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Purdue Owl Argumentative Essay


For example, in an insanitycase, whether the symptoms that he found in his patient led him to thebelief as a purdue owl argumentative essay professional man of experience and skill that his patientwas sane or insane the question is, can he be compelled to give thatopinion, if he chooses to decline to give it without the promise orassurance of further compensation than the mere per diem fee andmileage of an ordinary witness?. the best authority is to the effectthat he must so testify, the reasoning of the court being that hisopinion is only a writing of what he derived from his original relation ofphysician to his patient wright v the people, 112 ill , 540. Samecase, 33 alb l j , 79 same rule in civil and criminal paper - the rule is the same whetherthe professional man is called to testify as an expert in civil orcriminal paper in either one he is not obliged to give an opinion assuch, independent of a personal knowledge of the facts in the case, without being paid or assured reasonable compensation therefor hisproper course of conduct is, when he has obeyed the subpœna and is inthe presence of the court and has been sworn, and the questions putby counsel disclose that the object of his examination is to elicitfrom him an opinion, to state to the court that he has not been paidany other compensation than that of an ordinary witness, and that herespectfully declines to give an opinion in the case as an expert, without compensation proportionate to the value of his opinion 182whether witness competent a question for court in limine - afterthe expert is placed upon the stand, as we have seen, the counselupon the side of the case by which he is summoned interrogates himas to his capacity, the purpose of the interrogation being that hisanswers shall qualify him and show him to be an expert whether ornot he is an expert so as to permit the giving of his opinion aswriting of the case to go to the jury, is for the court to decide inlimine, that is, at the threshold, and as a matter of discretion, andthe exercise of that discretion, if fair and reasonable, will not bedisturbed upon appeal by the higher court it is permissible, but alsodiscretionary, after the counsel calls the witness and has apparentlyqualified him, for the counsel upon the other side to cross-examinethe witness as to his qualifications before he is examined in chief, with a view of determining whether or not there are limitations uponthose qualifications which should prevent the court from permitting himto testify as an expert the general rule is as stated by greenleafin his work on evidence, sec 440, that it is not necessary that themedical expert should have actually practised his profession nor is itessential that the witness should belong to any writingicular school ofmedicine the law does not undertake to pass upon conflicting theoriesof medical practice, in determining the question of the qualificationof a medical expert it is proper, however, for counsel to inquire asto what school of medicine the witness is an adherent, because of itsimportance in weighing the value of his testimony after it has beengiven persons not duly licensed essaytimes held not competent - it hasalso been a mooted question in those states where it is necessary, inorder to enable a person to practise physic or surgery, that he shouldbe licensed, whether a person practising without a license, howeverextensive his reading and practice, would be considered qualified asan expert witness in a court of justice this point, so far as diligentexamination discloses, has not been determined in any reported case, although it has been suggested at nisi prius and has been, in oneinstance within the knowledge of the writer, decided that he is notto be considered an expert in matters involving medical knowledge andskill the reasoning of the court was that the policy of the stateis to prohibit persons not possessing the qualifications requiredto obtain a license, from acting in any capacity as professors andpractitioners of medicine or surgery if the witness is a member ofthe profession, legally qualified as such, it has been held that he issufficiently qualified as an expert if he shows that he possesses theaverage ability of members of his profession hall v costello, 48n h , 176. Tellis v kidd, 12 ala , 648. Wharton on evidence, sec 446.

Late surgeon 65th regt n y vols. Late health commissioner, rochester, n y. Etc , etc death by heat and cold temperature of the body the production and regulation of heat in the body is a problem byno means elucidated we consider heat production to be of internalorigin, by a complex process involving tissue metamorphosis, chemicalchanges in nutrient elements, muscular movements, etc heat regulationis accomplished, not only by variation in the loss of heat by thebody, but by what is more important, variations in the amount of heatgenerated it is an accepted physiological conclusion that there existsin the body a thermotaxic nervous mechanism which controls its normal, as well as its abnormal, manifestations of heat the average temperature of the body in health is 37° c 98 6° f , inthe axilla taken in the vagina or rectum, 9° c 1 3° f higher isnoted the daily average range of variation is about 1° c 1 8° f in disease or injury considerable variations occur. Very high, as wellas very low, temperatures are met in severe neuroses and essay forms ofmalarial disease a temperature of 42 2° c 115° f has been recorded, and after an injury 71° c 122° f 688very low temperatures are reported in several paper of acutealcoholism, accompanied by exposure to cold, where a temperature of28 8° c 75° f in the rectum was noted, recovery following 689such extreme temperatures, though authentic, are exceptional very high temperatures in febrile conditions are borne becauseremitting. And low temperatures, subject to periods of elevation, are met in wasting and other conditions very high and very lowtemperatures are also noted, just before death, in acute diseases andconditions specially involving the nervous system the degree to which the temperature may be raised without destroyinglife has been investigated by berger, bernard, chossat, and others 690their experiments show that if an elevation of temperature of the body7 20° c 13° f be maintained for any length of time in warm-bloodedanimals, death ensues depression