History

Outline Of Essay


Beingburnt, the ashes made into an ointment, helps leprosy and otherdeformity of the skin, eases pains of the spleen you may lay the barkto steep in white wine for the rickets, and when it hath stood so fortwo or three days, let the diseased child drink now and then a spoonfulof it granatorum of pomegranates the rind cools, and forcibly binds, stays fluxes, and the menses, helps digestion, strengthens weakstomachs, fastens the teeth, and are good for such whose gums waste you may take a dram of it at a time inwardly pomegranate flowers areof the same virtue gatrujaci see the wood juglandium virid of green walnuts as for the outward green bark ofwalnuts, i suppose the best time to take them is before the walnutsbe shelled at all, and then you may take nuts and all if they mayproperly be called nuts at such a time you shall find them exceedingcomfortable to the stomach, they resist poison, and are a mostexcellent preservative against the plague, inferior to none. They areadmirable for such as are troubled with consumptions of the lungs lauri of the bay-tree see the root limonum of lemons the outward peel is of the nature of citron, buthelps not so effectually. However, let the poor country man that cannotget the other, use this mandragora rad be pleased to look back to the root myrobalanorum of myrobalans see the fruits macis of mace it is hot in the third degree, strengthens thestomach and heart exceedingly, and helps concoction maceris, &c it is held to be the inner bark of nutmeg-tree, helpsfluxes and spitting of blood petroselini rad of parsley root. Opens obstructions, provokes urineand the menses, warms a cold stomach, expels wind, and breaks thestone use them as grass roots, and take out the inner pith as you weretaught in smallage roots prunelli silvestris of sloe-tree i know no use of it pinearum putaminae pine shucks, or husks i suppose they mean of thecones that hold the seeds.

Where there is evidenceof a severe struggle in all these paper murder may be reasonablysuspected the number, situation, extent, and direction of mustbe carefully noted and weighed if these are out of proportion tothe ligature, the suspension, etc , they strongly suggest homicide, although they may occur in suicide see paper 4, 11, 18, 20, 28, 29, 44, 52, 55, 59, 66 homicidal hanging may be committed by an assailant who is strong ona subject who is weak, on a child, a woman, an old person. On onestupefied by liquor or narcotic poison. Or by thesis combined against oneperson paper are reported where injuries were inflicted or poison given, andthe subject was afterward hanged to avert suspicion most of thesepaper are those of murder either by strangulation or suffocation paper64, 65, 67, 68, 69, 70, 74 essaytimes hanging is accidental children and even older personsplay at hanging successfully taylor mentions the case of a boy whowitnessed a hanging and afterward tried the experiment himself toascertain the sensation, and caused his own death tardieu882 relates the case of a man, t , age 37, of small stature, feeble constitution, very thin, of sinister face, eyes hollow but lively, cunning nose and mouth, who meeting a man aged 81, learned that he had essay trouble with his leg and promised to cure him the old man lived alone t told him to buy a strong cord as thick as his little finger and one and one-half yards long, and keep the whole thing a secret t would see him at his room at 7 p m the old man became suspicious and had t arrested the investigation showed that already t had made away with three old men by hanging, who were known to be opposed to suicide their bodies showed no trace of violence two others had escaped when the cord was passed around their necks tardieu gives a number of paper of suicidal hanging which were falselyattributed to criminal violence, in which the pressure of publicopinion joined to circumstances improperly explained by inexpertphysicians caused deplorable judicial errors illustrative paper suicide 1 harvey.

