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The first of which is an italianby birth, and only nursed up here in the gardens of the curious twoor three sorts are found commonly growing wild here, the description oftwo of which i shall give you descript the first is a smooth, low plant, not a foot high, verybitter in taste, with thesis square stalks, diversly branched from thebottom to the top, with divers joints, and two small leaves at eachjoint, broader at the bottom than they are at the end, a little dentedabout the edges, of a sad green colour, and full of veins the flowersstand at the joints, being of a fair purple colour, with essay whitespots in them, in fashion like those of dead nettles the seed is smalland yellow, and the roots spread much under ground the second seldom grows half a foot high, sending up thesis smallbranches, whereon grow thesis small leaves, set one against the other, essaywhat broad, but very short the flowers are like the pay some to do my school work flowers of theother fashion, but of a pale reddish colour the seeds are small andyellowish the root spreads like the other, neither will it yield toits fellow one ace of bitterness place they grow in wet low grounds, and by the water-sides. Thelast may be found among the bogs on hampstead heath time they flower in june or july, and the seed is ripe presentlyafter government and virtues they are herbs of mars, and as choleric andchurlish as he is, being most violent purges, especially of cholerand phlegm it is not safe taking them inwardly, unless they be wellrectified by the art of the alchymist, and only the purity of themgiven. So used they may be very helpful both for the dropsy, gout, and sciatica. Outwardly used in ointments they kill worms, the bellyanointed with it, and are excellently good to cleanse old and filthyulcers black hellebore it is also called setter-wort, setter-grass, bear-foot, christmas-herb, and christmas-flowers descript it hath sundry fair green leaves rising from the root, each of them standing about an handful high from the earth. Each leafis divided into seven, eight, or nine writings, dented from the middleof the leaf to the point on both sides, abiding green all the winter;about christmas-time, if the weather be any thing temperate, theflowers appear upon foot stalks, also consisting of five large, round, white leaves a-piece, which essaytimes are purple towards the edges, with thesis pale yellow thumbs in the middle. The seeds are dividedinto several cells, like those of columbines, save only that they aregreater. The seeds are in colour black, and in form long and round theroot consists of numberless blackish strings all united into one head there is another black hellebore, which grows up and down in the woodsvery like this, but only that the leaves are smaller and narrower, andperish in the winter, which this doth not place the first is maintained in gardens the second is commonlyfound in the woods in northamptonshire time the first flowers in december or january. The second infebruary or march government and virtues it is an herb of saturn, and therefore nomarvel if it has essay sullen conditions with it, and would be farsafer, being purified by the art of the alchymist than given raw ifany have taken any harm by taking it, the common cure is to take goatmilk. If you cannot get goat milk, you must make a shift with suchas you can get the roots are very effectual against all melancholydiseases, especially such as are of long standing, as quartan agues andmadness.

