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If, notwithstanding, any will be so mad as to dothemselves a mischief, the fault is not mine roots acanths, brancæ ursinæ of bearsbreech, or brankursine, it is meanlyhot and dry, helps aches and numness of the joints, and is of a bindingquality, good pay someone to do your school project for wounds and broken bones dioscorides saith, theyare profitable for ruptures, or such as are bursten, or burnt withfire, a dram of the root in powder being taken in the morning fasting, in a decoction made with the same root and water acori, veri, perigrini, vulgaris, &c see calamus aromaticus ishall not speak concerning the several sorts of it, one of which iswater-flag, or flower-de-luce, which is hot and dry in the seconddegree, binds, strengthens, stops fluxes of the belly, and immoderateflowing of the menses, a dram being taken in red wine every morning allium garlic it is hot and dry in the fourth degree, breedscorrupt blood, yet is an enemy to all poisons, and such as are bittenby cold venomous beasts, viz adders, toads, spiders, &c it provokesurine, and expels wind alcannæ of privet see the leaves althææ of marsh mallows, are meanly hot, of a digesting, softeningnature, ease pains, help bloody fluxes, the stone, and gravel. Beingbruised and boiled in milk, and the milk drank, is a good remedy forgripings of the belly, and the bloody flux if a fever accompany thedisease, boil a handful of common mallow leaves with a handful of theseroots angelicæ of angelica. Is hot and dry in the third degree, strengthens the heart, and is good against pestilence and poison, halfa dram taken in the morning fasting anchusæ of alkanet. Cold and dry, binding, good for old ulcers anthoræ a foreign root, the counterpoison for monkshood, it is anadmirable remedy for the wind cholic, and resists poison apii of smallage see the barks aristolochiæ of birthwort. Of which are three sorts, long, round, and climing. All hot and dry in the third degree the long, beingdrank in wine, brings away both birth and after-birth, and whatsoevera careless midwife hath left behind dioscorides, galen the round, being drank with wine, helps besides the former stuffings of thelungs, hardness of the spleen, ruptures, convulsions. Both of themresist poison i never read any use of the climing birthwort artanitæ, cyclaminis, &c or sowbread. Hot and dry in the thirddegree, a most violent purge, dangerous.

The indianmyrobalans, are held pay someone to do your school project to purge melancholy most especially, the otherflegm. Yet take heed you use them not in stoppings of the bowels. Theyare cold and dry, they all strengthen the heart, brain, and sinews, strengthen the stomach, relieve the senses, take away tremblings andheart-qualms they are seldom used alone prunes, are cooling and loosening tamarinds, are cold and dry in the second degree, they purge choler, cool the blood, stay vomiting, help the yellow jaundice, quench thirst, cool hot stomachs, and hot livers i omit the use of these also as resting confident a child of threeyears old, if you should give it raisins of the sun or cherries wouldnot ask how it should take them seeds or grains coriander seed, hot and dry, expels wind, but is hurtful to the head;sends up unwholeessay vapours to the brain, dangerous for mad people fenugreek seeds, are of a softening, discussing nature, they ceaseinflammations, be they internal or external. Bruised and mixed withvinegar they ease the pains of the spleen. Being applied to the sides, help hardness and swellings of the matrix, being boiled, the decoctionhelps scabby heads lin-seed hath the same virtues with fenugreek gromwell seed, provokes urine, helps the cholic, breaks the stone, and expels wind boil them in white wine. But bruise them first lupines, ease the pains of the spleen, kill worms and cast them out:outwardly, they cleanse filthy ulcers, and gangrenes, help scabs, itch, and inflammations dill seed, encreases milk in nurses, expels wind, stays vomitings, provokes urine. Yet it dulls the sight, and is an enemy to generation smallage seed, provokes urine and the menses, expels wind, resistspoison, and eases inward pains, it opens stoppings in any writing of thebody, yet it is hurtful for such as have the falling-sickness, and forpregnant women rocket seed, provokes urine, stirs up lust, encreases seed, killsworms, eases pains of the spleen use all these in like manner basil seed.