If there are no clots plugging the divided arteries on thesurface then we need have little hesitancy in saying that the woundwas produced after death, but probably not later than ten or twelvehours after death if the wound was inflicted still longer after deathand before putrefaction, then we would have a lack of the signs dueto hemorrhage, clots, staining, etc if we find the conditions moreor less midway between the first two, we may be left in essay doubt asto the date of the injury thus if the hemorrhage is moderate, theblood mostly but not altogether clotted and the clots moderately firm, the skin slightly everted, and the sides slightly separated and notaltogether smooth on their surface. If the surfaces are fairly deeplystained and the stain cannot be easily washed off then we can onlysay that the wound was inflicted during life or within two hours orso after death, and this fact is often enough for the purposes of themedico-legal inquiry the same is the case with contusions where there is no bleedingexternally if we have a bluish, violet, green, or yellow tumor with orwithout more or less superficial œdema. If this tumor fluctuates or ishard, but in either case is elastic. If on incision the skin and thetissue spaces are infiltrated with blood which is coagulated, or ifthere is a cavity filled with clotted blood, the coagulum being firmand the entire amount of blood coagulated then the wound was inflictedduring life if, however, the surface shows a bluish or violet color, little or no swelling of the skin, which is of natural thickness, andthe ecchymosed area is not tense and elastic to the touch. If furtherthe blood is found on incision to be fluid or if coagulated only writinglyso, and the blood is not infiltrated into the tissue spaces, but merelyimbibed by the tissues then the blow was inflicted after death, andprobably more than two or three hours after in contusions especially we may have difficulty, as the sign offluidity of the blood may fail and putrefaction may modify theconditions of the wound unless writings deep beneath the surface beexamined we see, then, that in essay paper it is very easy to say that a woundwas inflicted post mortem if a wound was not inflicted until ten ortwelve hours after death or even sooner, we cannot easily mistake it but in thesis paper it may be hard or impossible to say whether a woundwas inflicted during life or within an hour or two after death herewe must be cautious in expressing an opinion which should be guarded but we should remember that it is important to be able to state that awound was inflicted before or immediately after death, as no one but amurderer would think of inflicting a fatal injury on a body immediatelyafter death in such paper a well-guarded medical opinion may oftenmeet all the requirements of the case granted that a given wound was produced before death there are, then, one or two questions which may arise, and which depend for theiranswer on the length of time the wounded person could have lived andthe physiological or muscular acts which he could have performed afterreceiving the injury and before death the first of these questions maybe expressed as follows:could the victim have performed certain acts after having received hisfatal injury?. the term “certain acts” here refers to almost any thingor things which would require time and strength in other words, thecontinuance of life with bodily and mental powers for a certain timeafter receiving a mortal injury this question may be raised in relation to an attempted alibi of theaccused, who may have been proved to be in the presence of the victima moment before death if after this moment the victim has movedfrom the spot or performed certain acts before death, the attemptedalibi may depend upon the answer to the question as to whether thegiven acts of the victim were compatible with the fatal character ofthe wound an alibi can aid in the acquittal of the accused only whenthe nature of the injury was such that death would be supposed to beimmediate or nearly so great care should be taken on the writing ofthe medical witness in answering this question, for after very gravewounds, proving speedily fatal, the victim essaytimes can do certainacts requiring more or less prolonged effort, as shown by numerousexamples wounds of the brain are especially noticeable in allowinga survival of several hours, days, or even weeks, during which timethe injured person may pursue his occupations where the survivalhas lasted days or weeks, the alibi has no importance, but not ifthe survival is of shorter duration the following case is cited byvibert1 and may be mentioned in this connection, though the woundwas caused by a bullet which traversed from behind forward the entireleft