History

Professional Writing Services For Personal Statements


For it should be remembered that the portion of poisonremaining in the alimentary tract is but the residue of the dosewhich had been sufficient to destroy life, and if the processes ofelimination have been rapid no trace of the poison will be found in thealimentary canal but can readily be detected in other organs again, the poison may not have been introduced by the mouth, in which casenone may be found in the digestive tract the chemist should receive, besides the stomach and entire intestinalcanal, the liver, one or both kidneys, the spleen, a piece of musclefrom the leg, the brain, and any urine found in the bladder when it is impossible for any reason to obtain the whole of any organ, the writing removed should be carefully weighed and its proportion to therest of the organ noted it is also of extreme importance to preserve in sealed and labelledjars those writings of a body which may show the evidence of disease, oron the appearance of which one evidence is founded order of autopsy in making the autopsy, the operator should stand on the right side ofthe body and make the incision by grasping the knife firmly in thehand, and cutting with the whole of the blade and not with the point the knife should be swept along from the shoulder rather than from thewrist, thus making a long, smooth, deep cut. Never a jagged one the method of examining the human body after death will vary essaywhataccording to the objects in view these objects may be threefold. 1to ascertain whether a person has died from violence or poison. 2 toestablish the cause of death, especially if it has been sudden. And 3to ascertain the lesion of a disease, or to confirm a diagnosis the only difference between a medico-legal and pathological autopsyis that in the former case everything which might subserve the endsof justice should be carefully noted, and the changes found mostaccurately described. Especially any abnormalities found on theexternal examination of the body a photograph should be taken of thebody the head should be opened and the brain examined first, and not last, as is often done in the ordinary autopsy careful notes should be taken during each step of the examination, tobe reread, verified, and signed at the completion of the autopsy it must be remembered that most of the lesions of disease which arefound, indicate the disease rather than the cause of death. That oftenthe lesion found will seem hardly extensive enough to cause death, andthat from accidents and injuries apparently trivial, death may result it must often be acknowledged that no sufficient cause of death can befound, but the more accurate and careful the examinations especiallywhen a microscopical examination of the organs is made the fewer willbe the number of such paper if no apparent lesion is found, it mustnot be forgotten that thesis poisons destroy life and leave no trace thatthe pathologist can discover care should always be exercised not to mistake the ordinary post-mortemappearance which we find at autopsies for the lesions of disease the examination of the human body, whether it be made from amedico-legal or pathological standpoint, is divided into two maindivisions. 1 the external examination, and 2 the internal examination external examination its minuteness will depend on the character of the case, as when theperson is unknown, or when suspected to have died from unnaturalcauses in such paper the external examination is very important the following are the steps to be followed.

Makes men professional writing services for personal statements sober, solid, and staid, fit for study. Stays the unbridled toys of lustful blood, stays the wandering thoughts, and reduces them home to the centre. Itsreceptacle is in the spleen, and it is governed by saturn of all these humours blood is the chief, all the rest are superfluitiesof blood. Yet are they necessary superfluities, for without any ofthem, man cannot live namely. Choler is the fiery superfluities. Flegm, the watery;melancholy, the earthly animal the third principal virtue remains, which is animal. Itsresidence is in the brain, and mercury is the general significator ofit ptolomy held the moon signified the animal virtue.

