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Which is alsogood to fasten loose teeth, and to heal spungy foul gums it helps alsoto stay catarrhs, or defluctions of rheum in the mouth, throat, teeth, or eyes the juice or water is singularly good for hot and red inflamedeyes, if dropped into them, or they bathed therewith it is also ofexcellent property for all pushes, wheals and other breakings forth ofhot and sharp humours in the face and hands, and other writings of thebody, to bathe them therewith, and to take away any redness in theface, or spots, or other deformities in the skin, and to make it clearand smooth essay use this medicine, take so thesis strawberries as youshall think fitting, and put them into a distillatory, or body of glassfit for them, which being well closed, set it in a bed of horse dungfor your use it is an excellent water for hot inflamed eyes, and totake away a film or skin that begins to grow over them, and for suchother defects in them as may be helped by any outward medicine succory, or chicory descript the garden succory hath long and narrower leaves than theendive, and more cut in or torn on the edges, and the root abides thesisyears it bears also blue flowers like endive, and the seed is hardlydistinguished from the seed of the smooth or ordinary endive the wild succory hath divers long leaves lying on the ground, very muchcut in or torn on the edges, on both sides, even to the middle rib, ending in a point. Essaytimes it hath a rib down to the middle of theleaves, from among which rises up a hard, round, woody stalk, spreadinginto thesis branches, set with smaller and less divided leaves on them upto the tops, where stand the flowers, which are like the garden kind, and the seed is also only take notice that the flowers of the gardenkind are gone in on a sunny day, they being so cold, that they are notable to endure the beams of the sun, and therefore more delight in theshade the root is white, but more hard and woody than the garden kind the whole plant is exceedingly bitter place this grows in thesis places of our land in waste untilled andbarren fields the other only in gardens government and virtues it is an herb of jupiter garden succory, as it is more dry and less cold than endive, so it opens more anhandful of the leaves, or roots boiled in wine or water, and a draughtthereof drank fasting, drives forth choleric and phlegmatic humours, opens obstructions of the liver, gall and spleen. Helps the yellowjaundice, the heat of the reins, and of the urine. The dropsy also;and those that have an evil disposition in their bodies, by reasonof long sickness, evil diet, &c which the greeks call cachexia adecoction thereof made with wine, and drank, is very effectual againstlong lingering agues. And a dram of the seed in powder, drank in wine, before the fit of the ague, helps to drive it away the distilled waterof the herb and flowers if you can take them in time hath the likeproperties, and is especially good for hot stomachs, and in agues, either pestilential or of long continuance. For swoonings and passionsof the heart, for the heat and head-ache in children, and for the bloodand liver the said water, or the juice, or the bruised leaves appliedoutwardly, allay swellings, inflammations, st anthony fire, pushes, wheals, and pimples, especially used with a little vinegar. As also towash pestiferous sores the said water is very effectual for sore eyesthat are inflamed with redness, for nurses’ breasts that are pained bythe abundance of milk the wild succory, as it is more bitter, so it is more strengthening tothe stomach and liver stone-crop, prick-madam, or small-houseleek descript it grows with divers trailing branches upon the ground, set with thesis thick, flat, roundish, whitish green leaves, pointed atthe ends the flowers stand thesis of them together, essaywhat loosely the roots are small, and run creeping under ground place it grows upon the stone walls and mud walls, upon the tilesof houses and pent-houses, and amongst rubbish, and in other gravellyplaces time it flowers in june and july, and the leaves are green all thewinter government and virtues it is under the dominion of the moon, cold in quality, and essaything binding, and therefore very good tostay defluctions, especially such as fall upon the eyes it stopsbleeding, both inward and outward, helps cankers, and all frettingsores and ulcers. It abates the heat of choler, thereby preventingdiseases arising from choleric humours it expels poison much, resistspestilential fevers, being exceeding good also for tertian agues. Youmay drink the decoction of it, if you please, for all the foregoinginfirmities it is so harmless an herb, you can scarce use it amiss:being bruised and applied to the place, it helps the king evil, andany other knots or kernels in the flesh. As also the piles english tobacco descript this rises up with a round thick stalk, about two feethigh, whereon do grow thick, flat green leaves, nothing so large asthe other indian kind, essaywhat round pointed also, and nothing dentedabout the edges the stalk branches forth, and bears at the tops diversflowers set on great husks like the other, but nothing so large.

