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It clears the sight, provokessweat online professional resume writing services. Inwardly it troubles the stomach and belly, helps bruises, and stretching of the nerves, and therefore is good for women newlydelivered amber-grease, heats and dries, strengthens the brain and nervesexceedingly, if the infirmity of them come of cold, resists pestilence sea-sand, a man that hath the dropsy, being set up to the middle init, it draws out all the water red coral, is cold, dry and binding, stops the immoderate flowing ofthe menses, bloody-fluxes, the running of the reins, and the fluoralbus, helps such as spit blood, it is an approved remedy for thefalling sickness also if ten grains of red coral be given to a childin a little breast-milk so soon as it is born, before it take any otherfood, it will never have the falling-sickness, nor convulsions thecommon dose is from ten grains to thirty pearls, are a wonderful strengthener to the heart, encrease milkin nurses, and amend it being naught, they restore such as are inconsumptions. Both they and the red coral preserve the body in health, and resist fevers the dose is ten grains or fewer.

The flowersare long and hollow, of a purple colour, ending in fine corners thesmaller sort which is to be found in our land, grows up with sundrystalks, not a foot high, writinged into several small branches, whereongrow divers small leaves together, very like those of the lessercentaury, of a whitish online professional resume writing services green colour. On the tops of these stalks growdivers perfect blue flowers, standing in long husks, but not so big asthe other. The root is very small, and full of threads place the first grows in divers places of both the east and westcounties, and as well in wet as in dry grounds. As near longfield, by gravesend, near cobham in kent, near lillinstone in kent, also ina chalk pit hard by a paper-mill not far from dartford in kent thesecond grows also in divers places in kent, as about southfleet, andlongfield. Upon barton hills in bedfordshire. Also not far from st albans, upon a piece of waste chalky ground, as you go out by dunstableway towards gorhambury time they flower in august government and virtues they are under the dominion of mars, andone of the principal herbs he is ruler of they resist putrefactions, poison, and a more sure remedy cannot be found to prevent thepestilence than it is. It strengthens the stomach exceedingly, helpsdigestion, comforts the heart, and preserves it against faintings andswoonings.

The berries are excellently good to cool the liver, the blood, and the spleen, or an hot choleric stomach. To refresh and comfortthe fainting spirits, and quench thirst. They are good also for otherinflammations. Yet it is not amiss to refrain from them in a fever, lest by their putrifying in the stomach they increase the fits theleaves and roots boiled in wine and water, and drank, do likewise coolthe liver and blood, and assuage all inflammations in the reins andbladder, provoke urine, and allay the heat and sharpness thereof thesame also being drank stays the bloody flux and women courses, andhelps the swelling of the spleen the water of the berries carefullydistilled, is a sovereign remedy and cordial in the panting and beatingof the heart, and is good for the yellow jaundice the juice droppedinto foul ulcers, or they washed therewith, or the decoction of theherb and root, doth wonderfully cleanse and help to cure them lotionsand gargles for sore mouths, or ulcers therein, or in the privy writingsor elsewhere, are made with the leaves and roots thereof. Which is alsogood to fasten loose teeth, and to heal spungy foul gums it helps alsoto stay catarrhs, or defluctions of rheum in the mouth, throat, teeth, or eyes the juice or water is singularly good for hot and red inflamedeyes, if dropped into them, or they bathed therewith it is also ofexcellent property for all pushes, wheals and other breakings forth ofhot and sharp humours in the face and hands, and other writings of thebody, to bathe them therewith, and to take away any redness in theface, or spots, or other deformities in the skin, and to make it clearand