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Does not eat very much please do my homework pain reflexes good vii 2 19, still depressed. Does not eat appears normal, vii 3 19 experiment 6 -- 12 5 c c. Injected vi 25 19. Quiet, but reflexes good. More quiet and depressed after several hours essay loss of oil from wound died night of vi 25 19 one day tail stiff temperature low postmortem. Lungs markedly congested spleen and liver dark red one kidney congested other viscera normal experiment 7 -- 12 5 c c. Injected vii 9 19. Quiet for one-half hour. 1 5 hours twitching of muscles of whole body, lies on side, ataxia present died night of vii 9 19 one day experiment 8 -- 18 75 c c.

The red beet being under saturn and the white underjupiter. Therefore take the virtues of them awriting, each by itself thewhite beet much loosens the belly, and is of a cleansing, digestingquality, and provokes urine the juice of it opens obstructions bothof the liver and spleen, and is good for the head-ache and swimmingstherein, and turnings of the brain. And is effectual also against allvenomous creatures. And applied to the temples, stays inflammations ofthe eyes. It helps burnings, being used with oil, and with a littlealum put to it, is good for st anthony fire it is good for allwheals, pushes, blisters, and blains in the skin. The herb boiled, and laid upon chilblains or kibes, helps them the decoction thereofin water and essay vinegar, heals the itch, if bathed therewith. Andcleanses the head of dandruff, scurf, and dry scabs, and does much goodfor fretting and running sores, ulcers, and cankers in the head, legs, or other writings, and is much commended against baldness and shedding thehair the red beet is good to stay the bloody-flux, women courses, and thewhites, and to help the yellow jaundice. The juice of the root put intothe nostrils, purges the head, helps the noise in the ears, and thetooth-ache. The juice snuffed up the nose, helps a stinking breath, ifthe cause lie in the nose, as thesis times it does, if any bruise hasbeen there. As also want of smell coming that way water betony called also brown-wort, and in yorkshire, bishop-leaves descript first, of the water betony, which rises up with square, hard, greenish stalks, essaytimes brown, set with broad dark greenleaves dented about the edges with notches essaywhat resembling theleaves of the wood betony, but much larger too, for the most writing setat a joint the flowers are thesis, set at the tops of the stalks andbranches, being round bellied and open at the brims, and divided intotwo writings, the uppermost being like a hood, and the lowermost like ahip hanging down, of a dark red colour, which passing, there comes intheir places small round heads with small points at the ends, whereinlie small and brownish seeds. The root is a thick bush of strings andshreds, growing from the head place it grows by the ditch side, brooks and other water-courses, generally through this land, and is seldom found far from thewater-side time it flowers about july, and the seed is ripe in august government and virtues water betony is an herb of jupiter incancer, and is appropriated more to wounds and hurts in the breastthan wood betony, which follows. It is an excellent remedy for sickhogs it is of a cleansing quality the leaves bruised and applied areeffectual for all old and filthy ulcers. And especially if the juice ofthe leaves be boiled with a little honey, and dipped therein, and thesores dressed therewith.