And this hath beensufficiently proved true by the experience of a man of judgment, whokept it long to himself as a great secret it clears the eyes of dust, or any thing gotten into them, and preserves the sight it is also veryavailable against wounds and thrusts, being made into an ointment inthis manner. To every ounce of the water, add two drams of may butterwithout salt, and of sugar and wax, of each as much also. Let themboil gently together let tents dipped into the liquor that remainsafter it is cold, be put into the wounds, and the place covered witha linen cloth doubled and anointed with the ointment. And this is alsoan approved medicine it likewise cleanses and heals all foul ulcers, and sores whatsoever, and stays their inflammations by washing themwith the water, and laying on them a green leaf or two in the summer, or dry leaves in the winter this water, gargled warm in the mouth, and essaytimes drank also, doth cure the quinsy, or king evil in thethroat the said water applied warm, takes away all spots, marks, andscabs in the skin. And a little of it drank, quenches thirst when it isextreme lovage descript it has thesis long and green stalks of large winged leaves, divided into thesis writings, like smallage, but much larger and greater, every leaf being cut about the edges, broadest forward, and smallest atthe stalk, of a sad green colour, smooth and shining.

Our readers may remember that an article appeared in this dewritingment ofthe journal for july 6, 1918, under the title “henry smith williams and‘proteal therapy ’” “proteal therapy” is a treatment exploited by henrysmith williams, m d , of new york, for use in tuberculosis, cancer, rheumatism, etc it is apparently a modification of the “autolysin”cancer “cure” which williams had previously puffed in heartmagazine the journal article pointed out that henry smith williams, althoughentitled to write “m d ” after his name, is essentially a journalist he has written voluminously for essay years in lay publications onvarious subjects, both under his own name and under his nom order a paper online de plume, “stoddard goodhue, m d ” in addition, williams runs a publishingconcern called the goodhue company, which issues a number of books, thesis of them being reprints of williams’ own articles closely associated with henry smith williams is his brother, edwardhuntington williams, who also is a prolific writer the journalprevious article called attention to the fact that there had been sentbroadcast to physicians a neat little cloth-bound book, entitled, “alcohol, hygiene and legislation ” this book, which evidently costessaybody a good deal of money to distribute gratis, was published bythe goodhue company, and was written by edward huntington williams enclosed with the book was an advertising leaflet on the “autolysin”cancer cure and also a letter from the goodhue company, askingphysicians to accept it “with our compliments and the compliments ofthe author ” the letter was chiefly devoted to calling attention tohenry smith williams’ “new book, the autolysin treatment of cancer ”the last thirteen pages of the book “alcohol, hygiene and legislation”contained advertisements of the goodhue company publications, writingicular emphasis being placed on the “autolysin treatment ofcancer, ” by henry smith williams so much by way of retrospect now comes information that may throwan interesting side-light on the matter just presented there is atpresent being conducted by a committee of the united states senate, an investigation relative to the purchase of a washington d c newspaper with money alleged to have been furnished by those interestedin the brewing industry at the opening hearing before the senate committee, tuesday, november19, the secretary of the united states brewers’ association, afteradmitting that brewers’ propaganda had been published in theinternational monthly, edited by viereck of the fatherland, alsodeclared that the publication committee of the brewers’ associationemployed writers to “write up certain subjects” relating to thebrewers’ trade one of the writers mentioned in this connection was, according to the newspaper reports, “dr edward h williams, author ofarticles published in medical and other journals ”with this fact before us, it seemed worth while to go through thebook that had been distributed so lavishly to physicians with thecompliments of the goodhue company and dr edward huntington williams, in the exploitation of “autolysin, ” and henry smith williams’ book onthe subject the first chapter of “alcohol, hygiene and legislation” consists ofa reprint of an article from the new york medical journal of may8, 1915 the article is a skilful presentation of the case for thedefenders of the lighter alcoholic beverages, especially beer thischapter and all succeeding chapters of the book attempt to discreditprohibitory legislation, and argue that prohibition drives