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1st woman, hung herself with apiece of sheep-net band professional college admission writers. Cut down before death 2d man, hung withplough-string. Cut down in about six minutes 3d a heavy man 24 tardieu. Op cit , pp 93-105 - woman, died of coma and asphyxiafrom suicidal hanging, according to report of drs costan and facieu tardieu approved their report it was at first thought a case ofhomicide with subsequent hanging, more especially because of the kindof knot used, nœud d’artificier but tardieu showed that it was alsoa nœud de batalier her feet touched a chair, and her knees werebent there was a neckcloth in front of her mouth, but it did not seemto have interfered with respiration 25 ibid , pp 67-72 - the famous case of marc-antoine calas, whocommitted suicide by hanging see voltaire, “traité sur le tolérance, ”etc , in nouv philos histor , 1772, xxxii , p 30 he hung himselfto a door no sign of violence the city hangman said it was impossiblefor a man to commit suicide in that way the father was accused andconvicted of homicide tardieu shows that the act was a suicide 26 ibid , p 72 - another famous case a woman, age 30, hung herselfto the key of her bedroom door her husband cut her down he wasaccused and convicted of the crime and condemned to prison, where hedied tardieu showed that the case was one of suicide 27 hofmann. Wien med presse, 1880, xxi , p 201 - man, age 68, suicide by hanging there was profuse hemorrhage from both ears 28 ibid.

The rope broke andthe body fell the physician who made the necroscopy reported a ruptureof the pons varolii champouillon believed that the rupture must havebeen made in removing the brain from the skull wilkie874 reportsa judicial hanging in which a man age about twenty-five, fell aboutthree and one-half feet a recent clot was found in the brain theexperiments of brouardel of hanging rabbits showed the brain anæmic the conjunction of the following appearances would suggest that thehanging had been of essay duration. Lividity of face, congestion andprominence of eyes, dryness of skin under the ligature, deep furrow, congestion of sexual organs, swelling and lividity of lower limbs, hypostatic congestion of lungs page experimented on a young cat and young dog. Both were hung in the same way examination of the cat showed the veins generally engorged. Sublingual veins much engorged. Tongue protruded slightly and much swollen. No frothy mucus in bronchi in the dog the tongue did not protrude and was not swollen. Right cavities of heart contained blood, left empty. Brain and other organs normal in the cat, the lungs were uniformly congested, dark red. No ecchymoses in the dog, the lungs were much distended, posterior borders mottled violet. Emphysematous patches on surface. No apoplectic effusions. Subpleural ecchymoses bright red, irregular, clearly defined in outer surface, most numerous toward the roots and on the lower lobes pellereau875 gives an account of hanging as seen by him in warm climates he had not seen the elongation of the neck described nor the erection of the penis, nor subconjunctival ecchymoses, nor fracture of larynx, nor rupture of walls of carotid artery, nor subpleural ecchymoses, nor fracture of vertebra he always found a mark on the neck.

