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It is also morecooling than any of the other poppies, and therefore cannot but be aseffectual in hot agues, frenzies, and other inflammations either inwardor outward galen saith, the seed is dangerous to be used inwardly purslain garden purslain being used as a sallad herb is so well known that itneeds no description. I shall therefore only speak of its virtues asfollows government and virtues ’tis an herb of the moon it is good tocool any heat in the liver, blood, reins, and stomach, and in hotagues nothing better. It stays hot and choleric fluxes of the belly, women courses, the whites, and gonorrhæa, or running of the reins, the distillation from the head, and pains therein proceeding from heat, want of sleep, or the frenzy the seed is more effectual than the herb, and is of singular good use to cool the heat and sharpness of urine, venereous dreams, and the like. Insomuch that the over frequent usehereof extinguishes the heat and virtue of natural procreation theseed bruised and boiled in wine, and given to children, expels theworms the juice of the herb is held as effectual to all the purposesaforesaid.

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It is a mostgallant oil to strengthen the body, the back being anointed with it;strengthens the muscles, they being chafed with it. Helps head-ache, the forehead being rubbed with it moschelæum, or, oil of musk college take two nutmegs, musk one dram, indian leaf or mace, spikenard, costus, mastich, of each six drams, styrax calamitis, cassialignea, myrrh, saffron, cinnamon, cloves, carpobalsamum or cubebs, bdellium, of each two drams, pure oil three pounds, wine three ounces, bruise them as you ought to do, mix them, and let them boil easily, till the wine be consumed, the musk being mixed according to art afterit is strained culpeper it is exceeding good against all diseases of cold, especially those of the stomach, it helps diseases of the sides, theybeing anointed with it, the stranguary, cholic, and vices of thenerves, and afflictions of the reins oleum nardinum or, oil of nard college take of spikenard three ounces, marjoram two ounces, woodof aloes, calamus aromaticus, elecampane, cypress, bay leaves, indianleaf or mace, squinanth, cardamoms, of each one ounce and a half, bruise them all grossly, and steep them in water and wine, of eachfourteen ounces, oil of sesamin, or oil of olives, four pounds andan half, for one day. Then perfect the oil by boiling it gently in adouble vessel oleum populeum nicholaus college take of fresh poplar buds three pounds, wine four pounds, common oil seven pounds two ounces, beat the poplar buds very well, then steep them seven days in the oil and wine, then boil them in adouble vessel till the wine be consumed, if you infuse fresh buds onceor twice before you boil it, the medicine will be the stronger, thenpress out the oil and keep it culpeper it is a fine cool oil, but the ointment called by thatname which follows hereafter is far better ointments more simple unguentum album, or, white ointment college take of oil of roses nine ounces, ceruss washed inrose-water and diligently sifted, three ounces, white wax two ounces, after the wax is melted in the oil, put in the ceruss, and make itinto an ointment according to art, add two drams of camphire, madeinto powder with a few drops of oil of sweet almonds, so will it becamphorated culpeper it is a fine cooling, drying ointment, eases pains, anditching in wounds and ulcers, and is an hundred times better withcamphire than without it unguentum egyptiacum college take of verdigris finely powdered, five writings, honeyfourteen writings, sharp vinegar seven writings, boil them to a justthickness, and a reddish colour culpeper it cleanses filthy ulcers and fistulas forcibly, and notwithout pain, it takes away dead and proud flesh, and dries unguentum anodynum or, an ointment to ease pain college take of oil of white lilies, six ounces, oil of dill, andchamomel, of each two ounces, oil of sweet almonds one ounce, duckgrease, and hen grease, of each two ounces, white wax three ounces, mix them according to art culpeper its use is to assuage pains in any writing of the body, especially such as come by inflammations, whether in wounds or tumours, and for that it is admirable unguentum ex apio or, ointment of smallage college take of the juice of smallage one pound, honey nine ounces, wheat flower three ounces, boil them to a just thickness culpeper it is a very fine, and very gentle cleanser of wounds andulcers liniment of gum elemi college take of gum elemi, turpentine of the fir-tree, of each oneounce and an half, old sheep suet cleansed two ounces, old hoggrease cleansed one ounce. Mix them, and make them into an ointmentaccording to art culpeper it gently cleanses and fills up an ulcer with flesh, itbeing of a mild nature, and friendly to the body unguentum aureum college take of