the publicto the use of the more ardent alcoholic beverages, while preventing theuse of the milder beverages, such as beer, which one is led to inferis not writingicularly harmful throughout the book, also, the state ofkansas is held up as an example of the harm done by prohibition, andthe theme is developed that insanity and the use of cocain and otherhabit-forming drugs follows in the wake of prohibition the followingextracts are from chapter i. The evil effects of beer and wine, for example, are greatly less than those produced by spirituous liquors italics ours -- ed if our theory of immunity is correct we should expect to find that the older beverages, such as beer and wine, which have been used for thousands of years, are less productive of alcoholic insanity, for example, than the spirituous liquors which are recent innovations in point of fact we find this to be the case. The spirituous liquors are almost wholly responsible for all forms of alcoholic insanity italics ours -- ed chapter ii is a reprint of an article that appeared in everybodymagazine, august 1914, and deals with “legislation from a medicalviewpoint ” it is to the effect that drug addiction and insanity, together with special forms of mental disease directly attributable toalcoholism, seem to flourish best in prohibition territory chapter iii deals with “the peace and war footing of alcohol, ” andis a reprint from the medical record, aug 7, 1915 it, too, singsthe praises of the “lighter beverages, ” while deprecating the use of“ardent spirits ” for instance. An overwhelmingly large proportion of persons who develop alcoholic psychoses in america are drinkers of whisky, or essay corresponding ardent spirit, whereas this condition is seldom seen in beer and wine drinkers italics ours -- ed thus we find the highest percentage of alcohol psychoses among the whisky drinkers who come from western europe, while the wine and beer drinking races of central and southern europe show a distinctly lower percentage, in essay instances only about one-fourth as thesis per thousand italics ours -- ed chapter iv deals with “essay aspects of liquor legislation ” likechapter ii it is an indictment of prohibition, and the united statescensus bureau reports are called on to sustain this thesis quotations, too, are made from the writings of henry smith williamsfurther to prove the point “dry” kansas and “wet” nebraska arefrequently compared, to the detriment of the former one who acceptsthe statements in this chapter will get the impression that kansas hasmore lawlessness, illiteracy, pauperism, and insanity than nebraska chapter v deals with “the problem of legislation ” it is based on thepremise that “prohibition does not prevent the consumption of liquor, ”but on the contrary, “prohibitive legislation induces the consumptionof the most harmful form of liquors ” stated in another way, it isequivalent to charging that prohibition is hard on the brewers, butbeneficial to the distillers in fact, e h williams, in another book “the question of alcohol”-- goodhue co which also champions the casefor the milder alcoholics, quotes henry smith williams as saying, relative to prohibitory legislation. “in general, it would appearthat, if our legislators of recent years had been in league with thedistiller, they could not have served his purpose better ”whether or not edward h williams’ or henry smith williams’ conceptionof the alcohol problem is good, bad or indifferent, need not at thistime concern us the medical profession, however, has a right to asktwo questions. First, is the dr edward huntington williams who wrote“alcohol, hygiene and legislation” the “dr edward h williams” who wasemployed by the brewers to write propaganda favorable to the brewinginterests?. second, was the cloth-bound book, “alcohol, hygiene andlegislation, ” which was distributed by the williams brothers, paid for, wholly or in writing, by the united states brewers’ association?. For those who wish to read dr edward huntington williams’ opinion onthe alcohol question, the following bibliography may be of service. “liquor legislation and insanity”. Medical record 84:791, 1913 “the liquor question in medicine”. Medical record 85:612, 1914 “inebriety as a medical problem”. Post-graduate 29:603, 1914 “the problem of inebriety”. N y medical journal 101:940, 1915 “aspects of inebriety in alcohol”. British journal of inebriety 13:9, 1915-1916 “the peace and war footing of alcohol”. Medical record 88:226, 1915 “alcohol and therapeutics”. Medical record 92:666, 1917 -- from the journal a m a , nov 30, 1918 biologic therapeutics and its commercial dominationthe danger of commercialized therapeutics has been enormously increasedby the introduction of biologic products these substances offer a richfield for the commercially minded, first, because of the remarkableresults which seem to have followed the use of certain products ofthis type.

