History

Personal Narrative Essay


Horsetail, thesmoother rather than the rough, and the leaves rather than the bare, ismost physical it is very powerful to staunch bleeding either inward oroutward, the juice or the decoction thereof being drank, or the juice, decoction, or distilled water personal narrative essay applied outwardly it also stays allsorts of lasks and fluxes in man or woman, and bloody urine. And healsalso not only the inward ulcers, and the excoriation of the entrails, bladder, &c but all other sorts of foul, moist and running ulcers, andsoon solders together the tops of green wounds it cures all rupturesin children the decoction thereof in wine being drank, provokes urine, and helps the stone and stranguary. And the distilled water thereofdrank two or three times in a day, and a small quantity at a time, also eases the bowels, and is effectual against a cough that comes bydistillations from the head the juice or distilled water being warmed, and hot inflammations, pustules or red wheals, and other breakings-outin the skin, being bathed therewith, doth help them, and doth no lessthe swelling heat and inflammation of the lower writings in men and women houseleek or sengreen both these are so well known to my countrymen, that i shall not need towrite any description of them place it grows commonly upon walls and house-sides, and flowers injuly government and virtues it is an herb of jupiter, and it is reportedby mezaldus, to preserve what it grows upon from fire and lightning our ordinary houseleek is good for all inward heats as well asoutward, and in the eyes or other writings of the body. A posset made withthe juice of houseleek, is singularly good in all hot agues, for itcools and tempers the blood and spirits, and quenches the thirst. Andalso good to stay all hot defluctions or sharp and salt rheums in theeyes, the juice being dropped into them, or into the ears it helpsalso other fluxes of humours in the bowels, and the immoderate coursesof women it cools and restrains all other hot inflammations, st anthony fire, scaldings and burnings, the shingles, fretting ulcers, cankers, tettors, ringworms, and the like. And much eases the painsof the gout proceeding from any hot cause the juice also takes awayworts and corns in the hands or feet, being often bathed therewith, andthe skin and leaves being laid on them afterwards it eases also thehead-ache, and distempered heat of the brain in frenzies, or throughwant of sleep, being applied to the temples and forehead the leavesbruised and laid upon the crown or seam of the head, stays bleeding atthe nose very quickly the distilled water of the herb is profitablefor all the purposes aforesaid the leaves being gently rubbed on anyplace stung with nettles or bees, doth quickly take away the pain hound tongue descript the great ordinary hound tongue has thesis long andessaywhat narrow, soft, hairy, darkish green leaves, lying on theground, essaywhat like unto bugloss leaves, from among which rises upa rough hairy stalk about two feet high, with essay smaller leavesthereon, and branched at the tops into divers writings, with a small leafat the foot of every branch, which is essaywhat long, with thesis flowersset along the same, which branch is crooked or turned inwards beforeit flowers, and opens by degrees as the flowers blow, which consistof small purplish red leaves of a dead colour, rising out of the huskswherein they stand with essay threads in the middle it has essaytimes awhite flower after the flowers are past, there comes rough flat seed, with a small pointle in the middle, easily cleaving to any garment thatit touches, and not so easily pulled off again the root is black, thick, and long, hard to break, and full of clammy juice, smellingessaywhat strong, of an evil scent, as the leaves also do place it grows in moist places of this land, in waste grounds, anduntilled places, by highway sides, lanes, and hedge-sides time it flowers about may or june, and the seed is ripe shortlyafter government and virtues it is a plant under the dominion of mercury the root is very effectually used in pills, as well as the decoction, or otherwise, to stay all sharp and thin defluxions of rheum from thehead into the eyes or nose, or upon the stomach or lungs, as alsofor coughs and shortness of breath the leaves boiled in wine saithdioscorides, but others do rather appoint it to be made with water, andadd thereto oil and salt molifies or opens the belly downwards italso helps to cure the biting of a mad dog, essay of the leaves beingalso applied to the wound. The leaves bruised, or the juice of themboiled in hog lard, and applied, helps falling away of the hair, which comes of hot and sharp humours.

