History

Narrative Essay


Barley-flour, white salt, honey, and vinegarmingled together, takes away the itch speedily and certainly thewater distilled from the green barley in the end narrative essay of may, is very goodfor those that have defluctions of humours fallen into their eyes, and eases the pain, being dropped into them. Or white bread steepedtherein, and bound on the eyes, does the same garden bazil, or sweet bazil descript the greater of ordinary bazil rises up usually with oneupright stalk, diversly branching forth on all sides, with two leavesat every joint, which are essaywhat broad and round, yet pointed, of apale green colour, but fresh. A little snipped about the edges, and ofa strong healthy scent the flowers are small and white, and standingat the tops of the branches, with two small leaves at the joints, inessay places green, in others brown, after which come black seed theroot perishes at the approach of winter, and therefore must be new sownevery year place it grows in gardens time it must be sowed late, and flowers in the heart of summer, being a very tender plant government and virtues this is the herb which all authors aretogether by the ears about, and rail at one another like lawyers galen and dioscorides hold it not fit to be taken inwardly.

“the serum and iodized oil may be mixed for immediate use, but could not be put up only separate for the use of the profession and the therapy furnished dr watkins she mixed as used ”this statement throws no light on the discrepancies in the statementswith regard to the place of the iodinized oil in the treatment, namely. A the original statement that the oil was to be given a week afterthe serum. b white statement quoted earlier in this report thatthe oil “is only an adjunct or side treatment” and “is not always usedor indicated”. c the statement in dr watkins’ paper that the oiland the serum are given in combination the council declared the mark white goiter serum and mark whiteiodinized oil ineligible for new and nonofficial remedies andauthorized publication of this report editorial note on the mark white “serum”as essay of our readers will remember, on april 26, 1913, the journalcalled attention to the mark white preparation which at that time wasbeing exploited from denver the propaganda dewritingment has in its filesa number of letters sent out from the mark white concern at varioustimes one mailed in may, 1911, on the embossed stationery of “the markwhite goiter institute, ” exchange building, denver, was evidently ageneral letter sent to physicians, calling their attention to “the mostimportant medical discovery of the age ” “dr mark white, a graduateof the university of pennsylvania, ” said the letter, had discovered “asimple and harmless remedy” that would cure goiter “because of thedesire to preserve the secrecy of this remedy it is given only at theoffice here ” it was then suggested that the doctor might send thoseof his patients who were suffering from thyroidism to the “mark whitegoitre institute ” if he would do so he would be “given a commissionof $10, in paper of the $50 fee with the additional $5 for each $50increase ” it closed with essay casuistic arguments, presumably for thepurpose of overcoming the physician scruples, summing up the matterwith the statement.

And he and all laterauthorities agree that the ancient notion, that professional servicesare always gratuitous unless a special contract narrative essay to pay for them ismade, has long been abandoned he observes pp 13 and 14. “but inour day the increase in the number of professional practitioners, andtheir exclusive devotion to a special class of services as a meansof living, has essentially modified the practical character of thecontracts with their patrons although in legal acceptation a mandate, yet from force of circumstances growing out of an altered state ofsociety, the mandate is practically changed into a contract of hire locatio operis this doubtless reduces professions to the statusof artisanship, and places them on a par with manual labor, conjoinedto the special skill of a writingicular calling but it also simplifiesthe contract, removes it from the category of innominate or imperfectobligations, requiring the intervention of legal fictions to furnisha means for their enforcement, and brings it within the pale ofconsensual agreements based upon a sufficient consideration ”the physician right to sue on contract in england was declared bylegislative enactment by chap 90 sec 31, 21 and 22 victoria it hasnever been denied in the united states adams v stephens, 26 wend , 451-455 physicians’ and surgeons’ service in a sense voluntary - though itis true, as in the case of thesis other doctrines of ancient law whichwere formulated under social conditions far different from