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Persuasive Essay On Gun Control


Being made into an ointment with hog grease, you shallfind it admirable in green wounds buphthalmum, &c ox eye matthiolus saith they are commonly usedfor black hellebore, to the virtues of persuasive essay on gun control which i refer buxus boxtree. The leaves are hot, dry, and binding, they areprofitable against the biting of mad dogs. Both taken inwardly boiledand applied to the place. Besides they are good to cure horses of thebots calamintha, montana, palustris mountain and water calamint. Forthe water calamint. See mints, than which it is accounted stronger mountain calamint, is hot and dry in the third degree, provokes urineand the menses, hastens the birth in women, brings away the placenta, helps cramps, convulsions, difficulty of breathing, kills worms, helpsthe dropsy.

It also allays the heat and blood shooting of them country people do also in thesis places drink the juice thereof againstthe biting of an adder. And having boiled the herb in water, theyfirst wash the place with the decoction, and then lay essay of the herbalso to the hurt place the herb also boiled in swine grease, and somade into an ointment, is good to apply to the biting of any venomouscreature the herb also bruised and heated between tiles, and appliedhot to the share, causes them to make water who had it stopt before it is held likewise to be good for wounds, and to take away seed thedecoction of the herb and flowers, with the seed and root, taken foressay time, helps women that are troubled with the whites the seed andflowers boiled in water, and afterwards made into a poultice with essayoil, and applied, helps hard swellings and imposthumes heart trefoil besides the ordinary sort of trefoil, here are two more remarkable, andone of which may be properly called heart trefoil, not only because theleaf is triangular, like the heart of a man, but also because each leafcontains the perfection of a heart, and that in its proper colour, viz a flesh colour place it grows between longford and bow, and beyond southwark, bythe highway and writings adjacent government and virtues it is under the dominion of the sun, and ifit were used, it would be found as great a strengthener of the heart, and cherisher of the vital spirits as grows, relieving the body againstfainting and swoonings, fortifying it against poison and pestilence, defending the heart against the noiessay vapours of the spleen pearl trefoil it differs not from the common sort, save only in this writingicular, ithath a white spot in the leaf like a pearl it is writingicularly underthe dominion of the moon, and its icon shews that it is of a singularvirtue against the pearl, or pin and web in the eyes tustan, or park leaves descript it hath brownish shining round stalks, crested the lengththereof, rising two by two, and essaytimes three feet high, branchingforth even from the bottom, having divers joints, and at each of themtwo fair large leaves standing, of a dark blueish green colour on theupper side, and of a yellowish green underneath, turning reddish towardautumn at the top of the stalks stand large yellow flowers, and headswith seed, which being greenish at the first and afterwards reddish, turn to be of a blackish purple colour when they are ripe, with smallbrownish seed within them, and they yield a reddish juice or liquor, essaywhat resinous, and of a harsh and stypick taste, as the leaves alsoand the flowers be, although much less, but do not yield such a clearclaret wine colour, as essay say it doth, the root is brownish, essaywhatgreat, hard and woody, spreading well in the ground place it grows in thesis woods, groves, and woody grounds, as parksand forests, and by hedge-sides in thesis places in this land, as inhampstead wood, by ratley in essex, in the wilds of kent, and in thesisother places needless to recite time it flowers later than st john or st peter-wort government and virtues it is an herb of saturn, and a most nobleanti-venerean tustan purges choleric humours, as st peter-wort, is said to do, for therein it works the same effects, both to helpthe sciatica and gout, and to heal burning by fire. It stays all thebleedings of wounds, if either the green herb be bruised, or the powderof the dry be applied thereto it hath been accounted, and certainly itis, a sovereign herb to heal either wound or sore, either outwardly orinwardly, and therefore always used in drinks, lotions, balms, oils, ointments, or any other sorts of green wounds, ulcers, or old sores, inall which the continual experience of former ages hath confirmed theuse thereof to be admirably good, though it be not so much in use now, as when physicians and surgeons were so wise as to use herbs more thannow they do garden valerian descript this hath a thick short greyish root, lying for the mostwriting above ground, shooting forth on all other sides such like smallpieces of roots, which have all of them thesis long green strings andfibres under them in the ground, whereby it draws nourishment fromthe head of these roots spring up thesis green leaves, which at firstare essaywhat broad and long, without any divisions at all in them, ordenting on the edges. But