And that the reason, if ina nativity the moon personal narrative essay be stronger than mercury, sense thesis timesover-powers reason. But if mercury be strong, and the moon weak, reason will be master ordinarily in despite of sense it is divided into intellective, and sensitive 1 intellective the intellectual resides in the brain, within thepia mater, is governed generally by mercury it is divided into imagination, judgment, and memory imagination is seated in the forewriting of the brain. It is hot anddry in quality, quick, active, always working. It receives vapoursfrom the heart, and coins them into thoughts. It never sleeps, butalways is working, both when the man is sleeping and waking. Only whenjudgment is awake it regulates the imagination, which runs at randomwhen judgment is asleep, and forms any thought according to the natureof the vapour sent up to it mercury is out of question the disposerof it a man may easily perceive his judgment asleep before himself thesistimes, and then he shall perceive his thoughts run at random judgment always sleeps when men do, imagination never sleeps. Memoryessaytimes sleeps when men sleep, and essaytimes it doth not. So thenwhen memory is awake, and the man asleep, then memory remembers whatapprehension coins, and that is a dream. The thoughts would have beenthe same, if memory had not been awake to remember it these thoughts are commonly i mean in sleep, when they are purelynatural, framed according to the nature of the humour, calledcomplexion, which is predominate in the body. And if the humour bepeccant it is always so so that it is one of the surest rules to know a man own complexion, by his dreams, i mean a man void of distractions, or deep studies. This most assuredly shews mercury to dispose of the imagination, as also because it is mutable, applying itself to any object, asmercury nature is to do. For then the imagination will follow itsold bent. For if a man be bent upon a business, his apprehension willwork as much when he is asleep, and find out as thesis truths by study, as when the man is awake. And perhaps more too, because then it is nothindered by ocular objects and thus much for imagination, which is governed by mercury, andfortified by his influence.

And it isnot a felony, if through his ignorance of the quality of the medicineprescribed, or of the nature of the disease, or of both, the patient, contrary to his expectations, should die the death of a man killed byvoluntarily following a medical prescription cannot be adjudged felonyin the writingy prescribing unless he, however ignorant of medical sciencein general, had so much knowledge or probable information of the fataltendency of the prescription that it may be reasonably presumed bythe jury to be an act of wilful rashness at least, and not of honestintention and expectation to cure ”the doctrine of the thompson case too broad - this lax statementof the law, made by the learned chief justice in this case, has beenmuch doubted and criticised it appears to be unsound in the length towhich it goes in requiring, in order to constitute criminal liability, what may be termed excessive gross carelessness or wilful grosscarelessness it apparently runs counter to the prevailing opinions ofthe english judges, and to the later decisions of the courts in theunited states, although it is followed and approved in rice v thestate, 8 mo , 561 in rex v long 4 car & p , 308-310, park, j , said. “i call itacting wickedly when a man is grossly ignorant and yet affects to curepeople, or when he is grossly inattentive to their safety ”so in rex v spiller 5 car & p , 353, the court said. “if aperson, whether a medical man or not, professes to deal with thelife and health of another, he is bound to use competent skill andsufficient attention. And if he causes the death of another throughgross want of either he will be guilty of manslaughter ”bishop, in his work on criminal law, lays down the rule that not everydegree of carelessness renders a practitioner liable to criminalprosecution, and that it must be gross, or, as more strongly expressed, “the grossest ignorance or most criminal inattention ”189nevertheless he quotes with approval 2 bishop crim law, 264 theremark of willes, j , that a medical man is taking a leap in the darkif he knew he was using medicines beyond his knowledge.