of the temperature of warm-bloodedanimals 12° c 20° f , or even less than these degrees below thenormal, results fatally portions of the body may be frozen and yet, under appropriate treatment, recover but freezing of the whole bodymust necessarily prove fatal great differences in ability to endure extremes of heat and coldappear among different nations and in different individuals the veryyoung and the very old are unable to bear exposure to extreme cold in both, the capacity for heat production is low and the vital powersare soon enfeebled to a critical degree the healthy adult can, withproper precautions, safely endure great extremes of heat and cold the experience of arctic explorers in the expeditions of kane, nares, greely, and others has demonstrated the power of endurance, for aconsiderable period, of a temperature from 90° to 100° f below thefreezing-point on the other hand, laborers employed in pottery andother establishments, using ovens raised to 148° to 315° c 300° to600° f or higher, are often exposed for essay time without injury totemperatures approaching these intense figures effects of extreme cold legal inquiry into the conditions of death from cold occurs almostentirely in paper of unintentional exposure cold has been employed, however, with homicidal intent the depressing influence of continuedlow temperatures is observed in the death-rates of cities, in wintersof protracted severity, where the proportionate mortality amonginfants, the aged and enfeebled shows marked increase while age is aprominent predisposing and contributing factor, other causes exist exhaustion from severe and prolonged exertion, deprivation of food, intoxication, former illness, and other conditions of depression lessenthe powers of the body to resist cold thus an exposure which might besafely borne in perfect health might result fatally in the same personin conditions of depression just referred to case 1 investigation may be demanded in case of the death ofa young children b the injured c the insane a in young children - this may be in the new-born or older children in the new-born exposure to cold soon causes death, as warmth isessential to the life of the young being the length of time necessaryto a fatal issue is modified by several conditions in the immature orprematurely born infant the resisting power is much less than in thechild born at full term and otherwise healthy in paper of suspectedinfanticide by exposure the question of the maturity of the child atbirth is to be decided careful examination of the place in which thebody was discovered should be made as to its lack of warmth. And thedegree of external cold at the time of probable exposure should berecorded the circumstances as to whether the exposure was inadvertentor accidental, as in paper of premature or unexpected delivery, orwhether from intentional and deliberate purpose or from culpableneglect, should be carefully considered the post-mortem examinationshould decide whether the appearances and conditions of the body arethose peculiar to death from cold case 2 death may occur from culpably careless exposure to cold, as acontributory if not as a direct cause, in such conditions ofenfeeblement criminal neglect to provide medical attendance, food, andother essentials has been proven in essay paper of the so-called “faithcure” or “prayer cure ” exposure may be resorted to with deliberatehomicidal intent it may, in essay paper of death, become an importantlegal question to decide whether a studied and persistent neglect ofthis nature may not have been followed, with the purpose of getting ridof a troubleessay care paper 2 and 3 b exposure of the injured or wounded, thereby inducing essaygrave condition or complication which under proper care would havebeen avoided, may raise an important question in injuries inflictedby another, with or without criminal intent it is undeniable thatserious or fatal results may follow a slight wound, otherwise trivial, where the injured person was subjected, accidentally or intentionally, to extreme cold for a considerable period while such paper arecomparatively rare, they may demand investigation c exposure of the insane - while it must be admitted that theinsane subject is usually indifferent to matters of temperature, deathfrom exposure to cold may call for special examination carelessness, incompetence, or wilful neglect on the writing of nurses or keepers ofinsane hospitals, or deliberate criminal intent in such or othershaving the care of or an interest in the death of an insane person maylead to a judicial inquiry sudden death has been reported as occurring, in several paper, afterthe ingestion of large quantities of cold water when the person wasgreatly heated it is essaywhat difficult to explain all such paperreported on a single line of causation essay observers have attributeddeath to syncope or asthenia by the shock produced, in the suddeneffect of the cold upon the sympathetic nervous system inducing heartfailure this seems the most natural explanation others consider the causative factor to be the formation of thrombosesin the capillaries of the brain, lungs, and other organs, inducingactive and obstructive congestions causing death by apnœa or coma others regard these paper as similar to “heat apoplexy ”symptoms under the influence of external cold, the vessels of the skin arecontracted and the internal splanchnic areas dilated thus the surfaceof the body contains less blood and the internal organs a largerproportion this vascular change is one of the important factors inmaintaining the uniform temperature of the body the thermometer, placed in the mouth, in such conditions frequently indicates a rise oftemperature this is probably due, not only to the increased volumeof blood collected in the internal organs, but also to an increasedproduction of heat through a thermogenic action in exposure for a time to severe cold the nose, ears, cheeks, hands, feet, and other portions of the body, after the first appearance ofdusky lividity, become bloodless and white, lose sensation, and becomecongealed. A condition known as “frost-bite ” from this, recoverywithout injury is possible under appropriate treatment, by which thetemperature is gradually raised and the circulation restored wherethe latter result is not secured, the writing becomes gangrenous and isultimately removed by a process of inflammation and sloughing if the application