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Cough;copious mucous expectoration laryngoscopic examination showed coinin œsophagus the crico-thyroid membrane was incised and coin pushedupward and ejected 6 med times and gaz , 1874, i , p 486 - man, age 20, had severedyspnœa in taking a living fish in his teeth it was about four incheslong and had large dorsal fin, the fish passed into the pharynx andlay doubled up impossible to remove it because of spines tracheotomyat once twenty-four hours afterward the fish had decomposed enough tobe writingly removed patient died of exhaustion 7 littlejohn. Edin med jour , 1875, xx , p 780 - woman founddead in bed suffocated by pus from abscess of tonsil which burstduring sleep found pus in air-passages down to smallest bronchi. Lungscongested. Right side of heart distended with dark fluid blood. Leftside contracted and nearly empty blood everywhere fluid essay lividityof face the woman had died quietly lying beside her husband, who wasnot awakened 8 sayre.

The eyes were fixedand glassy it was essay time before he regained consciousness and fortwo days there was malaise hofmann says that the compression irritates and, in a higher degree, paralyzes the pneumogastric nerves and causes disturbance of the actionof the heart faure810 denies that the constriction of the vessels of the neck hasany effect in the production of symptoms811 coutagne believes that the pressure on the pneumogastric nerve is a factor in causing death he hung two dogs. In one the pneumogastric nerves were dissected out and placed in front of the ligature. This dog no 1 lived a quarter of an hour and died of pure asphyxia with efforts at inspiration continued to the end the other dog no 2, in which the nerves were compressed, died in five minutes in both, the abdominal organs were congested and the cavities of the heart were full the lungs of the first were dry and uniformly red. Of the second were resisting, crepitant, and quite œdematous no subpleural ecchymoses in either the experiments on animals by corin812 led him to conclude that pressure on the pneumogastrics caused increased frequency of the heart-beat and slowing of respiration pellier813 considers the subject quite fully it would appear that the pressure on the pneumogastrics disposes to stop the action of the heart and cause rapid, perhaps instant death the pressure on the carotids causes cerebral anæmia and is then only a secondary cause levy814 does not think the action of the pneumogastrics is sufficiently well known tidy states that a dog lived for three hours suspended by a rope placedabove an opening in the windpipe. And that smith815 mentions the caseof a criminal who was hung. Chovet tried to save the man by making anopening in the trachea before the execution and introducing a smalltube the man was alive forty-five minutes after the drop, but couldnot be resuscitated, although the surgeon bled him in a small proportion of paper of hanging, homicidal and judicial, death occurs by dislocation of the spine this is said to have beenfirst noticed by the celebrated louis, who states that the parisexecutioner was in the habit of giving a violent rotary movement tothe body of the convict as the trap was sprung, causing a dislocationof the odontoid process and compression of the cord and almost instantdeath taylor816 says that for dislocation the body must be heavy andthe fall long and sudden devergie817 found this to occur in abouttwo per cent of paper it is said that the paris hangman placed theslip-knot under the chin in front, which is as dr haughton suggests death may occur from secondary causes after apparent recovery. Fromcongestion of brain and other lesions of the nervous system.

One in a woman, where online homework help for free the cord was below the larynx. And in a man where it was over the larynx he quotes838 as follows. Remer, above larynx, 38. Over larynx, 7. Below larynx, 2 devergie, above larynx, 20. Over larynx, 7. Below larynx, 1 casper, above larynx, 59. Over larynx, 9 roth839 in 49 paper found the ligature mark above the hyoid bone in 5. Between the bone and the larynx, 31. Over the larynx, 8. Below the larynx, 1 hackel found the ligature in forty per cent of paper between hyoid bone and larynx. In sixty per cent lower down the ligature always appears lower after the body is laid down than it was in suspension maschka found the furrow 147 times in 153 paper above the larynx the mark will vary in character according to the kind of ligature used, its mode of application, the vitality of the tissues, and the periodthat has elapsed since death the result is different according as theknot or loop is single or double, a running or slip knot the mark may differ in character in one writing of the neck from another the same furrow may be soft in one writing and dry in another the widthof the mark does not necessarily correspond to the diameter of theligature a double mark usually means that the ligature has been twicepassed around the neck, although the marks may not be continuous orparallel tardieu states that a large single leather thong pressingon the neck only by its borders may make a double mark the mark isusually depressed the depth of the depression, groove, or furrow, as it is called, is greater the narrower and firmer the ligature, thelonger the suspension, and the greater the weight of the body themark may be merely a slight depression, without color, or only a redblush, if the subject is young, tissues healthy, and suspension brief roth, 840 in 49 paper of hanging, found the furrow of the ligature wasbrown in 40, red-brown in 6, and 3 times bluish in about two-thirds of the paper the bottom of the furrow, theplace of greatest pressure, is white, especially so where the knotis tied. While the edges of the furrow are usually slightly raisedand red or livid if the subject is very fat, there may be only aslight depression harvey841 says that this hard, white, shining, translucent band from compression of the connective tissue is the firststage of the parchment or vellum skin, and is chiefly noticed in freshbodies the borders are swollen and œdematous, called by lacassagne“bourrelet de sillon ”the skin beyond the furrow is usually violet authors differ as towhether this is due to congestion or hemorrhage roth842 in 49 paperfound swelling below the furrow 27 times hackel found ecchymoses abovethe mark in thirty-five per cent of the paper of hanging hofmannthinks that the lividity of the upper border of the furrow is due tothe stopping of the venous blood descending from the head the dry, hard, yellowish-brown, or reddish-brown “parchment” furrow, described by writers, is said to be common ogston843 found it inone-third of his paper it is found only when the body has remainedsuspended for several hours after death. Indeed, may be produced byapplying the ligature to the cadaver.