“medinal removes its diethylbarbituric acid one objectionable feature-- insufficient solubility-- and thus fulfills the three prerequisites of a truly rational hypnotic. Quick absorption, insuring prompt action, rapid and complete excretion, affording protection from cumulative toxic after effects, and the choice of rectal and subcutaneous administration ”there is no justification for the claim that diethylbarbituric acid barbital has only one objectionable feature and that a minor matterof “insufficient solubility ” the council has called the attention ofschering and glatz, inc , to the fact that the difference in the timeof absorption between medinal barbital sodium and barbital is, at themost, but one of minutes and that there is no evidence that medinal isexcreted more rapidly than barbital hence the claims that the dangerof toxic side-actions and that cumulative after-effects are avoided inthis product, are wholly unwarranted it is also claimed, and the claim is unsupported by satisfactoryevidence, that medinal is useful in the insomnia of tuberculosis inwhich condition it is said to have a double advantage owing to itsfavorable effects on the night-sweats it is claimed that medinalis used in the withdrawal treatment of morphin addiction with greatsuccess. There is no evidence that medinal has any special usefulnessin this treatment of the morphin habit it is claimed further thatsuccess has been reported with medinal in the treatment of whoopingcough the council knows of no satisfactory evidence to show thatmedinal is of special value in whooping cough. On the contrary, it iscapable of doing a great deal of harm the recommendations that medinalbe used for the control of labor pains and in acute neuralgic painsthat resist other forms of treatment are wholly unwarranted as thevalue of the drug in such conditions is inherently improbable and untilsatisfactory evidence in support of them is forthcoming, must be deemedmisleading -- from the journal a m a , nov 15, 1919 omission of cotarnin salts stypticin and styptol from n n r report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has authorized publication of the following report w a puckner, secretary salts of the base cotarnin have been used as local and systemichemostatics the hydrochlorid was first introduced as “stypticin, ”and is now in the pharmacopeia as cotarnin hydrochlorid cotarninae hydrochloridum, u s p the phthallic acid salt ofcotarnin-- cotarnin phthallate-- was introduced as “styptol ” bothstypticin and styptol were admitted to new and nonofficial remedies in1918 the council voted to omit stypticin because the former americanagents were no longer offering it for sale styptol was retained and isdescribed in n n r , 1919 as was pointed out in the description n n r , 1918, the evidencefor the usefulness of the cotarnin salts has been contradictory andunsatisfactory. But since the available data against the efficiencywere at least equally unreliable, the council deemed it best to retainthem in n n r pending a thorough investigation of the subject thiswas undertaken by p j hanzlik, at the suggestion of the therapeuticresearch committee of the council a reliable judgment of hemostatic efficiency can be formed only on abasis of strictly controlled conditions, which can best be furnished inthe laboratory hanzlik repeated the principal experiments publishedby previous investigators, and applied a number of new or improvedmethods the results published in the journal of pharmacologyand experimental therapeutics 10:523, 1918. 12:71, 1919 show thefollowing:direct application to wounds -- the widely quoted results of thegynecologist k abel, on the footpad of cats, were found to be quiteunreliable when the experiment is properly controlled, the resultsare either negative or the bleeding may be increased quantitativeexperiments on wounds of the footpad of dogs showed that cotarnininvariably increased the bleeding equally negative or unfavorableresults were obtained with wounds to the comb of roosters, and to theliver and spleen direct action on vessels -- the results of perfusion experiments werevariable, but, in general, showed a vasodilation action instead ofconstriction this holds true also of the uterine vessels the vesselsin the living animal rabbit ear were also unaffected systemic administration -- the bleeding from an irrigated wound wasnot modified directly by intravenous injection of cotarnin salts, butvaried merely with the state of the blood pressure the evidence for the inefficiency of cotarnin salts as hemostaticsseemed so conclusive as to warrant the council in rescinding theacceptance of styptol, and directing the omission of the generalarticle on cotarnin salts and the description of styptol from new andnonofficial remedies -- from the journal a m a , nov 22, 1919 micajah wafers and micajah suppositories report of the council on pharmacy and chemistry“micajah medicated wafers” and “micajah suppositories, ” sold bymicajah & co , warren, pa , are declared inadmissible to “new andnonofficial remedies” because 1 their composition is essentiallysecret rule 1. 2 name of neither of these mixtures is indicativeof its composition rule 8. 