Half a dram at a time taken inwardly, resistspestilence and poison, helps ruptures and bruises, stays fluxes, vomiting, and immoderate flowing of the menses, helps inflammationsand soreness of the mouth, and fastens loose teeth, being bruised andboiled in white wine, and the mouth washed with it borraginis of borrage, hot and moist in the first degree, cheersthe heart, helps drooping spirits dioscorides brionæ, &c pay someone to do your school project of briony both white and black. They are both hot anddry, essay say in the third degree, and essay say but in the first. Theypurge flegm and watery humours, but they trouble the stomach much, they are very good for dropsies. The white is most in use, and is goodfor the fits of the mother. Both of them externally used, take awayfreckles, sunburning, and morphew from the face, and cleanse filthyulcers. It is but a churlish purge, but being let alone, can do no harm buglossi of bugloss. Its virtues are the same with borrage, and theroots of either seldom used bulbus vomitorius a vomiting root. I never read of it elswhere bythis general name calami aromatici of aromatical reed, or sweet garden flag. Itprovokes urine, strengthens the lungs, helps bruises, resists poison, &c being taken inwardly in powder, the quantity of half a dram at atime you may mix it with syrup of violets, if your body be feverish capparum capper roots are hot and dry in the second degree, cuttingand cleansing. They provoke menses, help malignant ulcers, ease thetoothache, assuage swelling, and help the rickets see oil of cappers cariophillatæ, &c of avens, or herb bennet the roots are dry, andessaything hot, of a cleansing quality, they keep garments from beingmoth-eaten see the leaves caulium of colewort i know nothing the roots are good for, but onlyto bear the herbs and flowers centaurii majoris of centaury the greater the roots help such asare bursten, such as spit blood, shrinking of sinews, shortness ofwind, coughs, convulsions, cramps. Half a dram in powder being takeninwardly, either in muskadel, or in a decoction of the same roots theyare either not at all, or very scarce in england, our centaury is thesmall centaury cepœ of onions are hot and dry according to galen in thefourth degree. They cause dryness, and are extremely hurtful forcholeric people, they breed but little nourishment, and that little isnaught.

It helps the falling sickness, the leprosy, both the yellowand black pay someone to do your school project jaundice, the gout, sciatica, and convulsions. And this wasfound out by experience, that the root of that which grows wild in ourcountry, works not so churlishly as those do which are brought frombeyond sea, as being maintained by a more temperate air the root usedas a pessary, provokes the terms exceedingly. Also being beaten intopowder, and strewed upon foul ulcers, it consumes the dead flesh, andinstantly heals them. Nay, it will help gangrenes in the beginning twenty grains taken inwardly is a sufficient dose for one time, andlet that be corrected with half so much cinnamon. Country people usedto rowel their cattle with it if a beast be troubled with a cough, or have taken any poison, they bore a hole through the ear, and puta piece of the root in it, this will help him in 24 hours time thesisother uses farriers put it to which i shall forbear herb robert the herb robert is held in great estimation by farmers, who use it indiseases of their cattle descript it rises up with a reddish stalk two feet high, havingdivers leaves thereon, upon very long and reddish foot-stalks, dividedat the ends into three or five divisions, each of them cut in onthe edges, which essaytimes turn reddish at the tops of the stalkscome forth divers flowers made of five leaves, much larger than thedove-foot, and of a more reddish colour. After which come blackheads, as in others the root is small and thready, and smells, as thewhole plant, very strong, almost stinking place this grows frequently every where by the way-sides, uponditch banks and waste grounds wheresoever one goes time it flowers in june and july chiefly, and the seed is ripeshortly after government and virtues it is under the dominion of venus herbrobert is commended not only against the stone, but to stay blood, where or howsoever flowing, it speedily heals all green wounds, andis effectual in old ulcers in the privy writings, or elsewhere you maypersuade yourself this is true, and also conceive a good reason for it, do but consider it is an herb of venus, for all it hath a man name herb true-love, or one-berry descript ordinary herb true-love has a small creeping root runningunder the uppermost crust of the ground, essaywhat like couch grassroot, but not so white, shooting forth stalks with leaves, essay whereofcarry no berries, the others do.