Presse méd 20:433, 1912 starling63 finds that continued intravenous injections of secretin ina healthy dog produces after a time severe symptoms of collapse, which, he believes, are due to change in the intestinal mucous membrane causedby the entry and non-neutralization of the strongly alkaline pancreaticjuice intestinal digestion seems little affected in achylia gastrica stockton, 84 ehrman and lederer, 85 bayliss and starling32 thismay be due to other secretin stimulants as fats, or to the action ofthe nervous mechanisms meltzer86 84 stockton. In osier and mccrae modern medicine 3:19, 1914 85 ehrman and lederer. Deutsch med wchnschr 35:879, 1909 86 meltzer, s j. The factors of safety in animal structure andanimal economy, j a m a , feb 23, 1907, p 655 the destruction of secretin by human gastric juicewe have carried out in detail experiments on the digestive effect ofhuman gastric juice on secretin our results in every respect confirmthe findings of lalou, 62 who worked with commercial pepsin and doggastric juice, but are even more striking because of the much superiorquality of pure human gastric juice methods -- the human gastric juice was obtained from mr v , thegastric fistula case of our laboratory the chemical and digestivecharacters of his juice are discussed in a recent paper 87 in thedifferent experiments, different samples of gastric juice were used the secretin employed was always freshly prepared digestion wascarried out in the incubator at 38 c with the reaction of 0 4 percent acid, and the end of the period was marked by either boilingthe mixture or in the first two experiments by turning the mixturealkaline the action of the preparation, we proved, was not influencedby the method used the dogs on which the preparations were testedwere prepared for carotid blood pressure, injection into the externaljugular vein, and cannula in the pancreatic duct, essentially themethods of bayliss and starling32 being employed the preparationswere injected at body temperature after being neutralized and filtered except for the addition of normal salt solution instead of gastricjuice, the control injections of secretin were submitted to exactly thesame treatment as the other preparations 87 carlson. Am jour physiol 38:248, 1915 results -- our results are embodied in table 1 we assured ourselvesbefore beginning the series that incubation of secretin with boiledgastric juice produced no change it is to be noted in the table thateach experiment is a unit complete in itself, beginning and endingwith a control injection of secretin special attention is called tothe marked destruction that follows contact of human gastric juicewith secretin for merely one minute in experiment 4, using 1 c c of human gastric juice, the action fell to 14 drops from an originalsecretion of 21. In experiment 5, using 8 c c of gastric juice, theaction fell to 6 drops from an original secretion of 20 of interestalso is the rate at which we get complete destruction of secretin this is practically 2 hours for 2 c c with secretin giving originally110 drops experiment 2, fig 1, or 30 minutes for 5 c c with asecretin giving originally 53 drops experiment 6 these results arepractically parallel, though they were obtained with different samplesof gastric juice and in different experiments table 1 -- the destruction of secretin by human gastric juice | | secretion of pancreatic juice in drops | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- no |quan-|10 c c c| the secretin after incubation |10 c c of | tity|secretin| with human gastric juice |secretin exper-|of |control -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -control iment|gas- |-- begin-| | | | | | |-- end of | tric| ning |dig |secre-|dig |secre-|dig |secre-|experi- |juice|experi- |time, | tion |time, | tion |time, | tion | ment |used, | ment |hrs |rate |hrs |rate |hrs |rate | |c c | | | | | | | | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1 | 2 | 28 |6 | 0 |4 | 0 |2 | 0 | 16 2 | 2 | 110 |2 | 7 |1-1/2| 18 |1 | 18 | 41 3 | 2 | 40 |1 | 7 | 3/4| 7 | 1/4 | 8 | 31 4 | 1 | 21 | 1/2| 11 | 1/4| 12 | 1/60| 14 | 18 5 | 8 | 20 | 1/2| 1 | 1/4| 3 | 1/60| 6 | 18 6 | 5 | 53 | 1/2| 2 | | | | | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- we also tried the effect of keeping the digestive time constant andvarying the amount of gastric juice employed increasing the quantityof gastric juice used increases the quantity of secretin destroyed table 2 table 2 -- experiment 7* pancreatic preparation juice drops 10 c c secretin 20 10 c c secretin digested with 0 5 c c gastric juice 15 10 c c secretin digested with 3 c c gastric juice 13 10 c c secretin digested with 10 c c gastric juice 8* the digestive time was kept constant at fifteen minutes the gastricjuice used had been diluted with stomach washings the reader will observe in table 1 that the results obtained fromthe control injection of secretin at the beginning of the experimentis uniformly greater than that obtained after several injections ofdigested secretin in view of the established fact that equal quantities of secretin cangenerally be relied on to produce results, 21 one might suggest thatthe injections of the split products of secretin have inhibited to essaydegree the action of the pancreas we can submit the data in table 3in support of this view, showing among other things that the action ofsecretin is not influenced by previous injections of inert depressorsubstances, though it by the injection of the cleavage products ofsecretin the various injections in the experiments were made at aboutfifteen-minute intervals we have carefully analyzed the reaction in blood pressure that followsthe injection of the various preparations we find no constant effect digested secretin gives a fall in blood pressure that is at times less, at times equal, and at other times greater fig 1 than that producedby the original preparation besides the bearing that it has on the therapeutic use of secretin, this destructive action of the digestive enzymes is also of primephysiologic interest failure to realize it has led to misconceptionsas to the intrinsic nature of secretin table 3 -- experiments 8 and 9 pancreatic preparations juice drops experiment 8.