Solubility of lead sulphate and basic leadcarbonate in human gastric juice in hygiene of the paintertrade by alice hamilton, bull of u s bureau of labor statisticsno 120, may 13, 1913, pp 22-32 that even small quantities of leadsulphate when taken into the system for a long time, have produced leadpoisoning, the laboratory deemed it important that the products beexamined for lead a specimen of “akoz powder” submitted to the council by the naturacompany and contained in a sifter-top can was taken for analysis thecontents of the can were thoroughly mixed to determine the presence oflead essay of the powder was extracted with ammonium acetate solution details of analysisqualitative tests showed the presence of lead and sulphate in theammonium acetate solution the presence of lead was demonstrated by the black precipitate withhydrogen sulphid, the yellow precipitate with potassium chromate andthe typical yellowish crystalline precipitate with potassium iodin the presence of sulphates in the ammonium acetate solution was shown bythe formation of a precipitate with barium chlorid solution and aceticacid two 2 gm samples a and b were taken for the quantitativedetermination of lead each was treated repeatedly with a saturatedsolution of ammonium acetate until the filtered ammonium acetatesolution gave no appreciable precipitate with potassium chromatesolution the ammonium personal narrative essay acetate extractions from each specimen werecombined and treated with hydrogen sulphid, the precipitated leadsulphid filtered off and washed, and ignited with sulphuric acid at alow heat the crucible with the residue of lead sulphate was cooled andweighed a yielded 0 0469 gm , or 2 34 per cent , lead sulphate b yielded 0 0440 gm , or 2 20 per cent , lead sulphate while the laboratory has no evidence to show that the amount oflead-sulphate thus found to be present is likely to prove harmful, thefollowing cautionary letter was sent to the natura company. “according to information which you sent to the council on pharmacy and chemistry your product “akoz” does not contain lead in view of reports received ascribing symptoms, resulting from the internal use of akoz, to chronic lead poisoning, an examination of a specimen of akoz powder, which you sent to the council, was made this examination indicates the presence in akoz powder of about 2 2 per cent lead sulphate in view of the disastrous results likely to follow the internal use of products containing even small amounts of lead, the above is submitted to you for your consideration ”no reply to the foregoing was received from the natura company -- fromreports a m a chemical laboratory, 1916, p 103 sodium acetate in warming bottlesrecently the laboratory attention was called to the “thermorwaterless hot bottle, ” manufactured by the royal thermophor salesco , new york the following claims appear in one of the advertisingpamphlets. “there is moist heat ” “rubber hot-water ?. ?. ?. naturally give a moist heat ” it thermor gives a dry heat “the ‘thermor’ bottle is not a hot-water bottle-- it acts on a principle that is entirely different and new ” “ gives you first, last and all the time a fixed degree of dry usable heat-- a heat that holds steadily at 125 degrees for fully twelve hours-- you will easily see why it is that ‘thermor’ relieves and cures where hot-water bottles fail ”the bottle was nickel plated, 8-3/8 inches in diameter and 1-1/2 inchesthick, and in appearance resembled an exaggerated closed ingersollwatch the bottle is not flexible and weighs 3-1/2 pounds the contentsconsisted essentially of sodium acetate this salt melts when heated when it cools the temperature inside the bottle is relativelyconstant, as it will remain at the “freezing point” until all ofthe sodium acetate has solidified the duration of the time that itremains warm when well wrapped is simply in inverse proportion to theconductivity of the surrounding environment when two ordinary towelswere carefully arranged about it, the air between the bottle and thewrappings was maintained at a temperature of 40-50 c 104-122 f fora period of eight hours the company implication that the heat given out by the thermorbottle differs from that given out by an ordinary hot-water bottle isan absurdity the use of sodium acetate in the preparation of warmingbottles has been in practice thesis years, and is not “a principle thatis entirely different and new ” furthermore, the therapeutic claimsare extravagant -- from reports a m a chemical laboratory, 1916, p 105 anti-syphilitic compound sweenya specimen of anti-syphilitic compound sweeny, sold by the nationallaboratories of pittsburgh, was received from a physician the package 1 ounce size has been opened by the sender and about three fourths ofthe contents removed from the rather indefinite statements in the literature of themanufacturer it is gathered that the preparation is claimed to be a“sterile, oily emulsion” which contains 1/20 grain of mercuric benzoatein each 5 minims, together with essay sodium chlorid according toinformation furnished by the laboratory correspondent, the priceasked for the preparation is $15 an ounce the quantity of the preparation received was too small to permit acomplete examination, but, from the tests which it was possible tomake, the preparation appears to be an aqueous solution containingessay suspended matter and small quantities of mercuric benzoateand a chlorid, presumably