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For it should be remembered that the portion of poisonremaining in the alimentary tract is but the residue of the dosewhich had been sufficient to destroy life, and if the processes ofelimination have been rapid no trace of the poison will be found in thealimentary canal but can readily be detected in other organs again, the poison may not have been introduced by the mouth, in which casenone may be found in the digestive tract the chemist should receive, besides the stomach need help with research paper and entire intestinalcanal, the liver, one or both kidneys, the spleen, a piece of musclefrom the leg, the brain, and any urine found in the bladder when it is impossible for any reason to obtain the whole of any organ, the writing removed should be carefully weighed and its proportion to therest of the organ noted it is also of extreme importance to preserve in sealed and labelledjars those writings of a body which may show the evidence of disease, oron the appearance of which one evidence is founded order of autopsy in making the autopsy, the operator should stand on the right side ofthe body and make the incision by grasping the knife firmly in thehand, and cutting with the whole of the blade and not with the point the knife should be swept along from the shoulder rather than from thewrist, thus making a long, smooth, deep cut. Never a jagged one the method of examining the human body after death will vary essaywhataccording to the objects in view these objects may be threefold. 1to ascertain whether a person has died from violence or poison. 2 toestablish the cause of death, especially if it has been sudden.

Ibid, 1915, april 17, p 1283 weil avoided pitfalls of subjective impressions and usedas the essential criterion of efficiency “the demonstrable reductionin size of a tumor, of a kind not to be attributed to the naturalprocesses of evolution of that tumor or of its associated lesions” l c 1915, p 1289 the available evidence for cuprase is far from meeting this criterion that published by the manufacturers and agents presents only vaguegeneralities, and no definite data the evidence gathered by weilhimself permits an estimate of the value of cuprase and it is entirelyunfavorable he states l c 1915, p 1288:“colloidal copper has been used in recent time for the same purposeby gaube du gers and by others i have recently examined the effectsof colloidal copper on malignant tumors in man, and have been unableto find that it has any therapeutic value furthermore, a study ofthe distribution of the copper in tumors obtained at operation or bynecropsy from individuals so treated failed to show that the copper hadbeen deposited therein ”in view of the extravagant and cruelly misleading therapeutic claims, and the indefinite statements of composition, the council votedcuprase ineligible to n n r , and authorized the publication of thisreport -- from the journal a m a , april 12, 1919 collosol preparations report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has adopted and authorized publication of the report whichappears below declaring “collosol argentum, ” “collosol arsenicum, ”“collosol cocain, ” “collosol cuprum, ” “collosol ferrum, ” “collosolhydrargyrum, ” “collosol iodin, ” “collosol manganese, ” “collosol quinin”and “collosol sulphur” inadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies, because their composition is uncertain conflict with rule 1 in thefew paper in which the therapeutic claims for these preparations wereexamined, the claims were found to be so improbable or exaggerated conflict with rules 6 and 10 as to have necessitated the rejection ofthese products w a puckner, secretarythe anglo-french drug co , ltd , london and new york, in november, 1918, requested the council to consider the products “collosolargentum, ” “collosol arsenicum, ” “collosol cocain, ” “collosol cuprum, ”“collosol ferrum, ” “collosol hydrargyrum, ” “collosol iodin, ” “collosolmanganese, ” “collosol quinin” and “collosol sulphur ” the term“collosol” appears to be a group designation for what are claimed tobe permanent colloidal solutions, marketed by the anglo-french drugco , ltd were this claim correct, “collosols” should contain theiractive constituents in the form of microscopic or ultramicroscopicsuspensions, protected against spontaneous precipitation by thepresence of proteins or essay similar “stabilizers ”according to the original patent specifications for collosols, themetals are precipitated or treated with “peptone, ” which acts as thesuspending or stabilizing agent the method of using the peptone makesit doubtful, in the first place, whether the need help with research paper major writing of the metalsis present in colloidal form, or merely in the form of peptonates, i e , as ordinary salts moreover, the later patents indicate that theproducts have been unsatisfactory. “experience having shown that essaymetal colloids under certain conditions not yet fully understood havethe tendency to break down after a certain period” u s patent no 1, 116, 247 phenol, it is claimed has a tendency to counteract thisdecomposition, and the patent covers