In fact, it is inconsistent with the statementthat the preparation contains all the constituents found in the freshplant even if instances of cumulative action have not been reportedthis does not prove that such cumulative action does not occur thetincture of digitalis has the systemic side-effects of digitalis in nogreater degree than the various proprietary preparations attempts tocreate the impression that digitalysatum possesses all the virtues ofdigitalis without its chief disadvantage are to be condemned as likelyto lead to incautious use of the preparation these exaggerated claims are in the main made indirectly, but they arenone the less inimical to sound therapy the council therefore declareddigitalysatum ineligible for new and nonofficial remedies and votedthat this report be published -- from the journal a m a , jan 8, 1916 so-called secretin preparations report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council authorized the following report for publication, and votedto endorse the work of professor carlson discussed therein w a puckner, secretary the council has not accepted for inclusion in new and nonofficialremedies any preparations said to contain secretin or prosecretin astheir active ingredient a report giving the reasons for the rejectionof one the first of the so-called secretin preparations marketed waspublished early last year;29 an article on secretin, based on workundertaken at the request of the council on pharmacy and chemistry, isnow published 3029 secretogen, j a m a , may 1, 1915, p 1518 30 carlson, a j. Lebensohn, j e , and pearlmann, s j. Hassecretin a therapeutic value?. j a m a 66:178 jan 15 1916 lest the appearance of this detailed study of secretin, after therejection of so-called secretin preparations, should be interpreted as manufacturers whose products have been rejected have endeavored tointerpret such action as a case of first condemning a preparation andthen getting the facts, the council methods, and their applicationin this case, may be briefly stated the council maintains that, when a manufacturer places a product on the market, the burden ofproof is on that manufacturer to show that the properties of hisproduct are in accordance with his claims for it as stated in theintroduction to n n r , “it is manifestly impossible for thecouncil to investigate the composition of every complex pharmaceuticalmixture, or to check thoroughly every therapeutic claim. It can giveonly an unbiased judgment on the available evidence ” acting on thisprinciple, the council examined the claims made for secretogen, analleged secretin product manufactured by the g w carnrick company the conclusion was that these claims were in absolute conflict with theavailable evidence as to the action of secretin it is not necessary to review this subject again it will suffice tostate that the claims made for secretogen rest on two fundamentalpropositions. 1 that deficiency of secretin or, rather, ofprosecretin in the intestinal mucosa is a factor in gastro-intestinaldiseases. 2 that secretin given by the mouth is absorbed and producesincreased secretion of the pancreatic and intestinal juices and of thebile from an examination of the evidence available, including thatsubmitted by the manufacturers, the council concluded. “1 no evidencehas been presented that the absence of secretin is a cause ofgastro-intestinal disease 2 there is no evidence that secretin inany form is physiologically active when administered by mouth ” thatthese conclusions were justified is shown again by the review givenby carlson of the literature, much of which was also reviewed in thecouncil previous report since the claims of the carnrick company were not supported by anysatisfactory evidence, no further investigation on the council writingwas necessary to warrant rejection of the product the council didnot undertake to determine, for instance, whether or not secretogenand similar products actually contain secretin. The determination ofthis point was immaterial here, in view of the conclusiveness of theevidence that secretin given by mouth has no physiologic action since firms other than