lobe of the brain after the injury the victim was seen byseveral witnesses to climb a ladder, though with difficulty, for hehad right-sided hemiplegia he was found insensible more than half amile away, and did not die until six or eight hours after the injury severe injury of important organs is essaytimes not incompatible withan unexpectedly long survival devergie cites two illustrations ofthis which are quoted by vibert 622 a man received several extensivefractures of the skull, with abundant subdural hemorrhage, and ruptureof the diaphragm with hernia of the stomach the stomach was ruptured, and nearly a litre of its contents was contained in the left pleuralcavity notwithstanding all this, he was able to walk about for an houror so and answer several questions he died only after several hours another man, crushed by a carriage, received a large rupture of thediaphragm, complete rupture of the jejunum, and rupture and crushing ofone kidney yet he walked nearly five miles, and did not die until thenext day more rarely wounds of the great vessels are not immediately fatal m tourdes is quoted by vibert623 as citing the case of a man whodescended a flight of stairs and took several steps after divisionof the carotid artery. Also of one who lived ten minutes after abullet-wound of the inferior vena-cava even wounds of the heart are not as speedily fatal as is commonlysupposed, and often permit of a comparatively long survival fischer624 found only 104 paper of immediate death among 452 paperof wounds of the heart, and healing occurred in 50 paper among 401 vibert625 mentions two striking paper of long survival after woundsof the heart a woman received a stab-wound which perforated theright ventricle, causing a wound one centimetre long she did not dieuntil twelve days later, when on autopsy there was found an enormousextravasation of blood in the left pleural cavity and pericardium thesecond case, though one of bullet-wound, is equally applicable andinstructive in this connection a man received a bullet-wound whichperforated the left ventricle, the bullet being found later in thepericardium after being wounded he threw a lamp at his assassin whichset fire to the room he then went into the court-yard, drew essaywater, carried it back in a bucket, extinguished the fire, and then laydown on his bed and died in studying the wounds of different regions of the body, we may findthesis other mortal wounds which, though speedily fatal, leave thepossibility of more or less activity before death we see, therefore, that even in those wounds which are commonly supposed to be immediatelyfatal, even by thesis medical men where attention has not been called tothe exceptions, such exceptional paper are not uncommon in which deathis not immediate time and even strength may thus be allowed for moreor less complicated activity an alibi cannot, therefore, be allowedwithout question on the writing of the medical expert, who must exercisegreat caution in expressing an opinion the second question which mayessaytimes arise in connection with the last, but having little to dowith the subject of this section, is the following:how long before death had the deceased accomplished certainphysiological acts?. for instance, how long after a meal did he die?. This is hard to answer with precision, as digestion varies with theindividual, and digestion begun during life may go on to a certainextent after death we may be able to say if digestion has justcommenced, is well advanced, or has terminated what was eaten at thelast meal may be learned by the naked eye, the microscope, the color ofstomach contents and their odor the state of the bladder and rectum isessaytimes called in question all the above facts have less bearing onthe case than those in relation to the former question the cause of death from wounds the cause of death should be certain and definite in reality, there isonly one real cause, though one or thesis circumstances may be accessorycauses in most paper of death from the class of wounds which we havebeen considering, there is no difficulty in determining the cause ofdeath so as to be able to state it definitely but if the deceased hadrecovered from the first effects of the wound and then died, or ifdeath seems as much due to disease as to injury, then the real causeof death may be obscure if the medical witness is in doubt as to whichof two causes was the primary cause of death the doubt should be statedat once, as it may weaken the testimony if brought out later wounds may be directly or indirectly fatal they are directly fatal ifthe victim dies at once or very soon after the wound, with no othercause internally in his body or externally from his environment woundsare indirectly or secondarily fatal if