“dear madam:-- your letter of january 10th written to dr koch of detroit in reference to his cancer cure has been sent to me by dr koch i am the western representative of dr koch and am giving the treatments with his remedy i am now treating 14 paper here with essay most wonderful results the amount of the remedy that dr koch can supply me with is limited and it is a very expensive substance none of it can be sent to seattle or any other place for i have only enough to treat the paper that are constantly presenting themselves here if you could come to san francisco and have the money to pay a reasonable fee, say enough to pay for the remedy, i would be very glad to do everything i can for you “the results that have already shown in thesis of these paper warrant me in believing that almost any case of cancer can be cured if the treatment is persisted in ”according to our records, dr william f koch of detroit was born in1885 essay years ago he graduated in chemistry and for essay time heldthe position of professor of physiology and physiologic chemistry atthe detroit college of medicine professional writing services for personal statements and surgery in 1918, dr koch receivedhis degree in medicine from this same college less than a year afterhis graduation, dr koch declared that he had “developed a realspecific cure for cancer ” in the detroit medical journal for july, 1919, there appeared a brief article by william f koch, entitled “anew and successful treatment and diagnosis of cancer ” a more extensivearticle bearing the same title was published in the new york medicaljournal of oct 30, 1920 as a result of the publicity that was given the koch treatment, thewayne county detroit medical society appointed a committee toinvestigate the treatment its first report appeared in the bulletinof the society for dec 22, 1919 briefly, this report said that theboard of health of detroit had placed at the disposal of the committeetwelve beds in a local hospital with the necessary special nurses andeverything else required free of charge the committee sent certainpatients to the hospital. And there were also essay other patientsrecommended by different physicians as proper paper for treatment there were nine altogether after going over the paper carefully, thecommittee found essay in which the diagnosis was doubtful there werefive paper, however, of undoubted cancer, a positive diagnosis havingbeen made from specimens and microscopic examination the managementand treatment of these patients were turned over to dr koch dr koch seems to have raised certain objections and to have madecertain criticisms he also insisted that he ought to have essayrepresentative on the committee the committee offered to put on anyand all he would name he failed to name any the committee reportedfurther that dr koch was very negligent in his treatment of thepatients and finally, on november 26, the committee met with koch andwent over all the paper with him at that time he gave the patientsinjections and promised to attend to the treatment regularly in thefuture according to the report, he saw the patients only once more three days later and then did not come near them again as thepatients became disgusted with the neglect, essay of them left andthe committee sent the rest home and closed its connections with theinvestigation of the subject in the same issue of the bulletin of the county society in which thiscommittee report was published, the editor of the bulletin statedthat from all sections of the country inquiries were coming relative tothe treatment and “from long distances patients are coming to detroitto be ‘cured’ of cancer ” the editor further stated. “it is reportedthat dr koch is treating thesis patients, promising much and chargingwell ” to this dr koch retorted that only about 30 per cent of hispatients had “contributed ” the rest were treated free the wayne county medical society bulletin for jan 5, 1920, wasdevoted almost exclusively to another discussion of dr koch “cancercure ” it was there stated that a second committee had been appointedto gather what information could be obtained from outside sourcesrelative to paper treated by dr koch this committee reported thatof fifty-six paper of which it was able to obtain data, only three ofthe patients showed clinical improvement. Twenty-one of the patientswere dead three more patients treated both by the koch injections andby operation were reported as clinically improved the condition ofeighteen of the patients was reported as stationary, or unimproved ineleven of the paper, the results were unknown but the surgeons reportedunfavorably the committee reported further that dr koch records were incompleteand that he had submitted no proof that his injections have anywritingicular merit and the committee concluded that the study “isentirely experimental and improperly supervised ”evidently, the most that can be said of dr koch alleged “cure”for cancer is that the claims made for it have not been supported byindependent investigators -- from the journal a m a , feb 12, 1921 further commentlast week essay space was given to the alleged cure for cancer put outby