the g w carnrick company are manufacturingalleged secretin preparations, and since recommendations for the useof secretin preparations in gastro-intestinal diseases have even creptinto textbooks, it seemed desirable to obtain further information oncertain points the council therefore requested prof a j carlsonof the university of chicago to check the results of previousinvestigators with regard to the action of secretin administered bymouth or directly into the intestine, and, in addition, to investigatethe secretin content of certain alleged secretin preparations carlson and his co-workers, like all previous investigators, found thatsecretin given by mouth, or introduced even in enormous doses directlyinto the intestine, is entirely inactive they also found that markeddestruction of secretin followed contact for one minute with humangastric juice and that secretin is rapidly oxidized and rendered inertin contact with the air further, they were unable to demonstrate the presence of secretinin samples of secretogen and another supposed secretin preparation duodenin bought on the open market in the case of secretogen therewas one exception. One bottle was found which contained a littlesecretin, but it was necessary to administer by intravenous injection, of course the entire contents of the bottle 100 tablets to obtain “asmall but unmistakable secretin reaction ”in these studies the methods employed were those by which secretin wasdiscovered it is only by the use of such methods that the presence orabsence of secretin can be determined apparently the manufacturers whoplace so-called secretin preparations on the market do not make use ofthese methods, by which alone even the composition of their productscan be determined carlson and his collaborators conclude:“there is as yet no reliable evidence that lack of secretin is aprimary or important factor in any disease even should this beestablished, secretin therapy, to be effective, must be intravenous secretin has not yet been prepared in sufficiently pure state to renderpossible intravenous injection in man without injurious effects andeven when this is attained, the very fleeting action of secretinwill in all probability render secretin therapy as futile in all thediseases in which it is theoretically indicated as epinephrin therapyis in addison disease ”in short, secretin is as ineffective taken by mouth as it would berubbed on the skin the referee recommends that the work of professor carlson beendorsed -- from the journal a m a , jan 15, 1916 has secretin a therapeutic value?. B a j carlson, ph d , j e lebensohn, m s , and s j pearlman, b s chicagob from the hull physiological laboratory of the university of chicago b this investigation was undertaken at the request of the council onpharmacy and chemistry the following report, having been submittedto the council, received its endorsement see preceding report of thecouncil on pharmacy and chemistry, “so-called secretin preparations” it is well established that acid chyme in the duodenum is the normalstimulus to the secretion of pancreatic juice 31 interaction ofthe acid with the duodenal mucosa liberates into the blood stream asubstance which, circulating through the pancreas, excites the latterto activity this exciting substance has been termed “secretin ” itcan be prepared artificially by macerating duodenojejunal mucosa in0 4 per cent hydrochloric acid, neutralizing the boiling mixture, andfiltering a few cubic centimeters of the filtrate injected into avein produce invariably a powerful secretion of pancreatic juice 32that a “chemical messenger” is at the basis of the duodenal acidreflex has been proved by even more crucial experiments-- transfusion wertheimer, 33 enriquez and hallion34, cross circulation fleig, 35 matuso36, and perfusion of the isolated pancreas huston37 31 pawlow. The work of the digestive glands, 1912 32 bayliss and starling. Jour physiol 28:325, 1902 33 wertheimer. Compt rend soc de biol 54:475, 1902 34 enriquez and hallion. Compt rend soc de biol 55:233, 363, 1903 35 fleig. Arch internat de physiol , 10:206, 1910 36 matuso. Jour physiol 45:477, 1913 37 huston.