of cold be protracted and the temperatureextreme, the loss of heat becomes rapid and symptoms of depressionof the heart action appear painful sensations of the surface andother portions of the body are experienced, succeeded by impairedsensation and anæsthesia the skin acquires a dusky, reddish, andlivid appearance, with the formation occasionally of vesicles orblisters with the lessened sensation stiffness of the limbs appears, due to failing muscular contractility the congestion of the centralportions of the nervous system induces a condition of advancing stupor, resulting in complete coma with ultimate suspension of respiration andthe heart action death from exposure to cold may be rapid or slow in paper of recoverythe period of reaction is a critical one the depression of the heartis apt to continue, and gangrene of writings of the body is likely tooccur ulcers and sores healing with difficulty develop in essay paper treatment in the treatment of those who are suffering from the effects of extremecold, the restoration of the congealed or “frost-bitten” portions ofthe body should be gradually accomplished raising the temperaturerapidly is liable to induce the death and destruction of the affectedwritings ice or snow should, at first, be rubbed upon the frozen writing, to be succeeded later by cold water the patient should be placed ina cool room and distant from the fire or source of heat as soon aswarmth begins to return the writing should be enveloped in wool, cotton, or essay substance of poor conducting powers if the whole body bechilled, frictions of the surface with stimulating lotions are ofbenefit, wrapping the person in woollen or fur coverings or garmentsafterward hot coffee or alcoholic stimulants are of value as restoratives, butthe latter are to be avoided during an exposure to cold post-mortem appearances the appearances indicative of death from cold are sufficiently markedto enable one to decide whether exposure to cold was the chiefdetermining cause of death, provided that a careful consideration ofthe circumstances of season, temperature, place, and other conditionsbe also had in the examination of a body in a case of apparent death from cold, thelimbs and internal organs may be found frozen it must be rememberedthat this occurs after, not before, death. And the frozen conditionmust not be mistaken for “rigor mortis ”in paper where a body is found, in freezing conditions of atmosphere, showing commencing putrefaction, the death must not be hastilyattributed to cold, which prevents putrefaction it is evident that ifcold was the cause of death the temperature of the body had been raisedsince that event, or, more probably, death occurred from other causesand the body remained essay time before becoming frozen the finding of a body in the snow or frozen in severe weather must notpreclude the search for other causes of death, such as apoplexy, etc , which may have occurred anterior to the freezing observers generally have agreed upon the presence of certainpost-mortem conditions in paper of death from cold externally - upon the skin are found dusky reddish patches, irregularin outline, which are in sharp contrast with the general pallor of thesurface krajewskey, 691 ogston, 692 dieberg, 693 and others, in theseveral series of paper reported by them, all describe this condition the skin otherwise is pale internally - the viscera, including the brain, are congested the heartcontains a large quantity of blood in the cavities of both sides, andthe large vessels leading from it are also full the color of the bloodis a bright red, resembling its arterial hue this condition has beengenerally noted and described. But essay excellent observers have notreferred to it effects of extreme heat the application of moderate heat to the surface of the body causesdilatation of the cutaneous capillaries in such application theexhalant and perspiratory function of the skin is increased, by whichmeans a rise in general body temperature is prevented if, however, severe physical exertion accompany the exposure, a more pronouncedresult is induced and a depressing effect upon the nervous systembecomes manifest if the degree of heat be raised and the exertionincreased and prolonged, marked depression ensues under circumstancesof quiet and rest a high degree of temperature is borne by man withoutdepression or discomfort, but with continued and severe muscular effortthe rise in animal temperature is productive of distress and depressingconditions in the turkish or russian baths, in the healthy subject, a temperature of 48 8° to 54 4° c 120° to 130° f produces profuseperspiration but no depression, and a plunge in or affusion of coldwater is not only borne with impunity but is acceptable in conditionsof heat accompanied by physical exhaustion, such sudden exposure tocold would prove extremely dangerous in the condition of rest, exposed to external heat, the tendency toelevation of body temperature arises from the external causes alone, which in no way specially modify the nutritive functions but in thesecond condition the internal processes of nutrition, which have beensubject to great stimulation, are suddenly embarrassed by suppressionof the compensating activity of the cutaneous surface, and severeorganic and nervous derangements follow in the summer season the temperature rises to 32 3° c 90° f andeven much higher in certain localities during the prevalence of suchheat, the mortality among young children, the aged and enfeebled isvery marked. These two periods of life being very susceptible to thedepressing effects of heat a high temperature is easily borne if theair be pure and the atmosphere be not saturated with moisture telluricelectric conditions also have a modifying influence, undoubted thoughobscure in certain occupations an intensely heated atmosphere is endured withimpunity for a considerable time, provided the air be maintained in acondition of purity and water be supplied to the person exposed thestokers upon ocean steam-ships, where a forced draught is employed, aresubjected to extreme heat, essaytimes reaching 60° c 140° f resortto forced and continuous ventilation of the stoke-rooms, with shorthours of duty, renders tolerance of the high temperatures possible sunstroke the terms “sunstroke, ” “insolation, ” “coup de soleil, ” areapplied to conditions induced, not alone by exposure to the rays ofthe sun, but rather by a