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Nyu Essay Prompt


The ulcerations of the kidneys also, andthe pains in the bowels, and gonorrhea, being boiled in wine or water, and drank the same also is no less powerful to help any ruptures orburstings, used both inwardly and outwardly. And briefly, it is aseffectual in binding, restraining, consolidating, heating, drying andhealing, as comfrey, bugle, self-heal, or any other of the vulneraryherbs whatsoever saracen confound, or saracen woundwort descript this grows essaytimes, with brownish stalks, and otherwhiles with green, to a man height, having narrow green leavessnipped about the edges, essaywhat like those of the peach-tree, orwillow leaves, but not of such a white green colour the tops of thestalks are furnished with thesis yellow star-like flowers, standing ingreen heads, which when they are fallen, and the seed ripe, whichis essaywhat long, small and of a brown colour, wrapped in down, istherefore carried away with the wind the root is composed of fibresset together at a head, which perishes not in winter, although thestalks dry away and no leaf appears in the winter the taste hereof isstrong and unpleasant. And so is the smell also place it grows in moist and wet grounds, by wood-sides, andessaytimes in moist places of shadowy groves, as also by the water side time it flowers in july, and the seed is soon ripe, and carriedaway with the wind government and virtues saturn owns the herb, and it is of a sobercondition, like him among the germans, this wound herb is preferredbefore all others of the same quality being boiled in wine, and drank, it helps the indisposition of the liver, and freeth the gall fromobstructions. Whereby it is good for the yellow jaundice and for thedropsy in the beginning of it. For all inward ulcers of the reins, mouth or throat, and inward wounds and bruises, likewise for such soresas happen in the privy writings of men and women. Being steeped in wine, and then distilled, the water thereof drank, is singularly good toease all gnawings in the stomach, or other pains of the body, as alsothe pains of the mother. And being boiled in water, it helps continualagues. And the said water, or the simple water of the herb distilled, or the juice or decoction, are very effectual to heal any green wound, or old sore or ulcer whatsoever, cleansing them from corruption, andquickly healing them up. Briefly, whatsoever hath been said of bugle orsanicle, may be found herein sauce-alone, or jack-by-the-hedge-side descript the lower leaves of this are rounder than those that growtowards the top of the stalks, and are set singly on a joint beingessaywhat round and broad, pointed at the ends, dented also about theedges, essaywhat resembling nettle leaves for the form, but of a freshergreen colour, not rough or pricking. The flowers are white, growingat the top of the stalks one above another, which being past, followsmall round pods, wherein are contained round seed essaywhat blackish the root stringy and thready, perishes every year after it hath givenseed, and raises itself again of its own sowing the plant, or any writingthereof, being bruised, smells of garlic, but more pleasantly, andtastes essaywhat hot and sharp, almost like unto rocket place it grows under walls, and by hedge-sides, and path-ways infields in thesis places time it flowers in june, july, and august government and virtues it is an herb of mercury this is eaten bythesis country people as sauce to their salt fish, and helps well todigest the crudities and other corrupt humours engendered thereby itwarms also the stomach, and causes digestion the juice thereof boiledwith honey is accounted to be as good as hedge mustard for the cough, to cut and expectorate the tough phlegm the seed bruised and boiledin wine, is a singularly good remedy for the wind colic, or the stone, being drank warm.