those whichprevail in modern times, that these rules and theories have longsince lost their potency as distinct rules governing actions at law, nevertheless the legal aspect of the peculiar relationship betweenphysician and patient, is still affected by the idea that the serviceon the writing of the physician is voluntary that is, the physician orsurgeon is not bound to come and perform services whenever or whereverhe is called he is at liberty to refuse any and every patient whoattempts to employ him patients may cease employing at any time, unless there is a contractfor a certain period - and when he is employed, the patient may at anymoment discharge him, without incurring liability in damages, unless aspecial contract has been entered into between them that the servicesshall be rendered for a fixed period service once begun by physician must be continued until notice ofintention to cease is given by him - if, however, the services arebegun, they must be continued until notice has been given of theintention to discontinue them, and a reasonable time allowed thepatient to obtain the services of another person the reasons for thisrule will be considered more fully below contracts either express or implied - the contract between thephysician and patient may be an express one, that is, one in which allthe terms are agreed upon or expressed between the writingies, or it maybe what is called an implied contract, or one in which the patient, oranother person, simply calls on the physician or surgeon to come andperform services, and neither writingy specifically stipulates or agreesupon any of the terms of the employment express contracts may include any stipulation not contrary to publicpolicy - in the case of an express contract the agreement of thewritingies settles and determines their mutual obligations, whether itbe written or merely verbal but an express contract may also be madein such a form that certain conditions are required to be performedby the physician before he becomes entitled to any compensation forhis services it may also embody an agreement that the patient shallpay certain sums at certain times as the treatment goes on, or that noother physicians shall be employed without the consent of the attendingphysician, or if so employed that they shall be under the direction ofthe attending physician almost anything may be stipulated which is not contrary to publicpolicy, and a breach of any such stipulation entitles the aggrievedwritingy to rescind the contract and cease from performing it 163qualifications of the rule that express contracts may include anystipulation - essay qualifications of this rule of law must, however, be noted a breach by the patient of any one of these stipulationswould entitle the physician to treat the engagement as terminated likeany other contractual relation, and to bring his action for a recoveryfor services rendered up to the time of the breach. But it is doubtfulwhether he would have any action for damages for failure to permit himto perform further services this doubt arises from the legal doctrine, hereinbefore referred to, that a patient is always at liberty todismiss his physician at any time without notice, and without assigningany cause, which recognizes and grows out of the fact that if the trustand confidence of the patient are destroyed, or impaired, no matter howunreasonably or unjustly, the relation between them must thereafterbe unprofitable to both writingies, and dangerous to the patient on theother hand there is little doubt but that whenever an express contractis made by a physician to treat a patient for a certain length of timefor a writingicular disease or injury, the physician is not at liberty toarbitrarily terminate that relation or his connection with the case, unless he has in the contract specifically reserved the right so to do contracts making payment contingent upon successful treatmentvalid - the express contract between the writingies may also contain astipulation, by which the physician makes his compensation contingentupon his effecting a cure smith v hyde, 19 vt , 54.