smooth essay use this medicine, take so thesis strawberries as youshall think fitting, and put them into a distillatory, or body of glassfit for them, which being well closed, set it in a bed of horse dungfor your use it is an excellent water for hot inflamed eyes, and totake away a film or skin that begins to grow over them, and for suchother defects in them as may be helped by any outward medicine succory, or chicory descript the garden succory hath long and narrower leaves than theendive, and more cut in or torn on the edges, and the root abides thesisyears it bears also blue flowers like endive, and the seed is hardlydistinguished from the seed of the smooth or ordinary endive the wild succory hath divers long leaves lying on the ground, very muchcut in or torn on the edges, on both sides, even to the middle rib, ending in a point. Essaytimes it hath a rib down to the middle of theleaves, from among which rises up a hard, round, woody stalk, spreadinginto thesis branches, set with smaller and less divided leaves on them upto the tops, where stand the flowers, which are like the garden kind, and the seed is also only take notice that the flowers of the gardenkind are gone in on a sunny day, they being so cold, that they are notable to endure the beams of the sun, and therefore more delight in theshade the root is white, but more hard and woody than the garden kind the whole plant is exceedingly bitter place this grows in thesis places of our land in waste untilled andbarren fields the other only in gardens government and virtues it is an herb of jupiter garden succory, as it is more dry and less cold than endive, so it opens more anhandful of the leaves, or roots boiled in wine or water, and a draughtthereof drank fasting, drives forth choleric and phlegmatic humours, opens obstructions of the liver, gall and spleen. Helps the yellowjaundice, the heat of the reins, and of the urine. The dropsy also;and those that have an evil disposition in their bodies, by reasonof long sickness, evil diet, &c which the greeks call cachexia adecoction thereof made with wine, and drank, is very effectual againstlong lingering agues. And a dram of the seed in powder, drank in wine, before the fit of the ague, helps to drive it away the distilled waterof the herb and flowers if you can take them in time hath the likeproperties, and is especially good for hot stomachs, and in agues, either pestilential or of long continuance. For swoonings and passionsof the heart, for the heat and head-ache in children, and for the bloodand liver the said water, or the juice, or the bruised leaves appliedoutwardly, allay swellings, inflammations, st anthony fire, pushes, wheals, and pimples, especially used with a little vinegar. As also towash pestiferous sores the said water is very effectual for sore eyesthat are inflamed with redness, for nurses’ breasts that are pained bythe abundance of milk the wild succory, as it is more bitter, so it is more strengthening tothe stomach and liver stone-crop, prick-madam, or small-houseleek descript it grows with divers trailing branches upon the ground, set with thesis thick, flat, roundish, whitish green leaves, pointed atthe ends the flowers stand thesis of them together, essaywhat loosely the roots are small, and run creeping under ground place it grows upon the stone walls and mud walls, upon the tilesof houses and pent-houses, and amongst rubbish, and in other gravellyplaces time it flowers in june and july, and the leaves are green all thewinter government and virtues it is under the dominion of the moon, cold in quality, and essaything binding, and therefore very good tostay defluctions, especially such as fall upon the eyes it stopsbleeding, both inward and outward, helps cankers, and all frettingsores and ulcers. It abates the heat of choler, thereby preventingdiseases arising from choleric humours it expels poison much, resistspestilential fevers, being exceeding good also for tertian agues. Youmay drink the decoction of it, if you please, for all the foregoinginfirmities it is so harmless an herb, you can scarce use it amiss:being bruised and applied to the place, it helps the king evil, andany other knots or kernels in the flesh.