When melted, paraffin expands and forms a thin mobileliquid 179 paraffin is essaytimes spoken pay some to do my school work of as “white wax ” this isunfortunate, as “white wax” is an official name for “white beeswax, u s p ” the term “white wax” is also often applied to “chinese wax, ”which is formed from an insect living on the tree ligustrum lucidum illustration. Photographic reproduction from a booklet on “thermozine”giving the conditions in which the stuff was alleged to be “veryuseful ”the significant requirements of paraffin for surgical dressings arethat it should be solid at body temperature, at the same time havingflexibility and adhesiveness, together with a certain amount ofstrength a number of brands of paraffin are sold in the united states, so that it seemed advisable to examine essay of them and compare themwith certain paraffin-film preparations they were tested as to theirmelting points, plasticity, ductility, strength of film, etc melting point determination -- the melting point was determined bythe method of the u s pharmacopeia ix, p 596 the melting pointas obtained by this method is lower than the melting point used bymanufacturers of paraffin after conversion to fahrenheit pliability and ductility, limit temperature 180-- a little of themelted wax was poured from a teaspoon on the surface of the water atabout 40 c , in a tin pan bread mold this formed a fairly thin film the temperature of the water was then lowered by the addition of coldwater at each temperature the pliability and ductility were testedthus:180 i am indebted to dr torald sollmann for these methods pliability test -- the film, immersed in water, was doubled on itself, note being taken whether or not it broke ductility test -- the film was pulled under water, note being takenwhether it stretched on being pulled and broke with a ragged fracture;or whether it broke sharp without stretching it is desirable thatthe pliability and ductility be preserved at as low a temperature aspossible cotton films, adhesives and detachability 180-- the melted wax wasapplied as it would be for burns. Namely, a thin layer was painted onthe inner surface of the forearm with a camel hair brush, 181 atransverse strip about an inch wide being made this was covered witha very thin layer of absorbent cotton, and over this another layer ofmelted wax was painted as soon as this had cooled a little, it wascovered by a few layers of bandage and left on for at least an hour atthe end of that time, the bandage was removed the cotton film shouldbe found at the place at which it was applied, showing that it issufficiently adherent it should detach without “pulling” the skin 181 when painting a surface with a paraffin film, i found that thetemperature of the paraffin should not be too close to the meltingpoint, but several degrees above. Otherwise it does not “set” well illustration. Photographic reproduction greatly reduced of thecarton in which “ambrine” is now sold the results of these tests are given in the accompanying table it canbe seen that nearly all the paraffins examined have properties whichwould make them useful, the notable exceptions being nos 8, 15 and16 the more satisfactory products would be those having a meltingpoint about 47 c , ductility of 30 or below, and plasticity of 28 orbelow the paraffin described in the u s pharmacopeia is not sosatisfactory, the required melting point being between 50 and 57 c the use of paraffin bandages has been suggested by fisher182 andsollmann 183 in such paper, it may very likely be that a paraffin ofhigher melting point would be more satisfactory, owing to its greaterresistance and tougher fiber 182 fisher, h e. Nonadhering surgical gauze, the journal a m a , march 25, 1916, p 939 183 sollmann, torald. Paraffin-covered bandages, the journala m a , april 21, 1917, p 1178 summary1 “ambrine” is essentially paraffin in which a small amount of fattyand asphalt-like body is incorporated. Like most secret mixtures, itscomposition varies 2 a simple formula for a paraffin film, similar in chemicalcomposition but superior in physical properties to “ambrine, ” is thatdescribed as formula 21 the superiority is due to using a grade ofparaffin that is better adapted to the purpose the cost of materialsis about 10 cents a pound 3 the properties of the paraffin used for a surgical dressing areimportant a number of different grades have been examined, in order todetermine the ones that appear most promising paraffins nos 3, 4, 10, 11 and 25 are the best in the table, and