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Which being well understood, shew thee the key of galen andhippocrates their method of physic. He that useth their method, andis not heedful of these rules, may soon cure one disease, and causeanother more desperate that thou mayest understand what i intend, it is to discover in ageneral way of the manifest virtues of medicines i say of the manifest virtues, and qualities, viz such as areobvious to the senses, especially to the taste and smell. For it hathbeen the practice of most physicians, in these latter ages as well asours, to say, when they cannot give, nor are minded to study a reason, why an herb, plant, &c hath such an operation, or produces such aneffect in the body of man. It doth it by an hidden quality, for theynot minding the whole creation, as one united body, not knowing whatbelongs to astral influence, not regarding that excellent harmonythe only wise god hath made in a composition of contraries in theknowledge of which consists the whole ground and foundation of physicare totally led astray by tradition it is the manifest qualities of medicines that here i am to speak to, and you may be pleased to behold it in this order section 1 of the temperature of medicines section 2 of the appropriation of medicines section 3 of the properties of medicines section i of the temperature of medicines herbs, plants, and other medicines manifestly operate, either by heat, coldness, dryness, or moisture, for the world being composed of sothesis qualities, they and only they can be found in the world, and themixtures of them one with another but that they may appear as clear as the sun when he is upon themeridian, i shall treat of them severally, and in this order 1 of medicines temperate 2 of medicines hot 3 of medicines cold 4 of medicines moist 5 of medicines dry of medicines temperate if the world be composed of extremes, then it acts by extremes, foras the man is, so is his work. Therefore it is impossible that anymedicine can be temperate, but may be reduced to heat, cold, dryness, or moisture, and must operate, i mean such as operate by manifestquality by one of these, because there is no other to operate by, andthat there should be such a temperate mixture, so exquisitely of thesequalities in any medicine, that one of them should not manifestly excelthe other, i doubt it is a system too rare to find thus then i conclude the matter to be, those medicines are calledtemperate not because they have excess of temperature at all in themwhich can neither be said, to heat nor cool so much as will amount tothe first degree of excess, for daily experience witnesses that theybeing added to medicines, change not their qualities, they make themneither hotter nor colder their use they are used in such diseases where there is no manifestdistemper of the first qualities, viz heat and cold, for example;in obstruction of the bowels, where cold medicines might make theobstruction greater, and hot medicines cause a fever in fevers of flegm, where the cause is cold and moist, and the effecthot and dry. In such, use temperate medicines which may neitherencrease the fever by their heat, nor condensate the flegm by theircoldness besides, because contraries are taken away by their contraries, and every like maintained by its like, they are of great use, topreserve the constitution of the body temperate, and the body itselfin strength and vigour, and may be used without danger, or fear ofdanger, by considering which writing of the body is weak, and using suchtemperate medicines as are appropriated to that writing of medicines hot the care of the ancient physicians was such that they did not labourto hide from, but imwriting to posterity, not only the temperature ofmedicines in general, but also their degrees in temperature, that sothe distempered writing may be brought to its temperature, and no further;for all things which are of a contrary temperature, conduce not tocure, but the strength of the contrariety must be observed, that so themedicine may be neither weaker nor stronger, than just to take awaythe distemper. For if the distemper be but meanly hot, and you applya medicine cold in the fourth degree, it is true, you may soon removethat distemper of heat, and bring another of cold twice as bad galen, de simp med facul lib 3 cap 12 then, secondly, not only the distemper itself, but also the writing ofthe body distempered must be heeded. For if the head be distempered byheat, and you give such medicines as cool the heart or liver, you willbring another disease, and not cure the former the degrees then of temperature are to be diligently heeded, whichantient physicians have concluded to be four in the qualities, viz heat and cold, of each we shall speak a word or two severally of medicines hot in the first degree those are said to be hot in the first degree, which induce a moderateand natural heat to the body, and to the writings thereof. Either cold bynature, or cooled by accident, by which natural heat is cherished whenweak, or restored when wanting effect 1 the first effect then of medicines hot in the first degree, is, by their sweat and temperate heat to reduce the body to itsnatural heat, as the fire doth the external writings in cold weather, unless the affliction of cold be so great that such mild medicines willnot serve the turn effect 2 the second effect is, the mitigation of pain arising fromsuch a distemper, and indeed this effect hath other medicines, essaythat are cold, and essay that are hotter than the first degree, theybeing rationally applied to the distemper these medicines the greekscall anodyna, and shall be spoken of in their proper places in thisplace let it suffice that medicines hot in the first degree, makethe offending humours thin, and expel them by sweat, or insensibletranspiration, and these of all others are most congruous or agreeableto the body of man, for there is no such equal temperature of heatand cold in a sound man, but heat exceeds, for we live by heat andmoisture, and not by cold medicines then which are hot in the first degree, are such as justcorrespond to the natural heat of our bodies. Such as are hotter orcolder, are more subject to do mischief, being administered by anunskilful hand, than these are, because of their contrariety to nature;whereas these are grateful to the body by their moderate heat effect 3 thirdly, these take away weariness, and help fevers, beingoutwardly applied, because they open the pores of the skin, and bytheir gentle heat prepare the humours, and take away those fuliginousvapours that are caused by fevers discommodities yet may discommodities arise by heedless givingeven of these, which i would have young students in physic to be verycareful in, lest they do more mischief than they are aware of, viz it is possible by too much use of them, to consume not only what isinimical in the body, but also the substance itself, and the strengthof the spirits, whence comes faintings, and essaytimes death.