those that rise up after are more and moredivided on each side, essay to the middle rib, being winged, as made ofthesis leaves together on a stalk, and those upon a stalk, in like mannermore divided, but smaller towards the top than below. The stalk risesto be a yard high or more, essaytimes branched at the top, with thesissmall whitish flowers, essaytimes dashed over at the edges with a palepurplish colour, of a little scent, which passing away, there followssmall brownish white seed, that is easily carried away with the wind the root smells more strong than either leaf or flower, and is of moreuse in medicines place it is generally kept with us in gardens time it flowers in june and july, and continues flowering until thefrost pull it down government and virtues this is under the influence of mercury dioscorides saith, that the garden valerian hath a warming faculty, and that being dried and given to drink it provokes urine, and helpsthe stranguary the decoction thereof taken, doth the like also, andtakes away pains of the sides, provokes women courses, and is usedin antidotes pliny saith, that the powder of the root given in drink, or the decoction thereof taken, helps all stoppings and stranglingsin any writing of the body, whether they proceed of pains in the chestor sides, and takes them away the root of valerian boiled withliquorice, raisins, and anniseed, is singularly good for those that areshort-winded, and for those that are troubled with the cough, and helpsto open the passages, and to expectorate phlegm easily it is given tothose that are bitten or stung by any venomous creature, being boiledin wine it is of a special virtue against the plague, the decoctionthereof being drank, and the root being used to smell to it helpsto expel the wind in the belly the green herb with the root takenfresh, being bruised and applied to the head, takes away the pains andprickings there, stays rheum and thin distillation, and being boiledin white wine, and a drop thereof put into the eyes, takes away thedimness of the sight, or any pin or web therein it is of excellentproperty to heal any inward sores or wounds, and also for outward hurtsor wounds, and drawing away splinters or thorns out of the flesh vervain descript the common vervain hath essaywhat long broad leaves nextthe ground deeply gashed about the edges, and essay only deeply dented, or cut all alike, of a blackish green colour on the upper side, essaywhat grey underneath the stalk is square, branched into severalwritings, rising about two feet high, especially if you reckon the longspike of flowers at the tops of them, which are set on all sides oneabove another, and essaytimes two or three together, being small andgaping, of a blue colour and white intermixed, after which come smallround seed, in small and essaywhat long heads the root is small andlong place it grows generally throughout this land in divers places ofthe hedges and way-sides, and other waste grounds time it flowers in july, and the seed is ripe soon after government and virtues this is an herb of venus, and excellentfor the womb to strengthen and remedy all the cold griefs of it, asplantain doth the hot vervain is hot and dry, opening obstructions, cleansing and healing it helps the yellow jaundice, the dropsy and thegout. It kills and expels worms in the belly, and causes a good colourin the face and body, strengthens as well as corrects the diseasesof the stomach, liver, and spleen. Helps the cough, wheezings, andshortness of breath, and all the defects of the reins and bladder, expelling the gravel and stone it is held to be good against thebiting of serpents, and other venomous beasts, against the plague, and both tertian and quartan agues it consolidates and heals alsoall wounds, both inward and outward, stays bleedings, and used withessay honey, heals all old ulcers and fistulas in the legs or otherwritings of the body. As also those ulcers that happen in the mouth. Orused with hog grease, it helps the swellings and pains of the secretwritings in man or woman, also for the piles or hæmorrhoids. Applied withessay oil of roses and vinegar unto the forehead and temples, it easesthe inveterate pains and ache of the head, and is good for those thatare frantic the leaves bruised, or the juice of them mixed with essayvinegar, doth wonderfully cleanse the skin, and takes away morphew, freckles, fistulas, and other such like inflamations and deformitiesof the skin in any writings of the body the distilled water of the herbwhen it is in full strength, dropped into the eyes, cleanses themfrom films, clouds, or mists, that darken the sight, and wonderfullystrengthens the optic nerves the said water is very powerful in allthe diseases aforesaid, either inward or outward, whether they be oldcorroding sores, or green wounds the dried root, and peeled, is knownto be excellently good against all scrophulous and scorbutic habitsof body, by being tied to the pit of the stomach, by a piece of whiteribband round the neck the vine the leaves of the english vine i do not mean to send you to thecanaries for a medicine being boiled, makes a good lotion for soremouths. Being boiled with barley meal into a poultice, it coolsinflammations of wounds.