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And those persons who desiredto become licensed who were not in practice were likewise required toobtain similar licenses pay someone to do your school project or certificates and file the same a diplomaof a chartered school or medical college was given the same effect as alicense issued by the censors recent legislation in new york state - the whole matter, however, of licensing physicians to practise has, in the state of new york, been recently regulated by chapter 468, laws of 1889, and 499 of 1890, which have reference to the qualifications of persons becoming medicalstudents, and chapter 507 of 1890, which gives to the regents of theuniversity of the state of new york power to select boards of examinersfrom persons nominated by each of the three state medical societies, viz , the new york state medical society, homœopathic medical society, and eclectic medical society these boards prepare questions which areto be approved by the state board of regents. Examinations are heldin different writings of the state upon these questions, the examinationpapers are certified to that one of these boards of examiners whichthe student may elect, and that board in turn certifies whether ornot the examination has been successfully undergone. And upon itscertificate the board of regents licenses the student to practise, andhis examination papers are filed in the office of the board of regentsand become a matter of record these provisions have been enlarged andmodified slightly by various statutes since enacted they are all nowembodied in chapter 601 of laws of 1893 they will be found carefullysynopsized below penal provisions in new york state - the new york penal code, whichwent into effect in 1882, enacted that a person practising medicine orsurgery, or pretending to be a physician or surgeon, without a licenseor a diploma from essay chartered school, should be deemed guilty of amisdemeanor punishable by fine or imprisonment penal code, section356. And the same statute, 357, made it a misdemeanor for a person, whether licensed or not, to practise medicine or surgery, or do anyother act as a physician or surgeon, while intoxicated, by which thelife of any person is endangered or his health seriously affected 155giving “patented” medicines no exception - at one time an attempt wasmade to claim, that under the patent laws of the united states a personhad the right to administer patent medicines without being punishablefor practising without a license, but this doctrine was repudiated bythe courts thompson v staats, 15 wend , 395. Jordan v overseers, etc , 4 ohio, 295 courts may compel granting of license - a person who is qualifiedand complies with reasonable rules of a licensing body, can compelsuch body to license him this was held to be the law in the case ofthe people ex rel bartlett v the medical society of the countyof erie, which is also an important authority in respect to a vexedquestion of medical ethics it appeared in that case that under thegeneral laws of new york in regard to the organization of medicalsocieties, a medical society had refused to receive as a member aperson otherwise qualified, because he had advertised in the publicprints a certain cure, including a mechanical appliance used intreating throat troubles. It being forbidden by the code of ethics ofthe american medical association, which the county medical societyhad adopted as one of its by-laws, that a physician or surgeon shouldadvertise the court of appeals of the state of new york held that thisconstituted no defence to a proceeding instituted by such person toobtain a mandamus compelling the society to admit him to membership, ifotherwise qualified 156it has also been decided that a medical society had no right to makea by-law establishing a fixed fee-bill, or tariff of charges, andproviding for the expulsion of a member charging at a different ratethan that prescribed such a by-law was declared unreasonable and voidin the case of people v medical society of erie county, 24 barb , 570 the effect of these decisions was, so far as they affect the validityof by-laws, attempted to be avoided in that state by chapter 445 oflaws of 1866, by which it is expressly enacted that the county medicalsocieties of the state of new york may make such rules and by-laws asthey see fit, “not inconsistent with the laws of said state, and mayenforce them by expulsion or other discipline ” it may be considereddoubtful whether this legislation can accomplish its purpose in thecase of the adoption of a by-law void as against public policy no writingicular schools recognized by the courts - the general trend ofthe decisions in all the states, whenever any questions in referenceto schools of medicine have been before our courts, is to avoidrecognizing any writingicular system or school the theory of the newyork courts upon this subject is well expressed by the liberal-mindedand learned judge daly in the