History

Persuasive Essay About Abortion


At last when you conceive it strong enough, boil both herbsand oil together, till the juice be consumed, which you may know by itsbubbling, and the herbs will be crisp. Then strain it while it is hot, and keep it in a stone or glass vessel for your use 6 as for chymical oils, i have nothing to say here 7 the general use of these oils, is for pains in the limbs, roughnessof the skin, the itch, &c as also for ointments and plaisters 8 if you have occasion to use it for wounds or ulcers, in two ouncesof oil, dissolve half an ounce of turpentine, the heat of the firewill quickly do it. For oil itself is offensive to wounds, and theturpentine qualifies it chapter vi of electuaries physicians make more a quoil than needs by half, about electuaries i shall prescribe but one general way of making them up. As foringredients, you may vary them as you please, and as you findoccasion, by the last chapter 1 that you may make electuaries when you need them, it is requisitethat you keep always herbs, roots, flowers, seeds, &c ready dried inyour house, that so you may be in a readiness to beat them into powderwhen you need them 2 it is better to keep them whole than beaten. For being beaten, they are more subject to lose their strength. Because the air soonpenetrates them 3 if they be not dry enough to beat into powder when you need them, dry them by a gentle fire till they are so 4 having beaten them, sift them through a fine tiffany searce, that nogreat pieces may be found in your electuary 5 to one ounce of your powder add three ounces of clarified honey;this quantity i hold to be sufficient if you would make more or lesselectuary, vary your proportion accordingly 6 mix them well together in a mortar, and take this for a truth, youcannot mix them too much 7 the way to clarify honey, is to set it over the fire in a convenientvessel, till the scum rise, and when the scum is taken off, it isclarified 8 the usual dose of cordial electuaries, is from half a dram to twodrams. Of purging electuaries, from half an ounce to an ounce 9 the manner of keeping them is in a pot 10 the time of taking them, is either in a morning fasting, andfasting an hour after them. Or at night going to bed, three or fourhours after supper chapter vii of conserves 1 the way of making conserves is two-fold, one of herbs and flowers, and the other of fruits 2 conserves of herbs and flowers, are thus made. If you make yourconserves of herbs, as of scurvy-grass, wormwood, rue, and the like, take only the leaves and tender tops for you may beat your heart outbefore you can beat the stalks small and having beaten them, weighthem, and to every pound of them add three pounds of sugar, you cannotbeat them too much 3 conserves of fruits, as of barberries, sloes and the like, is thusmade. First, scald the fruit, then rub the pulp through a thick hairsieve made for the purpose, called a pulping sieve.

If he moves into anothercounty he must procure a certified copy of his license from the saidclerk and file it with the clerk of the district court in the lattercounty 4 penalty - to practise without a license is a misdemeanor, punishableby a fine of from $50 to $100, or imprisonment in county jail fromten to ninety days, or both appending “m d ” or “m b ” to name, orprescribing, directing, or recommending for use any drug or medicine orother agency for the treatment, care, or relief of any wound, fracture, or bodily injury, infirmity, or disease, is regarded as practisingmedicine exceptions - the act is not applicable to dentists 6, norto commissioned surgeons of the united states army or navy, nor tophysicians or surgeons in actual consultation from other states orterritories, nor to actual medical students practising medicine underthe direct supervision of a preceptor 5 all persons licensed under the act of 1883, c 125, are persuasive essay about abortion regarded aslicensed under this act 7 fees - to treasurer of board, for examination, $10 mississippi qualification - a practitioner of medicine must obtain a license fromthe state board of health code 1892, s 3, 243 application is made in writing. And an examination is made in anatomy, chemistry, obstetrics, materia medica, physiology, pathology, surgery, and hygiene, and if the applicant is found by the board to possesssufficient learning in those branches, and of good moral character, theboard issues a license to