yellow wax half a pound, common oil two pounds, turpentine two ounces, pine rozin, colophonia, of each one ounce and anhalf, frankincense, mastich, of each one ounce, saffron one dram, firstmelt the wax in the oil, then the turpentine being added, let them boiltogether. Having done boiling, put in the rest in fine powder, letthe saffron be the last and by diligent stirring, make them into anointment according to art basilicon, the greater college take of white wax, pine rozin, heifer suet, greek pitch, turpentine, olibanum, myrrh, of each one ounce, oil five ounces, powder the olibanum and myrrh, and the rest being melted, make it intoan ointment according to art basilicon, the less college take of yellow wax, fat rozin, greek pitch, of each half apound, oil nine ounces. Mix them together, by melting them according toart culpeper both this and the former, heat, moisten, and digest, procure matter in wounds, i mean brings the filth or corrupted bloodfrom green wounds. They clense and ease pain ointment of bdellium college take of bdellium six drams, euphorbium, sagapen, of eachfour drams, castoreum three drams, wax fifteen drams, oil of elder orwall-flowers, ten drams, the bdellium, and sagapen being dissolved inwater of wild rue, let the rest be united by the heat of a bath unguentum de calce or, ointment of chalk college take of chalk washed, seven times at least, half a pound, wax three ounces, oil of roses one pound, stir them all togetherdiligently in a leaden mortar, the wax being first melted by a gentlefire in a sufficient quantity of the prescribed oil culpeper it is exceeding good in burnings and scaldings unguentum dialthæ or, ointment of marsh-mallows college take of common oil four pounds, mussilage of marsh-mallowroots, linseed, and fenugreek seed two pounds. Boil them together tillthe watery writing of the mussilage be consumed, then add wax half a pound, rozin three ounces, turpentine an ounce, boil them to the consistenceof an ointment, but let the mussilage be prepared of a pound of freshroots bruised, and half a pound of each of the seeds steeped, andboiled in eight pounds of spring water, and then pressed out see thecompound unguentum diapompholygos college take of oil of nightshade sixteen ounces, white wax, washed, ceruss, of each four drams, lead burnt and washed, pompholixprepared, of each two ounces, pure frankincense one ounce. Bring theminto the form of an ointment according to art culpeper this much differing from the former, you shall have thatinserted at latter end, and then you may use which you please unguentum enulatum or, ointment of elecampane college take of elecampane roots boiled in vinegar, bruised andpulped, one pound, turpentine washed in their decoction, new wax, ofeach two ounces, old hog grease salted ten ounces, old oil fourounces, common salt one ounce, add the turpentine to the grease, wax, and oil, being melted, as also the pulp and salt being finely powdered, and so make it into an ointment according to art unguentum enulatum cum mercurio or, ointment of elecampane with quick-silver, college is made of the former ointment, by adding two ounces ofquick-silver, killed by continual stirring, not only with spittle, orjuice of lemons, but with all the turpentine kept for that intent, andwriting of the grease, in a stone mortar culpeper my opinion of this ointment, is briefly this. It wasinvented for the itch, without quick-silver it will do no good, withquick-silver it may do harm unguentum laurinum commune or, ointment of bays common college take of bay leaves bruised one pound, bay berries bruisedhalf a pound, cabbage leaves four ounces, neat-foot oil five pounds, bullock suet two pounds, boil them together, and strain them, that soit may be made into an ointment according to art unguentum de minie sive rubrum camphora or, ointment of red lead college take of oil of roses one pound and an half, red lead threeounces, litharge two ounces, ceruss one ounce and an half, tutty threedrams, camphire two drams, wax one ounce and an half, make it into anointment according to art, in a pestle and mortar made of lead culpeper this ointment is as drying as a man shall usually readof one, and withal cooling, therefore good for sores, and such as aretroubled with defluctions unguentum e nicotiona, seu peto or, ointment of tobacco college take of tobacco leaves bruised, two pounds, steep them awhole night in red wine, in the morning boil it in fresh hog grease, diligently washed, one pound, till the wine be consumed, strain it, andadd half a pound of juice of tobacco, rozin four ounces, boil it to theconsumption of the juice, adding towards the end, round birthwort rootsin powder, two ounces, new wax as much as is sufficient to make it intoan ointment according to art culpeper it would take a whole summer day to write the writingicularvirtues of this ointment, and my poor genius is too weak to give itthe hundredth writing of its due praise.