combination of great heat with other excitingcauses they are used to designate attacks occurring in very hotweather after exposure to solar or other sources of extreme heat the striking and usual phenomena are exhaustion, unconsciousness, stertorous respiration, and death, occurring by syncope, within afew moments or hours in a number of paper the symptoms of cerebralapoplexy with death by coma are present in others, the condition seems one of complete exhaustion the majorityof paper seem to be a combination of these several conditions, withdeath resulting from syncope the ordinary phenomena of the attack are pain in the head, hurriedrespiration essaytimes stertorous, violent beating of the heart withfailing of its power, oppression within the chest and, occasionally, nausea and vomiting the pupils are essaytimes dilated and essaytimescontracted, but in all paper exhibit lessened sensitiveness to light the suddenness of the attack modifies the symptoms developed pathological conditions these are exhaustion with syncopic tendency and a rapid rise in thetemperature of the body to a point destructive to the activity of thenervous centres this is accompanied by an abnormal condition of theblood, resulting from loss of its watery portions, with retention ofeffete products and impaired aeration a tendency to general stasis, specially marked by congestions of the lungs and brain, is present the change in the blood is a very important factor in essay paper, notfatal at the outset, this induces a septic condition the greatly elevated temperature of the body undoubtedly producescertain modifications which type it, in essay respects, as a febriledisease. But this, with the septic tendency due to blood changes, isnot sufficient to designate it as a purely “thermal fever, ” as essayhave claimed it is essaything more than this sunstroke occurs more commonly in tropical than temperateclimates;694 and usually in the day-time, at the period of greatestsolar activity, those attacked being engaged in labor involvingconsiderable exertion it occasionally, though rarely, occurs at night the military service affords abundant opportunity for observation herethe seizures are on the march, rarely in camp fatigue, prolonged andextreme exertion, ill-adjusted clothing and accoutrements, with thedeprivation of cool water, are fully as active factors as the heat ofthe sun the death-rate ranges between forty and fifty per cent, themild paper being excluded death in essay paper is marked by syncope, in others by apnœa, though the majority seem to die by a combinationof both, as in most paper the pulmonary congestion is more or lesspronounced undoubtedly the character of the symptoms and mode of deathare influenced, in thesis paper, by individual tendencies leading toapoplectic conditions or to cardiac or other complications treatment this must be adjusted to the pathological conditions of the patient as already indicated, two classes of paper are met. One marked byexhaustion, with tendency to death by syncope. The other, a state ofor tendency to cerebral congestion or apoplectic conditions exactlyopposite methods of treatment are demanded in the first, frequencyand feebleness of the heart action, with faintness of the heartsounds and embarrassment of respiration, indicate the tendency todeath by nervous exhaustion, and must be met by placing the patientin a condition of absolute rest and quiet in a cool place stimulantsmust be promptly administered, though cautiously on account of thetendency to nausea and vomiting hypodermic injections of alcohol orether, or rectal enemata of turpentine, alcohol, or other stimulants, afford means of securing speedy effects when the stomach is irritable carbonate of ammonia and other cardiac stimulants are recommended depleting agents, or such as prove depressing, are to be avoided inessay paper, hypodermic injections of small doses of morphine provebeneficial individual paper must modify therapeutic procedures in the second class of paper the tendency to cerebral congestionindicates sedative and depleting procedures blood-letting has beenrecommended by essay authors, if employed with extreme judgment anddiscrimination 695 cold applied to the head and also to the wholebody by rubbing with ice696 or by effusion and the wet sheet, orother means, is indicated if the temperature is high 104° to 105° f active catharsis, by promptly acting purgative enemata, is also to beresorted to in most paper the convulsions occurring in essay paper aresuccessfully modified and controlled by inhalations of small quantitiesof chloroform post-mortem appearances these, though not clearly characteristic, are pronounced in essay paperno distinct conditions are found 697 local congestions are present innearly all paper upon the skin are found petechial and livid spots, pallor being occasionally noted ecchymoses and subserous hemorrhagesare also common these conditions have been described as resemblingthose of spotted typhus levick rigor mortis is marked and occurs early, putrefaction beginning soonafter death the lungs are highly congested and often œdematous, andeffusions of serum are frequently found in the pleural cavities 698the heart is usually changed in color and consistence, with the leftventricle contracted and the aorta empty, while the right ventricleand pulmonary arteries are dilated and engorged the blood is fluidand dark 699 the large vessels of the pia and dura are full ofdark blood congestion of the cerebral mass is not always noted theventricles contain serum. And extravasations of blood into the cervicalsympathetic ganglia and vagus are essaytimes found the kidneys areusually moist and œdematous. The liver and spleen congested and dry burns and scalds for all purposes of practice it is unnecessary to draw any distinctionbetween a burn and a scald, for in reality none exists, except asregards the nature of the causative agent in essay paper requiringinvestigation, this may prove to be a matter of much importance definition - a burn is an injury produced by the application to thebody of a heated substance, flame or radiant heat a scald is an injury produced by the application of a liquid at ornear its boiling-point appearances as indicating origin a hot body may produce a burn of any intensity, ranging betweenreddening of the skin and complete charring of the tissues, accordingas its temperature is elevated and the period of contact prolonged.