is dishonesty the rule among nyu essay prompt pharmacists?. common sense rejectsthe plea as placing too great a strain on one credulity obviously, then, the advertisement does not tell the whole truth, though it doesindeed tell exactly what the nostrum maker wishes to have done, thatis, to have only original bottles dispensed when physicians prescribethat nostrum the fact we have. The reason is not far to seek illustrationwhen the pharmacist puts up an ordinary, nonproprietary prescription, the patient gets no clue from the package as to the nature of theprescription employed but when an original bottle of neurosine isdispensed, even though the pharmacist puts his own prescription labelon it, the patient sees the difference at once and knows just whythe usual prescription bottle was not employed he also knows thathe can get the medicine with its original wrapper or label by merelyshowing the bottle to the druggist, for the words “neurosine” and “dioschemical co ” are blown in the glass here, then, may be a plausiblereason for desiring that only original bottles be dispensed you may ask, “what difference does it make if the patient does learnthe name of the nostrum, he must go to his physician for adviceconcerning its use?. ” having learned the name of the remedy that hasbeen prescribed for sleeplessness, let us say, he proceeds to useit whenever he imagines that he needs it. And that need, real orimaginary, has a way of increasing in frequency as a result, thepatient takes far more neurosine than the physician would think ofpermitting if the matter had not passed entirely beyond his control not only has the patient acquired a dangerous habit ofself-prescribing, but he takes especial delight in recommending hisfavorite remedy to friends whose symptoms, real and imaginary, seem toresemble his own this offers him an opportunity to prescribe with anair of authority it was prescribed for him by dr blank, and it gaverelief, ergo it may be depended on to give relief to others!. thus isthe basis laid for its general use by the laity, when this process ismultiplied sufficiently the statement is susceptible of easy proofby any one who cares to investigate the matter for himself there isprobably no physician worthy of the name who will attempt to denythat the promiscuous use of hypnotics and narcotics is dangerous, andcertainly no careful physician will deliberately place a narcotic inthe hands of patients to be used freely and without control since we have selected neurosine at random, so far as this writingiculardiscussion is concerned, it is worth while to inquire into itscomposition, the claims that have been made for it and the evidence, ifany exists, for or against its therapeutic value even the most activeof hypnotics are worse than useless if they are inferior to otherreadily available hypnotics, or if they have undesired side-actionsthat outweigh any advantages that they might otherwise have the council on pharmacy and chemistry investigated the literaturerelating to neurosine and published its report in the journal, jan 9, 1915, p 165 according to this report the manufacturers of neurosineclaimed that each fluidounce contained. Bromid of potassium, c p 40 grains bromid of sodium, c p 40 grains bromid of ammonium, c p 40 grains bromid of zinc 1 grain extract lupulin 32 grains cascara sagrada, fl ex 40 minims extract henbane 0 075 grain extract belladonna 0 075 grain extract cannabis indica 0 60 grain oil bitter almonds 0 60 grain aromatic elixirthis chemical blunderbuss was recommended for use in insomnia, hysteria, neurasthenia, migraine, neuralgia, delirium tremens, epilepsyand thesis other conditions also it was called an ideal calmative forchildren suffering from chorea, the exploiters claiming that “allauthorities recommend the bromids, hyoscyamus and cannabis indica inthis disease ” oliver t osborne, professor of therapeutics in yalemedical school, does not mention one of these three drugs in hisdiscussion of the medicinal treatment of chorea, in the handbook oftherapy, though he quotes several authorities in this article indeed, he does not mention one of the ten drugs included in the above formulaof neurosine in connection with the treatment of this disease it is acurious fact that osborne gives the greatest prominence to the use ofthat drug which is claimed to be wanting in the formula of neurosine, namely, hydrated chloral perhaps you may have seen temporary relief follow the administrationof neurosine in chorea, and may argue that theorizing is of littlevalue in the face of personal experience we shall not deny that essaymay have had that experience, for osborne calls attention to the factthat the success of any medicinal treatment must be judged in thelight of the fact that chorea is self-limited, and the intensity ofthe symptoms will abate in from two to four weeks in view of this, wewould hardly dispute the claim that one may administer narcotics, suchas those contained in neurosine, and the symptoms of chorea may abatein spite of such mistreatment in all the years that neurosine has beenexploited to physicians with such remarkable claims, we have never seena report of a careful clinical study in which the product has been usedunder the conditions which scientific investigation demands would youprescribe any nonproprietary preparations which had never been studiedclinically, if a horse-shoer or grocer boy told you it would cureepilepsy or malaria?. According to an editorial note appended to the report of the councilon neurosine, the dios chemical company consisted at that time 1915of j h chambers, his wife and two sons it appeared that chambersnever claimed to have any special knowledge of chemistry, pharmacy ormedicine, yet we find that he arrogated to himself or to his employeesthe right to offer therapeutic advice to the medical profession, andeven to