1638 tablets - - - pancreatin old - -the conclusions in the foregoing summary depend on the followingcriteria:amylase. Removal of starch paste, small in proportion to beginwith pepsin. Solution of small shreds of fresh fibrin in acid media rennin. Curdling of milk in moderate excess trypsin. Solution of small shreds of fresh fibrin in neutral andalkaline media, and tryptophan test lipase. Coloration of litmus-milk. Exact color controls all tests were suitably controlled the responses for pepsin were weakeven when compared with those of old pepsin preparations in the table above, the interrogation points in parentheses ?.

The entrance of air intothe pleural cavities with collapse of the lungs all tend to causemechanical suffocation either by pressure or by paralysis for deathsin epileptics, see paper 1, 10, 11, 33, and 40 it is not necessary that the air-passages should be absolutely closedto cause suffocation the cause of death is more likely to be pure asphyxia, because of theabsence of the complicating pressure of the hand or professional writing services vancouver ligature on thevessels and nerves of the neck, and of fracture of larynx or vertebræ symptoms - foreign bodies889 entering the trachea naturally falltoward the right bronchial tube instead of the left because of thesize and position of the entrance of the right tube if then but onetube is involved, the signs will usually be on the right side. Whereasif the foreign body stop in the larynx or trachea, both sides will beaffected the latter condition is much more dangerous the symptomswould be resonance over the lung with the respiratory murmur writingly orwholly absent. Less mobility. Puerile breathing on the unaffected side in either case there may at first be little disturbance, especiallyif the shape of the foreign body is such as not to greatly interferewith the access of air.

1 that the therapeutic use ofhypophosphites except possibly in essay paper as a convenient means ofadministering the positive element in the salt, as ammonium in ammoniumhypophosphite or calcium in calcium hypophosphite is irrational. 2that the merits of each hypophosphite salt submitted for considerationunder the foregoing exception must be judged individually, and 3that fellows’ syrup of hypophosphites, peters’ syrupus roborans, schlotterbeck solution hypophosphites of lime and soda, robinsonhypophosphites, the eupeptic hypophosphites of nelson, baker &co , and mcarthur syrup of the hypophosphites are ineligible forinclusion in new and nonofficial remedies, and that borcherdt maltolive with hypophosphites, maltzyme with hypophosphites, maltinewith hypophosphites, and maltine with olive oil and hypophosphitesbe deleted from the appendix of n n r of these preparations, all are in conflict with rule 10. Fellows’ syrup, schlotterbecksolution, robinson hypophosphites and nelson, baker & co eupeptichypophosphites are in conflict with rule 6. The fellows, schlotterbeck, and nelson, baker preparations are also in conflict with rule1 -- from the journal a m a , sept 2, 1916 pulvoids calcylates report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrypulvoids calcylates 5 grains was submitted by the drug productscompany, inc , new york, under the following claims as to composition. “when ingested represents the following chemical formulas. Oh c₆h₄ coo₂ ca 2h₂o sr c₇h₅o₃₂ 2h₂o ” “strontium di-salicylate 2-1/2 grs and our especially prepared salt of calcium and acid salicylic adjusted in such nascent form, that these pulvoids upon ingestion will promptly form calcium neutral di-salicylate 2-1/2 gr ” “a combination of calcium and strontium di-salicylate, in seemingly true chemical union ”these statements are rather vague, possibly because they are an attemptto mystify the product, however, may be assumed to be a mixture not achemical combination of calcium salicylate and strontium salicylate the therapeutic claims made for the preparation are. “superior to ordinary salicylates can be taken continuously and indefinitely without gastric irritation, insuring maximum efficiency ” “reports show surprisingly good results, even where the sodium salt fails ”as there is no evidence to show that strontium salicylate, calciumsalicylate or a mixture of the two salts has any advantage oversodium salicylate, these claims cannot be accepted the name and thestatement of composition are objectionable in that they do not revealthe identity of the drugs in “calcylates” and in suggesting that thispreparation possesses radical advantages over salicylates in otherforms the drug products company was told that the facts just mentionedrendered “pulvoids calcylates” ineligible for new and nonofficialremedies the company in its reply objected to the councilconclusions, and in support of its position submitted testimonials froma number of physicians the reply of the company embodied no facts orarguments which had not been considered by the council referee, andthe testimonials from physicians contained no evidence to show that thecombination has any real advantage over sodium salicylate the council therefore declared “pulvoids calcylates” ineligible fornew and nonofficial remedies for the following reasons. Unwarrantedtherapeutic claims are made for the mixture rule 6. The name does notdescribe the composition rule 8, and the mixture is an unessentialmodification of an established remedy sodium salicylate rule10 -- from the journal a m a , sept 9, 1916 sulfuryl monal report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrysulfuryl monal is said to be manufactured by monal frères, manufacturing chemists of nancy, france it is sold in the unitedstates by george j wallau, inc , new york city according to the label. {contains. Sulfuryl combined polysulphurets { 0 35 centigr ” “each pastille { {liberates. Nascent sulphurretted hydrogen { 2 cub cent ”the chemical laboratory of the american medical association wasrequested to check the amount of available hydrogen sulphid anoriginal bottle of sulfuryl monal was used.