The flowers are white thatgrow at the tops of the branches, spike-fashion, one above another;after which come round pouches, writinged in the middle with a furrow, having one blackish brown seed on either side, essaywhat sharp in taste, and smelling of garlick, especially in online professional resume writing services the fields where it is natural, but not so much in gardens. The roots are small and thready, perishingevery year give me leave here to add mithridate mustard, although it may seem moreproperly by the name to belong to m, in the alphabet mithridate mustard descript this grows higher than the former, spreading more andhigher branches, whose leaves are smaller and narrower, essaytimesunevenly dented about the edges the flowers are small and white, growing on long branches, with much smaller and rounder vessels afterthem, and writinged in the same manner, having smaller brown seeds thanthe former, and much sharper in taste the root perishes after seedtime, but abides the first winter after springing place they grow in sundry places in this land, as half a mile fromhatfield, by the river side, under a hedge as you go to hatfield, andin the street of peckham on surrey side time they flower and seed from may to august government and virtues both of them are herbs of mars the mustardsare said to purge the body both upwards and downwards, and procurewomen courses so abundantly, that it suffocates the birth it breaksinward imposthumes, being taken inwardly. And used in clysters, helpsthe sciatica the seed applied, doth the same it is an especialingredient in mithridate and treacle, being of itself an antidoteresisting poison, venom and putrefaction it is also available in thesispaper for which the common mustard is used, but essaywhat weaker the black thorn, or sloe-bush it is so well known, that it needs no description place it grows in every county in the hedges and borders of fields time it flowers in april, and essaytimes in march, but the fruitripens after all other plums whatsoever, and is not fit to be eatenuntil the autumn frost mellow them government and virtues all the writings of the sloe-bush are binding, cooling, and dry, and all effectual to stay bleeding at the nose andmouth, or any other place. The lask of the belly or stomach, or thebloody flux, the too much abounding of women courses, and helpsto ease the pains of the sides, and bowels, that come by overmuchscouring, to drink the decoction of the bark of the roots, or moreusually the decoction of the berries, either fresh or dried theconserve also is of very much use, and more familiarly taken for thepurposes aforesaid but the distilled water of the flower first steepedin sack for a night, and drawn therefrom by the heat of balneum andanglico, a bath, is a most certain remedy, tried and approved, toease all manner of gnawings in the stomach, the sides and bowels, or any griping pains in any of them, to drink a small quantity whenthe extremity of pain is upon them the leaves also are good to makelotions to gargle and wash the mouth and throat, wherein are swellings, sores, or kernels. And to stay the defluctions of rheum to the eyes, or other writings. As also to cool the heat and inflammations of them, and ease hot pains of the head, to bathe the forehead and templestherewith the simple distilled water of the flowers is very effectualfor the said purposes, and the condensate juice of the sloes thedistilled water of the green berries is used also for the said effects thorough wax, or thorough leaf descript common thorough-wax sends forth a strait round stalk, twofeet high, or better, whose lower leaves being of a bluish colour, aresmaller and narrower than those up higher, and stand close thereto, not compassing it. But as they grow higher, they do not encompassthe stalks, until it wholly pass through them, branching toward thetop into thesis writings, where the leaves grow smaller again, every onestanding singly, and never two at a joint the flowers are smalland yellow, standing in tufts at the heads of the branches, whereafterwards grow the seed, being blackish, thesis thick thrust together the root is small, long and woody, perishing every year, afterseed-time, and rising again plentifully of its own sowing place it is found growing in thesis corn-fields and pasture groundsin this land time it flowers in july, and the seed is ripe in august government and virtues both this and the former are under theinfluence of saturn thorough-wax is of singular good use for all sortsof bruises and wounds either inward or outward. And old ulcers andsores likewise, if the decoction of the herb with water and wine bedrank, and the place washed therewith, or the juice of the green herbbruised, or boiled, either by itself, or with other herbs, in oil orhog grease, to be made into an ointment to serve all the year thedecoction of the herb, or powder of the dried herb, taken inwardly, andthe same, or the leaves bruised, and applied outwardly, is singularlygood for all ruptures and burstings, especially in children before theybe too old being applied with a little flour and wax