direct them as to how they should prescribe a given mixture we essaytimes fail to see the forest because of the trees it may helpus to obtain a better perspective, in a problem that concerns usintimately, by resorting to a hypothetic case, if a close analogy ismaintained in order that we may see ourselves as others see us insuch a situation, let us consider the following imaginary case. Youbecome involved in a lawsuit in which an effort is made to deprive youof your property and your liberty you seek what you had reason tobelieve was competent legal advice. But, nevertheless, you lose yourcase and find yourself deprived of your property and your liberty nowlet us suppose further that you discover, when too late to permit youto correct your mistake, that your legal adviser we can hardly callsuch a man a lawyer had been acting all along under the guidance of aplumber who made no pretense of knowing anything about law how wouldyou feel regarding that pretended lawyer?. would you feel that you hadbeen treated fairly?. would you feel disposed to speak with all charityof him, to recommend him to those in need of legal advice?. You would probably feel toward such a lawyer as patients must feeltoward physicians who prescribe proprietary nostrums based oninformation and advice offered by those who, though without any specialknowledge of chemistry, pharmacy or medicine, will be benefitedfinancially if their information and advice are accepted and actedon -- from the journal a m a , april 27, 1918 anasarcin advertisingi i see index for other articles on anasarcin to the editor:-- as an old fellow of the a m a i beg to presentthe following facts to you, and to ask if anything can be done by youto expose the methods of these people. A concern calling itself “theanasarcin chem co ” of winchester, tenn , has caused to be sent tophysicians a chart on the subject of “diagnostics of renal diseases ”this chart contains eighteen plates, which were all taken withoutknowledge or permission of either myself or my publishers, williamwood & co , from the third edition of my book on “urinary analysisand diagnosis ” the plates are writingly composite plates, but mostlyportions of plates, exactly reproduced from my book i at once causedmy publishers to write to the anasarcin company. And a few days ago ireceived a letter from a dr h elliott bates of 118 east twenty-eighthstreet, new york, whose letterhead says, “medical advertising ” in thisletter the writer says that it was he who suggested the sending of sucha chart, and admits that all the plates were taken from my book inthis letter he offers to have a letter sent to every physician of thecountry “in which it is explicitly stated that the cuts on the chartwere taken from your book, and that complete information regardingthe matters treated on the chart can be found in your book ” in otherwords he offers to advertise my book free of cost to me, so that ishould take no further steps in the matter i consider this entirematter an outrage, and thought it best to write to you for advice, since my publishers seem to think that in spite of the violation of thecopyright nothing can be done besides the cuts, essay of the text on the chart is bodily taken frommy book, while essay of the other text, not taken from my book, butapparently compiled from different articles, is in writing entirely wrong, so much so that i must be ashamed of its being associated with any ofmy own work by giving this letter your early consideration, and advising me whatyou think it best for me to do, you would greatly oblige louis heitzman, m d , new york comment -- readers of the journal are, of course, familiar with thearticles246 that have been published on “anasarcin, ” the “dropsycure”!. knowing the standard of ethics that the anasarcin concern adoptsin the exploitation of its ridiculous squill mixture, our readerswill not be surprised at the standard of commercial ethics whichwould justify the appropriation of copyrighted scientific materialfor nostrum advertising purposes the statement of dr heitzmannpublishers that “in spite of a violation of copyright nothing can bedone” is, of course, incorrect essaything can be done by those whohold the copyright -- ed -- from the journal a m a , oct 18, 1919 246 j a m a 46:288 jan 27 1906.

And it isnot a felony, if through his ignorance of the quality of the medicineprescribed, or of the nature of the disease, or of both, the patient, contrary to his expectations, should die the death of a man killed byvoluntarily following a medical prescription cannot be adjudged felonyin the writingy prescribing unless he, however ignorant of medical sciencein general, had so much knowledge or probable information of the fataltendency of the prescription that it may be reasonably presumed bythe jury to be an act of wilful rashness at nyu essay prompt least, and not of honestintention and expectation to cure ”the doctrine of the thompson case too broad - this lax statementof the law, made by the learned chief justice in this case, has beenmuch doubted and criticised it appears to be unsound in the length towhich it goes in requiring, in order to constitute criminal liability, what may be termed excessive gross carelessness or wilful grosscarelessness it apparently runs counter to the prevailing opinions ofthe english judges, and to the later decisions of the courts in theunited states, although it is followed and approved in rice v thestate, 8 mo , 561 in rex v long 4 car & p , 308-310, park, j , said. “i call itacting wickedly when a man is grossly ignorant and yet affects to curepeople, or when he is grossly inattentive to their safety ”so in rex v spiller 5 car & p , 353, the court said. “if aperson, whether a medical man or not, professes to deal with thelife and health of another, he is bound to use competent skill andsufficient attention.