the use of phenol for this purpose it is difficult to see how phenol could possibly have such action infact, it obviously does not, for a number of the samples of collosolssubmitted to the council had separated for instance, “collosolhydrargyrum” was not a colloidal solution at all, but a suspensionof a coarse powder the ampules of “collosol ferrum” contained aconsiderable quantity of flocculent precipitate if either of thesepreparations were injected intravenously as directed, death mightresult, making the physician morally if not legally liable the recklessness of the claims is further illustrated by the advicethat these indefinite mixtures of poisonous metals can be injected inunlimited quantities thus, henry crookes stated chemical news, may 7, 1914, p 218 that collosols “contain so small a proportion ofmetal, viz , 1 in 2000, that even a poisonous body like arsenic can beused with impunity ” he stated that they may be applied as a lotion, intramuscular or intravenous injection, and that “one pint or more canbe injected intravenously ”in the case of “collosol cocain, ” as was brought out in the councilreport published in the journal, april 12, 1919, the manufacturers haveadmitted that the product is not what they have claimed-- and stillclaim-- for it the report of the a m a chemical laboratory showedthat “collosol cocain, ” instead of containing 1 per cent cocain asclaimed, contained, in fact, at most not more than 0 4 per cent cocain the report of the a m a chemical laboratory on the collosol productswas sent by the council to the new york office of the anglo-french drugco , ltd , in duplicate in order to facilitate reference to the londonoffice this was essay months ago the information which the councilrequested has not yet been received, nor has the anglo-french drug co , ltd , indicated its intention of supplying such information on theother hand, claims to which specific objection have been made, continueto appear in current advertising accordingly, the council authorizespublication of this report, and declares the collosol preparationspreviously named ineligible to new and nonofficial remedies additional notes on collosol evidencein addition to the preceding the following notes of the referee on theevidence so far submitted were sent to the anglo-french drug company, ltd , for consideration:collosol iodine. The leaflet which describes collosol iodine containsclaims that are improbable, not in accord with accepted facts norsubstantiated by evidence.

The laboratory and the councilas stated in the rules of the need help with research paper council on pharmacy and chemistry, it is“manifestly impossible for the council to investigate the compositionof every complex pharmaceutical mixture ”. “it can only give anunbiased judgment on the available evidence ” in line with this, thelaboratory does not undertake to prove the composition of constitutionof all new synthetics, nor does it attempt to determine the individualcomposition of proprietary mixtures it checks all claims that seemdoubtful, however, and uses its best endeavors to secure correction ofmisstatements with regard to proprietary remedies and improvement inthe quality of these products further, it reexamines, when this seemsdesirable, the products which have been admitted by the council to newand nonofficial remedies, and thus determines, from time to time, theirdependability the fact that no product admitted to new and nonofficialremedies has later been shown to be untrue to its claimed compositionis, it is believed, an indication that in this respect the laboratoryhas succeeded in performing the work for which it was primarily created in this connection the question may be asked, are thesis proprietarymedicines exploited to the medical profession with false claims inregard to their composition?. also it may be asked, has the number ofproprietaries marketed with false statements of composition decreasedsince the council and the laboratory began their work?. answering thelatter question first. There is no doubt that today fewer proprietarymedicines are being sold with false claims as to composition thanthere were ten years ago when the council began its work, medicaljournal advertising teemed with statements regarding the compositionof medicines which any chemist familiar with medicine would nothesitate at sight to brand as untrue today such manifestly falseclaims are rare coming to the former question. Thesis false statementsregarding the identity and composition of remedies have been made inignorance this is not surprising when it is remembered that the mostignorant may and do engage in the manufacture of medicine besidesignorance, however, an accommodating conscience on the writing of themanufacturer and a failure on the writing of the medical profession toappreciate the danger which lies in the use of medicines of unknowncomposition unquestionably have greatly encouraged the marketing offalsely declared medicines a glaring illustration of the ignoranceof manufacturers-- for it is hard to believe that any business concernwould deliberately court prosecution by the federal authorities throughfalse statements on labels-- is the fact that