Fewer still realizehow much has been accomplished through their efforts, or how much morecould be accomplished if every physician who at least believes in thework of the council would give it his full support -- editorial fromthe journal a m a , nov 6, 1920 delays in passing on products report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has adopted the following report and authorized itspublication w a puckner, secretary the council frequently receives inquiries-- essay of them accompanied byexpressions of impatience-- concerning articles, reports on which appearto be delayed it therefore seems advisable to make a statement of essayof the factors which enter into this problem the council fully realizes the importance of giving prompt informationto the profession with regard to proprietary medicines underconsideration it therefore acts as soon as sufficient informationis available to justify a definite judgment, and publishes itsconclusions as soon as possible when adequate information is availableat the outset, there is no delay in the publication of the councilconclusions unfortunately, but very naturally, there are thesis paper in which theinformation available at the time the product is submitted is notsufficient to justify the council in coming to definite conclusions foror against the preparation in essay paper the manufacturer possessesthe required information, but to obtain it from him takes time. Inother paper the manufacturer does not possess the information-- perhapshe did not realize the inadequacy of his evidence until the subject wasbrought to his attention by the council such paper might be dealt with in either one of two ways. The councilmight at once reject the article because the claims for it are notsupported by adequate evidence. Or, the council might suspend judgmentand give the manufacturer an opportunity to supply the information the first method-- immediate rejection-- would obviously be felt bymanufacturers as a hardship to afford the fullest possible opportunityfor the presentation of the case, the council follows the secondmethod. That is, it suspends judgment and withholds publication ofa report until reasonable time has been afforded for furnishing therequired information, provided the manufacturer or agent appears tobe making honest and diligent efforts to supply it the collectionand compilation of such information is essaytimes a lengthy process, especially when the products are of foreign manufacture although it would be easier for the council to render an immediatedecision than to assist manufacturers to supply the data necessary forthe formation of an authoritative judgment, the council cannot yield toimportunities for hasty action it must rely on the medical professionto bear in mind that the character of a product under considerationby the council has not yet been determined the council holds that, during this stage, a product is suitable, at most, for experimentaluse -- from reports of council on pharmacy and chemistry, 1915, p 119 cooperation of the pharmaceutical houses report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryin reply to the suggestion made last year by president bevan that thereshould be closer cooperation between the large pharmaceutical housesand the council on pharmacy and chemistry, the council submitted to theboard of trustees of the american medical association the statementwhich appears below. “cooperation of the pharmaceutical houses. At the opening meeting of the house of delegates last year, president arthur dean bevan suggested the desirability of greater cooperation between the large pharmaceutical houses and the council on pharmacy and chemistry the need of such cooperation has been recognized by the council from the first in no one direction has the council made greater effort than in its endeavor to secure the fullest cooperation of the various pharmaceutical houses the difficulty has been, and always must be, the fundamental antagonism between objectives that are largely commercial on the one hand and purely scientific on the other nevertheless, the council has always believed-- and has acted on the belief-- that there is a possible middle ground wherein the interests of therapeutics would not be injured but would go hand in hand with a commercial development based on enlightened self-interest “the profits to be made by a pharmaceutical house from the sale of a staple drug-- a pharmacopeial, national formulary, or nonproprietary preparation-- which enters into free competition with other drugs of the same kind, are moderate. The profits to be made from the sale of a proprietary medicine on which the manufacturer holds a monopoly are usually large-- essaytimes enormous there are, broadly, two kinds of proprietary preparations advertised to physicians. One represents laborious research ending in the production of a new medicinal chemical. This product can be patented and the manufacturer can obtain a seventeen-year monopoly on its manufacture and sale the other represents no research but comprises simple mixtures-- frequently of the “shotgun” variety-- of well known pharmaceuticals, or biologic products sold under trade names as these do not represent anything new or original the manufacturer is unable to obtain a patent, but by