surpass “ambrine” itself 4 it is exceedingly probable that further experience will show thatfor most purposes simple paraffin will serve just as well as themixtures-- if, indeed, not better addenda reprinted from the annual report of the chemical laboratory of theamerican medical association, vol 10 1917, p 32since the foregoing was published, two other products-- “cerelene” and“stanolind surgical wax”-- were submitted to the council on pharmacy andchemistry for investigation as to their acceptability for inclusion innew and nonofficial remedies in this connection the laboratory wasrequested to examine them “cerelene” is manufactured by the holliday laboratories, pittsburgh according to the manufacturers, “cerelene” is a compound composed of84 per cent paraffin, 15 per cent myricyl palmitate and 1 per cent elemi gum as ordinarily marketed, “cerelene” contains the followingmaterials. To the beeswax is added oil of eucalyptus, u s p , 2 percent , and betanaphthol, u s p , 0 25 per cent the manufacturerfurther states that the myricyl palmitate is a purified form ofbeeswax, free from all impurities, acids, etc , which is solelymanufactured by this company and for which patents are pending theproperties described for “cerelene” were as follows. When cold, cerelene is a solid wax-like cake of a fine yellow brown color on exposure to air for long periods, the amber color darkens to essay extent it is entirely free from solids, odorless and tasteless. Does not separate or change when melted repeatedly, and cannot in the melted state be separated by fractional crystallization it is entirely neutral to indicators being perfectly free from both acids and bases tests. Melting point, u s p method, 126 f density, u s p method, 0 907 iodin value, 0 5 saponification number, 0 9 “stanolind surgical wax” is manufactured by the standard oil company ofindiana in the submission of the product to the council on pharmacyand chemistry, it was stated that the product was a specially preparedparaffin “free from dirt or other deleterious matter it hasbeen steamed and resteamed to drive out any free oil and repeatedlyfiltered ”the examination of the foregoing products yielded the figures describedin table “b ”-- from the journal a m a , may 19, 1917 the stability of iodine ointments l e warren, ph c , b s in general, the literature on the keeping qualities of iodine ointment, and on the stability of iodine if mixed with ointment bases, isconfusing the recorded evidence is often contradictory the attentionof the writer was brought to this condition by studies of severalproprietary preparations, iodex, 184 iod-izd-oil, 185 iocamfen, andiocamfen ointment 186184 rep chem lab , a m a , 1915, 8, 89 185 rep chem lab , a m a , 1915, 8, 106 186 rep chem lab , a m a , 1916, 9, 118 iodex was sold under the claim that it is “ an embodiment of vaporized iodine, in an organic base, reduced and standardized at 5 per cent by incorporation with a refined petroleum product ”the exact composition of iodex is a trade secret analysis showed thatit contains petrolatum-like substances and combined iodine, the latterprobably in combination with oleic acid tests for free iodine weremade in five specimens of iodex in one of these no free iodine waspresent. In the others the merest traces were found two years ago a preparation called “iod-izd-oil” was examined this wasclaimed to contain 2 per cent of free iodine in liquid petrolatum at the time of the examination the age of the preparation was notknown, but it had been obtained just prior to the analysis, and wasthought not to be very old the analysis showed that it contained butabout 0 43 per cent of iodine, all of which was in a free state thefact that all of the iodine present was in the free state appearedto indicate that iodine is relatively stable in liquid petrolatumsolutions iocamfen is a liquid composed of iodine, camphor and phenol it wasclaimed to contain 10 per cent of free iodine analysis showed thatit contained 9 3 per cent of total iodine of which 7 5 per cent was present in an uncombined state, 66 1 per cent of camphor and19 7 per cent of phenol after storing for several months a secondassay of iocamfen showed no appreciable loss in iodine content this would indicate that iodine is relatively stable in presenceof phenol and camphor, although immediately after mixing there isessay loss of free iodine the iocamfen ointment was supposed tocontain 50 per cent of iocamfen equivalent to 5 per cent of freeiodine in a lard-wax-cacaobutter base the analysis showed