Being mixed with honey, and applied tothe place, is an admirable remedy for the gout chrystal being beaten into very fine powder, and a dram of it takenat a time helps the bloody-flux, stops the fluor albus, and increasesmilk in nurses mathiolus lapis samius is cooling and binding, it is very comfortable to thestomach, but it dulls the senses, helps fluxes of the eyes and ulcers geodetes binds and drys, being beaten into powder and mixed withwater, and applied to the place, takes away inflammations of thetesticles pumice-stone being beaten into powder and the teeth rubbed with it, cleanses them dioscorides jet, it is of a softening and discussing nature, it resists the fitsof the mother lapis arabicus being beaten into powder, and made into an ointmenthelps the hemorrhoids ostracites, a dram of it taken in powder provokes the menses. Beingtaken after that purgation, causes conception, also being made into anointment, helps inflammations of the breast myexis being borne about one takes away pains in the reins, andhinders the breeding of the stone lapis armenius purges melancholy, and also causes vomiting, i holdit not very safe for our english bodies, and therefore i will speak nomore of it explanation of certain vacuations the five opening roots smallage, sparagus, fennel, parsley, knee-holly the two opening roots fennel, parsley the five emolient herbs marsh-mallows, mallows, beets, mercury, pellitory of the wall, violetleaves the five capillary herbs maidenhair, wall rue, cetrach, hart-tongue, politricum the four cordial flowers borrage, bugloss, roses, violets the four greater hot seeds, carminative, or breaking wind annis, carraway, cummin, fennel the four lesser hot seeds bishop weed, amomus, smallage, carrots the four greater cold seeds citrul, cucumber, gourds, melon the four lesser cold seeds succory, endive, lettice, purslain five fragments of precious stones granite, jacinth, sapphire, sardine, emerald the right worshipful, the college of physicians of london in their new dispensatory give you free leave to distil these common waters that follow, but they never intend you should know what they are good for simple distilled waters of fresh roots ofbriony, onions, elecampane, orris, or flower-de-luce, turnips of flowers and buds ofsouthernwood, both sorts of wormwood, wood sorrel, lady-mantle, marsh-mallows, angelica, pimpernel with purple flowers, smallage, columbines, sparagus, mouse-ear, borrage, shepherd purse, calaminth, woodbine or honey-suckles, carduus benedictus, our lady thistles, knotgrass, succory, dragons, colt-foot, fennel, goat rue, grass, hyssop, lettice, lovage, toad-flax, hops, marjoram, mallows, horehound, featherfew, bawm, mints, horse-mints, water cresses, english tobacco, white poppies, pellatory of the wall, parsley, plantain, purslain, self-heal, pennyroyal, oak leaves, sage, scabious, figwort orthroatwort, house-leek, or sengreen, the greater and lesser mother oftime, nightshade, tansy, tormentil, valerian of flowers oforanges, if you can get them blue-bottle the greater, beans, water-lilies, lavender, nut-tree, cowslips, sloes, rosemary, roseswhite, damask, and red, satyrien, lime-tree, clove-gilliflowers, violets of fruits oforanges, black cherries, pome citrons, quinces, cucumbers, strawberries, winter cherries, lemons, rasberries, unripe walnuts, apples of writings of living creatures and their excrementslobsters, cockles, or snails, hartshorn, bullocks dung made in may, swallows, earthworms, magpies, spawn of frogs * * * * * simple waters distilled, being digested before-hand of the fresh roots of nettles of the leaves of agrimony, wild tansy, or silverweed, mugwort, bettony, marigolds, chamomel, chamepitys, celandine, pilewort, scurvy-grass, comfry the greater, dandelyon, ash-tree leaves, eyebright, fumitory, alehoof, or ground ivy, horsetail, st john wort, yarrow, moneywort, restharrow, solomon seal, res solis, rue, savin, saxifrage, hart tongue, scordium, tamarisk, mullin, vervain, paul bettony, mead-sweet, nettles of the flowers of mayweed, broom, cowslips, butter-bur, peony, elder of the berries of broom, elder culpeper then the college gives you an admonition concerning these, which being converted into your native language, is as follows we give you warning that these common waters be better prepared for time to come, either in common stills, putting good store of ashes underneath, the roots and herbs being dryer, &c or if they be full of juice, by distilling the juice in a convenient bath, that so burning may be avoided, which hitherto hath seldom been but let the other herbs, flowers, or roots, be bruised, and by adding tartar, common salt, or leven be digested, then putting spring water to them, distil them in an alembick with its refrigeratory, or worm, till the change of the taste shew the virtue to be drawn off. Then let the oil if any be separated from the water according to art into the number of these waters may be ascribed the tears of vines, the liquor of the birch-tree, may dew culpeper that my country may receive the benefit of these waters, i shall first shew the temperatures, secondly, the virtues of themost usual and most easy to come by. If any should take exceptionsthat i mention not all, i answer first, i mention enough secondly, who ever makes this objection, they shew extreme ingratitude.

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As, namelyin a wood two miles from canterbury, by fish-pool hill, as also inbushy close belonging to the parsonage of alderbury, near clarendon, two miles from salisbury. In cheffon wood, on chesson hill, betweennewington and sittingbourn in kent, and divers other places in essex, and other counties time it flowers about may. The root abides and shoots a-new everyyear government and virtues saturn owns the plant, for he loves hisbones well the root of solomon seal is found by experience to beavailable in wounds, hurts, and outward sores, to heal and close up thelips of those that are green, and to dry up and restrain the flux ofhumours to those that are old it is singularly good to stay vomitingsand bleeding wheresoever, as also all fluxes in man or woman. Also, to knit any joint, which by weakness uses to be often out of place, or will not stay in long when it is set.