nearly thirty years agoa b lyons published a report147 pointing out that the proprietaryiodia was falsely declared as to composition and that in 1914 when thecouncil examined this preparation such incorrect declaration appearedon the label 148 that thesis physicians do not recognize the dangerto their patients and their reputation in the use of medicines, thecomposition of which they do not know, is illustrated by the fact, disclosed by inquiries sent to the laboratory, that physicians werefound willing to employ an arsenical preparation venarsen, advertisedfor intravenous use, although its promoters vouchsafed no informationin regard to the nature of the arsenic compound contained therein 147 lyons, a b. Detroit lancet, 1882, 6, 157 148 the journal a m a , nov 21, 1914, p 1871 unreliability of little used drugsthe purpose of the federal food and drugs act is to secure theprosecution and punishment of all who sell medicines which areadulterated or misrepresented as to composition as a matter of fact, the wording of the law relating to the adulteration and misbranding ofdrugs is such that the federal authorities have been able to do littlemore than to require that the drugs for which standards are providedin the pharmacopeia shall when sold comply with those standards similarly, those states which attempt to improve the quality of drugssold within their borders-- few states do efficient work along theselines-- limit their work to the enforcement of the pharmacopeialstandards this leaves the vast number of unofficial drugs andmedicaments beyond the control of federal or state authorities while most of these drugs are relatively unimportant, and while theamounts of them which are used are not great individually, the totalconsumption of them is large with a view of furnishing to physiciansstandards for drugs of this sort the council has described in new andnonofficial remedies not only distinctly proprietary drugs, but alsoessay of the unofficial drugs which are apparently of therapeutic valueand used to a considerable extent aiding the council in this line ofendeavor, the laboratory has attempted to establish standards for theselittle used drugs, and new and nonofficial remedies, 1916, providesstandards for such unofficial and non-proprietary drugs as quinin andurea hydrochlorid quinin, tannate, sodium acid phosphate, and sodiumperborate an example of work which furnished much needed standardsfor an unofficial article is the investigation of zinc permanganateby w s hilpert 149 reference to the published reports of thelaboratory will give an idea of the amount of work such standardizationentails a reference to the new u s pharmacopeia, when this comesfrom the press, will show that a considerable number of unofficialarticles described in new and nonofficial remedies have been admittedto the pharmacopeia along with the standards worked out in thislaboratory 149 zinc permanganate, j a m a , feb 6, 1909, p 488. Reportschem lab 2:15, 1909 while in a way the work done in connection with these less importantdrugs has attracted little attention from the medical profession, it has had an effect on pharmaceutical manufacturers in the past, pharmaceutical houses, ever anxious to market essaything new, on theslightest provocation have placed on the market, in the form of pills, powder, elixir, ampule, etc , every drug for which essay sort of medicalrecommendation could be found in marketing these dosage forms, themanufacturer has too often been little concerned about the quality ofthe drugs used 150 just at present, for instance, essay interest isbeing shown in iron cacodylate. But while manufacturers appear to bemost ready to take advantage of this interest by offering the drugin the form of ampules, etc , they have given little help toward theestablishment of standards for this arsenic compound manufacturers areever ready to sell drugs of all sorts, but in view of the small demandthey cannot or will not safeguard the identity and purity of suchdrugs a further illustration of the unreliability of unofficial drugsis the recent report by levy and rowntree151 showing not only thatthe various dosage forms of emetin hydrochlorid obtained from differentmanufacturers varied from manufacturer to manufacturer, but also thatthe product of the same manufacturer was variable and that the supplyfurnished by one pharmaceutical firm was so toxic as to make its usedangerous 150 the unreliability of unimportant medicaments, the journala m a , sept 28, 1912, p 1156 151 levy, r l , and rowntree, l g. On the toxicity of variouscommercial preparations of emetin hydrochlorid, arch int med , march, 1916, p 420 the analysis of “patent medicines”in the preface to the first annual report of the chemical laboratoryit was stated that the laboratory “occasionally takes up theexamination of ‘patent medicines’ ” at that time it was felt thatthe widespread use by the medical profession of irrational and evensecret medicines made it necessary to devote the laboratory attentionto the correction of this evil as the years have passed on, theseconditions have been remedied to essay extent, at least so far aschemical analysis can correct them on the