to childrennavels that stick forth, it helps them thyme it is in vain to describe an herb so commonly known government and virtues it is a noble strengthener of the lungs, asnotable a one as grows. Neither is there scarce a better remedy growingfor that disease in children which they commonly call the chin-cough, than it is it purges the body of phlegm, and is an excellent remedyfor shortness of breath it kills worms in the belly, and being anotable herb of venus, provokes the terms, gives safe and speedydelivery to women in travail, and brings away the after birth it is soharmless you need not fear the use of it an ointment made of it takesaway hot swellings and warts, helps the sciatica and dullness of sight, and takes away pains and hardness of the spleen ’tis excellent forthose that are troubled with the gout it eases pains in the loins andhips the herb taken any way inwardly, comforts the stomach much, andexpels wind wild thyme, or mother of thyme wild thyme also is so well known, that it needs no description place it may be found commonly in commons, and other barren placesthroughout the nation government and virtues it is under the dominion of venus, andunder the sign aries, and therefore chiefly appropriated to the head it provokes urine and the terms, and eases the griping pain of thebelly, cramps, ruptures, and inflamation of the liver if you make avinegar of the herb, as vinegar of roses is made you may find outthe way in my translation of the london dispensatory and anoint thehead with it, it presently stops the pains thereof it is excellentlygood to be given either in phrenzy or lethargy, although they are twocontrary diseases. It helps spitting and voiding of blood, coughing, and vomiting. It comforts and strengthens the head, stomach, reins, andwomb, expels wind, and breaks the stone tormentil, or septfoil descript this hath reddish, slender, weak branches rising from theroot, lying on the ground, rather leaning than standing upright, withthesis short leaves that stand closer to the stalk than cinquefoil towhich this is very like with the root-stalk compassing the branchesin several places. But those that grow to the ground are set uponlong foot stalks, each whereof are like the leaves of cinquefoil, butessaywhat long and lesser dented about the edges, thesis of them dividedinto five leaves, but most of them into seven, whence it is also calledseptfoil. Yet essay may have six, and essay eight, according to thefertility of the soil at the tops of the branches stand divers smallyellow flowers, consisting of five leaves, like those of cinquefoil, but smaller the root is smaller than bistort, essaywhat thick, butblacker without, and not so red within, yet essaytimes a little crooked, having blackish fibres thereat place it grows as well in woods and shadowy places, as in the openchampain country, about the borders of fields in thesis places of thisland, and almost in every broom field in essex time it flowers all the summer long government and virtues this is a gallant herb of the sun tormentilis most excellent to stay all kind of fluxes of blood or humours in manor woman, whether at nose, mouth, or belly the juice of the herb androot, or the decoction thereof, taken with essay venice treacle, andthe person laid to sweat, expels any venom or poison, or the plague, fever, or other contagious diseases, as pox, measles, &c for it is aningredient in all antidotes or counter poisons andreas urlesius is ofopinion that the decoction of this root is no less effectual to curethe french pox than guiacum or china. And it is not unlikely, becauseit so mightily resists putrefaction the root taken inwardly is mosteffectual to help any flux of the belly, stomach, spleen, or blood. Andthe juice wonderfully opens obstructions of the liver and lungs, andthereby helps the yellow jaundice the powder or decoction drank, orto sit thereon as a bath, is an assured remedy against abortion, if itproceed from the over flexibility or weakness of the inward retentivefaculty. As also a plaster made therewith, and vinegar applied tothe reins of the back, doth much help not only this, but also thosethat cannot hold their water, the powder being taken in the juice ofplantain, and is also commended against the worms in children itis very powerful in ruptures and burstings, as also for bruises andfalls, to be used as well outwardly as inwardly the root hereof madeup with pellitory of spain and allum, and put into a hollow tooth, notonly assuages the pain, but stays the flux of humours which causes it tormentil is no less effectual and powerful a remedy against outwardwounds, sores and hurts, than for inward, and is therefore a specialingredient to be used in wound drinks, lotions and injections, forfoul corrupt rotten sores and ulcers of the mouth, secrets, or otherwritings of the body the juice or powder of the root put in ointments, plaisters, and such things that are to be applied to wounds or sores, is very effectual, as the juice of the leaves and the root bruisedand applied to the throat or jaws, heals the king evil, and easesthe pain of the sciatica.