Of h graham, at purdue owl argumentative essay westminster hospital, in1835. Of w cummin, at the aldersgate street school, in 1836-37. Andof t southwood smith, at the webb street theatre of anatomy, in1837-38 107among the noteworthy contributions to the science previous to 1850are the writings of dease 1808, haslam 1817, 108 christison, thesuccessor of professor duncan in the university of edinburgh, and bestknown as a toxicologist, forsyth 1829, 109 chitty 1834, 110watson 1837, 111 brady 1839, 112 skae 1840, 113 pagan 1840, 114 and sampson 1841 115in 1836, dr alfred swaine taylor b 1806, d 1880, the firstprofessor of medical jurisprudence in guy hospital, published his“elements of medical jurisprudence ” this, the most important work uponthe subject in the english language, is now in its twelfth englishand eleventh american edition during forty years of devotion toforensic medicine dr taylor also contributed other important works andnumerous papers, published for the most writing in the reports of guyhospital 116 in 1844, dr wm a guy, professor of forensic medicinein king college, published the first edition of his excellentwork 117 in 1858, fr ogston, professor of medical jurisprudencein the university of aberdeen, published a syllabus and subsequently 1878 a complete report of his lectures 118 in 1882, c m tidy, professor of chemistry and forensic medicine in the london hospital, who had previously 1877 been associated with w b woodman in theauthorship of a valuable handbook, began the publication of a moreextended work, which was interrupted by his death in 1892 119the first spanish work on legal medicine was that of juan fernandezdel valles, printed in 1796-97 120 no further contribution tomedico-legal literature was furnished by spain until the appearance in1834 of the work of peiro and rodrigo, which went through four editionsin ten years 121 ten years later, in 1844, pedro mata, professor oflegal medicine and toxicology at madrid, published the first edition ofa work, which in the development of its subsequent editions, has becomethe most important on the subject in the spanish language 122the first portuguese medico-legal treatise was that of jose ferreiraborjes, first printed at paris in 1832 123a posthumously published report of the lectures of albrecht von hallerwas the earliest swiss work on forensic medicine 124in sweden the earliest medico-legal publication was a comprehensivetreatise by jonas kiernander, in 1776, 125 which was followed in 1783by a translation of hebenstreit, by r martin the voluminous writingsof the brothers wistrand a t and a h , including a handbook, were published at stockholm, between 1836 and 1871 between 1846 and1873, several articles upon medico-legal subjects were published athelsingfors, in finland, by e j bonsdorff, o e dahl, and j a estlander in 1838 skielderup126 published his lectures on legalmedicine, delivered at christiania, and orlamundt127 publisheda handbook at copenhagen in 1843 the earliest recognition ofmedico-legal science in russia was in the lectures of balk, 128 begunin 1802 at the then newly founded university of dorpat although dissertations upon subjects of medico-legal interest werepublished at the university of leyden as early as the middle of theseventeenth century, 129 and the works of pineau, 130 zacchias, 131ludwig, 132 von plenk, 133 and metzger134 were printed in holland, either in latin or in the vernacular, no original systematic work onlegal medicine in the dutch language has yet appeared the only belgian contribution to the literature of forensic medicine, other than articles in the journals, is a text-book by a dambre, firstpublished at ghent in 1859 135two medico-legal works have been printed in the japanese language, onea report of the lectures of professor ernst tiegel, at the universityof tokio, 136 the other a treatise by katayama 137in the united states the development of forensic medicine has kept pacewith that in the mother country in an introductory address deliveredat the university of pennsylvania in 1810, the distinguished dr benjamin rush dwelt eloquently upon the importance of the subject 138in 1813, dr james s stringham was appointed professor of medicaljurisprudence in the college of physicians and surgeons of newyork, and a syllabus of his lectures was published in the followingyear 139 at the same period 1812-13 dr charles caldwell delivereda course of lectures on medical jurisprudence in the university ofpennsylvania 140 in 1815, dr t r beck was appointed lecturer onmedical jurisprudence in the college of physicians and surgeons of thewestern district of the state of new york. And soon after dr waltercharming was appointed professor of midwifery and medical jurisprudencein harvard university in 1823, dr williams, in the berkshire medicalinstitute, and dr hale, of boston, each lectured upon the subject 141in 1819, dr thomas cooper, formerly a judge in pennsylvania, and atthat time professor of chemistry and mineralogy in the university ofpennsylvania, reprinted, with notes and additions, the english worksof farr, dease, male, and haslam 142 the works of ryan, chitty, traill, and guy were also reprinted in this country shortly after theirpublication in england in 1823, dr theodric romeyn beck published at albany the first editionof a treatise as admirable for scholarly elegance of diction as forprofound scientific research this remarkable work, facile princepsamong english works