means of the trade name he can and does obtain a perpetual monopoly this, from a business standpoint, is more valuable than the limited monopoly granted by a patent it is not surprising that proprietary remedies of the latter type flourish so long as physicians unthinkingly accept and prescribe them solely on the manufacturer valuation “the council has practically the undivided support of manufacturers of medicinal chemicals. That is, of proprietaries of the first mentioned type but pharmaceutical firms which have found it profitable to promote proprietaries of the second type-- “specialties, ” unscientific or ordinary mixtures of pharmaceuticals or biologic products sold under trade names-- have not supported the council “when the council was organized, it was hoped and believed that all the large pharmaceutical houses would find it possible and desirable, if not actually more profitable, to shape their business methods so as to make their proprietary and other articles conform to those conservative standards on which the council bases its rules, and thus render such articles acceptable for new and nonofficial remedies it soon developed, however, that the methods of the pseudochemical companies, whose sales propaganda in the interest of unscientific nostrums with its attending damage to scientific medicine had led to the establishment of the council, had found their lodgment in most of the pharmaceutical houses it was a genuine disappointment to the council to find that essay of the large and old-established firms were not only unwilling to cooperate with the council, but in thesis instances exhibited a definite antagonism to the council work “the object-- and duty-- of the officers of pharmaceutical houses is primarily to pay dividends to their stockholders through skilful advertising or the persuasiveness of “detail men, ” they are able to induce physicians to prescribe their controlled products, on which there are large profits, even though such products have not only not been accepted by the council, but in thesis instances, have been disapproved is it any wonder that concerns which put out such products are indifferent or openly antagonistic to the work of the council?. the matter is largely one of business policy when the medical profession as a unit will support the council in its work, then such firms will find it good business policy to accede to dr bevan suggestion-- but not before ”evidently the problem resolves itself into this. The council, constituted of scientific men, working without remuneration inthe interest of scientific medicine and the medical profession, expects-- and rightfully-- the cooperation and support of the members ofthat profession what is needed, therefore, is the active, sympatheticcooperation of physicians. The cooperation of pharmaceutical houseswill follow as a matter of course j a m a 74:1235 may 11920 the following is the recommendation of the reference committee towhich the report of the board of trustees was referred.

Chlorlyptus exp 3 10%, 2 to 4 hours 10% for 1 hour 5% for 2 hours eucalyptus persuasive essay on gun control oil exp 1 5% within 5 minutes no data phenol exp 5 1% within 10 min no data streptococci and staphylococci in olive oil. Chlorlyptus exps 7 and 8 1%, almost at once, no data essaytimes eucalyptus oil no data no data phenol exps 9 and 10 1%, almost at once, no data staphylococci in pus. Chlorlyptus exp 11 10% for 1 hour 10% for 1/2 hour 5% for 2 hours eucalyptus oil no data no data phenol no data no data staphylococci in human blood serum. Chlorlyptus exp 12 5% in 1 hour 1% in 1 hour eucalyptus oil no data no data phenol 5% almost at once 1% in 1 hour -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- infection experiments in vivodr rivas reports two series of experiments, in each of which threeguinea-pigs received staphylococcus suspensions in the peritoneum one guinea-pig in each series was left untreated. The others receivedinjections of chlorlyptus into the peritoneum at various intervals the following results were obtained. Chlorlyptus results exp 19, no 1 none survived exp 20, no 1 none died exp 19, no 2 at once died exp 19, no 3 after 24 hours survived exp 20, no 2 after 18 hours died exp 20, no 3 after 24 hours died -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- this shows mortalities of. 1 in 2, i e , 50 per cent , without chlorlyptus 3 in 4, i e , 75 per cent , with chlorlyptus it is doubtful whether so small a series of experiments on so variablea phenomenon as is infection should receive any serious consideration so far as they go, they would indicate that chlorlyptus is useless orworse toxicitythe referee determined the acute toxicity of chlorlyptus by hypodermicinjection of oily solutions into white rats comparative experimentswere made with ordinary eucalyptus oil the details are given in theappendix the end-results may be summarized as follows. Survived chlorlyptus eucalyptus oil 1 56 c c 3 75 c c 5 00 c c 6 25 c c 1 25 c c 8 65 c c 2 5 c c 3 days died in days 12 5 c c 1 day 3 75 c c 3 days 12 5 c c 1 day 5 00 c c 3 days 18 75 c c 1 day 6 25 c c 1-1/2 days m f d 8 75 to 12 5 c c per kg 1 25 to 2 5 c c per kg -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- fatality -- the doses are calculated for cubic centimeters of theundiluted drugs per kilogram of rat dr rivas reports a series of toxicity experiments on guinea-pigs assuming a uniform weight of 400 gm per animal, his results detailsin appendix may be summarized as. minimal maximal fatal dose survived dose c c per kg c c per kg chlorlyptus, peritoneal exp 14 7 5 c c 5 0 c c chlorlyptus, pleural exp 15 5 0 c c 2 5 c c eucalyptus oil, peritoneal exp 16 2 5 c c no data eucalyptus oil, pleural exp 16 1 25 c c no data dichloramin-t, peritoneal exp 16 1 25 c c no data -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- the comparative toxicity in the various series is thereforeapproximately as follows. Chlorlyptus. Eucalyptus referee, rats, hypodermic 1/5. 