sodium chlorid there was no evidence ofthe presence of an “oily emulsion ” quantitative tests indicatedthe presence of a mercuric salt, equivalent to about 0 2783 gm ofcrystallized mercuric benzoate per 100 c c this corresponds to about0 00086 gm in each 5 minims, or about 26 5 per cent of the amountclaimed -- from reports a m a chemical laboratory, 1916, p 106 “ambrine” and paraffin filmsf paul nicholas leech, ph d f contribution from the chemical laboratory of the american medicalassociation in the last year or so, the hot-wax or paraffin treatment of burns hasbeen widely discussed both in medical and lay periodicals although thetreatment is simply a modification of the well-known use of oil andointments, it has received unusual attention, owing to the widespreadsensationalism following the exploitation in france of a secret andtherefore mysterious mixture, “ambrine, ” the formula of dr barthe desandfort owing to this publicity, it seemed desirable to investigatethe chemical composition, and to compare its physical properties withother waxlike substances “ambrine” is promoted as a dressing for burns, frostbites, neuritis, varicose ulcers, phlebitis, neuralgia, rheumatism, sciatica, gout, etc it is a smoky-appearing substance, resembling paraffin in consistencyand without odor for application, “ambrine” is melted and applied tothe wound either with a brush or with a specially devised atomizer itcools quickly, and leaves a solid, protecting film illustration. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - | hyperthermality a reality | | | | hyperthermality is a fact, however, through the | | agency of a keri-resinous product which has been | | used in france since 1900 under the name of | | l’ambrine hyperthermine, as the remedial agent | | will be known in this country, is a combination | | of several kinds of waxes and resins, scientific- | | ally blended and containing no medicinal elements | | whatever it comes in the form of waxy flakes it | | melts at 124° and on cooling resembles a dark | | colored wax | | | | hyperthermine is the discovery of dr barthe de | | sandfort, an eminent retired french naval surgeon | | and a member of numerous foreign medical societies | | he | - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - “ambrine” has been exploited in the united states for essay time to physicians it was sold under the name “hyperthermine ” above isa photographic reproduction reduced of a portion of a bookletdescribing “hyperthermine, ” which has been in the journal office foressay years illustration.

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A handful of the herb or root is aconvenient quantity for a pint of water, boil it till half the waterbe consumed, then let it stand till it be almost cold, and strainit through a woollen cloth, letting it run out at leisure. Withoutpressing to every pint of this decoction add one pound of sugar, andboil it over the fire till it come to a syrup, which you may know, ifyou now and then cool a little of it with a spoon. Scum it all thewhile it boils, and when it is sufficiently boiled, whilst it is hot, strain it again through a woollen cloth, but press it not thus youhave the syrup perfected 3dly, syrups made of juice, are usually made of such herbs as are fullof juice, and indeed they are better made into a syrup this way thanany other. The operation is thus. Having beaten the herb in a stonemortar, with a wooden pestle, press out the juice, and clarify it, asyou are taught before in the juices. Then let the juice boil away tillabout a quarter of it be consumed. To a pint of this add a pound ofsugar, and when it is boiled, strain it through a woollen cloth, as wetaught you before, and keep it for your use 3 if you make a syrup of roots that are any thing hard, as parsley, fennel, and grass roots, &c when you have bruised them, lay them insteep essay time in that water which you intend to boil them in hot, sowill the virtue the better come out 4 keep your syrups either in glasses or stone pots, and stop them notwith cork nor bladder, unless you would have the glass break, and thesyrup lost, only bind paper about the mouth 5 all syrups, if well made, continue a year with essay advantage. Yetsuch as are made by infusion, keep shortest chapter iii of juleps 1 juleps were first invented, as i suppose, in arabia. And my reasonis, because the word julep is an arabic word 2 it signifies only a pleasant potion, as is vulgarly used by such asare sick, and want help, or such as are in health, and want no moneyto quench thirst 3 now-a-day it is commonly used 1 to prepare the body for purgation 2 to open obstructions and the pores 3 to digest tough humours 4 to qualify hot distempers, &c 4 simple juleps, for i have nothing to say to compounds here arethus made. Take a pint of such distilled water, as conduces to the cureof your distemper, which this treatise will plentifully furnish youwith, to which add two ounces of syrup, conducing to the same effect. I shall give you rules for it in the next chapter mix them together, and drink a draught of it at your pleasure if you love tart things, add ten drops of oil of vitriol to your pint, and shake it together, and it will have a fine grateful taste 5 all juleps are made for present use. And therefore it is in vain tospeak of their duration chapter iv of decoctions 1 all the difference between decoctions, and syrups made by decoction, is this.