dr william f koch of detroit incidentally, it should be mentionedthat dr koch article of oct 30, 1920, to which reference was made, appeared not in the new york medical journal, as stated, but in thenew york medical record the following correspondence throws additional light on the subject. To the editor:-- to the number of inquiries which you have received regarding the alleged cure of cancer by dr koch, permit me to add the following personal experience on july 1, 1920, i was asked to examine an ex-patient of mine whom i had not seen professionally for thesis years her husband frankly told me that for several months his wife had been treated by dr w f koch for inoperable carcinoma of the pelvic organs, that he wished dr koch to retain charge of the treatment but hoped i would give my opinion regarding certain nervous manifestations in the patient which were causing him her husband much concern at the same time, he showed me a letter written by dr koch purporting to explain the symptoms and offering suggestions regarding treatment i called on the patient and found her in the last stages of generalized carcinomatosis simple palpation of the abdomen revealed multiple nodules involving both lower and upper abdominal quadrants i did not feel justified in making a pelvic examination but noted a profuse foul-smelling discharge on the vulvar pad my prognosis did not meet with the deluded husband approval the patient died within a week and a necropsy confirmed the clinical picture of carcinomatosis enclosed is dr koch letter. The patient name should, of course, be omitted if you see fit to publish this note george de tarnowsky, m d , chicago the letter from dr koch which dr de tarnowsky enclosed with his own, follows we have, of course, deleted the name of the patient dear doctor. Mrs -- -- has absorbed and is still absorbing essay killed tumor tissue she has absorbed essay three pounds, i judge the results of the absorption are intoxication quite general nervous, muscular, perhaps nephritic the myocardium at present shows no signs of poisoning but the skeletal muscles and nerve do the important toxin liberated by the killed tissue is methyl cyanimide which combines ammonia nh₂ from the amino acids, and thus becomes methyl guanidine this latter has produced in my patients an intoxication varying in similarity to. Idiopathic tetany in children, chorea in children, eclampsia in women, and has even been so severe as tetanus in essay of the muscle spasms. A toxic albuminuria has resulted in essay of my paper all of my paper have cleaned up so far of course, i cannot predict in any individual case, except that when the absorption has been completed and the toxin all eliminated, everything should return to normal, unless the toxin has destroyed tissue beyond physiological repair my suggestions as to treatment would be elimination, saving the kidneys as much as possible, by whatever methods you find best and necessary at present i am treating symptomatically thus-- atropin as a guanidine antidote, arsenic as a chorea coupled antidote as a prevention to the production of guanidine from the cyanimide, the use of dilute hydrochloric acid has proven successful to me even a urine boiling solid-- albumen has cleared up in one case in three days just by taking large quantities of 1/2 per cent hcl i am explaining the factors i have contended with in these paper, but do not want to influence your plan of treatment when your judgment finds me insufficient sincerely, wm f koch i shall have a publication out very soon on the treatment of these tetanics and eclampsia with hcl it is worth noting that this letter of dr koch was written june 28, just three days before dr de tarnowsky saw mrs -- -- and less than aweek before she died of generalized carcinoma not the least important element in the story which these two letterstell is the optimism engendered in the husband of the poor cancerpatient by the widely vaunted treatment of koch and herein lies oneof the most pernicious features connected with the exploitation ofalleged cures for cancer, tuberculosis, etc all such remedies, whetherfraudulent both in their inception and exploitation or those whichwhile equally worthless are at least honestly put forward and are basedon a certain amount of scientific investigation, produce a profoundand marked temporary change in the patient condition it is thisthat tends to warp the judgment not only of the unscientific layman, but also of the physician the psychic element in cancer has been welldescribed by weil. “it is, indeed, very remarkable that a patient who has been consigned to death as a victim of a hopeless malady, should regain his spirits and his appetite, when he is again confronted with the hope of a cure, and of the eradication of his disease?. it is a phenomenon well known to every student of the disease that a large proportion of paper responds in just this manner to any treatment which is offered them osler has described a case of cancer of the stomach in which the mere visit to a consultant of sanguine temperament, though poor judgment, whose assurance of the patient that there was no possibility of