that theointment contained but 0 4 per cent of free iodine, the balancebeing in combination from the results of the examination, and fromcorrespondence with the manufacturers schering and glatz, it becameevident that the only plausible explanation for the loss of free iodinein the preparation of iocamfen ointment from iocamfen lay in thecombination of the free iodine with the ingredients of the ointmentbase it seems likely that the free iodine originally present iniocamfen for the most writing had gradually gone into combination with thefatty substances after the ointment had been prepared the literature was then examined to determine the consensus of opinionconcerning the stability of iodine in iodine ointment in the olderliterature the belief that iodine ointment is unstable appears to bequite general such statements as the following are typical. The ointment should be prepared only when wanted for use, for it undergoes change if kept, losing its deep, orange-brown color, and becoming pale upon its surface 187 187 u s disp , ed 19, p 1315 it is better to prepare it only as it is required for use 188 188 am disp , ed 2, p 2022 this ointment must not be dispensed unless it has recently been prepared 189 189 u s pharmacopeia, ix, p 481 in 1909 lythgoe, 190 of the massachusetts board of health laboratory, reported an examination of four samples of iodine ointment three werefound to be pure, the fourth was low in iodine experiments showedthat iodine ointment deteriorates rapidly. Consequently, no furthercollections of samples were made 190 rep mass bd health, 1909, 41, 477 in 1912 pullen191 reported that he had prepared two specimens ofiodine ointment according to the british pharmacopeia, one beingfrom new lard and the other from a specimen of lard at least 2 yearsold assays for free iodine were carried out immediately after thepreparations were made, and at intervals afterward up to four months the following values were found:191 pharm jour , 1912, 89, 610 sample i sample ii ointment from ointment from new lard, old lard, per cent per cent iodine introduced 4 0 4 0 iodine found immediately after making 3 95 3 38 iodine found after twenty-four hours 3 30 3 15 iodine found on the third day 3 18 2 62 iodine found on the seventh day 3 15 2 46 iodine found on the fourteenth day 3 00 2 45 iodine found after one month 3 00 2 39 iodine found after two months 2 90 2 31 iodine found after four months 2 92 2 26pullen found that the loss in free iodine could be accounted for by theiodine which had gone into combination with the fats of the ointmentbase pullen also found that if the potassium iodide and glycerin wereomitted in the preparation of the ointment, the loss in free iodinewas very rapid, the preparation containing practically no free iodine only 1/20 after a few hours he concludes that the use of potassiumiodide and glycerin is necessary for the preservation of the ointment he obtained specimens of iodine ointment in drug stores, and assayedthem for free iodine it is to be presumed that the ages of the severalspecimens were not known the results are found in the following table. Specimen no 1 2 74 per cent specimen no 2 2 85 per cent specimen no 3 2 62 per cent specimen no 4 2 48 per cent specimen no 5 2 53 per cent specimen no 6 2 79 per cent fried192 prepared iodine ointment according to the u s p viiiformula, and assayed it at intervals his results are tabulatedherewith:192 pharm jour , 1912, 89, 610 per cent iodine introduced 4 00 iodine found immediately after making 3 89 iodine found one hour after making 3 51 iodine found one day after making 3 48 iodine found five days after making 3 06 iodine found ten days after making 2 84 iodine found thirty days after making 2 81 iodine found ninety days after making 2 81 iodine found eight months after making 2 81iodine ointment has been official in the u s pharmacopeia since 1870 briefly, the method now used for making the preparation is as follows. Four gm of iodine, 4 gm of potassium iodide and 12 gm of glycerin are weighed into a tared mortar and the mixture triturated until the iodine and potassium iodide are dissolved and a dark, reddish-brown, syrupy liquid is produced eighty gm of benzoinated lard are then added in small portions and with trituration after each addition the mass is then triturated until of uniform consistence 193193 the time required to complete the process after the initialportion of lard has been added should be about twenty minutes paraffins and paraffin preparations-- table a key. A. Formula b.