It refreshes the vital spirits, and is agood cordial in fevers narrative essay. And usually mixed with other cordials, you canhardly err in taking it, it is so harmless a syrup syrupus de cinnamomo or syrup of cinnamon college take of cinnamon grossly bruised, four ounces, steep it inwhite wine, and small cinnamon water, of each half a pound, three days, in a glass, by a gentle heat. Strain it, and with a pound and a half ofsugar, boil it gently to a syrup culpeper it refreshes the vital spirits exceedingly, and cheersboth heart and stomach languishing through cold, it helps digestionexceedingly, and strengthens the whole body you may take a spoonful ata time in a cordial college thus also you may conveniently prepare syrups but onlywith white wine, of annis seeds, sweet fennel seeds, cloves, nutmegs, ginger, &c syrupus acetositatis citriorum or syrup of juice of citrons college take of the juice of citrons, strained without expression, and cleansed, a pound, sugar two pounds, make it into a syrup likesyrup of clove-gilliflowers culpeper it prevails against all diseases proceeding from choler, or heat of blood, fevers, both pestilential, and not pestilential. Itresists poison, cools the blood, quenches thirst, cures the vertigo, ordizziness in the head college after the same manner is made syrups of grapes, oranges, barberries, cherries, quinces, lemons, woodsorrel, mulberries, sorrel, english currants, and other sour juices culpeper if you look the simples you may see the virtues of them:they all cool and comfort the heart, and strengthen the stomach, syrupof quinces stays vomiting, so doth all syrup of grapes syrupus corticum citriorum or syrup of citron pills college take of fresh yellow citron pills five ounces, the berriesof chermes, or the juice of them brought over to us, two drams, springwater four pounds, steep them all night, boil them till half beconsumed, taking off the scum, strain it, and with two pounds and ahalf of sugar boiled it into a syrup. Let half of it be without musk, but perfume the other half with three grains of musk tied up in a rag culpeper it strengthens the stomach, resists poison, strengthensthe heart, and resists the passions thereof, palpitation, faintings, swoonings. It strengthens the vital spirits, restores such as are inconsumptions, and hectic fevers, and strengthens nature much you maytake a spoonful at a time syrupus e coralliis simplex or syrup of coral simple college take of red coral in very fine powder four ounces, dissolveit in clarified juice of barberries in the heat of a bath, a pound, ina glass well stopped with wax and cork, a digestion being made three orfour days, pour off what is dissolved, put in fresh clarified juice, and proceed as before, repeat this so often till all the coral bedissolved. Lastly, to one pound of this juice add a pound and a half ofsugar, and boil it to a syrup gently syrupus e coralliis compositus or syrup of coral compound college take of red coral six ounces, in very fine powder, andlevigated upon a marble, add of clarified juice of lemons, theflegm being drawn off in a bath, sixteen ounces, clarified juice ofbarberries, eight ounces, sharp white wine vinegar, and juice ofwood-sorrel, of each six ounces, mix them together, and put them ina glass stopped with cork and bladder, shaking it every day till ithave digested eight days in a bath, or horse dung, then filter it, ofwhich take a pound and a half, juice of quinces half a pound, sugar ofroses twelve ounces, make them into a syrup in a bath, adding syrup ofclove-gilliflowers sixteen ounces, keep it for use, omitting the halfdram of ambergris, and four grains of musk till the physician commandit culpeper syrup of coral both simple and compound, restore such asare in consumptions, are of a gallant cooling nature, especially thelast, and very cordial, good for hectic fevers, it stops fluxes, therunning of the reins, and the fluor albus, helps such as spit blood, and such as have the falling-sickness, it stays the menses half aspoonful in the morning is enough syrupus cydoniorum or syrup of quinces college take of the juice of quinces clarified six pounds, boil itover a gentle fire till half of it be consumed, scumming it, adding redwine three pounds, white sugar four pounds, boil it into a syrup, to beperfumed with a dram and a half of cinnamon, cloves and ginger, of eachtwo scruples culpeper it strengthens the heart and stomach, stays looseness andvomiting, relieves languishing nature. For looseness, take a spoonfulof it before meat, for vomiting after meat, for both, as also for therest, in the morning syrupus de erysimo or syrup of hedge-mustard college take of hedge-mustard, fresh, six handfuls, the rootsof elecampane, colt-foot, liquorice, of each two ounces, borrage, succory, maiden-hair, of each a handful and a half, the cordialflowers, rosemary and bettony, of each half a handful, annis seeds halfan ounce, raisins of the sun stoned, two ounces, let all of them, beingprepared according to art, be boiled in a sufficient quantity of barleywater and hydromel, with six ounces of juice of hedge-mustard to twopounds and a half, the which, with three pounds of sugar, boil it intoa syrup according to art culpeper it was invented against cold afflictions of the breastand lungs, as asthmas, hoarseness, &c you may take it either with aliquorice stick, or which is better, mix an ounce of it with three orfour ounces of pectoral decoction, and drink it off warm in the morning