other hand, public opinionhas been aroused to the thesis evils connected with the exploitation of“patent medicines, ” and has more and more insistently demanded that themedical profession aid in the correction of this evil accordingly, the laboratory has paid much attention to the analysis of “patentmedicines” during the last few years as the chief asset of “patentmedicines” is the element of secrecy which surrounds their composition, it is hoped that the laboratory analysis of such widely used “patentmedicines” as nature creation, 152 mayr wonderful stomachremedy, 153 sanatogen, 154 eckman alterative, 155 tonsiline, 156and bromo-quinin157 has been worth the labor in addition, thework of this laboratory has been published, including not only theresults of its analyses, but also the methods which are used in viewof the dearth of published reports regarding the methods used in theanalysis of “patent medicines, ” it is hoped that this feature of thelaboratory work has been of aid to chemists engaged in similar work 152 the journal a m a , march 5, 1910, p 806 153 the journal a m a , aug 19, 1911, p 671 154 the journal a m a , april 20, 1912, p 1216 155 the journal a m a , april 27, 1912, p 1298 156 the journal a m a , april 4, 1914, p 1109 157 the journal a m a , nov 27, 1915, p 1932 the laboratory activities along these lines have done much todiscount the claim of proprietary manufacturers that chemical analysisis unable to determine the character of “patent medicines ” the recentwine of cardui trial has brought it out prominently that chemicalanalysis can determine the presence of potent constituents, and that“patent medicines” which fail to reveal such potent ingredients to theanalyst may safely be put down as worthless the demonstration thatthe essential composition of medicinal preparations may be determinedby chemical analysis should also prove an effective answer to themanufacturers in their protest against the requirement, now beingurged for enactment into law in various states, that the medicinalingredients of their wares must be declared on the label manufacturershave held that this would lay them open to competition with imitationsand substitutions the possibility of chemical identification proves, however, that secrecy of composition, though it prevents consumers fromknowing the character of a “patent medicine, ” will not be a hindranceto the imitator and substitutor identity of drugs used in investigationsin the past, much of the experimental work in medicine has seriouslysuffered in that the identity of the material used in suchinvestigations was not established in view of this the laboratoryhas watched the contributions submitted to the journal, and whenevernecessary and feasible has urged the authors to identify their materialbefore publication of the findings for instance, a number of stainingagents-- so-called “anilin dyes”-- have been found to possess therapeuticaction since the identity of thesis of these staining agents is todayessentially secret, the laboratory has urged through the journal thatthose who experiment with these substances make an effort to determinetheir identity whenever possible and to give preference to those thechemical identity of which is known the need for such identificationhas been discussed in the reports of the laboratory 158 the amountof work involved in the chemical identification of drugs used forexperimental work is illustrated in a contribution entitled “anexamination of several commercial specimens of opium alkaloids or theirsalts ”159 by l e warren, in which was determined the identity ofthe various opium products used in an investigation by d i macht, carried out under a grant of the therapeutic research committee 158 reports a m a chemical laboratory, 1912, v, 102 159 am jour pharm , 1915, 87, 439 the laboratory and pharmaceutical literaturein the past much of the information in regard to the compositionand properties of medicines which has appeared in pharmaceuticaljournals has not become available to medicine in thesis paper medicaljournals could not afford to publish such data because this would havebeen contrary to the interest of their advertisers, and hence thepublications regarding the irrational character of lactopeptine, ofbromidia, etc , which appeared in the pharmaceutical journals did notbecome a matter of common medical knowledge through the laboratoryan attempt has been made to keep the medical profession informed inregard to pharmaceutical literature the laboratory has a good workingpharmaceutical and chemical library, and subscribes to the importantamerican and foreign pharmaceutical and chemical publications thediscussion of new remedies, such as medinal and sodium veronal, 160salvarsan, atoxyl and arsacetin, 161 and neosalvarsan162 soon aftertheir introduction, illustrates the work of the laboratory along theselines 160 the journal a m a , jan 23, 1909, p 311 161 the journal a m a , dec 31, 1910, pp 2303 and 2314 162 the journal a m a , oct 5, 1912, p 1295 the laboratory efforts toward rational prescribingthe laboratory naturally is in thorough sympathy with the present dayefforts toward a more rational use of drugs, as exemplified in