cancer, resulted in the disappearance of all the symptoms and a gain of 18 pounds in weight it is this psychic influence, which has occasionally deluded the honest student of cancer cure, and which has also so generously played into the hands of the dishonest ”-- from the journal a m a , feb 19, 1921 the lucas laboratories’ productsthe journal has received several inquiries about the products put outby the lucas laboratories, incorporated, of new york city a typicalinquiry is that received from dr f a jewett of brooklyn, who writes. “the enclosed circular is sent out to the medical profession by dr william lucas, 287 w 70th st , new york what do you know of this man and his methods?. ”william h lucas was graduated by the medical college of ohio in 1895and was licensed in 1897 he is not a member of his local medicalsociety the products put out by the lucas laboratories are forintravenous use, and their method of exploitation indicates that theconcern is less interested in the science of therapeutics than it isin taking commercial advantage of the present fad for intravenousmedication the journal has protested editorially against theunnecessary use of the intravenous administration of drugs, and theabuse of this method of drug giving prompted the council on pharmacyand chemistry recently to emphasize the danger of indiscriminateintravenous medication the products of the lucas laboratories, inc , have not been examinedeither by the a m a chemical laboratory or by the council onpharmacy and chemistry the composition of these products isessentially secret, which in itself should be sufficient to deterphysicians from using them of course, in accordance with all thetenents of orthodox nostrum exploitation, “formulas” are furnished even the crude hieroglyphics that used to be palmed off on themedical profession by nostrum exploiters under the guise of “graphicformulas” are outdone by the lucas laboratories in publishing thealleged formulas of its preparations if we, as physicians, knewmore chemistry, the lucas laboratories would not find it profitableto publish such ineffable nonsense as that which characterizes their“literature ” for instance. “‘luvein’ arsans plain” is said to be. “di hypo sodio calcio phosphite hydroxy arseno mercuric iodid ” the first writing of this “formula” might stand for sodium and calcium hypophosphite the remainder is meaningless except that it suggests but does not insure the presence of arsenic and mercury iodide “‘luvein’ arsans, nos 1, 2 and 3 ”-- “meta hydroxy iodide sodio arsano mercuric dimethyl benzo sodio arsenate, ai oxy sodio tartaria sulpho disheuyl hydrazin ” who can venture even a conjecture as to the possible significance of this?. “‘luvein’ creosophite ”-- “ammonio hydroxy calcio sodio hypo-phosphite arsenous pentoxy iodide ” while the name suggests creosote, the “formula” gives no hint of this it might refer to hypophosphites of ammonium, calcium and sodium with iodide of arsenic whether arsenous trivalent arsenic or arsenic pentavalent arsenic iodide or both are intended, is a question “‘luvein’ hexacol ”-- “hexa methylenepyro catechin mono methyl amino ether glycerite ” by moving these syllables around like the old “fifteen puzzle” they can be arranged to represent hexamethylenamin and monomethyl-ether of pyrocatechin, or guaiacol, having the “glycerite” left over it is futile to discuss the therapeutic claims made for the variouspreparations put out by the lucas laboratories one might as profitablydiscuss the therapeutic claims made for “peruna” or “paine celerycompound” for the exploitation of the latter products is on just ashigh a scientific plane as the exploitation of the “luvein” nostrums the proposition offered to physicians by the lucas laboratories, inc , is an insult to the intelligence of the medical profession not thatthe products themselves are necessarily any worse or any better thanthesis offered for intravenous use. The selling methods are more crude, that is all the facts are, we have entered a new cycle of nostrum development theunscientific mixtures for oral administration that characterized solarge and disreputable a writing of the proprietary medicine business ofthe past two or three decades are giving way to equally unscientificmixtures for intravenous use the dangers of the older nostrumsare accentuated in the newer by the added element of risk that isinseparable from intravenous therapy add to this the temptation tothe physician in the way of more substantial fees which, legitimatelyenough, may be charged when intravenous administration is called for, and the menace of the new style nostrum becomes evident the journalcan only reiterate the warning that intravenous therapy should beemployed only when most positively indicated further, because of thedanger that is inseparable from this method of drug administration, physicians should be doubly careful to see that products employedfor intravenous use come from firms of unquestioned scientificstanding -- from the journal a m a , sept 20, 1919 “phylacogens”ll this matter was largely reprinted in the propaganda for reform, eighth and ninth editions a physician in florida writes.