3 of exaggerated and unwarrantedtherapeutic claims rule 6, and 4 the therapeutic advice whichaccompanies the trade packages constitutes an indirect advertisement tothe public rule 4 w a puckner, secretary micajah medicated wafers formerly called “micajah medicateduterine wafers” were analyzed in the a m a chemical laboratory in1910 they were found to consist essentially of dried “burnt” alum, boric acid and borax, in approximately the following proportions. Alum, dried 59 86 per cent borax, dried 15 62 per cent boric acid 5 67 per cent water of hydration 18 85 per cent there are a number of drugs that are more or less effective in thetreatment of local lesions of mucous membranes and the skin theyare classed as astringents among these are included alum, boraxand boric acid every physician has used them to say that a waferconsists of alum, borax and boric acid inspires but little awe butthere is essaything much more mysterious and impressive in declaringthat a wafer “consists of an astringent and antiseptic base, in whichare incorporated certain medicaments which both locally and afterabsorption, contribute to the astringent, antiphlogistic, depletive, soothing and healing action of the product ” this gives the impressionthat essay powerful and almost incomprehensible factors are at work yet, after all is said and done, the substances contained in micajahmedicated wafers are just the homely old alum, boric acid and borax in addition to “micajah medicated wafers, ” micajah & co also put out“micajah suppositories for hemorrhoids ” these have been examined inthe a m a chemical laboratory and, like the “medicated wafers” havebeen found to contain alum, boric acid and borax-- and these substancespractically alone-- incorporated in cocoa butter the company claimsthat “to these have been added ammonii ichthyosulphonate, balsam ofperu, ext belladonae ” the a m a chemists report, however, that ifextract of belladonna is present at all it is in amounts too small tobe detected by the method commonly employed in the chemical examinationof alkaloidal drugs the chemists report further that while ammoniumichthyosulphonate and balsam of peru both have a decided odor and aredark in color, the suppositories have but little color and the odor ofthe cocoa butter that forms their base is not covered by these drugs;obviously, therefore, if ammonium ichthyosulphonate and balsam of peruare present at all it is in amounts utterly insufficient to exert anytherapeutic effect it would be hard to find better examples of mischievous proprietarymedicines than these two products of the micajah company “twinsof efficiency, ” they are called in an advertising pamphlet thecomposition is not stated a physician using the “twins” does soabsolutely in the dark to him they are secret preparations he isencouraged to use them in a great variety of conditions in which otherdrugs are much more useful inevitably, physicians using them will belikely to overlook, or pass over, new growths, specific infections anddiseases that require radical remedial measures in addition to misleading and exaggerated claims, there is a referenceto a report from the usual “well-known and reliable bacteriologicallaboratory ” the excerpts published from this report of an unnamedlaboratory are sufficiently vague to incriminate no one from time to time it is worth while to emphasize facts regardingproprietary medicines that while obvious are essaytimes forgotten forthis reason attention is directed to micajah uterine wafers andmicajah suppositories -- from the journal a m a , nov 29, 1919 alkalithia report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryalkalithia was introduced at a time when it was believed that theadministration of lithium salts served to remove uric acid from thesystem the product was considered by the council in 1906, and foundineligible for new and nonofficial remedies no report, however, waspublished at that time because of inquiries received, the council examined the current claimsfor alkalithia, and authorized publication of the report which appearsbelow w a puckner, secretary keasbey and mattison company effervescent alkalithia is sold with thefollowing statement of composition. “each dose or heaping teaspoonful contains 1 grain of caffeine, 10 grains each of bi-carbonates of soda and potash, and 5 grains of carbonate of lithia ”the a m a chemical laboratory reports that alkalithia is aneffervescent mixture which contains alkaline carbonates andbicarbonates together with caffein, free tartaric acid and free citricacid the major portion of the alkali carbonates and bicarbonatesis converted into citrates and tartrates when the preparation isdissolved in water-- as is done before it is taken an excess of alkaliis present, however, as the solution has an alkaline reaction each“heaping teaspoonful” which was found to be about 4 85 gm containsabout 0 044 gm of caffein the manufacturers claim 0 0648 gm perheaping teaspoonful as taken, alkalithia, therefore, representscaffein in a solution of alkali tartrate, citrate and bicarbonatecontaining free carbonic acid if it is assumed that all of thetartrate and citrate in alkalithia is converted into carbonate inthe organism, a “heaping teaspoonful” of alkalithia would representabout 2 9 gm of sodium bicarbonate this assumption is, however, notcorrect, for it is known that tartrates are not completely convertedinto carbonates in the organism according to the label on the bottle, this mixture of caffein andalkali salts is “a common sense remedy for the relief and treatmentof conditions dependent upon perverted metabolism as manifested byneuralgic, rheumatic, cardiac and renal symptoms ” wrapped with a tradepackage is a circular in which is discussed the “uric acid diathesis”as “a cause of rheumatism in its various forms, calculus, gravel andinflammation of the bladder and kidneys, asthma, hay fever, catarrh, quinsy