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Then add the rest, and boil them according to art, till the vinegar be consumed, and itstick not to your hands culpeper it helps the bitings of men and beasts, easesinflammations of wounds, and helps infirmities of the joints, and goutsin the beginning emplastrum de betonica or, a plaister of betony college take of betony, burnet, agrimony, sage, pennyroyal, yarrow, comfrey the greater, clary, of each six ounces, frankincense, mastich, of online professional resume writing services each three drams, orris, round birthwort, of each six drams, whitewax, turpentine, of each eight ounces, per-rozin six ounces, gum elemi, oil of fir, of each two ounces, white wine three pounds. Bruise theherbs, boil them in the wine, then strain them, and add the rest, andmake them into a plaister according to art culpeper it is a good plaister to unite the skull when it iscracked, to draw out pieces of broken bones, and cover the bones withflesh. It draws filth from the bottom of deep ulcers, restores fleshlost, cleanses, digests, and drys emplastrum cæsarus college take of red roses one ounce and an half, bistort roots, cypress nuts, all the sanders, mints, coriander seeds, of each threedrams, mastich half an ounce, hypocistis, acacia, dragon blood, earthof lemnos, bole-ammoniac, red coral, of each two drams, turpentinewashed in plantain water four ounces, oil of roses three ounces, whitewax twelve ounces, per-rozin ten ounces, pitch six ounces, the juiceof plantain, houseleek, and orpine, of each an ounce, the wax, rozin, and pitch being melted together, add the turpentine and oil, then thehypocistis and acacia dissolved in the juices, at last the powders, andmake it into a plaister according to art culpeper it is of a fine, cool, binding, strengthening nature, excellently good to repel hot rheums or vapours that ascend up to thehead, the hair being shaved off, and it applied to the crown emplastrum catagmaticum the first college take of juice of marsh-mallow roots six ounces, bark ofashtree roots, and their leaves, the roots of comfrey the greater andsmaller with their leaves, of each two ounces, myrtle berries an ounceand an half, the leaves of willow, the tops of st john wort, of eachan handful and an half, having bruised them, boil them together in redwine, and smith water, of each two pound, till half be consumed, strain it, and add oil of myrtles, and roses omphacine, of each onepound and an half, goat suet eight ounces, boil it again to theconsumption of the decoction, strain it again, and add litharge ofgold and silver, red lead, of each four ounces, yellow wax one pound, colophonia half a pound, boil it to the consistance of a plaister, thenadd turpentine two ounces, myrrh, frankincense, mastich, of each halfan ounce, bole-ammoniac, earth of lemnos, of each one ounce, stir themabout well till they be boiled, and made into an emplaister accordingto art catagmaticum the second college take of the roots of comfrey the greater, marsh-mallows, misselto of the oak, of each two ounces, plantain, chamepitys, st john wort, of each a handful, boil them in equal writings of blackwine, and smith water till half be consumed, strain it, and addmussilage of quince seeds made in tripe water, oil of mastich androses, of each four ounces, boil it to the consumption of the humidity, and having strained it, add litharge of gold four ounces, boil it tothe consistence of an emplaister, then add yellow wax four ounces, turpentine three ounces, colophonia six drams, ship pitch ten ounces, powders of balaustines, roses, myrtles, acacia, of each half an ounce, mummy, androsamum, mastich, amber, of each six drams, bole-ammoniacfine flowers, frankincense, of each twelve drams, dragon blood twoounces. Make it into a plaister according to art culpeper both this and the former are binding and drying, theformer rules will instruct you in the use emplastrum cephalicum or, a cephalic plaister college take of rozin two ounces, black pitch one ounce, labdanum, turpentine, flower of beans, and orobus, dove dung, of each half anounce, myrrh, mastich, of each one dram and an half, gum of juniper, nutmegs, of each two drams, dissolve the myrrh and labdanum in a hotmortar, and