the injured person dies from awound disease or complication, the direct consequence of the wound, or from a surgical operation necessary in the treatment of the case wounds may also be necessarily fatal either directly or secondarily, or not necessarily fatal in the latter case death may be due asmuch, if not more, to other causes than the wound, and essaytimes notat all to the wound itself thus death may be due to natural causes, latent disease, an unhealthy state of the body, imprudence or neglectof treatment, or improper treatment, etc these various degrees ofresponsibility of a wound as the cause of death we will now considermore at length i was the wound the cause of death directly?. If so, it must have caused death in one of the following ways:1 hemorrhage - this may act by producing syncope but the amount ofthe hemorrhage may not be sufficient for this result, and still causedeath by disturbing the function of the organ into which it is effused, as in the brain or in the pleural or pericardial cavities the bloodhere acts mechanically blood in the trachea may also kill mechanicallyby causing asphyxia the amount of hemorrhage required to produce syncope varies under avariety of circumstances less is required in the very young, the aged, and the diseased, also less in women than in men young infants maydie from hemorrhage from very slight wounds, even from the applicationof a leech or the lancing of the gums a sudden loss of blood is muchmore serious than an equal amount lost slowly this is the reason thatthe wound of an artery is more serious and more rapidly fatal thana similar loss of blood from other sources it is hard to specifythe absolute quantity which must be lost in order to cause death bysyncope the total blood in the body is about one-thirteenth of theweight of the body, making the total amount of blood weigh about twelvepounds of this, about one-fourth is in the heart, lungs, and largeblood-vessels according to watson, the loss of an amount varying fromfive to eight pounds is enough to be fatal to an adult but less isenough to prove fatal in thesis paper, as the rapidity of the loss ofblood and the age, sex, and bodily condition of the wounded personaffect the amount necessary though death from a small artery isslower than that from a large one, yet it may occur in time, as shownin the instance quoted by taylor, 626 where a man bled to death inthirty-eight hours from the wound of an intercostal artery thus, too, a wound of the branches of the external carotid artery is often enoughto cause death, and a wound in a vascular writing may cause death fromhemorrhage, though no vessel of any size be divided internal hemorrhage may be fatal from mechanical interference with thefunction of an organ, as well as from syncope thus we may have deathfrom syncope due to hemorrhage into the peritoneal cavity or, aftercontusions, into the intercellular spaces and the cavity due to theblow, into which several pounds of blood may be extravasated internalhemorrhage is most fatal when due to the rupture of a viscus such asthe heart, lungs, liver, kidney taylor627 cites a case of a manrun over and brought to guy hospital in november, 1864 he had painin the back, but there were no symptoms or marks of severe injury heleft the hospital and walked home, where he was found dead in bed a fewhours later his abdomen contained a large amount of blood from therupture of a kidney after severe flagellation blood may be effused inlarge quantity beneath the skin and between the muscles, which is justas fatal as if it had flowed externally from a wound in fact, if theinjuries are numerous the loss of much less blood is enough to provefatal, the element of shock here assisting that of hemorrhage how are we to ascertain whether a person has died from hemorrhage?. This may be more difficult in the case of an open wound, for the bodymay have been moved from the spot where it lay after the wound wasreceived, and the blood on the body, clothes, and surrounding objectsmay have been removed then the case may be presumptive only, but wemay arrive at a definite conclusion by attention to the followingpoints. If the wound was in a very vascular writing and of essay size, orif a large vessel or thesis moderately large vessels were divided andthe vessels, especially the veins in the neighborhood, are empty, thenwe may be quite sure of death from hemorrhage if there is no diseasefound which could be rapidly fatal the case is still stronger the bodyshould be pallid after fatal hemorrhage, but the same may be the casefrom death from other causes in case the body and surrounding objectshave not been disturbed, then the amount of clotted blood in the wound, on the body and clothes, and about the body, taken in connection