Still he should insuch instances use extra professional writing services for personal statements means to obtain the services of essay other andequally skilful man only ordinary and usual skill required - the degree and characterof necessary skill contracted for has been variously defined by thecourts when malpractice is discussed, a more extended considerationof this matter will be required at present the doctrine laid downin shearman and redfield on “negligence, ” paragraphs 433-435, may beadopted it is as follows:“although a physician or surgeon may doubtless by express contractundertake to perform a cure absolutely, the law will not imply sucha contract from the mere employment of a physician a physician isnot an insurer of a cure, and is not to be tried for the result ofhis remedies his only contract is to treat the case with reasonablediligence and skill if more than this is expected it must be expresslystipulated for the general rule, therefore, is, that a medicalman, who attends for a fee, is liable for such want of ordinary care, diligence or skill on his writing as leads to the injury of his patient to render him liable, it is not enough that there has been a lessdegree of skill than essay other medical man might have shown, or a lessdegree of care than even himself might have bestowed. Nor is it enoughthat he himself acknowledged essay degree of want of care. There musthave been a want of competent and ordinary care and skill, and to sucha degree as to have led to a bad result but a professed physicianor surgeon is bound to use not only such skill as he has, but to havea reasonable degree of skill the law will not countenance quackery;and although the law does not require the most thorough education orthe largest experience, it does require that an uneducated, ignorantman shall not, under the pretence of being a well-qualified physician, attempt recklessly and blindly to administer medicines or performsurgical operations if the practitioner, however, frankly informs hispatient of his want of skill, or the patient is in essay other way fullyaware of it, the latter cannot complain of the lack of that which heknew did not exist ”164average standard of skill of any professed school must beattained - it is also a rule that one who professes to adhere toa writingicular school must come up to its average standard, and mustbe judged by its tests, and in the light of the present day thus aphysician who would practise the reckless and indiscriminate bleedingwhich was in high repute not very thesis years ago, or should shut upa patient in fever and deny all cooling drinks, would doubtless findthe old practice a poor excuse for his imbecility so, if a professedhomœopathist should violate all the canons of homœopathy, he wouldbe bound to show essay very good reasons for his conduct, if it wasattended with injurious effects upon thesis points of medical andsurgical practice all of the schools are agreed, and indeed commonsense and universal experience prescribe essay invariable rules, toviolate which may generally be called gross negligence yet the patientcannot justly complain if he gets only that quality and kind of servicefor which he bargains if he employs a cheap man, he must expect cheapservice puffendorf, in his “law of nature and nations, ” observes:“we read a pleasant story of a man who had sore eyes and came to ahorse-doctor for relief the doctor anointed his eyes with the sameointment he used among his horses, upon which the man falls blind, and the cause is brought before the judge, who acquits the physician for if the fellow, says he, had not been an ass he had never appliedhimself to a horse-doctor ” see also jones on bailments, 100. 1 field“lawyers’ briefs, ” sub bailments, sec 573. Musser v chase, 29 ohiost , 577. Lanphier v phipos, 8 carr & payne, 478 degree of care and skill used a question of fact - in an actionat law, whether brought by a physician to recover for his services, or by a patient to recover for malpractice or neglect, it is alwaysa question of fact, to be determined by the jury under properinstructions as to the measure of care and skill required, whether ornot the physician has in a given case used that degree of care anddisplayed that amount of skill which might reasonably be expected of aman of ordinary ability and professional skill these same rules applyto the surgeon he must possess and exercise that degree of knowledgeand sense which the leading authorities have announced, as a result oftheir researches and experiments up to the time, or within a reasonabletime before, the issue or question to be determined is made 165rule in leading case of lanphier v phipos - in the case of lanphierv phipos, 8 c & p , 478, already cited, chief justice tyndallenunciated the rule as to the degree of skill required of a physicianor surgeon, which has been followed by all the courts since then hesaid. “every person who enters into a learned profession undertakes tobring to the exercise of it a reasonable degree of care and skill hedoes not, if he is an attorney, undertake at all events to gain thecause, nor does a surgeon undertake that he will perform a cure. Nordoes the latter undertake to use the highest possible degree of skill, as there may be persons of higher education and greater advantagesthan himself. But he undertakes to bring a fair, reasonable andcompetent degree of skill and in an action against him by a patient, the question for the jury is whether the injury complained of must bereferred to a want of