adding the rest, make it into a plaister according to art if you will have it stronger, add the powders, euphorbium, pellitory ofspain, and black pepper, of each two scruples culpeper it is proper to strengthen the brain, and repel suchvapours as annoy it, and those powders being added, it dries up thesuperfluous moisture thereof, and eases the eyes of hot scaldingvapours that annoy them emplastrum de cerussa or, a plaister of ceruss college take of ceruss in fine powder, white wax, sallad oil, ofeach three ounces, add the oil by degrees to the ceruss, and boil it bycontinual stirring over a gentle fire, till it begin to swell, then addthe wax cut small by degrees, and boil it to its just consistence culpeper it helps burns, dry scabs, and hot ulcers, and in generalwhatever sores abound with moisture emplastrum ex cicuta cum ammoniaco or, a plaister of hemlock with ammoniacum college take of the juice of hemlock four ounces, vinegar, ofsquills, and ammoniacum, of each eight ounces, dissolve the gum in thejuice and vinegar, after a due infusion, then strain it into its justconsistence according to art culpeper i suppose it was invented to mitigate the extreme pains, and allay the inflammations of wounds, for which it is very good. Letit not be applied to any principal writing emplastrum e crusta panis or, a plaister of a crust of bread college take of mastich, mints, spodium, red coral, all thesanders, of each one dram, oil of mastich and quinces, of each onedrain and an half, a crust of bread toasted, and three times steepedin red rose vinegar, and as often dried, labdanum, of each two ounces, rozin four ounces, styrax calamitis half an ounce, barley meal fivedrams. Make them into a plaister according to art culpeper i shall commend this for a good plaister to strengthenthe brain as any is in the dispensatory, the hair being shaved off, and it applied to the crown. Also being applied to the stomach, itstrengthens it, helps digestion, stays vomiting and putrefaction ofthe meat there emplastrum e cymino or, a plaister of cummin college take of cummin-seed, bayberries, yellow wax, of each onepound, per-rozin two pounds, common rozin three pounds, oil of dillhalf a pound. Mix them, and make them into a plaister culpeper it assuages swellings, takes away old aches coming ofbruises, and applied to the belly, is an excellent remedy for the windcholic this i have often proved, and always with good success emplastrum diacalciteos college take of hog grease fresh and purged from the skins twopounds, oil of olives omphacine, litharge of gold beaten and sifted, of each three pounds, white vitriol burnt and purged four ounces. Letthe litharge, grease, and oil boil together with a gentle fire, witha little plantain water, always stirring it, to the consistence of aplaister, into which being removed from the fire put in the vitrioland make it into a plaister according to art culpeper it is a very drying, binding plaister, profitable in greenwounds to hinder putrefaction, as also in pestilential sores after theyare broken, and ruptures, and also in burnings and scaldings diachylon simple college take of mussilage of linseed, fenugreek seed, marsh-mallowroots, of each one pound, old oil three pounds. Boil it to theconsumption of the mussilage, strain it, and add litharge of gold infine powder, one pound and an half. Boil them with a little water overa gentle fire always stirring them to a just thickness culpeper it is an exceeding good remedy for all swellings withoutpain, it softens hardness of the liver and spleen, it is very gentle diachylon ireatum college add one ounce of orris in powder to every pound ofdiachylon simple diachylon magnum college take of mussilage of raisins, fat figs, mastich, mallow-roots, linseeds, and fenugreek-seeds, bird-lime, the juice oforris and squills, of each twelve drams and an half, œsypus or oilof sheep feet an ounce and an half, oil of orris, chamomel, dill, of each eight ounces, litharge of gold in fine powder one pound, turpentine three ounces, per-rozin, yellow wax, of each two ounces, boil the oil with the mussilages and juices to the consumption of thehumidity, strain the oil from the faces, and by adding the lithargeboil it to its consistence.