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And it is the duty of the board ofhomœopathic medical examiners to examine thoroughly every applicant, upon the production of his diploma from a college recognized by theamerican institute of homœopathy, on anatomy, physiology, surgery, gynæcology, materia medica, therapeutics, obstetrics, and chemistry, but no preference is given to any school of medicine rev stats , 1892, s 806 when the board is satisfied as to the qualifications of the applicant, they grant a certificate which entitles him to practise medicine in anycounty, when recorded 807 any two members of the boardmay grant a certificate any member may grant a temporary certificate, upon examination, until the next regular meeting, at which time thetemporary certificate ceases to be of effect 808 before heshall be entitled to practise, the certificate must be recorded in theoffice of the clerk of the circuit court of the county in which he mayreside or sojourn. And the clerk must certify thereon, under officialseal, the fact and date of the record, and return the certificate809 a practitioner engaged in the practice of medicine in any dewritingmentprior to may 31st, 1889, upon the production of a diploma from amedical college recognized by the american medical association, isgranted a certificate, without further examination and without charge811 exceptions - this act is not applicable to persons who have compliedwith prior laws, nor to females practising midwifery, strictly as such no other person shall practise medicine in any of its branches ordewritingments, without having obtained and recorded a certificate s 812 penalty - practising as a physician without a certificate is punishableby imprisonment not exceeding six months, or a fine not exceeding $2002, 669 fees - to clerk, legal fee for recording 809 to board, $10 from each applicant whether certificate granted or not810 georgia the code of 1882, s 1, 409 a as amended by chap 413, laws 1882-83, provides that qualification - no person is to practise medicine, unless he wastheretofore legally authorized, or is hereafter authorized by a diplomafrom an incorporated medical college, medical school or university, orhas after attending one or more full terms at a regularly charteredmedical college, been in active practice of medicine since the year1866, or was by law authorized to practise medicine in 1866, and bycompliance with the statute definition - to “practise medicine” means to suggest, recommend, prescribe, or direct, for the use of any person, any drug, medicine, appliance, apparatus, or other agency, whether material or notmaterial, for the cure, relief, or palliation of any ailment or diseaseof mind or body, or for the cure or relief of any wound, fracture, orother bodily injury, or any deformity, after having received or withthe intent of receiving therefor, either directly or indirectly, anybonus, gift, or compensation 1, 409 b registration - every person now lawfully engaged in practice mustregister on or before december 1st, 1881. Every person hereafter dulyqualified shall, before commencing to practise, register in the officeof the clerk of the superior court of the county wherein he resides andis practising, or intends to practise, his name, residence, and placeof birth, together with his authority. He shall subscribe or verify, by oath or affirmation, before a person duly qualified to administeroaths under the laws of this state, an affidavit containing such facts, and whether such authority is by diploma or license, and the date ofthe same, and by whom granted, which shall be exhibited to the countyclerk, before the applicant is allowed to register, and which, ifwilfully false, is punishable as false swearing 1, 409 c removal - a registered physician changing his residence from countyto county must register in the clerk office of the county to whichhe removes and wherein he intends to reside and to practise medicine1, 409 d penalty - the violation of this law or practising, or offering topractise, without lawful authority, or under cover of a diploma orlicense illegally obtained, is a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine offrom $100 to $500, or imprisonment from thirty to ninety days, or both1, 409 e exceptions - commissioned medical officers of the united states army ornavy, or united states marine hospital service, and women practisingonly midwifery, are not affected 1, 409 f medical boards - all medical boards are abolished, and only thequalifications of practitioners of medicine set forth above arerequired 1, 409 g fees - to county clerk, fifty cents for each registration s 1, 409 c tax - on practitioners of physic, $5 per annum 809 idaho qualification - no person can lawfully practise medicine or surgery whohas not received a medical education, and a diploma from a regularlychartered medical school, having a bona fide existence when thediploma was granted rev stats , 1887, s 1, 298 a physician or surgeon must file for record with the county recorderof the county in which he is about to practise, or where he practises, a copy of his diploma, at the same time exhibiting the original, ora certificate from the dean of a medical school certifying to hisgraduation 1, 298 a when filing the copy required, he must be identified as the personnamed in the papers, by the affidavit of two citizens of the county, orby his affidavit taken before a notary public