new york court of common pleas, in thecase of corsi v maretzek, 4 e d smith, 1-5 in that case it wasclaimed that a certificate of incapacity because of sickness, givenby a “homœopathic” physician to an opera-singer, was not binding itwas argued that the employment of a “homœopathic” physician under thecontract did not fulfil a provision thereof which required the event ofthe singer sickness to be certified to by “a doctor, ” to be appointedby the director the court said. “the system pursued by the practitioner is immaterial the law has nothing to do with writingicular systems their relativemerit may become the subject of inquiry, when the skill or ability ofa practitioner in any given case is to be passed upon as a matter offact but the law does not, and cannot, supply any positive rules forthe interpretation of medical science it is not one of those certainor exact sciences in which truths become established and fixed, butis essentially progressive in its nature, enlarging with the growthof human experience, and subject to those changes and revolutionsincident to any branch of human inquiry, the laws of which are notfully ascertained the labors of the anatomist, the physiologist, andthe chemist have contributed an immense storehouse of facts. But themanner in which this knowledge is to be applied in the treatment andcure of diseases has been, and will probably continue to be, open todiversity of opinion no one system of practice has been uniformlyfollowed, but physicians from the days of hippocrates have been dividedinto opposing sects and schools the sects of the dogmatists and theempirics divided the ancient world for centuries, until the rise ofthe methodics, who, in their turn, gave way to innumerable sects theories of practice, believed to be infallible in one age, have beenutterly rejected in another for thirteen centuries europe yieldedto the authority of galen he was implicitly followed his practicestrictly pursued everything that seemed to conflict with his preceptswas rejected. And yet, in the revolutions of medical opinion, theworks of this undoubtedly great man were publicly burned by paracelsusand his disciples. And for centuries following, the medical worldwas divided between the galenists and the chemists, until a completeascendency over both was obtained by the sect of the vitalists thisstate of things has been occasioned by the circumstance that medicalpractitioners have often been more given to the formation of theoriesupon the nature of disease and the mode of its treatment, than tothat careful observation and patient accumulation of facts, by which, in other sciences, the phenomena of nature have been unravelled iam far from undervaluing the great benefits conferred upon mankindby the study of medicine, and have no wish to minister to any vulgarprejudice against a useful and learned profession, but it is not to beoverlooked that, as an art, it has been characterized, in a greaterdegree, by fluctuations of opinion as to its principles and the modeof its practice, than, perhaps, any other pursuit that it has beendistinguished by the constant promulgation and explosion of theories, that it has alternated between the advancement of new doctrines andthe revival of old ones, and that its professors in every age havebeen noted for the tenacity with which they have clung to opinions, and the unanimity with which they have resisted the introduction ofvaluable discoveries they still continue to disagree in respect to thetreatment of diseases as old as the human race. And at the present day, when great advances have been made in all dewritingments of knowledge, aradical and fundamental difference divides the allopathist from thefollowers of hahnemann, to say nothing of those who believe in thesovereign instrumentality of water “in fact, nothing comparatively is known of the philosophy of disease its eradication or cure, where the result of human agency is, inthe great majority of instances, attributable rather to the carefulobservation, judgment and experience of the writingicular practitioner, than to the application of general or established methods available toall the popular axiom, that ‘doctors differ, ’ is as true now as itever was, and as long as it continues to be so, it is impossible forthe law to recognize any class of practitioners, or the followers ofany writingicular system or method of treatment, as exclusively entitledto be regarded as doctors in adverting to the conflicting viewsand differences of opinion, that exist and have ever existed in thepractice of the healing art, it is not to call in question the valueof learned, skilful and experienced physicians, but merely to showthe error of attempting, in the present state of medical science, to recognize, as matter of law, any one system of practice, or ofdeclaring that the practitioner who follows a writingicular system is adoctor, and that one who pursues a different method is not ” and seealso white v carroll, 42 n y , 161.