As also by small water courses, and in divers other places time it flowers and seeds in the end of summer government and virtues this is an herb of venus, thereforemaintains the writings of the body she rules, remedies the diseases ofthe writings that are under her signs, taurus and libra mugwort is withgood success put among other herbs that are boiled for women to applythe hot decoction to draw down their courses, to help the delivery ofthe birth, and expel the after-birth as also for the obstructions andinflammations of the mother it breaks the stone, and opens the urinarypassages where they are stopped the juice thereof made up with myrrh, and put under as a pessary, works the same effects, and so does theroot also being made up with hog grease into an ointment, it takesaway wens and hard knots and kernels that grow about the neck andthroat, and eases the pains about the neck more effectually, if essayfield daisies be put with it the herb itself being fresh, or the juicethereof taken, is a special remedy upon the overmuch taking of opium three drams of the powder of the dried leaves taken in wine, is aspeedy and the best certain help for the sciatica a decoction thereofmade with camomile and agrimony, and the place bathed therewith whileit is warm, takes away the pains of the sinews, and the cramp the mulberry-tree this is so well known where it grows, that it needs no description time it bears fruit in the months of july and august government and virtues mercury rules the tree, therefore are itseffects variable as his are the mulberry is of different writings. Theripe berries, by reason of their sweetness and slippery moisture, opening the body, and the unripe binding it, especially when they aredried, and then they are good to stay fluxes, lasks, and the abundanceof women courses the bark of the root kills the broad worms in thebody the juice, or the syrup made of the juice of the berries, helpsall inflammations or sores in the mouth, or throat, and palate of themouth when it is fallen down the juice of the leaves is a remedyagainst the biting of serpents, and for those that have taken aconite the leaves beaten with vinegar, are good to lay on any place that isburnt with fire a decoction made of the bark and leaves is good towash the mouth and teeth when they ache if the root be a little slitor cut, and a small hole made in the ground next thereunto, in theharvest-time, it will give out a certain juice, which being hardenedthe next day, is of good use to help the tooth-ache, to dissolve knots, and purge the belly the leaves of mulberries are said to stay bleedingat the mouth or nose, or the bleeding of the piles, or of a wound, being bound unto the places a branch of the tree taken when the moonis at the full, and bound to the wrists of a woman arm, whose coursescome down too much, doth stay them in a short space mullein descript common white mullein has thesis fair, large, woolly whiteleaves, lying next the ground, essaywhat larger than broad, pointed atthe end, and as it were dented about the edges the stalk rises up tobe four or five feet high, covered over with such like leaves, butless, so that no stalk can be seen for the multitude of leaves thereonup to the flowers, which come forth on all sides of the stalk, withoutany branches for the most writing, and are thesis set together in a longspike, in essay of a yellow colour, in others more pale, consisting offive round pointed leaves, which afterwards have small round heads, wherein is small brownish seed contained the root is long, white, andwoody, perishing after it hath borne seed place it grows by way-sides and lanes, in thesis places of this land time it flowers in july or thereabouts government and virtues it is under the dominion of saturn a smallquantity of the root given in wine, is commended by dioscorides, against lasks and fluxes of the belly the decoction hereof drank, isprofitable for those that are bursten, and for cramps and convulsions, and for those that are troubled with an old cough the decoctionthereof gargled, eases the pains of the tooth-ache and the oil madeby the often infusion of the flowers, is of very good effect for thepiles the decoction of the root in red wine or in water, if there bean ague wherein red hot steel hath been often quenched, doth stay thebloody-flux the same also opens obstructions of the bladder and reins a decoction of the leaves hereof, and of sage, marjoram, and camomileflowers, and the places bathed therewith, that have sinews stiff withcold or cramps, doth bring them much ease and comfort three ounces ofthe distilled water of the flowers drank morning and evening for essaydays together, is said to be the most excellent remedy for the gout the juice of the leaves and flowers being laid upon rough warts, asalso the powder of the dried roots rubbed on, doth easily take themaway, but doth no good to smooth warts the powder of the dried flowersis an especial remedy for those that are troubled with the belly-ache, or the pains of the cholic the decoction of the root, and so likewiseof the leaves, is of great effect to dissolve the tumours, swellings, or inflammations of the throat the seed and leaves boiled in wine, andapplied, draw forth speedily thorns or splinters gotten into the flesh, ease the pains, and heal them also the leaves bruised