Andthe hands washed morning and evening therewith, helps the palsy, andshaking of them the dwarf elder is more powerful than the common elder in opening andpurging choler, phlegm, and water. In helping the gout, piles, andwomen diseases, colours the hair black, helps the inflammationsof the eyes, and pains in the ears, the biting of serpents, or maddogs, burnings and scaldings, the wind cholic, cholic, and stone, thedifficulty of urine, the cure of old sores and fistulous ulcers eitherleaves or bark of elder, stripped upwards as you gather it, causesvomiting also, dr butler, in a manuscript of his, commends dwarfelder to the sky of dropsies, viz to drink it, being boiled in whitewine. To drink the decoction i mean, not the elder the elm tree this tree is so well known, growing generally in all counties of thisland, that it is needless to describe it government and virtues it is a cold and saturnine plant the leavesthereof bruised and applied, heal green wounds, being bound thereonwith its own bark the leaves or the bark used with vinegar, curesscurf and leprosy very effectually. The decoction of the leaves, bark, or root, being bathed, heals broken bones the water that is foundin the bladders on the leaves, while it is fresh, is very effectualto cleanse the skin, and make it fair. And if cloaths be often wettherein, and applied to the ruptures of children, it heals them, ifthey be well bound up with a truss the said water put into a glass, and set into the ground, or else in dung for twenty-five days, themouth thereof being close stopped, and the bottom set upon a layer ofordinary salt, that the fœces may settle and water become clear, isa singular and sovereign balm for green wounds, being used with softtents.

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Thus do;1 keep your head outwardly warm 2 accustom yourself to the smell of hot herbs 3 take a pill that heats the head at night going to bed 4 in the morning take a decoction that cools the liver, for thatquickly passes the stomach, and is at the liver immediately you must not think, courteous people, that i can spend time to give youexamples of all diseases. These are enough to let you see so much lightas you without art are able to receive. If i should set you to look atthe sun, i should dazzle your eyes, and make you blind 2dly, to such as study astrology, who are the only men i know that arefit to study physic, physic without astrology being like a lamp withoutoil you are the men i exceedingly respect, and such documents as mybrain can give you at present being absent from my study i shall giveyou 1 fortify the body with herbs of the nature of the lord of theascendant, ’tis no matter whether he be a fortune or infortune in thiscase 2 let your medicine be essaything antipathetical to the lord of thesixth 3 let your medicine be essaything of the nature of the sign ascending 4 if the lord of the tenth be strong, make use of his medicines 5 if this cannot well be, make use of the medicines of the light oftime 6 be sure always to fortify the grieved writing of the body bysympathetical remedies 7 regard the heart, keep that upon the wheels, because the sun is thefoundation of life, and therefore those universal remedies, aurumpotabile, and the philosopher stone, cure all diseases by fortifyingthe heart theenglish physicianandfamily dispensatory an astrologo-physical discourse of the human virtues in the body ofman. Both principal and administering human virtues are either principal for procreation, and conservation;or administring, for attraction, digestion, retention, or expulsion * * * * *virtues conservative, are vital, natural, and animal by the natural are bred blood, choler, flegm, and melancholy the animal virtue is intellective, and sensitive the intellective is imagination, judgment, and memory the sensitive is common, and writingicular the writingicular is seeing, hearing, smelling, tasting, and feeling the scope of this discourse is, to preserve in soundness and vigour, the mind and understanding of man.