thecouncil publication “useful drugs ” two recent contributions ofthe laboratory may be cited as a further support of the movement forlimiting prescribing to the more widely used drugs in line with thegeneral tendency of manufacturers to put out all sorts of modificationsand asserted improvements over official substances, there have beenplaced on the market a number of preparations said to represent essayimprovement over the pharmacopeial blaud pills the report, “thequality of commercial blaud pills, ”163 by l e warren, shows thatthe ordinary pharmacopeial blaud pill is in every way the equal of thesemiproprietary preparations claimed to be improvements further, theexamination of the various brands of sodium and theobromin salicylateas compared with the preparation diuretin by p n leech164 showsthat the former preparations, sold at 35 cents per ounce at the timethe examination was made, are fully the equal of the proprietarydiuretin, which then cost the druggist $1 75 per ounce 163 the journal a m a , april 17, 1915, p 1344 164 the journal a m a , april 4, 1914, p 1108 the laboratory as an information bureauit is generally admitted that the proprietary medicine business, writingicularly the exploitation of complex mixtures, attained theextensive vogue which it has or had because instruction in medicalschools was deficient in materia medica, pharmacy and chemistry as aresult of lack of knowledge along these lines, the young graduate afteressay trial became fearful of formulating his own prescriptions, and intime became dependent on pharmaceutical firms which provided him withmedicines ready to dispense that physicians have been insufficientlytrained in regard to the pharmacy and chemistry of drugs has often beenemphasized in pharmaceutical journals where prescriptions containingincompatible drugs are reported and where even plans are broughtforward whereby the pharmaceutical profession may aid in remedying thisdifficulty during my pharmaceutical experience i was often sorely vexed as to whatto do when prescriptions contained drugs which on mixing would undergodecomposition which the physician surely did not anticipate i rememberwell a prescription directing that potassium permanganate be made intopills with extract of gentian and other things, and how, the physicianhaving spurned the suggestion to modify the prescription so as to avoiddecomposition of the permanganate, i was obliged to select a mortar, gently triturate the drugs until a conflagration was started, and tofinish the prescription after the combustion had subsided however, in my pharmaceutical experience i generally found the physician mostready to receive suggestions from the pharmacist which would preventincompatibilities, improve the palatability and appearance of hisprescriptions, and protect the patient from unnecessary expense similarly it has been my experience since the establishment of theassociation laboratory that physicians are anxious to receiveinformation in regard to the materia medica, pharmacy and chemistryof drugs as the druggist earns the respect and support of thephysician when he makes available to him the pharmaceutical knowledgeand experience which he has, so this laboratory has aimed to gainthe endorsement of the american medical association membership byfurnishing to physicians information in regard to the composition, chemistry and pharmacy of drugs through replies in the query andminor notes dewritingment of the journal as well as through directcorrespondence it has been most gratifying to the laboratory that thejournal receives an increasing number of inquiries both as regardsthe chemical and pharmaceutical questions involved in the writing ofprescriptions and as regards the composition of secret and semisecretproprietaries often because they are prescribed by the inquirercolleague and “patent medicines” which are taken by his patient thelaboratory has tried its best to answer the thesis inquiries received thesis of the questions which come in can be answered by a pharmacist orchemist without hesitation others, writingicularly as to the compositionof medicines, the laboratory has been able to answer by reference toits library and its extensive card index still others have requiredexperimentation and chemical analysis while, as stated a moment ago, the laboratory has encouraged thesending of inquiries and has earnestly striven to furnish theinformation asked for, it is obvious that the amount of chemical workwhich can be done is limited the small size of the laboratory force, consisting of three chemists engaged in actual analytical work, makesit necessary to select for investigation those problems which shallbe of general interest to the medical profession as the americanmedical association is national in its scope, the laboratory has heldthat it can do analytical work only when such work will be of generalinterest to physicians and of value both to the medical professionand the public in view of this it has refrained from undertakinganalyses which would benefit only the physician making the inquiry andpossibly his patient the laboratory further has not felt justifiedin undertaking work of merely local interest.