proper degree of skill and care in the defendant, or not hence he is never presumed to engage for extraordinary skill, or for extraordinary diligence and care as a general rule, he whoundertakes for a reward to perform any work is bound to use a degreeof diligence, attention and skill, adequate to the performance of hisundertaking. That is, to do it according to the rules of the art;spondet peritiam artis and the degree of skill arises in proportionto the value and delicacy of the operation but he is in no caserequired to have more than ordinary skill, for he does not engage formore ”physician must instruct patient how to care for himself, etc - acorollary of these rules is, that the physician must give properinstruction to his patient how to take care of himself, how to manage adiseased or injured member, when and how to take any medicines that maybe prescribed, what diet to adopt, and that in case the physician failsto give these instructions he is liable for any injuries that resultfrom this failure carpenter v blake, supra patient must inform physician fully concerning his case hiscommunications privileged - on the other hand, as we have alreadystated, the patient owes the duty to his physician of informing himfully of all the varied symptoms of his disease, or the circumstancesattending his injury, and to freely and with due confidence answerall questions concerning his past history which would tend to throwany light upon his present condition to battle with the occultforces which play so important a writing in determining the course orconsequences of disease, it is absolutely essential that the physicianshould know all that is possible to be known of the patient history, and of the history of the patient family as we shall see later on, all such communications are, in most of the states of the union andelsewhere, by statutory enactment made privileged, and without theconsent of the patient the physician or surgeon is absolutely forbiddento divulge any communication or information which he receives in orderto enable him to prescribe this rule applies equally whether thephysician or surgeon is acting for hire or is treating the person as acharity patient, and it has been extended by construction by the courtsin essay states, so as to include examinations made by jail physiciansor other physicians sent by the prosecuting officials of the state toexamine a prisoner, for purpose of giving evidence, but who allowedthe prisoner to suppose that they were there simply to treat him intheir professional capacity people v murphy, 101 n y , 126 atthe same time the courts have been careful to make an exception in thecase of advice given for the purpose of enabling the person receivingthe advice to commit a crime, and of any information received by thephysicians while the persons asking for it were engaged in a criminalattempt all of these interesting questions will be examined andtreated of at length hereafter 166conditions of contract between physician and patient furtherconsidered - it has been observed that the contract between thephysician and patient may be conditional or unconditional by this itis meant that limitations upon the reciprocal obligations between themmay be imposed, or extensions of such obligations made, by specialagreement the physician may contract to cure, and may make the curea condition precedent to receiving any reward for his services ormedicaments, and a breach of such a contract will be enforced bythe courts as a bar to an action for services rendered or medicinesfurnished the patient may agree to come to the physician home or toa hospital or other place agreed upon between them, for the purpose ofbeing treated, or of being operated upon by a surgeon, and a failureto perform such an agreement on the writing of the patient absolves themedical man from carrying out his agreement to treat the patient in the case already suggested of a request by the medical man forinformation as to the patient past history, or that of the patientfamily, or the circumstances concerning the injury or symptoms ofthe disease, if the patient should give false information, or shouldwilfully neglect to give true information, the physician would have aright, upon giving reasonable and due notice, and opportunity to employessay one else, as already intimated, to decline to proceed further withhis care of the case, and might sue and recover pay for the servicesrendered physicians cannot contract that they shall not be responsible forwant of ordinary care and skill - an important and salutary exceptionto the general rule that all writingies may contract freely as betweenthemselves stipulations measuring their reciprocal obligations, doubtless applies to the relations between physician and patient it is an exception which has been applied to the contract relationsexisting between a common carrier and a shipper or a passenger this isthat persons contracting to perform services which are to a certainextent public in their nature, and which, as in the case of the commoncarrier or in the case of the physician or surgeon, are foundedupon conventional relations, and affect the public welfare, are notpermitted, from reasons of public policy, to contract for a release orescape from liability arising out of their own negligence or wrong inshort, a physician or surgeon cannot contract with a patient that thepatient shall waive any claim for damages growing out of his want ofordinary care and skill nevertheless, the physician or surgeon mayfrankly inform his