and bronchitis, eczema, hives, itching and burning of the skin, palpitation of the heart and cold hands and feet, dizziness, mentaldepression, melancholia, neuralgia, chorea, hysteria, numbness and agreat variety of purely nervous symptoms ” the arguments for the useof alkalithia as “a safe and scientific treatment for the uric aciddiathesis” found in the circular constitute an indirect appeal to thelaity conflict with rule 4 in the circular matter sent direct to the physicians, keasbey andmattison claim that in rheumatism, alkalithia is prescribed by themedical profession more often than any other remedy the claim is madethat, “in five minutes the urine will be discolorized and analysis willshow it to be loaded with urates ” the manufacturers further assert. “you can change the character of the urinary secretion in a few minutes completely” by alkalithia, and “in nine paper out of ten, when the doctor prescribes ‘alkalithia’ his patient greatly improves, or gets well ”the firm advises that “renal insufficiency” be determined by the oldmethod of multiplying the ounces of urine in twenty-four hours by thelast two numbers of the specific gravity, adding 10, which gives thenumber of grains of solids excreted in the twenty-four hours if thisis low, no matter what the cause, they advise alkalithia, “that idealeliminant ”the council declared alkalithia inadmissible to new and nonofficialremedies because the claims made on the label and the circularaccompanying the trade package lead the public to its detriment todepend on this preparation rule 4. And because the therapeutic claimsare unwarranted rule 6 -- from reports of council on pharmacy andchemistry, 1919, p 65 arhovin omitted from n n r report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryarhovin is a solution of dephenylamine, thymol benzoate and ethylbenzoate, marketed by schering and glatz, inc it was omitted fromnew and nonofficial remedies because the therapeutic claims made forthe preparation were unwarranted and because the firm had refused todiscontinue the distribution of the advertising which contained theobjectionable claims prior to jan 1, 1919 when the report whichappears below explaining the dismissal was submitted to schering andglatz, inc , the firm again promised a revision of its advertising, but refused discontinuance of the objectionable circular before jan 1, 1920 since arhovin is still marketed with unwarranted therapeuticclaims, the council has authorized publication of this report w a puckner, secretary the attention of the firm schering and glatz, inc , was called tomisleading statements in its booklet for arhovin in 1915, and in 1918the firm was informed that unless the misleading statements werewithdrawn before jan 1, 1919, arhovin would be omitted from new andnonofficial remedies the following quotations are taken from the circular in question, andillustrate the character of the claims to which objection was made. “striking also is the antiphlogistic and anesthetic effect of arhovin on the inflamed mucosae, an effect which, as all authorities agree, is far greater than that of all other internal anti-gonorrheaics ” “under its influence vesical and prostatic complications, gonorrheal arthritis, endocarditis, etc , are rarely incurred ”references to the indexes of leading textbooks, including thoseof meyer and gottlieb, cushny, sollman and bastedo, fails to showthat arhovin is so much as mentioned by those authors. Hence, it isobviously false to state, as is done in the first of the quotationsabove, that all authors agree concerning the striking effects ofarhovin thesis of the statements are objectionable by reason of the actionsimplied, rather than stated directly the following are examples. “arhovin in gonorrheal infections of the male genito-urinary organs anterior urethritis this is the class of paper in which the most favorable results from arhovin have been reported ” “posterior urethritis “here also the striking effects from arhovin medication, both in acute and chronic paper, are rapid decrease of discharge, disappearance of gonococci from the secretion, and cessation of subjective difficulties, such as strangury ”while the firm did not agree to withdraw the objectionable advertisingbefore jan 1, 1919, which made necessary the omission of arhovin fromnew and nonofficial remedies, 1919, it did submit a proposed folder inwhich the most objectionable of the claims are still made the following statement, which was in the proposed “folder” and isincluded in an advertising pamphlet sent out during 1919, serves toillustrate those points. “its action is three-fold. “strong antiseptic and bactericidal effect upon the urethral and vesical mucosae, highly conducive to shortening and palliation of the acute disease course ”no evidence has been presented that arhovin is capable of destroyingthe gonococcus in the urethra, and consequently, the councildeclared the recommendation for the use of arhovin in the treatmentof gonorrhea, by means of claims such as those just cited, is bothmisleading and dangerous -- from reports of council on pharmacy andchemistry, 1919, p 66 chloron, chlorax and number “3” report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe report which appears below was sent to the chlorine productscompany, inc , may 14, 1919 in reply to an inquiry sent the chlorineproducts company, july 8, the company wrote that it could send no replybecause the medical director was still in france however, chloron andchlorax are being advertised in medical journals.