on legal medicine, has had twelve american andenglish editions, and has been translated into german and swedish 143papers upon medico-legal subjects or reports of lectures were publishedby j w francis, 144 j webster, 145 r e griffith, 146 r dunglison, 147 j bell, 148 and s w williams149 between 1823and 1835 in 1840, amos dean, professor of medical jurisprudence atthe albany medical college, published a medico-legal work, followedby another in 1854, which with the later work of elwell are the onlytreatises on forensic medicine upon the title-pages of which nophysician name appears 150numerous papers and tracts upon medico-legal subjects were published byj j allen, t d mitchell, h howard, d h storer, j s sprague, j s mulford, j f townsend, and a k taylor between 1840 and 1855 in the latter year appeared the first edition of the admirable work offrancis wharton and dr moreton stillé, the first american product ofthe collaboration of members of the two professions, now in its fourthedition 151between 1855 and 1860 no systematic treatises on legal medicine werepublished, although the medical journals contained numerous articlesbearing upon the subject in 1860 the first edition of a treatisewritten from the legal aspect was published by j j elwell 152 in1869 dr j ordronaux, recently deceased, widely known as a teacher oflegal medicine and a graduate in law as well as in medicine, publisheda treatise which has been extensively used as a text-book 153 at thepresent time the great number and variety of articles published inthe medical and legal journals, bearing upon every branch of forensicmedicine and of medical jurisprudence, and written for the most writingby specialists, is evidence of the assiduity with which the science iscultivated the wide appreciation of the importance of medico-legal science inthe united states is also indicated by the fact that at the presenttime there are but few medical schools in which the subject is nottaught to ascertain the extent of medico-legal instruction at thepresent time, a circular of inquiry was sent to the deans of 124medical schools and of 56 law schools in the united states and britishprovinces answers were received from 103 medical colleges of theseonly 3 are without a teacher of “medical jurisprudence ” in 38 theteacher is a physician, in 50 he is a lawyer, in 5 he is a graduatein both professions, and 3 have two teachers, one a lawyer, theother a physician the average number of lectures given is 21, andthe average in those schools in which the teacher is a lawyer, andtherefore presumably teaches only medical jurisprudence, is 15 themedico-legal relations of their subjects are taught in their lecturesby the neurologist in 62 schools, by the surgeon in 66, by theobstetrician in 69, and by the chemist toxicology in 91 it appearsfrom these reports that not only is the importance of medico-legalscience appreciated, but that in the majority of our medical schoolsthe distinction between medical jurisprudence and forensic medicineis recognized in the fact that the instructor is a lawyer, whopresumably teaches medical jurisprudence, while the different branchesof forensic medicine and toxicology are taught by the specialistsmost competent to deal with them every practising physician requiresthorough instruction in medical jurisprudence, which, being strictlylegal, is best taught by one whose profession is the law the generalpractitioner only requires so much knowledge of the different branchesof forensic medicine as will enable him to intelligently fulfil hisobligations in such medico-legal paper as will be forced upon him asresults of his ordinary practice he can become a medical expert onlyby a writingicular study of and a large experience in essay writingicularbranch of the subject in our law schools the teaching of medico-legal science is not asgeneral as in schools of medicine of 35 law schools, only 10 haveprofessors of medical jurisprudence of these 6 are lawyers, 1 is aphysician, 2 are graduates in both professions, and 1 is a doctor ofdivinity in this work the existence of specialists in the various branchesof medico-legal science has been recognized for the first time in atreatise in the english language each branch has been assigned toa specialist in that subject, or at least to one who has made it awritingicular study in the arrangement of the matter, the primary division into the threesciences of medical jurisprudence, forensic medicine, and toxicologyhas been adopted the division of pure medical jurisprudence iscontained in the present volume, while the legal aspects of neurology, obstetrics, etc , will be treated of in future volumes along with thesubjects to which they relate in the division of forensic medicine theclassification of casper has been followed. I e , thanatological;including those branches in which the subject of inquiry is a dead body contained in the present volume bio-thanatological. Relating toquestions concerning both dead bodies and living persons in the secondvolume biological. Relating to living persons in the second andthird volumes the applications of the microscope to forensic medicinewill be treated of in the second volume the fourth volume will containthe division relating to toxicology r a w medical jurisprudence the legal relations of physicians and surgeons, including their acquirement of the right to practise medicine and surgery. Their legal duties and obligations. Their right to compensation.