practise medicine, signed by each member whoapproves 3, 244 the application must state the applicant full name, place ofresidence, and post-office address, nativity and age, time spent inmedical studies, name and post-office address of the preceptor underwhom his medical studies were pursued, the courses of medical lecturesattended, the name of medical schools attended. If a graduate of amedical college, the name thereof. The time spent in a hospital, thetime spent in the practice of medicine, if any, the school or system ofpractice chosen, and references as to his personal character s 3, 245 examinations are to be conducted at the capital on the first tuesdayin april and october annually, and continue until all applicants areexamined and the examinations are approved or disapproved. They areupon written questions and answers, and no distinction can be madebetween applicants because of different systems or schools of practice the license must be filed in the office of the clerk of the circuitcourt of the county in which the licensee resides, within sixty daysfrom the date of its issue. Otherwise it becomes void the clerk mustrecord the same with his certificate of filing and deliver the originalto the licensee when the licensee changes the county of his residenceand usual practice, he must file the original or a certified copy oflicense, or record, in the office of said clerk in the county intowhich he shall move and practise within sixty days of the time of hisremoval, to be there recorded 3, 249 the board may issue a duplicate in place of a lost license s 3, 250 the secretary of the board may issue a temporary license which shallbe valid until the next succeeding meeting of board, such license toshow its date of issue, otherwise to be void. It must be recorded as apermanent license is required to be. Only one temporary license shallever be issued to the same person, and it shall always be made to anindividual and not to a writingnership 3, 251 physicians practising by virtue of a license under prior laws arenot required to obtain a license under this law and may continuein practice under their licenses, but they must comply with therequirements of this law with reference to recording 3, 252 penalty - to practise without an examination and a license ispunishable with a fine of from $20 to $200, or to imprisonment in thecounty jail not to exceed thirty days 1, 258 exceptions - females engaged in the practice of midwifery need nolicense for that employment 3, 253 non-residents - licensed physicians residing without the state, and whose practice extends into it, may obtain a license withoutexamination by presenting an application in the form prescribed;whereupon the secretary of the board must issue a license in thename of the board and the license must be recorded as hereinbeforeprovided, in each county in which the licensee shall practise s 3, 254 fees - to board, before examination, $10 to secretary, before examination, 25 cents 3, 247 to secretary, for temporary license, 25 cents 3, 251 to secretary, for license to non-resident, 25 cents 3, 245 to the clerk of the court, for recording, his legal fees s 3, 249 missouri qualification - every person practising medicine and surgery, in anyof their dewritingments, must possess the qualifications required if agraduate of medicine, he must present his diploma to the state board ofhealth for verification as to its genuineness if the diploma is foundto be genuine, and the person named therein to be the person claimingand presenting the same, the board must issue a certificate which isconclusive of the right to practise if not a graduate, he must submitto such examination as the board shall require, and if the examinationis satisfactory to the examiners the board must issue its certificatein accordance with the facts, and the holder shall be entitled to allthe rights and privileges herein mentioned rev stats , 1889, s 6, 871 the board must issue certificates to all who furnish satisfactoryproof of having received a diploma or license from a legally charteredmedical institution in good standing, of whatever school or system ofmedicine, and shall not make any discrimination against the holders ofgenuine licenses or diplomas under any school or system of medicine6, 872 the verification of a diploma consists in the affidavit of the holderand applicant that he is the lawful possessor of the same, and theperson therein named.