patient of his want of knowledge and experience asto the writingicular kind of treatment required by any special and unusualdisease or injury if after full information on this point, and fullopportunity to employ essay one else, the patient insists that thephysician or surgeon go on with such treatment as he is able to giveto the case, and injuries result which a more skilful and experiencedpractitioner might have avoided, it is probable that the courts wouldhold that the practitioner was not liable under such circumstances, or that such circumstances could be pleaded in mitigation of damages but it would be the duty of the practitioner in such a case to beexceedingly careful in performing any surgical operations, and notadminister any powerful drugs with the strength and medicinal qualitiesof which he was not acquainted if he should assume to perform suchoperations or administer such drugs instead of confining himself tomodifying the ravages of disease by the use of well-known simpleremedies, or protecting against the consequences of severe injury bythe use of ordinary antiseptic dressings and treatment, he would nodoubt be liable for any resulting damage, and could not recover pay forhis service experiments not to be tried on patients this rule applies to charitypatients - for like reasons of public policy it has been held that aphysician has no right to try experiments on his patient 167 in thisrespect a charity patient will be protected by law and compensated fordamages received from experiments on his health and person, just asmuch as a person from whom a large fee could be expected humanity andpublic policy both forbid that experiments should be tried upon oneclass of patients any more than another however this may be, in acase of extreme danger, where other resorts have failed and everythingelse done that could reasonably be required, and if the patient andhis family consent after full information of the dangerous characterof the operation, or the unknown qualities and powers of the drug tobe administered, the practitioner would be justified and protected ifessay new methods of treatment not entirely developed or known to theprofession, but supposed to be efficacious, should be adopted, althoughthe result might prove unfavorable in such a case, however, it wouldbe extremely perilous for the physician to stand upon his own judgmentalone he should consult the best talent in his profession available, and abide by the judgment of his colleagues or a fair majority of them;and even then should apply to his course of action the maxim when indoubt run no risks. Better let a patient perish from disease or injury, than while attempting uncertain experiments with the surgeon knifeor the use of dangerous drugs the safe rule is to take no chances, unless there is a consensus of judgment of several physicians itmay be objected that if no experiments are tried no new medicines orsurgical devices could be discovered, or their effects observed theanswer to this objection is that vivisection, and other experimentsupon live animals, permit of experimentation to a considerable degree, and often effectually point out the proper course of treatment of thehuman subjects in the case of drugs and medicines the practice is wellknown of physicians trying the effects thereof upon their own persons, in their zeal and anxiety to give to the world new discoveries but, as heretofore observed, the law does not recognize the right of themedical or surgical practitioner to tamper with his patients’ health bythe use of untried experiments, without imposing upon the practitionerliability for all injuries proximately resulting from their use allof such matters will, however, fall more properly under considerationwhen the liability of the physician and surgeon for malpractice isconsidered chapter iv of the legal right of physicians and surgeons to recover compensationfor services liability to pay for services - an important matter for physiciansand surgeons is the question as to who is responsible, or liable to payfor their services if there is an express contract this question doesnot arise. But in most instances the person performing the servicesrenders them upon call, and it is necessary for him to understand hislegal right to recover pay for services in the absence of an expresscontract person treated, and not person calling in physician, employs himand is liable - in the first place, it must be stated as a generalproposition that the person for whom the services are actuallyrendered, or upon whom the operation is performed, is bound to pay forthem, if otherwise capable in law of making contracts and incurringobligations and secondly, that one who calls a physician or surgeonto attend a patient is not presumed to have contracted to pay for theservices rendered, unless his relations with the patient are such thathe would be obligated in law to pay, even if he had not himself calledin the medical man in the first case it is presumed that the patient is liable, because hereceives the benefit of the services, and nothing less than a distinctunderstanding that he was not to pay will relieve him from thisobligation married women and infants generally not liable - where such a personis a married woman, unless the case arises in states or countrieswhere married women have been declared by statutes to be liablethe same as if single, this rule does not obtain nor is an infantpersonally liable when he is living with his parent or guardian hullv connelly, 3 mccord s c , 6.