and wrapped indouble papers, and covered with hot ashes and embers to bake a while, and then taken forth and laid warm on any blotch or boil happening inthe groin or share, doth dissolve and heal them the seed bruised andboiled in wine, and laid on any member that has been out of joint, andnewly set again, takes away all swelling and pain thereof mustard descript our common mustard hath large and broad rough leaves, verymuch jagged with uneven and unorderly gashes, essaywhat like turnipleaves, but less and rougher the stalk rises to be more than a foothigh, and essaytimes two feet high, being round, rough, and branched atthe top, bearing such like leaves thereon as grow below, but lesser, and less divided, and divers yellow flowers one above another at thetops, after which come small rough pods, with small, lank, flat ends, wherein is contained round yellowish seed, sharp, hot, and biting uponthe tongue the root is small, long, and woody when it bears stalks, and perishes every year place this grows with us in gardens only, and other manured places time it is an annual plant, flowering in july, and the seed is ripein august government and virtues it is an excellent sauce for such whoseblood wants clarifying, and for weak stomachs, being an herb of mars, but naught for choleric people, though as good for such as are aged, or troubled with cold diseases aries claims essaything to do with it, therefore it strengthens the heart, and resists poison let such whosestomachs are so weak they cannot digest their meat, or appetite it, take of mustard-seed a dram, cinnamon as much, and having beaten themto powder, and half as much mastich in powder, and with gum arabicdissolved in rose-water, make it up into troches, of which they maytake one of about half a dram weight an hour or two before meals. Letold men and women make much of this medicine, and they will either giveme thanks, or shew manifest ingratitude mustard seed hath the virtueof heat, discussing, ratifying, and drawing out splinters of bones, andother things of the flesh it is of good effect to bring down womencourses, for the falling-sickness or lethargy, drowsy forgetful evil, to use it both inwardly and outwardly, to rub the nostrils, foreheadand temples, to warm and quicken the spirits. For by the fiercesharpness it purges the brain by sneezing, and drawing down rheum andother viscous humours, which by their distillations upon the lungs andchest, procure coughing, and therefore, with essay, honey added thereto, doth much good therein the decoction of the seed made in wine, anddrank, provokes urine, resists the force of poison, the malignity ofmushrooms, and venom of scorpions, or other venomous creatures, if itbe taken in time.

Nor is it enoughthat he himself acknowledged essay degree of please do my homework want of care. There musthave been a want of competent and ordinary care and skill, and to sucha degree as to have led to a bad result but a professed physicianor surgeon is bound to use not only such skill as he has, but to havea reasonable degree of skill the law will not countenance quackery;and although the law does not require the most thorough education orthe largest experience, it does require that an uneducated, ignorantman shall not, under the pretence of being a well-qualified physician, attempt recklessly and blindly to administer medicines or performsurgical operations if the practitioner, however, frankly informs hispatient of his want of skill, or the patient is in essay other way fullyaware of it, the latter cannot complain of the lack of that which heknew did not exist ”164average standard of skill of any professed school must beattained - it is also a rule that one who professes to adhere toa writingicular school must come up to its average standard, and mustbe judged by its tests, and in the light of the present day thus aphysician who would practise the reckless and indiscriminate bleedingwhich was in high repute not very thesis years ago, or should shut upa patient in fever and deny all cooling drinks, would doubtless findthe old practice a poor excuse for his imbecility so, if a professedhomœopathist should violate all the canons of homœopathy, he wouldbe bound to show essay very good reasons for his conduct, if it wasattended with injurious effects upon thesis points of medical andsurgical practice all of the schools are agreed, and indeed commonsense and universal experience prescribe essay invariable rules, toviolate which may generally be called gross negligence yet the patientcannot justly complain if he gets only that quality and kind of servicefor which he bargains if he employs a cheap man, he must expect cheapservice puffendorf, in his “law of nature and nations, ” observes:“we read a pleasant story of a man who had sore eyes and came to ahorse-doctor for relief the doctor anointed his eyes with the sameointment he used among his horses, upon which the man falls blind, and the cause is brought before the judge, who acquits the physician for if the fellow, says he, had not been an ass he had never appliedhimself to a horse-doctor ” see also jones on bailments, 100. 