1 rivas guinea-pig, peritoneal 1/3. 1 rivas guinea-pig, pleural 1/4. 1 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- evidently, the toxicity of chlorlyptus is about one-fourth of that ofeucalyptus oil the difference is considerable, but not fundamental moreover, the symptoms of chlorlyptus resemble the characteristics ofeucalyptus oil according to the tabulation of barker and rowntree, 136 the mean fataldose of eucalyptus oil for man, in the twenty-nine clinical paperreported in the literature, is about 20 c c if the toxicity ratio ofthe two substances were the same as for the rat experiments a ratherhazardous assumption, the fatal dose of chlorlyptus for man would beabout 80 c c 136 barker and rowntree bull johns hopkins hospital 29:215, 221oct 1918 obtained the following results with eucalyptus oil:cat, hypodermic. Survived 3 c c per kg. Killed by 5 5 c c per kg cat, intraperitoneal. Killed by 5 c c per kg dog, hypodermic.

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it is worthmentioning in this connection that mr sinclair in his latest bookdevotes a few pages to a eulogy of dr abrams and his methods thismaterial has not only been reproduced by dr abrams in his “houseorgan” physico-clinical medicine but is reprinted in leaflet form andis being distributed by essay of the individuals who are exploiting theabrams methods such reprints have been sent to this office by bothlaymen and physicians mr sinclair’ letterto the editor -- a few weeks ago you published an article dealingwith the discoveries or claims of dr albert abrams of san francisco i happen to be attending dr abrams’ clinic at the time and havediscussed this article with him at essay length dr abrams follows thepolicy of ignoring attacks on his work, taking the view that in thelong run, the man who cures disease makes his way in the world in spiteof all opposition however, it is easy to see that he has been deeplyhurt by this attack on his reputation, and as one of his friends andmost ardent admirers i am taking the liberty of addressing a letter toyou i do not know if the rules of your publication permit interventionin medical affairs by a mere layman permit me to introduce myselfas a layman who for essay twenty years tried faithfully to be curedof various diseases by thesis doctors of the best reputation in thesiswritings of the world, and failed. And who, therefore, was compelled, asa matter of self-protection, to look into the question of health forhimself i have read so thesis different kinds of books on health andmade so thesis experiments of my own that nowadays when i meet with agroup of physicians i find that before long they come to accept me asone of themselves you may not go that far, but at least you may be sogenerous as to allow me to tell you a little of what i have seen duringthe time i have spent in the clinic of dr albert abrams i observe that in the course of your two page article dealing with thissubject, you nowhere have anything to charge against dr abrams, nordo you show that you have investigated his work you consider that allyou have to do is to quote dr abrams’ own words as to what he can do, and that these words refute themselves italics our -- ed also youquote dr abrams’ schedules of prices, and imply that his motives aremercenary i will take up these two questions one at a time what dr abrams can dofirst, as to what dr abrams can do. I have been here and have seenhim do all that he claims to do therefore, you will understand thatthis portion of your argument does not produce much impression on me imerely say to you, why do you not come and see, or why do you not sendessay reliable representative to see-- before you take it for grantedthat abrams is a knave or a lunatic?. this man is not merely a colleagueof yours. He is a fellow of the royal medical society of great britainwe know of no such society -- ed and surely he was entitled to alittle elementary courtesy from you why did you not at least writeto him and permit him to put before you a little of his evidence onthe genuineness of his work?. you admit that he is a graduate of theuniversities of heidelberg and stanford. Dr abrams is not a graduateof “stanford ”-- ed you admit that he was graduated from heidelberg atthe age of twenty it happens that this was the youngest and remainsthe youngest age at which any man has taken a doctor degree at thatuniversity in a hundred years if you had inquired further you mighthave learned that ten years ago abrams was one of the most respectedphysicians in san francisco what has he done since to forfeit thehonors of a lifetime?.