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we do not by any means intend to impute any such effect tophilosophy quite the contrary!. we are thoroughly aware of the greatinfluence which philosophy is entitled to claim in all sciences withoutexception, and for this reason we believe that modern representativesof medical science would be much better off if they were a little lessat variance with philosophy than they actually are in the wide realm of philosophy there are only certain points wherewe can detect a tendency to promote the development of medicalsuperstition this tendency appears in all endeavors which are made toexplain natural phenomena solely in a speculative manner, or to build atheory of life upon a base of pure assumptions whenever such attemptswere made manifest, and impressed philosophy into their service underthe name of natural philosophy, it resulted in the wide predominance ofmedical superstition it is well known that all prae-socratic philosophy aimed at thediscovery of a single principle as underlying and explaining all thephenomena of nature but in spite of this very apparent tendency, it can scarcely be accused of promoting medical superstition. Forprae-socratic philosophy busied itself in speculations concerningterrestrial phenomena earth and air, fire and water, cold and heat, coming into being and passing away, are the things in which itendeavored to find the elemental basis of nature with its multiformphenomena but upon the study of medicine these endeavors exercised, for the time being, a liberalizing influence they emancipated itfrom the repressive grasp of theism, and opened up the way for anexclusively natural explanation of all processes of the body, inhealth as well as in sickness unfortunately the apparatus, or organon, which philosophy furnished to science in its terrestrial phenomena wasa very questionable one, investigation of the conclusion from analogyand the deductive method being of extremely little value, either inmedical diagnosis or the pursuit of natural science for this reasonmedicine was bound to be encumbered with countless badly foundedhypotheses but other monstrous guesses at truth could not fail tobecome current let us consider, for instance, the absurd theory whichheraclitus of ephesus 500 b c has propounded as to the relationsbetween wine and the human soul as the soul, according to thisphilosopher, naturally was a fiery vapor, and the drier and the morefiery it remained the better, the excessive use of alcohol would notbe advisable, in that the abundant infusion of fluids causes the soulto become wet, which would be harmful to its fiery nature, as fire andmoisture are always incompatible who will venture to deny that it wasfrom his opinion regarding the use of wine that heraclitus acquired hissobriquet of “whining philosopher”?. But curious as were all the hypotheses with which hellenic naturalphilosophy foisted upon medicine, they should by no means be confoundedwith superstition, for even a baseless hypothesis is far removedfrom superstition otherwise, medicine and superstition would bealmost identical conceptions, for baseless hypotheses have at no timebeen wanting in our science superstition, so far as its sources arefound in philosophy, did not enter medical science until philosophysought for an explanation of the various processes of life not onlyin material but also in immaterial forces and as indian as well aspersian philosophy, in the earliest period of its existence known tous, had already found in demons the immaterial elements which to agreat extent control the processes of life in man, it will be seen thatthe relations between philosophy and medical superstition are quiteold the hellenic poets and philosophers, homer, hesiod, empedocles, democritus, and plato, elaborated this immemorial doctrine of demonsand introduced it into greece but the recognition of immaterial, supernatural curative factors did not attain any considerable anddetermining influence in ancient medicine until the year 150 b c , when, under the eager advocacy of alexandrian jews, oriental andoccidental doctrines became amalgamated to a coherent system oftheosophic and medical mysticism medicine suffered greatly forcenturies from this mysticism, which prevailed late in the middleages and even up to more recent times the center of all the variousforms under which speculations in the philosophical and theosophicaldomain made their appearance was alexandria, the great central pointof culture in which the civilization of the orient and the occidentwere united in the evolution of a new theory of life but that thebirthplace of developments so momentous for the future of medicineshould be alexandria almost suggests the thought that the writers ofhistory were indulging in a satire upon medical science.