The melting point given by the manufacturers isfrom 120 to 122 f , which, according to the american standard of takingmelting points, gives higher results than the method described in thepharmacopeia illustration. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - | inception | | | | where the dry wax poultice has been used | | | | thermozine known in france as l’ambrine, has been | | used in the following parisian hospitals, with | | 92% of cures. | | | | hospital de la pitie, services of drs lion, darier | - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - photographic reproduction from a booklet on “thermozine” showing thatit is identical with “ambrine ”about 10 c c of “asphalt varnish” b asphaltum176 is placed ina beaker and heated on the steam bath for one-half hour from 3 to 5drops, delivered from a 1 c c pipet, are then placed in a casserole, and 1 5 c c of olive oil added the mixture is heated and stirredfor a few minutes until perfect solution is effected to this is thenadded, with stirring, the paraffin, which has been previously melted when it is cooled, a brown solid is obtained 177 the physical factorsof this paraffin mixture are, melting point 45 4 c u s p method;plasticity, 28 5. Ductility, 29. It is very pliable and strong at38 c , and adheres exceedingly well to the skin, although it detacheseasily this mixture, which is easy to prepare, is inexpensive, thecost of the materials being approximately 10 cents a pound 176 the “asphalt varnish” used was obtained from remien & kuhnertcompany, chicago 177 while needless, a color resembling “ambrine” may be obtained bythe addition of coloring agents both hull and sollmann noticed that tarlike substances and meltedparaffin do not mix well this is noticeable in “ambrine, ” which cannotbe called an “elegant” preparation the difficulty may be overcome byfirst mixing hot olive oil and asphalt. The asphalt will then go intosolution it is interesting to note that the suggested formula as wellas others which were also prepared is not as plastic as the paraffinitself 178 this is also true of “ambrine ” on the other hand, themelting point of the paraffin is higher the important point, however, in compounding all paraffin preparations, is to select a proper gradeof paraffin as elaborated below 178 in a personal communication dr sollmann expressed the opinionthat the synthetic preparation is inferior to the paraffin used in theformula, basing the view on the greater plasticity of the paraffin for practical purposes, the paraffin will most probably serve as wellas the mixture, especially when it is held in place by bandages, but ibelieve that the mixture is more adhesive examination of paraffins and paraffin preparationsillustration. Photographic reproduction greatly reduced of a fullpage magazine advertisement of “thermozine, ” the name under which“ambrine” was sold to the public the name “paraffin” generally applies to a colorless and tastelesswaxlike substance that is solid at ordinary temperature it is composedof saturated hydrocarbons, that is, they are unable to take up any morehydrogen, and thereby are quite stable. The hydrocarbons in paraffinhave the general formula of c↓{n}h↓{2n2}, ranging as high as c₂₄h₅₀ toc₂₇h₅₆ paraffin may be found in crude form in coal, from which sourcethe first paraffin candles were made it may be produced from thedistillation of brown coal, as in gerthesis, or from bituminous shale in america, it is obtained chiefly from the distillation of crudepetroleum, being in the residue after the distillation of such productsas naphtha gasoline, kerosene and the lubricating oils the residueis treated by one of a number of processes causing the unpurifiedsolid paraffin to be made available the crude paraffin is eithersold as such, or is refined paraffin or “paraffin waxes”179 aredesignated in the trade by their melting points which in the “americanstandard” is expressed in fahrenheit degrees, and as to their stateof refinement as “crude, ” “semirefined” and “fully refined” paraffin there are certain chemical and physical differences so that two refinedwaxes having the same melting point would not have the same plasticity the higher melting point varieties of paraffin are hard and tough atroom temperature. When melted, paraffin expands and forms a thin mobileliquid 179 paraffin is essaytimes spoken of as “white wax ” this isunfortunate, as “white wax” is an official name for “white beeswax, u s p ” the term “white wax” is also often applied to “chinese wax, ”which is formed from an insect living on the tree ligustrum lucidum illustration. Photographic reproduction from a booklet on “thermozine”giving the conditions in which the stuff was alleged to be “veryuseful ”the significant requirements of paraffin for surgical dressings arethat it should be solid at body temperature, at the same time havingflexibility and adhesiveness, together with a certain amount ofstrength a number of brands of paraffin are sold in the united states, so that it seemed advisable to examine essay of them and compare themwith certain paraffin-film preparations they were tested as to theirmelting points, plasticity, ductility, strength of film, etc melting point determination -- the melting point was determined bythe method of the u s pharmacopeia ix, p 596 the melting pointas obtained by this method is lower than the melting point used bymanufacturers of paraffin after conversion to fahrenheit pliability and ductility, limit temperature 180-- a little of themelted wax was poured from a teaspoon on the surface of the water atabout 40 c , in a tin pan bread mold this formed a fairly thin film the temperature of the water was then lowered by the addition of coldwater