syrupus de fumaria or syrup of fumitory college take of endive, common wormwood, hops, dodder, hart-tongue, of each a handful, epithimum an ounce and a half, boilthem in four pounds of water till half be consumed, strain it, andadd the juice of fumitory a pound and a half, of borrage and bugloss, of each half a pound, white sugar four pounds, make them into a syrupaccording to art culpeper the receipt is a pretty concocter of melancholy, andtherefore a rational help for diseases arising thence, both internaland external, it helps diseases of the skin, as leprosies, cancers, warts, corns, itch, tetters, ringworms, scabs, &c and it is the betterto be liked, because of its gentleness it helps surfeits exceedingly, cleanses, cools, and strengthens the liver, and causes it to make goodblood, and good blood cannot make bad flesh i commend this receipt tothose whose bodies are subject to scabs and itch if you please you maytake two ounces by itself every morning syrupus de glycyrrhiza or syrup of liquorice college take of green liquorice, scraped and bruised, two ounces, white maiden-hair an ounce, dryed hyssop half an ounce, steep these infour pounds of hot water, after twenty-four hours, boil it till halfbe consumed, strain it, and clarify it, and with honey, penids, andsugar, of each eight ounces, make it into a syrup, adding, before it beperfectly boiled, red rose water six ounces culpeper it cleanses the breast and lungs, and helps continualcoughs and pleurisies you may take it with a liquorice stick, or addan ounce of it or more to the pectoral decoction syrupus granatorum cum aceto. Vulgo, oxysaccharum simplex or syrup of pomegranates with vinegar college take of white sugar a pound and a half, juice ofpomegranates eight ounces, white wine vinegar four ounces, boil itgently into a syrup culpeper look the virtues of pomegranates among the simples syrupus de hyssopo or syrup of hyssop college take eight pounds of spring water, half an ounce of barley, boil it about half an hour, then add the roots of smallage, parsley, fennel, liquorice, of each ten drams, jujubes, sebestens, of eachfifteen, raisins of the sun stoned, an ounce and a half, figs, dates, of each ten, the seeds of mallows and quinces, gum tragacanth tiedup in a rag, of each three drams, hyssop meanly dryed, ten drams, maiden-hair six drams, boil them together, yet so, that the roots mayprecede the fruits, the fruits the seeds, and the seeds the herbs, about a quarter of an hour. At last, five pounds of water beingconsumed, boil the other three being first strained and clarifiedinto a syrup with two pounds and a half of sugar culpeper it mightily strengthens the breast and lungs, causes longwind, clears the voice, is a good remedy against coughs use it likethe syrup of liquorice syrupus ivæ arthriticæ, sive chamæpityos or syrup of chamepitys college take of chamepitys, two handfuls, sage, rosemary, poleymountain, origanum, calaminth, wild mints, pennyroyal, hyssop, thyme, rue, garden and wild, bettony, mother of thyme, of each a handful, theroots of acorns, birthwort long and round, briony, dittany, gentian, hog fennel, valerian, of each half an ounce, the roots of smallage, asparagus, fennel, parsley, bruscus, of each an ounce, pellitory ofspain, an ounce and a half, stœchas, the seeds of annis, ammi, caraway, fennel, lovage, hartwort, of each three drams, raisins of the sun twoounces, boil them in ten pounds of water to four, to which add honeyand sugar, of each two pounds, make it into a syrup to be perfumed withsugar, nutmegs, and cubebs, of each three drams syrupus jujubinus or syrup of jujubes college take of jujubes, violets, five drams, maiden-hair, liquorice, french barley, of each an ounce, the seeds of mallows fivedrams, the seeds of white poppies, melons, lettice, seeds of quincesand gum tragacanth tied up in a rag of each three drams, boil them insix pounds of rain or spring water till half be consumed, strain it, and with two pounds of sugar make it into a syrup culpeper it is a fine cooling syrup, very available in coughs, hoarseness, and pleurisies, ulcers of the lungs and bladder, as alsoin all inflammations whatsoever you may take a spoonful of it once inthree or four hours, or if you please take it with a liquorice stick syrupus de meconio, sive diacodium or syrup of meconium, or diacodium college take of white poppy heads with their seeds, gathered alittle after the flowers are fallen off, and kept three days, eightounces, black poppy heads so ordered six ounces, rain water eightpounds, steep them twenty-four hours, then boil and press them gently, boil it to three pounds, and with twenty-four ounces of sugar boil itinto a syrup according to art syrupus de meconio compositus or syrup of meconium compound college take of white and black poppy heads