withthe foregoing points, can leave no doubt we should remember, however, that not all the blood about the body was necessarily effused duringlife, but a little hemorrhage may have occurred after death while thebody was still warm and the blood fluid, i e , during the first four, eight, or ten hours but the amount thus lost is small in paper ofdeath from internal hemorrhage we do not have so much difficulty inpronouncing an opinion, as by post-mortem examination we can determinethe amount of the hemorrhage we can judge, too, from its position, whether it has acted mechanically to interfere with a vital function, and has thus caused death, or whether the latter was due to syncopefrom the quantity lost 2 severe mechanical injury of a vital organ, such as crushing ofthe heart, lungs, brain, etc this crushing may be accompanied byhemorrhage, but death may be more immediate than the hemorrhage wouldaccount for the mechanical injury done to the vital centres in themedulla by the act of pithing is the direct cause of the sudden deathwhich follows it exceptionally slight violence to a vital organ isfatal, but this may be better explained by attributing it to shock 3 shock - an injury is often apparently not enough to account forthe fatal result so speedily the marks of external injury may failentirely or be very trifling thus more than once persons have died inrailway collisions with no external marks of violence so, too, a blowon the upper abdomen, on the “pit of the stomach, ” has been rapidlyfatal without any visible injury to the viscera death is attributed tothe effect on the cardiac plexus, and there may be no marks externallyor only very superficial ones in reg v slane and others durhamwint ass , 1872, quoted by taylor, 628 the deceased was proved tohave sustained severe injuries to the abdomen by kicks, etc , but therewere no marks of bruises all organs were found healthy on post-mortemexamination, but the injured man died in twenty minutes death wasattributed to shock and the prisoners were convicted of murder death from concussion of the brain is another example of death fromshock this may occur with only a bruise on the scalp and with nointracranial hemorrhage or laceration of the brain the medical witnessshould be cautious in the above classes of paper in giving evidence, asthe defence may rely upon the absence of any visible signs of mortalinjury to prove that no injury was done, a principle fundamentallywrong also a number of injuries, no one of which alone could be the directcause of death, may cause death on the spot or very soon afterward death in such paper, where there is no large effusion under the skin, is referred to exhaustion, which, however, is merely another termfor shock such paper are exemplified by prize-fighters who, duringor after the fight, become collapsed and die of exhaustion havingsustained numerous blows on the body during the thesis rounds, the bodypresents the marks of various bruises, but there may be nothing elseto explain the sudden death no one injury or bruise is mortal, andyet, when the deceased was previously sound and in good health, deathmust be referred directly to the multiple injuries received in thefight we have already stated above that if the injuries are numerous, the loss of a smaller amount of blood may be fatal we see, therefore, that there is not always a specific and visible “mortal” injury toaccount for death this is a well-known medical fact, but it does notaccord with the erroneous popular prejudice that no one can die fromviolence without essay one visible wound which is mortal in otherwords, the non-professional mind leaves out of account the idea ofshock, only regarding material injury and not functional disturbance if the circumstances accompanying death are unknown, it is well to becautious but if the deceased was in ordinary health and vigor andthere was no morbid cause to account for the sudden death, we need nothesitate to refer death to the multiple injuries ii was the wound the cause of death necessarily?. This brings up a number of interesting questions to be considered inmedical jurisprudence there is probably no condition so common as thatthe injury is admitted, but death is attributed to essay other cause thus if there are several wounds it may be hard to decide on therelative degree of mortality of any writingicular one, so as to be able tosay that death was directly or necessarily due to this or that one thedefence may plead that death was not necessarily due to the writingicularwound attributed to the prisoner this brings up the question which of two or more wounds was the cause of death?. no generalrule can be laid down for all paper, but each case must be judgedby itself another way of putting the question is.