1 field“lawyers’ briefs, ” sub bailments, sec 573. Musser v chase, 29 ohiost , 577. Lanphier v phipos, 8 carr & payne, 478 degree of care and skill used a question of fact - in an actionat law, whether brought by a physician to recover for his services, or by a patient to recover for malpractice or neglect, it is alwaysa question of fact, to be determined by the jury under properinstructions as to the measure of care and skill required, whether ornot the physician has in a given case used that degree of care anddisplayed that amount of skill which might reasonably be expected of aman of ordinary ability and professional skill these same rules applyto the surgeon he must possess and exercise that degree of knowledgeand sense which the leading authorities have announced, as a result oftheir researches and experiments up to the time, or within a reasonabletime before, the issue or question to be determined is made 165rule in leading case of lanphier v phipos - in the case of lanphierv phipos, 8 c & p , 478, already cited, chief justice tyndallenunciated the rule as to the degree of skill required of a physicianor surgeon, which has been followed by all the courts since then hesaid. “every person who enters into a learned profession undertakes tobring to the exercise of it a reasonable degree of care and skill hedoes not, if he is an attorney, undertake at all events to gain thecause, nor does a surgeon undertake that he will perform a cure. Nordoes the latter undertake to use the highest possible degree of skill, as there may be persons of higher education and greater advantagesthan himself. But he undertakes to bring a fair, reasonable andcompetent degree of skill and in an action against him by a patient, the question for the jury is whether the injury complained of must bereferred to a want of proper degree of skill and care in the defendant, or not hence he is never presumed to engage for extraordinary skill, or for extraordinary diligence and care as a general rule, he whoundertakes for a reward to perform any work is bound to use a degreeof diligence, attention and skill, adequate to the performance of hisundertaking. That is, to do it according to the rules of the art;spondet peritiam artis and the degree of skill arises in proportionto the value and delicacy of the operation but he is in no caserequired to have more than ordinary skill, for he does not engage formore ”physician must instruct patient how to care for himself, etc - acorollary of these rules is, that the physician must give properinstruction to his patient how to take care of himself, how to manage adiseased or injured member, when and how to take any medicines that maybe prescribed, what diet to adopt, and that in case the physician failsto give these instructions he is liable for any injuries that resultfrom this failure carpenter v blake, supra patient must inform physician fully concerning his case hiscommunications privileged - on the other hand, as we have alreadystated, the patient owes the duty to his physician of informing himfully of all the varied symptoms of his disease, or the circumstancesattending his injury, and to freely and with due confidence answerall questions concerning his past history which would tend to throwany light upon his present condition to battle with the occultforces which play so important a writing in determining the course orconsequences of disease, it is absolutely essential that the physicianshould know all that is possible to be known of the patient history, and of the history of the patient family as we shall see later on, all such communications are, in most of the states of the union andelsewhere, by statutory enactment made privileged, and without theconsent of the patient the physician or surgeon is absolutely forbiddento divulge any communication or information which he receives in orderto enable him to prescribe this rule applies equally whether thephysician or surgeon is acting for hire or is treating the person as acharity patient, and it has been extended by construction by the courtsin essay states, so as to include examinations made by jail physiciansor other physicians sent by the prosecuting officials of the state toexamine a prisoner, for purpose of giving evidence, but who allowedthe prisoner to suppose that they were there simply to treat him intheir professional capacity people v murphy, 101 n y , 126 atthe same time the courts have been careful to make an exception in thecase of advice given for the purpose of enabling the person receivingthe advice to commit a crime, and of any information received by thephysicians while the persons asking for it were engaged in a criminalattempt all of these interesting questions will be examined andtreated of at length hereafter 166conditions of contract between physician and patient furtherconsidered - it has been observed that the contract between thephysician and patient may be conditional or unconditional by this itis meant that limitations upon the reciprocal obligations between themmay be imposed, or extensions of such obligations made, by specialagreement the physician may contract to cure, and may make the curea condition precedent to receiving any reward for his services ormedicaments, and a breach of such a contract will be enforced bythe courts as a bar to an action for services rendered or medicinesfurnished the patient may agree to come to the physician home or toa hospital or other place agreed upon between them, for the purpose ofbeing treated, or of being operated