Are madein the same manner as we professional college admission writers shewed you in syrups 3 decoctions made with wine last longer than such as are made withwater. And if you take your decoction to cleanse the passages of theurine, or open obstructions, your best way is to make it with whitewine instead of water, because this is penetrating 4 decoctions are of most use in such diseases as lie in the passagesof the body, as the stomach, bowels, kidneys, passages of urine andbladder, because decoctions pass quicker to those places than any otherform of medicines 5 if you will sweeten your decoction with sugar, or any syrup fit forthe occasion you take it for, which is better, you may, and no harm 6 if in a decoction, you boil both roots, herbs, flowers, and seedtogether, let the roots boil a good while first, because they retaintheir virtue longest. Then the next in order by the same rule, viz 1 barks 2 the herbs 3 the seeds 4 the flowers 5 the spices, ifyou put any in, because their virtues come soonest out 7 such things as by boiling cause sliminess to a decoction, as figs, quince-seed, linseed, &c your best way is, after you have bruisedthem, to tie them up in a linen rag, as you tie up calf brains, andso boil them 8 keep all decoctions in a glass close stopped, and in the coolerplace you keep them, the longer they will last ere they be sour lastly, the usual dose to be given at one time, is usually two, three, four, or five ounces, according to the age and strength of the patient, the season of the year, the strength of the medicine, and the qualityof the disease chapter v of oils 1 oil olive, which is commonly known by the name of sallad oil, isuppose, because it is usually eaten with sallads by them that love it, if it be pressed out of ripe olives, according to galen, is temperate, and exceeds in no one quality 2 of oils, essay are simple, and essay are compound 3 simple oils, are such as are made of fruits or seeds by expression, as oil of sweet and bitter almonds, linseed and rape-seed oil, &c ofwhich see in my dispensatory 4 compound oils, are made of oil of olives, and other simples, imagineherbs, flowers, roots, &c 5 the way of making them is this. Having bruised the herbs or flowersyou would make your oil of, put them into an earthen pot, and to two orthree handfuls of them pour a pint of oil, cover the pot with a paper, set it in the sun about a fortnight or so, according as the sun is inhotness. Then having warmed it very well by the fire, press out theherb, &c very hard in a press, and add as thesis more herbs to the sameoil. Bruise the herbs i mean not the oil in like manner, set them inthe sun as before. The oftener you repeat this, the stronger your oilwill be. At last when you conceive it strong enough, boil both herbsand oil together, till the juice be consumed, which you may know by itsbubbling, and the herbs will be crisp. Then strain it while it is hot, and keep it in a stone or glass vessel for your use 6 as for chymical oils, i have nothing to say here 7 the general use of these oils, is for pains in the limbs, roughnessof the skin, the itch, &c as also for ointments and plaisters 8 if you have occasion to use it for wounds or ulcers, in two ouncesof oil, dissolve half an ounce of turpentine, the heat of the firewill quickly do it. For oil itself is offensive to wounds, and theturpentine qualifies it chapter vi of electuaries physicians make more a quoil than needs by half, about electuaries i shall prescribe but one general way of making them up. As foringredients, you may vary them as you please, and as you findoccasion, by the last chapter 1 that you may make electuaries when you need them, it is requisitethat you keep always herbs, roots, flowers, seeds, &c ready dried inyour house, that so you may be in a readiness to beat them into powderwhen you need them 2 it is better to keep them whole than beaten. For being beaten, they are more subject to lose their strength. Because the air soonpenetrates them 3 if they be not dry enough to beat into powder when you need them, dry them by a gentle fire till they are so 4 having beaten them, sift them through a fine tiffany searce, that nogreat pieces may be found in your electuary 5 to one ounce of your powder add three ounces of clarified honey;this quantity i hold to be sufficient if you would make more or lesselectuary, vary your proportion accordingly 6 mix them well together in a mortar, and take this for a truth, youcannot mix them too much 7 the way to clarify honey, is to set it over the fire in a convenientvessel, till the scum rise, and when the scum is taken off, it isclarified 8 the usual dose of cordial electuaries, is from half a dram to twodrams. Of purging electuaries, from half an ounce to an ounce 9 the manner of keeping them is in a pot 10 the time of taking them, is either in a morning fasting, andfasting an hour after them.