It is not customary to entertain the commander of a cruiser in the chart room " need help with research paper so they came into the saloon just as he came through the door he saw essay of us being hustled out of sight but said nothing shortly one of the ladies would shout down the alleyway. "oh, mrs so and so, won't you come to my room for a minute?. don't be frightened " all this for the benefit of the danish officer in the saloon in the meantime the danish chief officer was wandering around the igotz mendi, taking notice of all he saw while strolling through the bunkers, where our "temporary" warm place was, he noticed nita's "kewpie" doll lying where she had dropped it there were men standing around all through these quarters suddenly the officer turned on a man standing there and said. "you're not a german " the man answered saying. "no, sir. I am a dane " "well, what are you doing here?. " was the next question the dane, jensen, told him he was from the wolf and was working here on the igotz mendi, and that there were american and british prisoners on board, including essay women and children after completing his rounds, the danish officer went on deck and told lieutenant lagoni that he was ready, and calling him aside, told him what he had found out lieutenant lagoni then gave orders to disable the wireless plant and told rose that the tug could not assist him off the beach, and that at the end of twenty-four hours the vessel would be interned providing she was still under german flag, and advised him to land any prisoners he had mendi"igotz mendi" ashore on the danish coast taken the morning we landed, february 26th, 1918 lifeboatlife boat leaving the beach for the stranded "igotz mendi" of course during all this talk we prisoners knew nothing at all of what was going on, and when we saw the danish officers leaving we came to the conclusion that our case was lost, and as there was an armed sentry pacing back and forth in front of the two doors leading from the cabin to the deck, it looked black indeed, and i for one felt very, very disappointed the strain was beginning to tell on my wife again. So we both lay down on the bunk with our clothes on and listened to rose on the bridge, ringing the telegraph and working his engines in a vain attempt to get his vessel off the beach as i lay there thinking, i could not but pity rose, realising how he must have felt just imagine what his feelings must have been on realising that after spending fifteen months on a raiding and mine laying cruise, and always evading his enemies, he had run his vessel aground almost at the gates of gerthesis, and in place of receiving the iron cross first class, there was the possibility of his facing court martial on his arrival home, provided of course he was lucky enough to escape internment thinking this i fell asleep and at 6:30 a m of february 25th shall i ever forget the date?. i was awakened by one of the german seamen named "hans" knocking at my door and saying. "kapitaine, kapitaine, wake up and get ready to go ashore in the boats " i'll bet we broke all speed records getting on deck rose asked me to get into the life-saving boat first, as the danish crew could not speak english, and then i could help the balance as they came down the ladder i got juanita firmly on my back and climbed down into the boat there was a large sea running and as the igotz mendi was stationary on the bottom and the life-boat was riding on the seas, one moment it would be even with my feet and in another would be fifteen feet below the idea was to jump at that instant the boat was even with me this was easy enough with myself and wife, who understood such things and had had previous experience, but to the balance of the passengers it was hard to make them let go at the right time. They all having a tendency to hang on until the boat had started to go down again then, if they should let go, the drop was so great that the men in the life-boat could not hold them when they tried to catch them in essay paper it was necessary absolutely to tear the passengers off the ladder by main force however, we finally got all the women, children and men into the boat and we started for the beach when we got into the breakers and the seas washed clean over us, thesis thought it would be a case of swim or drown, not reckoning on the kind of life-boat we were in or on the class of men that manned it i have seen various life-crews at drill and i spent a season on the beach at cape nome, where everything is surf work, but these old danes, averaging fifty years of age and the living caricatures of that great soap advertisement, "life buoy soap, " familiar to all the reading public, were in a class by themselves on entering the breakers, they dropped a kedge anchor with a long line on it, and literally slacked the boat through a gigantic comber, one of those curling ones, just commencing to break, would rush upon us. Up would go the stern of the boat and just at the instant that i would expect her to go end for end, the old "sinbad" tending the anchor line would check her and in another instant we would rush for the beach, just as the kanakas ride the surf on a board at honolulu when we finally grounded the men from the beach ran out and seized the women, the balance then ran the boat higher up the beach the natives must have thought that we were a bunch of raving maniacs, the way we carried on, getting our feet on good "terra firma" again we danced, we shouted, and cheered, and made damn fools of ourselves generally. But to my mind the situation warranted it what a fitting climax to an adventure of this kind eight months a prisoner on a teuton raider, and set free at the very gates of gerthesis, at the eleventh hour and fifty-ninth minute it is hard to realise just what this meant to us all possibly the very lives of my wife and kiddie, as i feel sure that they could not have stood much more, and at the best, there was from one to a possible five years' being buried alive in a german internment camp, and living under the conditions that i know to exist in that country we were taken to the nearby lighthouse, where the keepers and their families did everything possible for us, drying our clothes and giving us hot coffee to warm ourselves about midday we went into skagen, two miles distant, and separated, going to various hotels my family and i put up at the sailors' home and were excellently taken care of by our host, mr borg hansen i wish to go on record here as saying that at no place that i have ever been in have i met a more whole-souled, more hospitable or more likable class of people in my life than these danish people of the little town of skagen i met people there who were the quintessence of courtesy and hospitality. In fact, they were "regular danish ladies and gentlemen " here at skagen our various consuls took us in charge and sent us to copenhagen, where we separated, going our several ways appendixduring her fifteen months' cruise the wolf laid approximately five hundred mines and captured fourteen vessels, as follows:1 british tank s/s "turitella, " 7300 gross tons, captain s g meadows, captured on february 27, 1917, in the indian ocean, bound from rangoon to europe with a cargo of oil the captain and officers were taken off this vessel and transferred to the wolf a crew of german officers and mine-men were put on board of her, under charge of lieutenant-commander brandes, ex-chief officer of the wolf, and she was sent away as a mine layer, laying mines at bombay and at calcutta, and was afterwards captured at aden, while laying mines, by a british gun-boat. And her crew of chinamen were sent back to china, while her german officers were taken prisoners 2 british s/s "jumma, " 6050 gross tons, captain shaw wickerman, bound from torreirja, spain, to calcutta with a cargo of salt captured in the indian ocean, march 1st after what coal and stores she had on board had been removed, she was bombed on the morning of march 3rd in latitude 8 degrees 9 minutes north and longitude 62 degrees 1 minute east 3 british s/s "wadsworth, " of london, 3509 gross tons, built in 1915, captain john shields, captured on march 11th, in latitude 54 degrees 30 minutes north and longitude 67 degrees east after taking off about fifteen tons of rice and ship's stores the vessel was bombed on the 18th wadsworth was bound from bassinia, india, to london with a cargo of rice, and was six days out from colombo 4 mauritius bark "dee, " 1200 tons, captain ruug, bound from mauritius to bundbury, australia, in ballast, thirty-nine days out captured may 21st, 300 miles off the west coast of australia crew of blacks and stores taken on board the wolf and the vessel immediately bombed 5 new zealand s/s "wairuna, " of the union s/s co line, of new zealand, captain john saunders, with general cargo from auckland to san francisco captured may 21st off sunday island by seaplane the wolf was lying behind sunday island cleaning and repairing boilers at the time of capture the flying machine flew over the wairuna and dropped a message attached to a sandbag, saying to steer towards the wolf or the flying machine would drop bombs on her thus she was taken by the raider after taking off essay forty live sheep and ship's stores and about 900 tons of coal, she was sunk by one bomb and fifteen shells while towing the wairuna to sea, wolf discovered the schooner winslow 6 american schooner "winslow, " 566 gross tons, captain trudgett, bound from sydney to samoa, with general cargo captured off sunday island on june 7th by the seaplane while wolf was sinking the wairuna after removing ship's stores and essay 450 tons of coal the winslow was sunk on june 21st by four bombs and thirty-nine shells, the old wooden box simply refusing to sink 7 american bark "beluga, " of san francisco, 590 gross tons, captain cameron, bound from san francisco to sydney, australia, with a cargo of benzine captured latitude south 26 degrees, on july 9th after removing 300 paper of oil, the stores and boatswain's supplies, the beluga was set on fire on july 11th by gun fire, by the nineteenth shot 8 american schooner "encore, " 651 gross tons, captain oleson, bound from columbia river to sydney, australia, with a load of lumber captured july 16th in latitude south 21 degrees and longitude east 169 degrees after removing stores she was set on fire and left 9 australian s/s "matunga, " of the burns & phillips line, captain donaldson, en route from sydney to rabul, new guinea captured august 4th, about 122 miles southwest of rabul both vessels proceeded from this point to pirate's cove, at the northernmost end of new guinea, arriving there on august 10th transferred cargo to the wolf, amounting to essay 850 tons of coal and 350 tons of supplies. Also prisoners passengers, including two army medical corps officers and three military captains