Zinc sulphate 2-1/3 grains iodin free and combined 1/8 grain protein 1/25 grain alcohol 34 minimsthis amount of alcohol is equivalent to about 3-1/2 fluidrams of witchhazel water although the label states that each fluidounce containsthree grains of “proteo-albuminoid compound of iodine, ” yet the sum ofthe protein calculated from nitrogen content and iodin components isequivalent to less than 1/5 grain “national iodine solution” appears outline of essay to be very similar to “gonocol” thenational drug co , philadelphia, pa , which was analyzed by the bureauof chemistry of the u s dewritingment of agriculture the bureau statedthat “it gonocol consisted essentially of an aqueous solution of zincsulphate, hamamelis water, a small amount of alcohol, 0 38 grain ofiodin, and 0 36 grain of protein per fluidounce ”it is evident that “national iodine solution” is not a solution offree elementary iodin as the name suggests. Instead it appears to bea solution of zinc sulphate in witch hazel water containing less than0 03 per cent of combined iodin and not more than a trace of freeiodin “national iodine solution” is one more to be added to thatalready long list of proprietaries which makes capital of the highesteem in which physicians hold iodin the claimsan advertising circular sent to physicians begins. “dear doctor. We beg to suggest a line of treatment while using national iodine solution which our thesis years of experience has proven to us to give the best and quickest results in the treatment of inflammation of the urethral tract ”in it are given directions for the treatment of “acute gonorrhea, male, ” “anterior urethritis, ” “anterior-posterior urethritis, ” “ardorurinæ and chordee, ” etc , by means of national iodine solution andother proprietaries of the national drug company make in fact thesolution is claimed to be “indicated in all conditions of urethraaccompanied by a discharge ” comment and conclusionsthe therapeutic claims made for “national iodine solution” areunwarranted such a solution is not indicated in all conditions of theurethra accompanied by discharge the advice contained in the circularis equivalent to mail-order treatment of gonorrhea it is of interest to note that the claims for an identical or asimilar solution prepared by the national drug company as a treatmentfor gonorrhea and intended for use by the laity, has been adjudgedmisbranded by the federal authorities notice of judgment no 8150, issued jan 25, 1921 in that it misled and deceived the purchaseror purchasers thereof in the statements regarding the therapeuticor curative effects of the article, which falsely and fraudulentlyrepresent it to be indicated in all conditions of the urethraaccompanied with a discharge, “whereas in truth and in fact it was not ”the council would emphasize that if physicians give heed to advertisingsuch as that sent out by the national drug company for this preparationthe medical profession cannot with good grace protest against theroutine treatment of venereal diseases by quacks and “patent medicine”venders -- from the journal a m a , june 4, 1921 mon-arsone not admitted to n n r report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has authorized publication of the following report w a puckner, secretary mon-arsone is offered by the harmer laboratories company as “a newand non-toxic arsenical for the treatment of syphilis ” in theadvertisements for mon-arsone it has been claimed that with thisdrug “the toxic, corrosive and uncertain reactions attending the useof arsphenamine have been entirely eliminated” and that “it has atherapeutic value equal to arsphenamine, but extensive case reportsfail to record the slightest toxic reaction following its use ”according to the manufacturers, mons-arsone is disodiumethylarsonate, the sodium salt of ethylarsonic acid, derived from arsenic acid byreplacement of one hydroxyl group by the ethyl group-- aso ch₂ch₃ oh₂ mons-arsone is related to sodium cacodylate, which is the sodium saltof dimethyl-arsenic acid-- aso ch₃₂oh-- derived from arsenic acid byreplacement of two hydroxyl groups by two methyl groups ethylarsonicacid and its potassium salt were described by la coste139 more thanthirty-five years ago, and the use of the sodium salt of methylarsonicacid was proposed in france essay years ago the harmer laboratoriescompany claims originality for mons-arsone in that it was the firstto prepare the sodium salt of ethylarsonic acid and to propose itstherapeutic use 139 la coste. Annalen der chemie liebig 208. 34 it was reported several years ago by castelli140 that sodiumcacodylate and the sodium salt of methyl arsenic acid were devoid ofeffect on experimental trypanosomiasis and spirochete infections careful clinical observations in this country by h j nichols141 andh n cole142 have demonstrated the inefficacy of sodium cacodylatein the treatment of human syphilis 140 castelli, g. Arch f schiffs- u tropen-hyg 16. 605, 1912 141 nichols, h j.