with their seeds, fiftydrams, maiden-hair fifteen drams, jujubes thirty, the seeds of lettice, forty drams, of mallows and quinces tied up in a rag, a dram and ahalf, liquorice five drams, water eight pounds, boil it according toart, strain it, and to three pounds of decoction add sugar and penids, of each one pound, make it into a syrup culpeper meconium is nothing else but the juice of englishpoppies boiled till it be thick. It prevails against dry coughs, phthisicks, hot and sharp gnawing rheums, and provokes sleep it is anusual fashion for nurses when they have heated their milk by exerciseor strong liquor no marvel then if their children be froward then runfor syrup of poppies, to make their young ones sleep i would fain havethat fashion left, therefore i forbear the dose. Let nurses keep theirown bodies temperate, and their children will sleep well enough, neverfear syrupus melissophylli or syrup of bawm college take of the bark of bugloss roots, an ounce, the roots ofwhite dittany, cinquefoil, scorzonera, of each half an ounce, theleaves of bawm, scabious, devil-bit, the flowers of both sorts ofbugloss, and rosemary, of each a handful, the seeds of sorrel, citrons, fennel, carduus, bazil, of each three drams, boil them in four poundsof water till half be consumed, strain it, and add three pounds ofwhite sugar, juice of bawm and rose water, of each half a pound, boilthem to a syrup, the which perfume with cinnamon and yellow sanders, ofeach half an ounce culpeper it is an excellent cordial, and strengthens the heart, breast, and stomach, it resists melancholy, revives the spirits, isgiven with good success in fevers, it strengthens the memory, andrelieves languishing nature you may take a spoonfull of it at a time syrupus de mentha or syrup of mints college take of the juices of quinces sweet and between sweet andsour, the juice of pomegranates sweet, between sweet and sour, andsour, of each a pound and a half, dried mints half a pound, red rosestwo ounces, let them lie in steep one day, then boil it half away, and with four pounds of sugar boil it into a syrup according to art:perfume it not unless the physicians command culpeper the syrup is in quality binding, yet it comforts thestomach much, helps digestion, stays vomiting, and is as excellenta remedy against sour or offensive belchings, as any is in thedispensatory take a spoonful of it after meat syrupus de mucilaginibus or syrup of mussilages college take of the seeds of marsh-mallows, mallows, quinces, ofeach an ounce, gum tragacanth three drams, let these infuse six hoursin warm decoction of mallows, white poppy seeds, and winter cherries, then press out the mussilage to an ounce and an half, with which, andthree ounces of the aforesaid decoction, and two ounces of sugar, makea syrup according to art culpeper a spoonful taken by itself, or in any convenient liquor, is excellent for any sharp corroding humours be they in what writingof the body soever, phthisicks, bloody-flux, stone in the reins orbladder, or ulcers there. It is excellent good for such as have takenpurges that are too strong for their bodies, for by its slippery natureit helps corrosions, and by its cooling helps inflammations syrupus myrtinus or syrup of myrtles college take of myrtle berries two ounces and an half, sanderswhite and red, sumach, balaustines, barberry stones, red roses, ofeach an ounce and a half, medlars half a pound, bruise them in eightpounds of water to four, strain it, and add juice of quinces and sourpomegranates, of each six ounces, then with three pounds of sugar, boilit into a syrup culpeper the syrup is of a very binding, yet comforting nature, ithelps such as spit blood, all fluxes of the belly, or corrosions ofthe internal writings, it strengthens the retentive faculty, and stopsimmoderate flux of menses a spoonful at a time is the dose syrupus florum nymphæ simplex or syrup of water-lily flowers, simple college take of the whitest of white water-lily flowers, a pound, steep them in three pounds of warm water six or seven hours, let themboil a little, and strain them out, put in the same weight of flowersagain the second and third time, when you have strained it the lasttime, add its weight of sugar to it, and boil it to a syrup syrupus florum nymphæ compositus syrup of water-lily flowers compound college take of white water-lily flowers half a pound, violetstwo ounces, lettice two handfuls, the seeds of lettice, purslain, andgourds, of each half an ounce, boil them in four pounds of clear watertill one be consumed, strain it, and add half a pound of red rosewater, white sugar four pounds, boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper they are both fine cooling syrups, allay the heat ofcholer, and provoke sleep, they cool the body, both