Half a dram at a time taken inwardly, resistspestilence and poison, helps ruptures and bruises, stays fluxes, vomiting, and immoderate flowing of the menses, helps inflammationsand soreness of the mouth, and fastens loose teeth, being bruised andboiled in white wine, and the mouth washed with it borraginis of borrage, hot and moist in professional college admission writers the first degree, cheersthe heart, helps drooping spirits dioscorides brionæ, &c of briony both white and black. They are both hot anddry, essay say in the third degree, and essay say but in the first. Theypurge flegm and watery humours, but they trouble the stomach much, they are very good for dropsies. The white is most in use, and is goodfor the fits of the mother. Both of them externally used, take awayfreckles, sunburning, and morphew from the face, and cleanse filthyulcers. It is but a churlish purge, but being let alone, can do no harm buglossi of bugloss. Its virtues are the same with borrage, and theroots of either seldom used bulbus vomitorius a vomiting root. I never read of it elswhere bythis general name calami aromatici of aromatical reed, or sweet garden flag. Itprovokes urine, strengthens the lungs, helps bruises, resists poison, &c being taken inwardly in powder, the quantity of half a dram at atime you may mix it with syrup of violets, if your body be feverish capparum capper roots are hot and dry in the second degree, cuttingand cleansing. They provoke menses, help malignant ulcers, ease thetoothache, assuage swelling, and help the rickets see oil of cappers cariophillatæ, &c of avens, or herb bennet the roots are dry, andessaything hot, of a cleansing quality, they keep garments from beingmoth-eaten see the leaves caulium of colewort i know nothing the roots are good for, but onlyto bear the herbs and flowers centaurii majoris of centaury the greater the roots help such asare bursten, such as spit blood, shrinking of sinews, shortness ofwind, coughs, convulsions, cramps. Half a dram in powder being takeninwardly, either in muskadel, or in a decoction of the same roots theyare either not at all, or very scarce in england, our centaury is thesmall centaury cepœ of onions are hot and dry according to galen in thefourth degree. They cause dryness, and are extremely hurtful forcholeric people, they breed but little nourishment, and that little isnaught. They are bad meat, yet good physic for phlegmatic people, theyare opening, and provoke urine and the menses, if cold be the causeobstructing. Bruised and outwardly applied, they cure the bitings ofmad dogs, roasted and applied, they help boils, and aposthumes. Raw, they take the fire out of burnings, but ordinarily eaten, they causeheadache, spoil the sight, dull the senses, and fill the body full ofwind chameleontis albi nigri, &c of chameleon, white and black traguscalls the carline thistle by the name of white chameleon, the rootwhereof is hot in the second degree, and dry in the third, it provokessweat, kills worms, resists pestilence and poison.

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“after a patientinvestigation we are forced to the conclusion that it was never calleda punishable offence at common law to produce, with the consent of themother, an abortion prior to the time when the mother became quick withchild it was not even murder at common law to take the life of thechild at any period of gestation, even in the very act of delivery ”see also evans v people, 49 n y , 86 the inhumanity and danger to society of this rule became manifest at avery early period, and both in england and in this country statuteswere adopted, varying essaywhat in the degree and kind professional college admission writers of punishment andin the nomenclature of the crime, but all of them making the offenceof committing an abortion, no matter at what stage of gestation, acrime 188the common-law doctrine criticised - professor elwell in his valuablework on “malpractice, medical evidence and insanity, ” pp 250, 251, makes the following remarks upon this subject. “the idea once existedquite generally, and it still exists to essay extent, that there is nooffence in destroying the embryo or fœtus before there is a manifestknowledge of life by the mother, derived from motion of the childcalled ‘quickening ’ how absurd to suppose that there is no lifeuntil the mother can feel the muscular motions of the child!. as wellmight we deny the vitality of the blood because it cannot be felt the muscular tissues, and even the bones to which they are attached, must have essay degree of substance before there can be motion, and ofcourse this development depends upon life though this foolish notionis now fully exploded in medicine, it still lingers in the popularmind, and doubtless leads to much crime the life of the fœtus orembryo immediately after conception is just as positive physiologicallyas at any subsequent period quickening being an incident or signin the course of development of the fœtus, it indicates not thecommencement of a new state of existence, but only a new manifestationof pre-existing life it is