on august 26th wolf proceeded to sea and sunk the matunga by three bombs, vessel sinking in six and one-half minutes full writingiculars of the matunga's cargo was picked up by the wolf in a wireless message to her consignees, giving a copy of her outward manifest, also all sailing dates from time to time by burns & phillips themselves 10 japanese s/s "hitachi maru, " of the n y k co , 6558 gross tons, captain kokmoa, en route from colombo to england, via african ports captured on september 26th off the maldive islands and proceeded to southernmost group of the maldives, where 800 tons of bunker coal were transferred to the wolf, also 250 tons of copper and tin, silk, tea, approximately 400 tons of rubber, further cocoanuts and hides on october 7th both vessels proceeded in different directions, the wolf seeking for another vessel with coal while the hitachi loafed along in a general southeasterly direction wolf picked up hitachi again on october 19th, forty-two miles west of the chagos group on october 20th both vessels arrived at the chagos islands and tied up together additional rubber and silk and remaining coal were transferred to the wolf on the morning of november 7th both vessels left chagos and the hitachi was bombed 11 spanish steamer "igotz mendi, " of bilboa, 4648 tons captured in the indian ocean november 10th, en route from delagoa bay to colombo with a cargo of coal this vessel was sent to gerthesis, but grounded off denmark 12 american bark "william kirby, " 1200 tons, of new york, captain blum, from new york to port elizabeth, africa, with a general cargo. Captured on november 15th crew, provisions and stores were taken off and the vessel bombed on november 16th she was captured 320 miles southeast of port elizabeth 13 french bark "marechal davoust, " 1100 tons, from delagoa bay to france with a cargo of wheat captured on december 14th this vessel was armed and equipped with wireless guns and provisions were transferred to the wolf and the vessel sunk on the 15th by bombs captured 130 miles southeast of the cape of good hope 14 norwegian bark "storebror, " 2000 tons, captain moller, bound for europe from montevideo in ballast captured on january 5th in latitude 18 degrees south and 27 degrees west crew, provisions and stores transferred to the wolf and vessel bombed end of the project gutenberg ebook of ten months in a german raider, by john stanley cameron*** end of this project gutenberg ebook ten months in a german raider ******** this file should be named 52656-h htm or 52656-h zip *****this and all associated files of various formats will be found in. Gutenberg org/5/2/6/5/52656/produced by mws, graeme mackreth and the online distributedproofreading team at pgdp net this file wasproduced from images generously made available by theinternet archive/canadian librariesupdated editions will replace the previous one-- the old editionswill be renamed creating the works from public domain print editions means that noone owns a united states copyright in these works, so the foundation and you!. can copy and distribute it in the united states withoutpermission and without paying copyright royalties special rules, set forth in the general terms of use writing of this license, apply tocopying and distributing project gutenberg-tm electronic works toprotect the project gutenberg-tm concept and trademark projectgutenberg is a registered trademark, and may not be used if youcharge for the ebooks, unless you receive specific permission if youdo not charge anything for copies of this ebook, complying with therules is very easy you may use this ebook for nearly any purposesuch as creation of derivative works, reports, performances andresearch they may be modified and printed and given away-- you may dopractically anything with public domain ebooks redistribution issubject to the trademark license, especially commercialredistribution *** start.

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Slightinjection of need help with research paper conjunctivæ mouth open. Tongue not protruding justabove thyroid cartilage extending on right side from median line infront to spinous process was a dirty brown deep furrow with congestedwalls. On left side a line of discoloration due to direct action ofrope soft writings above and below the line much swollen, writingicularly onright side larynx and hyoid bone unnaturally mobile right trapeziusmuscle torn. Sterno-mastoid divided transversely, leaving an intervalof two inches slight ecchymoses between muscle and larynx ecchymoseson ligamentum nuchæ hyoid bone, both greater cornua fractured anddislocated from body. Lesions more marked on right side several smallecchymoses in vicinity larynx not injured brain normal no bloodyor frothy mucus in air-passages lungs not congested one drachm ofstraw-colored serum in pericardium heart empty abdominal organsnormal bladder essaywhat distended with urine see also tidy, “med juris , ” paper 1 to 4 and 60 accident 97 harvey. Indian med gaz , 1876, xi , p 3 - boy, age 1½ years;was swinging by two ropes attached to two posts. The ropes becametwisted around his neck necroscopy showed mark of very small rope infront of neck from ear to ear. Mucous membrane of larynx dark. Lungsmuch congested 98 hackel. Op cit , p 35 - man, age 19, sitting on a load of wood, with the lines around his neck, fell and was hung by the lines 99 biggs and jenkins. New york med jour , 1890, lii , p 30 - case16.