head, heart, liver, reins, and matrix, and therefore are profitable for hot diseases ineither, you may take an ounce of it at a time when your stomach isempty syrupus de papavere erratico, sive rubro or syrup of erratic poppies college take of the fresh flowers of red poppies two pounds, steepthem in four pounds of warm spring water, the next day strain it, andboil it into a syrup with its equal weight in sugar culpeper the syrup cools the blood, helps surfeits, and may safelybe given in frenzies, fevers, and hot agues syrupus de pilosella or syrup of mousear college take of mousear three handfuls, the roots of lady-mantlean ounce and an half, the roots of comfrey the greater, madder, white dittany, tormentil, bistort, of each an ounce, the leavesof wintergreen, horsetail, ground ivy, plantain, adder tongue, strawberries, st john wort with the flowers, golden rod, agrimony, bettony, burnet, avens, cinquefoil the greater, red coleworts, balaustines, red roses, of each a handful, boil them gently in sixpounds of plantain water to three, then strain it strongly, and when itis settled, add gum tragacanth, the seeds of fleawort, marsh-mallowsand quinces, made into a mussilage by themselves in strawberry andbettony water, of each three ounces, white sugar two pounds, boil it tothe thickness of honey culpeper it is drying and healing, and therefore good for ruptures syrupus infusionis florum pæoniæ or syrup of the infusion of peony flowers college it is prepared in the same manner as syrup ofclove-gilliflowers syrupus de pæonia compositus or syrup of peony compound college take of the roots of both sorts of peony taken up at thefull moon, cut in slices, and steeped in white wine a whole day, ofeach an ounce and an half, contra yerva half an ounce, siler mountainsix drams, elk claws an ounce, rosemary with the flowers on, onehandful, bettony, hyssop, origanum, chamepitys, rue, of each threedrams, wood of aloes, cloves, cardamoms the less, of each two drams, ginger, spikenard, of each a dram, stœchas, nutmegs, of each two dramsand an half, boil them after one day warm digestion, in a sufficientquantity of distilled water of peony roots, to four pounds, in which being strained through hippocrates’ sleeve put four pounds and anhalf of white sugar, and boil it to a syrup culpeper it helps the falling-sickness, and convulsions syrupus de pomis aiterans or syrup of apples college take four pounds of the juice of sweet scented apples, thejuice of bugloss, garden and wild, of violet leaves, rose water, ofeach a pound, boil them together, and clarify them, and with six poundsof pure sugar, boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper it is a fine cooling syrup for such whose stomachs areoverpressed with heat, and may safely be given in fevers, for it ratherloosens than binds. It breeds good blood, and is profitable in hecticfevers, and for such as are troubled with palpitation of the heart, itquenches thirst admirably in fevers, and stays hiccoughs you may takean ounce of it at a time in the morning, or when you need syrupus de prasio or syrup of horehound college take of white horehound fresh, two ounces, liquorice, polipodium of the oak, fennel, and smallage roots, of each half anounce, white maiden-hair, origanum, hyssop, calaminth, thyme, savory, scabious, colt-foot, of each six drams, the seeds of annis andcotton, of each three drams, raisins of the sun stoned two ounces, fatfigs ten, boil them in eight pounds of hydromel till half be consumed, boil the decoction into a syrup with honey and sugar, of each twopounds, and perfume it with an ounce of the roots of orris florentine culpeper it is appropriated to the breast and lungs, and is afine cleanser to purge them from thick and putrified flegm, it helpsphthisicks and coughs, and diseases subject to old men, and coldnatures take it with a liquorice stick syrupus de quinq radicibus or syrup of the five opening roots college take of the roots of smallage, fennel, parsley, bruscus, sparagus of each two ounces, spring water, six pounds, boil away thethird writing, and make a syrup with the rest according to art, with threepounds of sugar, adding eight ounces of white wine vinegar, towards thelatter end culpeper it cleanses and opens very well, is profitable againstobstructions, provokes urine, cleanses the body of flegm, and is safelyand profitably given in the beginning of fevers an ounce at a timeupon an empty stomach is a good dose syrupus raphani or syrup of radishes college take of garden and wild radish roots, of each an ounce, the roots of white saxifrage, lovage, bruscus, eringo, rest-harrow, parsley, fennel, of each half an ounce, the leaves of bettony, burnet, pennyroyal, nettles, water-cresses, samphire, maiden-hair, of each onehandful, winter cherries, jujubes, of each