or commissioner of deedsfor this state. And the affidavit is filed in the office of the countyrecorder 1, 298 b penalty - practising without complying with the act is a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of from $50 to $500, or imprisonment in a countyjail from thirty days to six months, or both fine and imprisonment foreach offence filing or attempting to file as his own the diploma or certificate ofgraduation of another, or a forged affidavit of identification, is afelony. Subject to fine and imprisonment 1, 298 c. S 6, 312 exceptions - the act is not applicable to a person in an emergencyprescribing or giving advice in medicine or surgery, in a townshipwhere no physician resides within convenient distance, nor to thosewho have practised medicine or surgery in this state for ten yearspreceding the passage of this act, nor to persons prescribing in theirown families, nor to midwifery in places where no physician resideswithin convenient distance 1, 298 e. As amended by act offebruary 7th, 1889 fees - no special fees are enumerated in the statute the countyrecorder fees for services are prescribed in rev stats , 1887, s 2, 128 illinois qualification - no person can lawfully practise medicine in any ofits dewritingments unless he possesses the qualifications required if agraduate in medicine, he must present his diploma to the state boardof health for verification as to its genuineness if the diploma isfound genuine, and from a legally chartered medical institution in goodstanding, and if the person named therein be the person claiming andpresenting the same, the board must issue a certificate conclusive asto his right to practise medicine if not a graduate, the person mustpresent himself before the said board and submit to examination, andif the examination is satisfactory the board must issue certificate laws 1887, p 225, s 1 the verification of a diploma consists in the affidavit of the holderand applicant that he is the person therein named the affidavit may betaken before any person authorized to administer oaths, and attestedunder the hand and official seal of such officer if he have a seal swearing falsely is perjury graduates may present their diplomas andaffidavits by letter or proxy 3 all examinations of persons not graduates or licentiates are made bythe board. And certificates authorize their possessor to practisemedicine and, surgery 4 the certificate must be recorded in the office of the clerk of thecounty in which the holder resides within three months from its date, and the date of recording indorsed until recorded, the holder cannotlawfully exercise the rights and privileges conferred a personremoving to another county to practise must record his certificate inthe county to which he removes 5 examinations may be wholly or writingly in writing and shall be ofelementary and practical character, but sufficiently strict to test thequalifications of the candidate as a practitioner 8 the board may refuse to issue a certificate to a person guilty ofunprofessional or dishonorable conduct, and may revoke for like causes the applicant in case of a refusal or revocation may appeal to thegovernor and his decision will be final 9 definition - “practising medicine” is defined as treating, operatingon, or prescribing for any physical ailment of another the actdoes not prohibit services in case of emergency, nor the domesticadministration of family remedies, and does not apply to commissionedsurgeons of the united states army, navy, or marine hospital service inthe discharge of official duty 10 itinerant vender - an itinerant vender of drug, nostrum, ointment, orappliance intended for treatment of disease or injury, or professingby writing, printing, or other method to cure or treat disease ordeformity by drug, nostrum, manipulation, or other expedient, must paya license fee of $100 per month into the treasury of the board theboard may issue such license selling without a license is punishableby fine of from $100 to $200 for each offence the board may for causerefuse a license 11 penalty - practising medicine or surgery without a certificate ispunishable by a forfeiture of $100 for the first offence, and $200 foreach subsequent offence. Filing or attempting to file as his own thecertificate of another, or a forged affidavit of identification, is afelony, punishable as forgery exceptions - the act saves for six months after its passage the rightof persons who have practised continuously for ten years in the stateprior to its passage, to receive a certificate under former act butall persons holding a certificate on account of ten years’ practice aresubject to all requirements and discipline of this act in regard totheir future conduct. All persons not having applied for or receivedcertificates within said six months, and all persons whose applicationshave for the causes named been rejected, or their certificates revoked, shall, if they practise medicine, be deemed guilty of practising inviolation of law 12 penalty - on conviction of the offence mentioned in the act, the courtmust, as a writing of the judgment, order the defendant to be committed tothe county jail until the fine and costs are paid 13 fees - to the secretary of the board, for each certificate to agraduate or licentiate, $5 2 for graduates or licentiates in midwifery, $2 2 to county clerk, usual fees for making record to treasury of board, for examination of non-graduates.