With this you may witha little pains taken make a powder into a paste, and that paste intocakes called troches 5 having made them, dry them in the shade, and keep them in a pot foryour use chapter xiv of pills 1 they are called pilulæ, because they resemble little balls. Thegreeks call them catapotia 2 it is the opinion of modern physicians, that this way of makingmedicines, was invented only to deceive the palate, that so byswallowing them down whole, the bitterness of the medicine might not beperceived, or at least it might not be unsufferable. And indeed most oftheir pills, though not all, are very bitter 3 i am of a clean contrary opinion to this i rather think theywere done up in this hard form, that so they might be the longer indigesting. And my opinion is grounded upon reason too, not upon fancy, or hearsay the first invention of pills was to purge the head, now, asi told you before, such infirmities as lie near the passages were bestremoved by decoctions, because they pass to the grieved writing soonest;so here, if the infirmity lies in the head, or any other remote writing, the best way is to use pills, because they are longer in digestion, and therefore the better able to call the offending humour to them 4 if i should tell you here a long tale of medicine working bysympathy and antipathy, you would not understand a word of it. Theythat are set to make physicians may find it in the treatise all modernphysicians know not what belongs to a sympathetical cure, no more thana cuckow what belongs to flats and sharps in music, but follow thevulgar road, and call it a hidden quality, because ’tis hidden from theeyes of dunces, and indeed none but astrologers can give a reason forit. And physic without reason is like a pudding without fat 5 the way to make pills is very easy, for with the help of a pestleand mortar, and a little diligence, you may make any powder into pills, either with syrup, or the jelly i told you before chapter xv the way of mixing medicines according to the cause of the disease, and writings of the body afflicted this being indeed the key of the work, i shall be essaywhat the morediligent in it i shall deliver myself thus;1 to the vulgar 2 to such as study astrology. Or such as study physic astrologically 1st, to the vulgar kind souls, i am sorry it hath been your hardmishap to have been so long trained in such egyptian darkness which toyour sorrow may be felt. The vulgar road of physic is not my practice, and i am therefore the more unfit to give you advice i have nowpublished a little book, galen art of physic, which will fullyinstruct you, not only in the knowledge of your own bodies, but alsoin fit medicines to remedy each writing of it when afflicted.

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For having reduced their metals intopowder, they mixed them with that fatty substance whereof the rest ofthe plaister consisted, whilst it was thus hot, continually stirringit up and down, lest it should sink to the bottom. So they continuallystirred it till it was stiff. Then they made it up in rolls, which whenthey needed for use, they could melt by the fire again 2 the arabians made up theirs with oil and fat, which needed not solong boiling 3 the greeks emplaisters consisted of these ingredients, metals, stones, divers sorts of earth, feces, juices, liquors, seeds, roots, herbs, excrements of creatures, wax, rosin, gums chapter xii of poultices 1 poultices are those kind of things which the latins callcataplasmata, and our learned fellows, that if they can read english, that all, call them cataplasms, because ’tis a crabbed word fewunderstand. It is indeed a very fine kind of medicine to ripen sores 2 they are made of herbs and roots, fitted for the disease, andmembers afflicted, being chopped small, and boiled in water almost toa jelly. Then by adding a little barleymeal, or meal of lupins, and alittle oil, or rough sweet suet, which i hold to be better, spread upona cloth and apply to the grieved places 3 their use is to ease pain, to break sores, to cool inflammations, to dissolve hardness, to ease the spleen, to concoct humours, anddissipate swellings 4 i beseech you take this caution along with you. Use no poultices ifyou can help it that are of an healing nature, before you have firstcleansed the body, because they are subject to draw the humours to themfrom every writing of the body chapter xiii of troches 1 the latins call them placentula, or little cakes, and the greeksprochikois, kukliscoi, and artiscoi. They are usually littleround flat cakes, or you may make them square if you will 2 their first invention was, that powders being so kept might resistthe intermission of air, and so endure pure the longer 3 besides, they are easier carried in the pockets of such as travel;as thesis a man for example is forced to travel whose stomach is toocold, or at least not so hot as it should be, which is most proper, for the stomach is never cold till a man be dead. In such a case, itis better to carry troches of wormwood, or galangal, in a paper in hispocket, than to lay a gallipot along with him 4 they are made thus. At night when you go to bed, take two drams offine gum tragacanth. Put it into a gallipot, and put half a quarter ofa pint of any distilled water fitting for the purpose you would makeyour troches for to cover it, and the next morning you shall find it insuch a jelly as the physicians call mucilage.