  • accounting homework help
  • thesis for compare and contrast essay
  • essay transitions
  • writing service reviews
  • history essay
  • an i buy cheap essays
  • how to end an argumentative essay
  • networking assignment help
  • pay for my essays
  • outline of an essay
  • buy custom essay
  • what is the sat essay out of
  • essay urban dictionary
  • a good man is hard to find essay
  • online editing services
  • order papers online
  • essay titles
  • why education is important essay
  • buy essays online college
  • best online essay writing service
  • best homework help websites

Nitrogen gas did not show any appreciable increase of the germicidal action of typhoid bacillus when grown in medium containing chlorlyptus growth was about the same in cultures supplied with nitrogen gas as in those growing in ordinary atmosphere experiment 7 -- germicidal action of chlorlyptus on pyogenic bacteria suspended in an oily medium -- experiment with streptococcus. Cultures of streptococcus in blood agar three days old were suspended in olive oil sterile, and chlorlyptus was added in the proportions of 1, 5 and 10 per cent and inoculated in trypsinized bouillon at different intervals, namely. At once, after five minutes, after ten minutes, after fifteen minutes, after thirty minutes, and after one hour tubes were incubated at 37 c for forty-eight hours result. All tubes remained sterile the germicidal action of chlorlyptus on streptococcus suspended in oil was almost at once and with certainty after five minutes when added in the proportion of 1, 5 and 10 per cent experiment 8 -- germicidal action of chlorlyptus on staphylococcus, suspended in sterile olive oil -- the technic employed was the same as in experiment 5, except that a culture of staphylococcus was used result. All tubes remained sterile the germicidal action of chlorlyptus was almost at once in the proportions of 1, 5 and 10 per cent remarks. By repeating this experiment the result showed essay variations the discrepancy was probably due to an imperfect suspension of the micro-organism in the oil experiment 9 -- germicidal action of carbolic acid on streptococcus suspended in olive oil -- the technic employed was the same as in experiment 5, except that carbolic acid was used instead of chlorlyptus result. The germicidal action of carbolic acid of streptococcus suspended in olive oil was almost at once in the proportions of 1, 5 and 10 experiment 10 -- germicidal action of chlorlyptus on staphylococcus -- the technic employed was the same as in experiment 6 except that the carbolic acid was used instead of chlorlyptus result. The germicidal action of carbolic acid on staphylococcus suspended in olive oil was almost at once, in proportions of 1, 5 and 10 per cent experiment 11 -- germicidal action of chlorlyptus on pyogenic bacteria suspended in pus -- chlorlyptus was added to sterile pus in the proportions of 1, 5 and 10 per cent , and then inoculated with staphylococcus and cultures were made in bouillon at once, after five minutes, after ten minutes, after fifteen minutes, after thirty minutes, after one hour and after two hours, respectively, and tubes incubated for forty-eight hours at 37 c result. Growth was shown in all tubes except those inoculated from tubes in which chlorlyptus was added in the proportions of 10 per cent after one hour experiment 12 -- germicidal action of chlorlyptus on streptococcus suspended in sterile human blood serum -- staphylococcus culture in agar forty-eight hours old was suspended in sterile human blood serum, and to the suspension chlorlyptus 5 per cent in paraffin oil was added in the proportions of 1, 5 and 10 per cent inoculations were made at intervals, at once, after five minutes, after ten minutes, after fifteen minutes and after one hour in trypsinized bouillon tubes were incubated at 37 c for forty-eight hours result. Chlorlyptus showed inhibitory action on the growth of staphylococcus in the strength of 10 per cent , but did not produce complete sterilization similar results were shown with the 5 per cent , and in the 1 per cent chlorlyptus did not show any inhibitory action at all experiment 13 -- germicidal action of carbolic acid on staphylococcus suspended in human blood serum sterile -- the technic employed was the same as in experiment 10 except that carbolic acid was used instead of chlorlyptus result. Carbolic acid produced a complete sterilization in the strength of 10 per cent almost at once, and with certainty after five minutes similar results were produced with the 5 per cent the 1 per cent carbolic acid did not show any appreciable germicidal action on staphylococcus experiment 14 -- toxic and irritant action of chlorlyptus -- six normal guinea-pigs were used for the experiment guinea-pig 1 was injected peritoneally with 1 c c of chlorlyptus, guinea-pig 2 with 2 c c of chlorlyptus, guinea-pig 3 with 3 c c of chlorlyptus, guinea-pig 4 with 4 c c and guinea-pig 5 with 5 c c 5 per cent respectively guinea-pig 6 was used as a control and not injected result.