physicians who examined thebody agreed in reporting it as suicidal, though one reason given forthis opinion, namely, “that the direction and nature of the wounds, as well as the instrument which might have effected them, lead to theconclusion of suicide, ” was hardly a valid one, for the wounds were nottypical of suicide in nature, direction, or position such wounds arerarely homicidal, though at least one such case is mentioned suicidal incised wounds, as has been said, are usually in the neck, where they may essaytimes be arrested by the larynx, especially if it beossified, though the incision often divides the larynx the situationof the wounds is often between the larynx and the hyoid bone, and thenmeeting no bony resistance, they may divide the great vessels andeven nick the vertebræ but it is rare to be so deep, at least on bothsides at once as a rule, it is deepest on the side on which it isbegun and ends more superficially as far as the situation of a woundis concerned, there is no wound which a suicide can inflict but whatmay also be inflicted by a murderer the reverse, however, is not true we cannot always certainly distinguish between suicidal and homicidalwounds from their situation the direction of the wound is one of the most important points tonotice it is considered by essay to furnish presumptive evidencefor the medical jurist, and taken in connection with the nature andsituation of the wound may often lead us to a positive opinion asto the question of the suicidal or homicidal nature of a wound theevidence from the direction of wounds is only furnished by incised andpunctured wounds, rarely by contused wounds suicidal incised wounds ofthe throat are almost always directed from above downward and from leftto right if the suicide be right-handed, and in the same direction fromright to left if the person be left-handed transverse wounds in thissituation without obliquity are also compatible with suicide, thoughperhaps more common in homicide, while obliquely transverse wounds fromabove downward and from right to left in a right-handed individual areindicative of their infliction by another homicidal incised woundsof the neck inflicted from behind or the right side, if the victimand assailant are right-handed, or from the left side if they areleft-handed, may have the same direction as similar suicidal wounds such a wound may be inflicted by a murderer to deceive as to the causeof the wound by raising the suspicion of suicide if an incised woundof the throat be inflicted by another from in front, then its directionis usually the reverse of a similar self-inflicted wound homicidal incisions, especially in the throat, may extend at one or theother end beyond the skin wound in similar suicidal wounds at bothangles of the wound the skin is the first and the last writing injured, and in such wounds the spine is seldom reached it should be bornein mind in this connection that a given suicide may be ambidextrousand this fact may be unknown to the friends of the deceased this isespecially the case in the use of the razor from practice in shaving, and the razor is the usual weapon used in such incised wounds of thethroat neglect of this point may lead to an unwarranted suspicion ofmurder the two following paper cited by taylor642 well illustratethis fact:in the case of sellis, 643 the man was generally supposed to beright-handed, though he was found dead in bed with his throat cutand the razor on the left side of the bed in point of fact, he wasambidextrous in the use of the razor the second case, which occurredin london in 1865, was still more remarkable a publican was found dead in bed with his throat cut in a left-handedmanner he was supposed to be right-handed and there was bloody waterin a basin in the room his wife, who gave the alarm, had marks ofbruises on her, and though she said she had found her husband dead inbed after having left it for a short time, suspicion fell upon her, especially as they were in the habit of quarrelling the suspicionswere removed, however, by the explanation that he had been brought upas a wood-carver, which required him to use both hands equally, andthat he had frequently threatened to kill himself, and further that thebloody water in the basin was due to a daughter washing her hands afterhaving touched her father it is even conceivable that an ambidextrousperson, to avoid suspicion of suicide or to impute murder to another, might inflict a suicidal wound from right to left notwithstanding allthis, the above paper are very rare exceptions, and the rules statedabove as to incised wounds in the throat hold in almost every case in the case of stab-wounds of the chest, especially in the cardiacregion, the same rule as to the direction holds good, and in thesewounds we can often define the direction more accurately than in thecase of incised wounds if the suicide is right-handed the wound isregularly on the front or side of the body and directed obliquely fromabove downward and from right to left, while it is from left to rightin case of a left-handed suicide a murderer from behind, or from thatside the hand of which the victim would use, may inflict a wound in thesame situation and direction as a suicidal one here again this maybe done with the motive of concealment of the nature of the crime homicidal stab-wounds inflicted from in front, as they generally are, are usually directed from left to right, and they may be directed fromabove downward or in the opposite direction oblique wounds from abovedownward may be either suicidal or homicidal. Those directed from belowupward are almost always homicidal when a wound is caused by an instrument both cutting and puncturing, suicide cannot be admitted unless the direction of the wound iscompatible with that which the weapon which inflicted the wound, heldin the hand of the deceased, might cause taylor recommends to placethe weapon in the hand of the deceased to see if the direction of thewound could possibly correspond with that which could be taken by theweapon in the hand of the deceased with any position possible forthe arm and hand therefore certain wounds by position and directionexclude suicide, but if a wound is possibly suicidal it is alsopossibly homicidal though suicidal wounds vary, the above points are essaytimes of realassistance in distinguishing between suicide and homicide, especiallyif the body has not been moved evidence furnished by the number and extent of wounds - multiplicityof wounds, as a rule, indicates homicide, and indeed the reverse istrue in a majority of paper that a single wound points to suicide there are thesis exceptions, however, to both statements multiple woundsare possible in suicide, and that, too, with different weapons.