upon by a surgeon, and a failureto perform such an agreement on the writing of the patient absolves themedical man from carrying out his agreement to treat the patient in the case already suggested of a request by the medical man forinformation as to the patient past history, or that of the patientfamily, or the circumstances concerning the injury or symptoms ofthe disease, if the patient should give false information, or shouldwilfully neglect to give true information, the physician would have aright, upon giving reasonable and due notice, and opportunity to employessay one else, as already intimated, to decline to proceed further withhis care of the case, and might sue and recover pay for the servicesrendered physicians cannot contract that they shall not be responsible forwant of ordinary care and skill - an important and salutary exceptionto the general rule that all writingies may contract freely as betweenthemselves stipulations measuring their reciprocal obligations, doubtless applies to the relations between physician and patient it is an exception which has been applied to the contract relationsexisting between a common carrier and a shipper or a passenger this isthat persons contracting to perform services which are to a certainextent public in their nature, and which, as in the case of the commoncarrier or in the case of the physician or surgeon, are foundedupon conventional relations, and affect the public welfare, are notpermitted, from reasons of public policy, to contract for a release orescape from liability arising out of their own negligence or wrong inshort, a physician or surgeon cannot contract with a patient that thepatient shall waive any claim for damages growing out of his want ofordinary care and skill nevertheless, the physician or surgeon mayfrankly inform his patient of his want of knowledge and experience asto the writingicular kind of treatment required by any special and unusualdisease or injury if after full information on this point, and fullopportunity to employ essay one else, the patient insists that thephysician or surgeon go on with such treatment as he is able to giveto the case, and injuries result which a more skilful and experiencedpractitioner might have avoided, it is probable that the courts wouldhold that the practitioner was not liable under such circumstances, or that such circumstances could be pleaded in mitigation of damages but it would be the duty of the practitioner in such a case to beexceedingly careful in performing any surgical operations, and notadminister any powerful drugs with the strength and medicinal qualitiesof which he was not acquainted if he should assume to perform suchoperations or administer such drugs instead of confining himself tomodifying the ravages of disease by the use of well-known simpleremedies, or protecting against the consequences of severe injury bythe use of ordinary antiseptic dressings and treatment, he would nodoubt be liable for any resulting damage, and could not recover pay forhis service experiments not to be tried on patients this rule applies to charitypatients - for like reasons of public policy it has been held that aphysician has no right to try experiments on his patient 167 in thisrespect a charity patient will be protected by law and compensated fordamages received from experiments on his health and person, just asmuch as a person from whom a large fee could be expected humanity andpublic policy both forbid that experiments should be tried upon oneclass of patients any more than another however this may be, in acase of extreme danger, where other resorts have failed and everythingelse done that could reasonably be required, and if the patient andhis family consent after full information of the dangerous characterof the operation, or the unknown qualities and powers of the drug tobe administered, the practitioner would be justified and protected ifessay new methods of treatment not entirely developed or known to theprofession, but supposed to be efficacious, should be adopted, althoughthe result might prove unfavorable in such a case, however, it wouldbe extremely perilous for the physician to stand upon his own judgmentalone he should consult the best talent in his profession available, and abide by the judgment of his colleagues or a fair majority of them;and even then should apply to his course of action the maxim when indoubt run no risks. Better let a patient perish from disease or injury, than while attempting uncertain experiments with the surgeon knifeor the use of dangerous drugs the safe rule is to take no chances, unless there is a consensus of judgment of several physicians itmay be objected that if no experiments are tried no new medicines orsurgical devices could be discovered, or their effects observed theanswer to this objection is that vivisection, and other experimentsupon live animals, permit of experimentation to a considerable degree, and often effectually point out the proper course of treatment of thehuman subjects in the case of drugs and medicines the practice is wellknown of physicians trying the effects thereof upon their own persons, in their zeal and anxiety to give to the world new discoveries but, as heretofore observed, the law does not recognize the right of themedical or surgical practitioner to tamper with his