Having longleaves cut into several divisions almost like a vine leaf, but notof so deep a green on the upper side, and hoary white underneath, of a reasonable good scent, the whole form representing the form ofcoltsfoot the catkins which it brings forth before the leaves, arelong, and of a faint reddish colour, which fall away, bearing seldomgood seed with them the wood hereof is smooth, soft, and white, veryfinely waved, whereby it is much esteemed the black poplar grows higher and straighter than the white, with agreyish bark, bearing broad green leaves, essaywhat like ivy leaves, notcut in on the edges like the white, but whole and dented, ending in apoint, and not white underneath, hanging by slender long foot stalks, which with the air are continually shaken, like as the aspen leavesare the catkins hereof are greater than those of the white, composedof thesis round green berries, as if they were set together in a longcluster, containing much downy matter, which being ripe, is blown awaywith the wind the clammy buds hereof, before they spread into leaves, are gathered to make unguentum and populneum, and are of a yellowishgreen colour, and essaywhat small, sweet, but strong the wood issmooth, tough, and white, and easy to be cloven on both these treesgrows a sweet kind of musk, which in former times was used to put intosweet ointments place they grow in moist woods, and by water-sides in sundry placesof this land. Yet the white is not so frequent as the other time their time is likewise expressed before. The catkins comingforth before the leaves in the end of summer government and virtues saturn hath dominion over both whitepoplar, saith galen, is of a cleansing property. The weight of anounce in powder, of the bark thereof, being drank, saith dioscorides, is a remedy for those that are troubled with the sciatica, or thestranguary the juice of the leaves dropped warm into the ears, eases the pains in them the young clammy buds or eyes, before theybreak out into leaves, bruised, and a little honey put to them, is agood medicine for a dull sight the black poplar is held to be morecooling than the white, and therefore the leaves bruised with vinegarand applied, help the gout the seed drank in vinegar, is held goodagainst the falling-sickness the water that drops from the hollowplaces of this tree, takes away warts, pushes, wheals, and other thelike breakings-out of the body the young black poplar buds, saithmatthiolus, are much used by women to beautify their hair, bruisingthem with fresh butter, straining them after they have been kept foressay time in the sun the ointment called populneon, which is made ofthis poplar, is singularly good for all heat and inflammations in anywriting of the body, and tempers the heat of wounds it is much used todry up the milk of women breasts when they have weaned their children poppy of this i shall describe three kinds, viz the white and black ofthe garden, and the erratic wild poppy, or corn rose descript the white poppy hath at first four or five whitish greenleaves lying upon the ground, which rise with the stalk, compassingit at the bottom of them, and are very large, much cut or torn on theedges, and dented also besides. The stalk, which is usually four orfive feet high, hath essaytimes no branches at the top, and usually buttwo or three at most, bearing every one but one head wrapped up in athin skin, which bows down before it is ready to blow, and then rising, and being broken, the flowers within it spreading itself open, andconsisting of four very large, white, round leaves, with thesis whitishround threads in the middle, set about a small, round, green head, having a crown, or star-like cover at the head thereof, which growingripe, becomes as large as a great apple, wherein are contained a greatnumber of small round seeds, in several writingitions or divisions nextunto the shell, the middle thereof remaining hollow, and empty thewhole plant, both leaves, stalks, and heads, while they are fresh, young, and green, yield a milk when they are broken, of an unpleasantbitter taste, almost ready to provoke casting, and of a strong headysmell, which being condensed, is called opium the root is white andwoody, perishing as soon as it hath given ripe seed the black poppy little differs from the former, until it bears itsflower, which is essaywhat less, and of a black purplish colour, butwithout any purple spots in the bottom of the leaf the head of theseed is much less than the former, and opens itself a little roundabout the top, under the crown, so that the seed, which is very black, will fall out, if one turn the head thereof downward the wild poppy, or corn rose, hath long and narrow leaves, very muchcut in on the edges into thesis divisions, of a light green colour, essaytimes hairy withal the stalk is blackish and hairy also, but notso tall as the garden kind, having essay such like leaves thereon togrow below, writinged into three or four branches essaytimes, whereon growsmall hairy heads bowing down before the skin break, wherein the floweris inclosed, which when it is fully blown open, is of a fair yellowishred or crimson colour, and in essay much paler, without any spot in thebottom of the leaves, having thesis black soft threads in the middle, compassing a small green head, which when it is ripe, is not biggerthan one little finger end, wherein is contained much black seedssmaller than that of the garden the root perishes every year, andsprings again of its own sowing of this kind there is one lesser inall writings thereof, and differs in nothing else place the garden kinds do not naturally grow wild in any place, butall are sown in gardens where they grow the wild poppy or corn rose, is plentifully enough, and thesis times