ten, the seeds of bazil, bur, parsley of macedonia, hartwort, carraway, carrots, gromwell, the bark of the root of bay-tree, of each two drams, raisins of thesun stoned, liquorice, of each six drams, boil them in twelve poundsof water to eight, strain it, and with four pounds of sugar, and twopounds of honey, make it into a syrup, and perfume it with an ounce ofcinnamon, and half an ounce of nutmegs culpeper a tedious long medicine for the stone syrupus regius, alias julapium alexandrinum or julep of alexandria college boil four pounds of rose-water, and one pound of whitesugar into a julep julep of roses is made with damask rose water, inthe very same manner culpeper two fine cooling drinks in the heat of summer syrupus de rosis siccis or syrup of dried roses college make four pounds of spring water hot, in which infuse apound of dried roses, by essay at a time, press them out and with twopounds of sugar, boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper syrup of dried roses, strengthens the heart, comforts thespirits, binds the body, helps fluxes, and corrosions, or gnawings ofthe bowels, it strengthens the stomach, and stays vomiting you maytake an ounce at a time, before meat, if for fluxes. After meat if forvomiting syrupus scabiosæ or syrup of scabious college take of the roots of elecampane, and polypodium of theoak, of each two ounces, raisins of the sun stoned an ounce, sebestenstwenty, colt-foot, lungwort, savory, calaminth, of each a handful andan half, liquorice, spanish tobacco, of each half an ounce, the seedsof nettles and cotton, of each three drams, boil them all the rootsbeing infused in white wine the day before in a sufficient quantityof wine and water to eight ounces, strain it, and adding four ouncesof the juice of scabious, and ten ounces of sugar, boil it to a syrup, adding to it twenty drops of oil of sulphur culpeper it is a cleansing syrup appropriated to the breastand lungs, when you perceive them oppressed by flegm, crudites, orstoppings, your remedy is to take now and then a spoonful of thissyrup, it is taken also with good success by such as are itchy, orscabby syrupus de scolopendrio or syrup of hart-tongue college take of hart-tongue three handfuls, polypodium of theoak, the roots of both sorts of bugloss, bark of the roots of capersand tamerisk, of each two ounces, hops, dodder, maiden-hair, bawm, ofeach two handfuls, boil them in nine pounds of spring water to five, and strain it, and with four pounds of white sugar, make it into asyrup according to art culpeper it helps the stoppings of melancholy, opens obstructionsof the liver and spleen, and is profitable against splenetic evils, andtherefore is a choice remedy for the disease which the vulgar call therickets, or liver-grown. A spoonful in a morning is a precious remedyfor children troubled with that disease men that are troubled with thespleen, which is known by pain and hardness in their left side, maytake three or four spoonfuls, they shall find this one receipt worththe price of the whole book syrupus de stœchade syrup of stœchas college take of stœchas flowers four ounces, rosemary flowers halfan ounce, thyme, calaminth, origanum, of each an ounce and an half, sage, bettony, of each half an ounce, the seeds of rue, peony, andfennel, of each three drams, spring water ten pounds, boil it till halfbe consumed, and with honey and sugar, of each two pounds, boil it intoa syrup, which perfume with cinnamon, ginger, and calmas aromaticus, ofeach two drams tied up in a rag syrupus de symphyto or syrup of comfrey college take of roots and tops of comfrey, the greater and lesser, of each three handfuls, red roses, bettony, plantain, burnet, knotgrass, scabious, colt foot, of each two handfuls, press the juiceout of them all, being green and bruised, boil it, scum it, and strainit, add its weight of sugar to it that it may be made into a syrup, according to art culpeper the syrup is excellent for all inward wounds and bruises, excoriations, vomitings, spittings, or evacuation of blood, it unitesbroken bones, helps ruptures, and stops the menses. You cannot err intaking of it syrupus violarum or syrup of violets college take of violet flowers fresh and picked, a pound, clearwater made boiling hot, two pounds, shut them up close together intoa new glazed pot, a whole day, then press them hard out, and in twopounds of the liquor dissolve four pounds and three ounces of whitesugar, take away the scum, and so make it into a syrup without boiling syrup of the juice of violets, is made with its double weight of sugar, like the former culpeper this syrup cools and moistens, and that very gently, itcorrects the sharpness of choler, and gives ease in hot vices of thebreast, it quenches thirst in acute fevers, and resist the heat of thedisease.