uncertain in its appearance, essaytimescoming on at three months, essaytimes at six months, and essaytimes notat all ”legal definitions of terms, “quick with child, ” etc - in evans v people, 49 n y , 86, following r v wycherly, 8 c & p , 262, it was held that a woman is “quick with child” from the period ofconception after the commencement of gestation, but is “pregnant withquick child” only when the child has become “quickened in the womb ”this distinction has been discussed in state v cooper, 2 zab , n j , 52, and since the evans case, the same court in new york state hasheld that the expression, “woman with child, ” means “pregnant woman ”eckhardt v people, 83 n y , 42 s c , 38 am rep , 462 death of child by abortion - if, in attempting to produce anabortion, the child is caused to be born alive but before the end ofthe period of gestation, and when it is not capable of sustaining life, and it dies, the person producing the abortion and bringing the childinto the world at this time and in this manner is guilty of murder wharton crim law, sec 942. Rex v west, 2 cox crim paper, 500;com v brown, 14 gray, mass , 419 death of mother by abortion - so also where in consequence ofproducing an abortion the death of the mother occurs, the personproducing the abortion is guilty of murder at common law 4blackstone com , 201. 1 bishop crim law, 328 in essay of thestates, however, these offences are declared to be only manslaughter further consideration of the subject of abortion will be had under thattitle in another writing of this work statutes generally except abortions necessary to save life - itshould be noted here, however, that nearly all the statutes whichdefine and punish the crime of abortion, or the crime of manslaughteror murder committed in consequence of abortion, declare that when it isnecessary to produce a miscarriage in order to save life, the act ofdoing so is excepted from the effect of the statute negligent malpractice - under the third subdivision of thedefinition, viz , when by reason of the negligent acts on the writingof the physician or surgeon the patient suffers death or unnecessaryinjury, may be placed the most numerous paper of malpractice, accordingto the generally accepted meaning of the term criminal liability for negligent malpractice - it is manifest thatnot every degree of negligence which causes death or injury ought torender the physician or surgeon liable to indictment and punishmentfor a crime the general theory of the criminal law is based upon thedoctrine that in order to constitute a crime there must be eitheran intent to do the wrong, or such a degree of negligence in theperformance of a given act as to supply the place of the intent to dowrong, and require punishment for the protection of society, upon theground that the carelessness of the defendant is so great as to makeit necessary and proper to punish him, in order to deter others fromfollowing his example doctrine of leading case of com v thompson - in com v thompson 6 mass , 134, parsons, c j , observes. “there was no evidence toinduce the belief that the prisoner by his treatment intended tokill or injure the deceased and the ground of express malice mustfall it has been said that implied malice may be inferred from therash and presumptuous conduct of the prisoner in administering suchviolent medicines before implied malice can be inferred, the judgesmust be satisfied that the prisoner by his treatment of his patientwas wilfully regardless of his social duties, being determined onmischief to constitute manslaughter, the killing must have been theconsequence of essay unlawful act now there is no law which prohibitsany man from prescribing for a sick person with his consent. And it isnot a felony, if through his ignorance of the quality of the medicineprescribed, or of the nature of the disease, or of both, the patient, contrary to his expectations, should die the death of a man killed byvoluntarily following a medical prescription cannot be adjudged felonyin the writingy prescribing unless he, however ignorant of medical sciencein general, had so much knowledge or probable information of the fataltendency of the prescription that it may be reasonably presumed bythe jury to be an act of wilful rashness at least, and not of honestintention and expectation to cure ”the doctrine of the thompson case too broad - this lax statementof the law, made by the learned chief justice in this case, has beenmuch doubted and criticised it appears to be unsound in the length towhich it goes in requiring, in order to constitute criminal liability, what may be termed excessive gross carelessness or wilful grosscarelessness it apparently runs counter to the prevailing opinions ofthe english judges, and to the later decisions of the courts in theunited states, although it is followed and approved in rice v thestate, 8 mo , 561 in rex v long 4 car & p , 308-310, park, j , said. “i call itacting wickedly when a man is grossly ignorant and yet affects to curepeople, or when he is grossly inattentive to their safety ”so in rex v spiller 5 car & p , 353, the court said.