patients’ health bythe use of untried experiments, without imposing upon the practitionerliability for all injuries proximately resulting from their use allof such matters will, however, fall more properly under considerationwhen the liability of the physician and surgeon for malpractice isconsidered chapter iv of the legal right of physicians and surgeons to recover compensationfor services liability to pay for services - an important matter for physiciansand surgeons is the question as to who is responsible, or liable to payfor their services if there is an express contract this question doesnot arise. But in most instances the person performing the servicesrenders them upon call, and it is necessary for him to understand hislegal right to recover pay for services in the absence of an expresscontract person treated, and not person calling in physician, employs himand is liable - in the first place, it must be stated as a generalproposition that the person for whom the services are actuallyrendered, or upon whom the operation is performed, is bound to pay forthem, if otherwise capable in law of making contracts and incurringobligations and secondly, that one who calls a physician or surgeonto attend a patient is not presumed to have contracted to pay for theservices rendered, unless his relations with the patient are such thathe would be obligated in law to pay, even if he had not himself calledin the medical man in the first case it is presumed that the patient is liable, because hereceives the benefit of the services, and nothing less than a distinctunderstanding that he was not to pay will relieve him from thisobligation married women and infants generally not liable - where such a personis a married woman, unless the case arises in states or countrieswhere married women have been declared by statutes to be liablethe same as if single, this rule does not obtain nor is an infantpersonally liable when he is living with his parent or guardian hullv connelly, 3 mccord s c , 6. Klein v la amoreaux, 2 paigech , 419. Atchinson v bruff, 50 barb , 384. Wilcox v smith, 26barb , 341 but the contract of an infant for medicine and medicalattendance is deemed a contract for necessaries, and will be heldvalid and enforced against his estate if there is no person standingin loco parentis who can be held liable 3 barn & cress , 484. 2kent com , 236 in paper when the parent of the infant or the husbandof the married woman is liable, this liability obtains because theservices rendered are deemed necessary, and fall within the common-lawobligation of such persons to provide and pay for necessaries for thosewhom they are bound to support and maintain burden upon physicians treating minors to show servicesnecessary - but even in such paper the burden is upon the personperforming the services, to show that they were necessary, and it ishis duty to know, or learn, the true legal status of the patient, andthe true legal relations of the patient to the person other than thepatient from whom payment is to be claimed as said in the case ofcrain v baudouin 55 n y , 256-261, “in the case of minor childreneven, the law imposes this duty upon those who would furnish them withnecessaries, relying upon the credit of their fathers, and seekingto charge them hunt v thompson, 3 scam , 179. Van valkinburghv watson, 13 j r , 480 ” “a fortiori, it is so in the case ofan adult married daughter living with her husband ” and as to theliability of the husband of a married woman in the absence of statutegiving her legal capacity to contract and charge her separate estate consult moody v osgood, 50 barb , 628. Potter v virgil, 67 barb , 578. Crain v baudouin, 55 n y , 256-261 mother of infant probably liable after father death - it has beena much disputed question whether after the father death the motherbecomes responsible for necessaries furnished for her minor children the theory of law upon which a father is made liable proceeds upon theground that he is bound to support the child and has a right to thechild services during its minority 168 it has been held that themother after the death of the father is entitled to those services campbell v campbell, 3 stock n j , 265.

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B, flow of pancreatic juice in drops tracing a please do my homework. At x, intravenous injection of 10 c c secretin prepared from duodenal mucosaof dog tracing b. At x, intravenous injection of 100 tablets ofsecretogen digested with 0 4 hydrochloric acid and neutralized tracingc. At x, intravenous injection of 100 tablets of secretogen, preparedas in tracing b tracing d. At x, intravenous injection of 50 c c elixir secretogen tracing e. At x, intravenous injection of 100tablets of duodenin dissolved in 0 9 per cent sodium chlorid duodenin -- this is a preparation manufactured by armour & company, which purports to be “secretin plus enterokinase ” the claims forthis product are similar to those for secretogen, but essaywhat lesssweeping according to the manufacturers, “duodenin armour isrecommended in the treatment of intestinal disorders where an increasedflow of pancreatic, hepatic and intestinal secretion is desired it isof specific value in proteid digestion on the theory that secretin andenterokinase stimulate the pancreas and activate its secretion ”illustration.