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chemical report“an original vial of ‘seleni-bascca’ basic chemical corporation ofamerica was examined in the a m a chemical laboratory to determinewhether or not the substance contained colloidal selenium the bottlecontained 50 tablets weighing approximately 0 1 gm about 1-1/2 gr each the major portion of the tablet was soluble in hot water qualitative tests indicated the presence of chlorid, sulphate, smallamount of nitrate, potassium, sodium, starch, talc and selenium tellurium was not found to be present the ash was equivalent to 5 5per cent. Over one-half of the ash consisted of a talc-like substance the amount of selenium present in the specimen examined was only about1 3 per cent “in the literature sent out by the basic chemical corporation, ‘dr frederick klein’ is mentioned as chemist several years ago, thecouncil on pharmacy and chemistry investigated ‘sulfo-selene, ’ a cancerremedy, with which the same ‘dr klein’ was connected the allegedcomposition of ‘sulfo-selene, ’ as given to the council, was. “selenium 25 “sulphur writingially in colloidal 10 and writingially in crystalloid state “potassium carbonate 10 “nitrogen 05 “bile salts 50 “to which is added an inert base or vehicle. As sugar of milk or amylum ”“it was claimed that ‘sulfo-selene’ was prepared by reducingnitro-selenious acid with sulphurous acid, neutralizing with potassiumbicarbonate and then adding bile salts assuming that the compositionclaimed for ‘sulfo-selene’ was correct the analysis of ‘seleni-bascca’shows that the two products resemble each other the tests, however, failed to reveal in ‘seleni-bascca’ the presence of the bile saltsclaimed to have been present in ‘sulfo-selene ’”“the product is not colloidal as claimed as the selenium can be removedby ordinary filtration ”-- from the journal a m a , nov 19, 1921 repudiated by the brooklyn bureau of charitiesto the editor:-- my attention has been called to the fact that thereappears in a recent issue of the journal of the american medicalassociation a statement that the cosmopolitan cancer research society, located at 847 union street, brooklyn, has the cooperation of thebrooklyn bureau of charities in reply may i say that the bureau ofcharities has no connection, understanding, or relationship whatever, with the cosmopolitan cancer research society, and has never sent apatient to them t j riley, brooklyn secretary, brooklyn bureau of charities -- correspondence from thejournal a m a , dec 24, 1921 bell-ans papayans, bellj as the new york tribune “ad-visor” sees itj see index for additional article on bell-ans “why avoid draughts?. sit by an open window if you want to!. just take a few drops of sneeze-o before you go into the draught and after you come out of it, and you’ll never catch cold “don’t be afraid of contagion kiss your uncle ebenezer, even if he dying of tuberculosis!. just fortify yourself with a sip of lungicide before you go to his bedside, and another when you come away, and you’ll be taking no risk “are you going to sit there and let the other folks eat up all the good things just because you are afraid to pitch in, when 2 or 3 bell-ans taken before and after the meal would enable you to enjoy your share of all that coming without a bit of discomfort or distress?. bell-ans has restored the pleasures of the table to thousands who say. ‘i can now eat anything and plenty of it, too ’”“the first two blurbs are the ad-visor the third is a bona fideadvertisement of bell-ans, aimed to catch the holiday trade they areall patterned after the same style and the first two are no more lackingin logic than the last overeat-- deliberately court indigestion-- invitegout-- don’t be a gourmet, be a gourmand-- be an anti-hoover and eat a lotof food, whether you need it or not. Than take bell-ans if it doesn’t‘absolutely remove indigestion, ’ your druggist will give you back yourmoney!. could anything be fairer than that?. “such copy as this is not limited in its evil effects to the misguidedindividual who eats lobster and ice cream at midnight and trusts tobell-ans to atone for his indiscretion the most serious effect of suchreckless advice is the example which the advertising sets to otheradvertisers ”the comments just quoted are from the ad-visor dewritingment of the newyork tribune of feb 7, 1918 they are respectfully referred to thenew york medical journal, the international journal of surgery andthe woman medical journal-- three presumably scientific publicationsthat through their advertising pages urge physicians to prescribebell-ans -- from the journal a m a , feb 23, 1918 campho-phenique appealing to the new fledged graduate the secretary of the harvard university medical school received fromthe campho-phenique company of st louis a letter that, presumably, hasbeen sent to most of the medical colleges of the country it read.