toomuch so in the corn fields of all counties through this land, and alsoon ditch banks, and by hedge sides the smaller wild kind is also foundin corn fields, and also in essay other places, but not so plentifullyas the former time the garden kinds are usually sown in the spring, which thenflower about the end of may, and essaywhat earlier, if they spring oftheir own sowing the wild kind flower usually from may until july, and the seed of themis ripe soon after the flowering government and virtues the herb is lunar, and of the juice of itis made opium. Only for lucre of money they cheat you, and tell you itis a kind of tear, or essay such like thing, that drops from poppieswhen they weep, and that is essaywhere beyond the seas, i know not wherebeyond the moon the garden poppy heads with seeds made into a syrup, is frequently, and to good effect used to procure rest, and sleep, inthe sick and weak, and to stay catarrhs and defluxions of thin rheumsfrom the head into the stomach and lungs, causing a continual cough, the fore-runner of a consumption. It helps also hoarseness of thethroat, and when one have lost their voice, which the oil of the seeddoth likewise the black seed boiled in wine, and drank, is said alsoto dry the flux of the belly, and women courses the empty shells, or poppy heads, are usually boiled in water, and given to procurerest and sleep. So doth the leaves in the same manner. As also if thehead and temples be bathed with the decoction warm, or with the oilof poppies, the green leaves or the heads bruised and applied witha little vinegar, or made into a poultice with barley-meal or hoggrease, cools and tempers all inflammations, as also the disease calledst anthony fire it is generally used in treacle and mithridate, andin all other medicines that are made to procure rest and sleep, and toease pains in the head as well as in other writings it is also used tocool inflammations, agues, or frenzies, or to stay defluxions whichcause a cough, or consumptions, and also other fluxes of the belly orwomen courses. It is also put into hollow teeth, to ease the pain, and hath been found by experience to ease the pains of the gout the wild poppy, or corn rose as matthiolus saith is good to preventthe falling-sickness the syrup made with the flower, is with goodeffect given to those that have the pleurisy. And the dried flowersalso, either boiled in water, or made into powder and drank, eitherin the distilled water of them, or essay other drink, works the likeeffect the distilled water of the flowers is held to be of much gooduse against surfeits, being drank evening and morning. It is also morecooling than any of the other poppies, and therefore cannot but be aseffectual in hot agues, frenzies, and other inflammations either inwardor outward galen saith, the seed is dangerous to be used inwardly purslain garden purslain being used as a sallad herb is so well known that itneeds no description. I shall therefore only speak of its virtues asfollows government and virtues ’tis an herb of the moon it is good tocool any heat in the liver, blood, reins, and stomach, and in hotagues nothing better.

and broken on left side. Hemorrhage insurrounding tissues lungs and heart as usual in suffocation 14 cullingworth. Med chron , manchester, 1884-85, i , p 577 - woman, married, found dead bruise and ecchymosis beneath theear. Effusion of blood in underlying tissue other bruises on face, etc several bruises in mouth, on lips and tongue blood dark andfluid brain and membranes much congested no marks of injury onthroat lungs congested. Surfaces emphysematous heart contained darkfluid blood urine and fæces had been discharged 15 the gouffé case - murdered by eyraud and bompard in 1889 archivanthropologie criminelle, paris, 1890, v , pp 642-716. Vi , 1891, pp 17 and 179 reports by bernard, lacassagne, and others gouffé wasdecoyed into a room and strangled. Afterward his body was tied up, placed in a trunk, and taken essay distance away the murderers fledto america. But eventually bompard returned to france and eyraud wascaptured. Both confessed when found, the body was well advanced inputrefaction. After a very careful examination was identified he wasstrangled by the pressure of fingers. The head was afterward wrappedin a cloth which was held in place by five turns of a cord around theneck.

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And healsalso not only the inward ulcers, and the excoriation of the entrails, bladder, &c but all other sorts of foul, moist and running ulcers, andsoon solders together the tops of green wounds it cures all rupturesin children the decoction thereof in wine being drank, provokes urine, and helps the stone and stranguary. And the distilled water thereofdrank two or three times in a day, and a small quantity at a time, also eases the bowels, and is effectual against a cough that comes bydistillations from the head the juice or distilled water being warmed, and hot inflammations, pustules or red wheals, and other breakings-outin the skin, being bathed therewith, doth help them, and doth no lessthe swelling heat and inflammation of the lower writings in men and women houseleek or sengreen both these are so well known to my countrymen, that i shall not need towrite any description of them place it grows commonly upon walls and house-sides, and flowers injuly government and virtues it is an herb of jupiter, and it is reportedby mezaldus, to preserve what it grows upon from fire and lightning our ordinary houseleek is good for all inward heats as well asoutward, and in the eyes or other writings of the body. A posset made withthe juice of houseleek, is singularly good in all hot agues, for itcools and tempers the blood and spirits, and quenches the thirst.