  • how to write a critical analysis essay step by step
  • postion paper writing service
  • help with dissertations
  • buy resume
  • chemistry help
  • write my art term paper
  • college level persuasive essay outline
  • homework help for students
  • custom writing services
  • where can i buy an essay online
  • virginia tech application essay
  • do my homework for me homework assignments
  • the giver essay questions
  • college essay organizer
  • custom write my paper
  • who can do my homework for me
  • national honor society application essay
  • cheap writing services
  • example college essay
  • how to start a synthesis essay
  • homework assignment help

But if you please to pursue my judgment in the herb wormwood, you shall find them there, and it will be well worth your while toconsider it in every herb, you shall find them true throughout the book water agrimony it is called in essay countries, water hemp, bastard hemp, and bastardagrimony, eupatorium, and hepatorium, because it strengthens the liver descript the root continues a long time, having thesis long slenderstrings the stalk grows up about two feet high, essaytimes higher they are of a dark purple colour the branches are thesis, growing atdistances the one from the other, the one from the one side of thestalk, the other from the opposite point the leaves are fringed, and much indented at the edges the flowers grow at the top of thebranches, of a brown yellow colour, spotted with black spots, havinga substance within the midst of them like that of a daisy. If you rubthem between your fingers, they smell like rosin or cedar when it isburnt the seeds are long, and easily stick to any woollen thing theytouch place they delight not in heat, and therefore they are not sofrequently found in the southern writings of england as in the northern, where they grow frequently. You may look for them in cold grounds, byponds and ditches’ sides, and also by running waters. Essaytimes youshall find them grow in the midst of waters time they all flower in july or august, and the seed is ripepresently after government and virtues it is a plant of jupiter, as well as theother agrimony, only this belongs to the celestial sign cancer itheals and dries, cuts and cleanses thick and tough humours of thebreast, and for this i hold it inferior to but few herbs that grow it helps the cachexia or evil disposition of the body, the dropsy andyellow-jaundice it opens obstructions of the liver, mollifies thehardness of the spleen, being applied outwardly it breaks imposthumesaway inwardly. It is an excellent remedy for the third day ague itprovokes urine and the terms. It kills worms, and cleanses the body ofsharp humours, which are the cause of itch and scabs. The herb beingburnt, the smoke thereof drives away flies, wasps, &c it strengthensthe lungs exceedingly country people give it to their cattle when theyare troubled with the cough, or broken-winded alehoof, or ground-ivy several counties give it different names, so that there is scarcelyany herb growing of that bigness that has got so thesis. It is calledcat-foot, ground-ivy, gill-go-by-ground, and gill-creep-by-ground, turn-hoof, haymaids, and alehoof descript this well known herb lies, spreads and creeps upon theground, shoots forth roots, at the corners of tender jointed stalks, set with two round leaves at every joint essaywhat hairy, crumpledand unevenly dented about the edges with round dents. At the jointslikewise, with the leaves towards the end of the branches, come forthhollow, long flowers, of a blueish purple colour, with small whitespots upon the lips that hang down the root is small with strings place it is commonly found under hedges, and on the sides ofditches, under houses, or in shadowed lanes, and other waste grounds, in almost every writing of this land time they flower essaywhat early, and abide a great while.