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But, nevertheless, you lose yourcase and find yourself deprived of your property and your liberty nowlet us suppose further that you discover, when too late to permit youto correct your mistake, that your legal adviser we can hardly callsuch a man a lawyer had been acting all along under the guidance of aplumber who made no pretense of narrative essay knowing anything about law how wouldyou feel regarding that pretended lawyer?. would you feel that you hadbeen treated fairly?. would you feel disposed to speak with all charityof him, to recommend him to those in need of legal advice?. You would probably feel toward such a lawyer as patients must feeltoward physicians who prescribe proprietary nostrums based oninformation and advice offered by those who, though without any specialknowledge of chemistry, pharmacy or medicine, will be benefitedfinancially if their information and advice are accepted and actedon -- from the journal a m a , april 27, 1918 anasarcin advertisingi i see index for other articles on anasarcin to the editor:-- as an old fellow of the a m a i beg to presentthe following facts to you, and to ask if anything can be done by youto expose the methods of these people. A concern calling itself “theanasarcin chem co ” of winchester, tenn , has caused to be sent tophysicians a chart on the subject of “diagnostics of renal diseases ”this chart contains eighteen plates, which were all taken withoutknowledge or permission of either myself or my publishers, williamwood & co , from the third edition of my book on “urinary analysisand diagnosis ” the plates are writingly composite plates, but mostlyportions of plates, exactly reproduced from my book i at once causedmy publishers to write to the anasarcin company. And a few days ago ireceived a letter from a dr h elliott bates of 118 east twenty-eighthstreet, new york, whose letterhead says, “medical advertising ” in thisletter the writer says that it was he who suggested the sending of sucha chart, and admits that all the plates were taken from my book inthis letter he offers to have a letter sent to every physician of thecountry “in which it is explicitly stated that the cuts on the chartwere taken from your book, and that complete information regardingthe matters treated on the chart can be found in your book ” in otherwords he offers to advertise my book free of cost to me, so that ishould take no further steps in the matter i consider this entirematter an outrage, and thought it best to write to you for advice, since my publishers seem to think that in spite of the violation of thecopyright nothing can be done besides the cuts, essay of the text on the chart is bodily taken frommy book, while essay of the other text, not taken from my book, butapparently compiled from different articles, is in writing entirely wrong, so much so that i must be ashamed of its being associated with any ofmy own work by giving this letter your early consideration, and advising me whatyou think it best for me to do, you would greatly oblige louis heitzman, m d , new york comment -- readers of the journal are, of course, familiar with thearticles246 that have been published on “anasarcin, ” the “dropsycure”!. knowing the standard of ethics that the anasarcin concern adoptsin the exploitation of its ridiculous squill mixture, our readerswill not be surprised at the standard of commercial ethics whichwould justify the appropriation of copyrighted scientific materialfor nostrum advertising purposes the statement of dr heitzmannpublishers that “in spite of a violation of copyright nothing can bedone” is, of course, incorrect essaything can be done by those whohold the copyright -- ed -- from the journal a m a , oct 18, 1919 246 j a m a 46:288 jan 27 1906. Ibid 48:1535 may 4 1907;ibid 48:1614 may 11 1907, and ibid 49:1992 dec 8 1917 antimeristem-schmidtessay, possibly thesis, of our readers have received a letter fromcologne, gerthesis, from the “bakteriologisch-chemisches laboratoriumwolfgang schmidt ” the letter contains a circular directing theattention of american physicians to “antimeristem-schmidt ” it alsocontains essay advertising leaflets one physician in sending thismaterial to the journal writes.