at each temperature the pliability and ductility were testedthus:180 i am indebted to dr torald sollmann for these methods pliability test -- the film, immersed in water, was doubled on itself, note being taken whether or not it broke ductility test -- the film was pulled under water, note being takenwhether it stretched on being pulled and broke with a ragged fracture;or whether it broke sharp without stretching it is desirable thatthe pliability and ductility be preserved at as low a temperature aspossible cotton films, adhesives and detachability 180-- the melted wax wasapplied as it would be for burns. Namely, a thin layer was painted onthe inner surface of the forearm with a camel hair brush, 181 atransverse strip about an inch wide being made this was covered witha very thin layer of absorbent cotton, and over this another layer ofmelted wax was painted as soon as this had cooled a little, it wascovered by a few layers of bandage and left on for at least an hour atthe end of that time, the bandage was removed the cotton film shouldbe found at the place at which it was applied, showing that it issufficiently adherent it should detach without “pulling” the skin 181 when painting a surface with a paraffin film, i found that thetemperature of the paraffin should not be too close to the meltingpoint, but several degrees above. Otherwise it does not “set” well illustration. Photographic reproduction greatly reduced of thecarton in which “ambrine” is now sold the results of these tests are given in the accompanying table it canbe seen that nearly all the paraffins examined have properties whichwould make them useful, the notable exceptions being nos 8, 15 and16 the more satisfactory products would be those having a meltingpoint about 47 c , ductility of 30 or below, and plasticity of 28 orbelow the paraffin described in the u s pharmacopeia is not sosatisfactory, the required melting point being between 50 and 57 c the use of paraffin bandages has been suggested by fisher182 andsollmann 183 in such paper, it may very likely be that a paraffin ofhigher melting point would be more satisfactory, owing to its greaterresistance and tougher fiber 182 fisher, h e.

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Lungs and heart about normal except for a moderate degree of congestion but no exudate guinea-pig 3 was sick for essay days, but recovered gradually one week after experiment 20 -- effect of chlorlyptus in vivo on staphylococcus -- the experiment was conducted in the same way as in experiment 17, but 2 c c were used instead of 1 c c result. Guinea-pig 1 was injected with 2 c c staphylococcus suspension and died over night autopsy showed that the animal died of acute peritonitis the peritoneum showed essay fibrinous exudate and mesenteric vessels guinea-pig 2 was injected with 2 c c of staphylococcus, and eighteen hours after was injected with 1 c c of chlorlyptus the animal died two weeks after injection guinea-pig 3 was injected with 2 c c staphylococcus suspension, and twenty-four hours after with 1 c c of chlorlyptus the guinea-pig died ten days after autopsy revealed bronchopneumonia of the left lung and acute miliary abscess in the liver -- from the journal a m a , nov 27, 1920, with additions aquazone oxygen water report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryaquazone is stated by the aquazone laboratories, inc , los angeles, california, to be a supersaturated solution of oxygen in water, carrying approximately five and one-half times as much dissolved oxygenas ordinary water in an advertising booklet, it is suggested thataquazone is of value in the treatment of influenza, pneumonia, typhoid, bright disease and kindred disorders it was also stated thereinthat in the treatment of fevers it lowers the temperature, and thatthe administration of three bottles of aquazone representing 0 033gm -- 1-1/2 grain-- of oxygen is of value for “preventive and tonicpurposes ”the evidence which the aquazone laboratories submitted did not showthat the effects were other than those which might be obtained from theadministration of ordinary potable water the council declared aquazoneinadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies, because the therapeuticclaims made for it were unwarranted, and because its use is irrationalfor the reason that oxygen given by stomach in this way is of littleor no value -- abstracted from reports of council on pharmacy andchemistry, 1920, p 50 coagulen-ciba omitted from n n r report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has authorized publication of the following reportannouncing the deletion of coagulen-ciba from new and nonofficialremedies w a puckner, secretary coagulen-ciba, a product of the society of chemical industry, basle, switzerland, was admitted to new and nonofficial remedies in 1915 it is stated to be an extract prepared from blood platelets and tocontain thromboplastic substances cytozym, thrombokinase, thrombozymmixed with lactose extensive clinical reports appeared to justify itsacceptance for new and nonofficial remedies with fibrin ferments andthromboplastic substances in 1918, dr arthur d hirschfelder reported to the council that ofa number of specimens of coagulen-ciba examined by him, failed toaccelerate the coagulation time of blood in view of dr hirschfelder findings, the therapeutic researchcommittee of the council invited dr p j hanzlik to undertake anexhaustive investigation of thromboplastic substances, the council, in the meantime temporarily retaining coagulen in new and nonofficialremedies until the investigation was completed the following report on the eligibility of coagulen-ciba was made tothe council by dr hanzlik. Object.