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Indian med gaz , 1886, xxi , p 78 - man, age 20;suicide. Was cut down and lived for four days 46 kite. Univ med mag , 1888-89, i , p 475 - man, age 69. Suicide 47 terrier. Prog méd , 1887, vi , pp 211-214 - two men, age 29 and25, insane attempted suicide by hanging both resuscitated 48 nobeling.

Am j m mla format essay sample sc 150:25 july 1920 salvarsan. Abrogate the patentthe journal has already commented on the difficulty in securingsalvarsan, on the moral and ethical question as to whether or not it isjustifiable for one person to control the output of a drug necessary topublic health this week we publish an account of the action of the st louis and chicago medical societies, which are calling on the medicalprofession to appeal to their senators and congressmen to abrogate thispatent the journal believes that this patent should be abrogated, notalone because the patentees have not supplied the demand, not alonebecause they have dictated to the medical profession who should havethe drug and how much a physician might have, not alone because ofthe war with gerthesis, not alone because of the special needs of thegovernment at this time for the control of venereal diseases, not alonebecause, as essay claim, the patent at washington does not correctlydescribe the product, but also because the people who are supplyingthis product are charging prices that are exorbitant compared to theprice at which others in this country can supply it the fact is thatthe salvarsan one can obtain today costs $4 50 per ampule of 0 6 gram, whereas the same dose of arsenobenzol-- a preparation identical with, ifnot better than, salvarsan-- costs $2 00 at retail, and as dr schambergsays. “if we are permitted to continue marketing the same drug afterthe war, we can sell it at $1 00 or less per tube ” to abrogate thispatent would be doing an injury to no one certainly the patentees ofsalvarsan have already reaped their harvest-- and a pretty rich one thesupply of salvarsan at a reasonable price in proportion to its actualcost of production is in the interest of the health of the entirepopulation of the country, whereas to let matters rest as they are, is to the benefit of one man while we are emphasizing here the cost, there is after all a greater question, and that is the supply necessaryto help control the ravages of one of the most serious diseaseswhich afflict humanity today it is the duty of congress to abrogatethe patent on this preparation and, incidentally, on all medicinalpreparations of importance -- editorial from the journal a m a , april 21, 1917 end the monopolythe adamson bill, known as the “trading with the enemy act, ” hasrecently been passed by the house of representatives, is now beforethe senate, and will doubtless be enacted into a law one of itsclauses confers authority on the federal trade commission to grantlicenses to citizens of this country to operate patents owned by enemyaliens physicians are interested in the bill primarily because itincludes the salvarsan situation the manner in which salvarsan hasbeen supplied in this country has been so arbitrary and the pricescharged so tremendously above the actual cost, that we should not besatisfied unless the monopoly is ended so that the drug can be suppliedat least at a fairly moderate figure, and the old methods eliminated it is to be hoped, therefore, that the federal trade commission willnot grant exclusive control-- that is, exclusive license-- to any oneperson or firm to do so would simply perpetuate the old monopoly andthe old conditions england has adopted a law, which, in principle, is similar to the adamson bill, and there several concerns have beenlicensed to manufacture the product the same should be done here thedermatologic research laboratories of philadelphia announce that theycan supply arsenobenzol at $1 50 a tube, and that there is immediatelyavailable a supply sufficient for any demand that may be made the samelaboratories have announced also that in a few months they will be ableto supply hospitals for $1 00 a tube considerable responsibility restson the federal trade commission in this matter, for it is not only aquestion of monopoly, but also a question of scientific qualificationsand ability to make the product on the writing of essay who may makeapplication undoubtedly the commission will secure the cooperation ofthe united states public health service, under whose supervision thesedrugs should be manufactured no matter who shall be licensed to makethe product -- editorial from the journal a m a , july 21, 1917 arsphenaminno, this is not a new chemical. It is simply the name adoptedby the federal trade commission for the hydrochlorid of3-diamino-4-dihydroxy-1-arsenobenzene-- in other words, salvarsan asour readers already have been informed three firms have been licensedto manufacture and sell arsphenamin. But, while each manufacturer mayhave his own trade name on the label, the official name must be theprominent one on all packages hence, physicians should at once make ita point to learn and use the name “arsphenamin” in place of salvarsan at first sight, arsphenamin looks formidable in reality, it is just aseasy to familiarize oneself with the word “arsphenamin” as it was tolearn to use the terms “salvarsan, ” “arsenobenzol” or any other of thetrade names -- editorial from the journal a m a , jan 19, 1918 beer and cancer cures did the brewing interests advertise autolysin?. Our readers may remember that an article appeared in this dewritingment ofthe journal for july 6, 1918, under the title “henry smith williams and‘proteal therapy ’” “proteal therapy” is a treatment exploited by henrysmith williams, m d , of new york, for use in tuberculosis, cancer, rheumatism, etc it is apparently a modification of the “autolysin”cancer “cure” which williams had previously puffed in heartmagazine the journal article pointed out that henry smith williams, althoughentitled to write “m d ” after his name, is essentially a journalist he has written voluminously for essay years in lay publications onvarious subjects, both under his own name and under his nom de plume, “stoddard goodhue, m d ” in addition, williams runs a publishingconcern called the goodhue company, which issues a number of books, thesis of them being reprints of williams’ own articles closely associated with henry smith williams is his brother, edwardhuntington williams, who also is a prolific writer the journalprevious article called attention to the fact that there had been sentbroadcast to physicians a neat little cloth-bound book, entitled, “alcohol, hygiene and legislation ” this book, which evidently costessaybody a good deal of money to distribute gratis, was published bythe goodhue company, and was written by edward huntington williams enclosed with the book was an advertising leaflet on the “autolysin”cancer cure and also a letter from the goodhue company, askingphysicians to accept it “with our compliments and the compliments ofthe author ” the letter was chiefly devoted to calling attention tohenry smith williams’ “new book, the autolysin treatment of cancer ”the last thirteen pages of the book “alcohol, hygiene and legislation”contained advertisements of the goodhue company publications, writingicular emphasis being placed on the “autolysin treatment ofcancer, ” by henry smith williams so much by way of retrospect now comes information that may throwan interesting side-light on the matter just presented there is atpresent being conducted by a committee of the united states senate, an investigation relative to the purchase of a washington d c newspaper with money alleged to have been furnished by those interestedin the brewing industry at the opening hearing before the senate committee, tuesday, november19, the secretary of the united states brewers’ association, afteradmitting that brewers’ propaganda had been published in theinternational monthly, edited by viereck of the fatherland, alsodeclared that the publication committee of the brewers’ associationemployed writers to “write up certain subjects” relating to thebrewers’ trade one of the writers mentioned in this connection was, according to the newspaper reports, “dr edward h williams, author ofarticles published in medical and other journals ”with this fact before us, it seemed worth while to go through thebook that had been distributed so lavishly to physicians with thecompliments of the goodhue company and dr edward huntington williams, in the exploitation of “autolysin, ” and henry smith williams’ book onthe subject the first chapter of “alcohol, hygiene and legislation” consists ofa reprint of an article from the new york medical journal of may8, 1915 the article is a skilful presentation of the case for thedefenders of the lighter alcoholic beverages, especially beer thischapter and all succeeding chapters of the book attempt to discreditprohibitory legislation, and argue that prohibition drives the publicto the use of the more ardent alcoholic beverages, while preventing theuse of the milder beverages, such as beer, which one is led to inferis not writingicularly harmful throughout the book, also, the state ofkansas is held up as an example of the harm done by prohibition, andthe theme is developed that insanity and the use of cocain and otherhabit-forming drugs follows in the wake of prohibition the followingextracts are from chapter i. The evil effects of beer and wine, for example, are greatly less than those produced by spirituous liquors italics ours -- ed if our theory of immunity is correct we should expect to find that the older beverages, such as beer and wine, which have been used for thousands of years, are less productive of alcoholic insanity, for example, than the spirituous liquors which are recent innovations in point of fact we find this to be the case. The spirituous liquors are almost wholly responsible for all forms of alcoholic insanity italics ours -- ed chapter ii is a reprint of an article that appeared in everybodymagazine, august 1914, and deals with “legislation from a medicalviewpoint ” it is to the effect that drug addiction and insanity, together with special forms of mental disease directly attributable toalcoholism, seem to flourish best in prohibition territory chapter iii deals with “the peace and war footing of alcohol, ” andis a reprint from the medical record, aug 7, 1915 it, too, singsthe praises of the “lighter beverages, ” while deprecating the use of“ardent spirits ” for instance. An overwhelmingly large proportion of persons who develop alcoholic psychoses in america are drinkers of whisky, or essay corresponding ardent spirit, whereas this condition is seldom seen in beer and wine drinkers italics ours -- ed thus we find the highest percentage of alcohol psychoses among the whisky drinkers who come from western europe, while the wine and beer drinking races of central and southern europe show a distinctly lower percentage, in essay instances only about one-fourth as thesis per thousand italics ours -- ed chapter iv deals with “essay aspects of liquor legislation ” likechapter ii it is an indictment of prohibition, and the united statescensus bureau reports are called on to sustain this thesis quotations, too, are made from the writings of henry smith williamsfurther to prove the point “dry” kansas and “wet” nebraska arefrequently compared, to the detriment of the former one who acceptsthe statements in this chapter will get the impression that kansas hasmore lawlessness, illiteracy, pauperism, and insanity than nebraska chapter v deals with “the problem of legislation ” it is based on thepremise that “prohibition does not prevent the consumption of liquor, ”but on the contrary, “prohibitive legislation induces the consumptionof the most harmful form of liquors ” stated in another way, it isequivalent to charging that prohibition is hard on the brewers, butbeneficial to the distillers in fact, e h williams, in another book “the question of alcohol”-- goodhue co which also champions the casefor the milder alcoholics, quotes henry smith williams as saying, relative to prohibitory legislation.

So we both lay down on the bunk with our clothes on and listened to rose on the bridge, ringing the telegraph and working his engines in a vain attempt to get his vessel off the beach as i lay there thinking, i could not but pity rose, realising how he must have felt just imagine what his feelings must have been on realising that after spending fifteen months on a raiding and mine laying cruise, and always evading his enemies, he had run his vessel aground almost at the gates of gerthesis, and in place of receiving the iron cross first class, there was the possibility of his facing court martial on his arrival home, provided of course he was lucky enough to escape internment thinking this i fell asleep and at 6:30 a m of february 25th shall i ever forget the date?. i was awakened by one of the german seamen named "hans" knocking at my door and saying. "kapitaine, kapitaine, wake up and get ready to go ashore in the boats " i'll bet we broke all speed records getting on deck rose asked me to get into the life-saving boat first, as the danish crew could not speak english, and then i could help the balance as they came down the ladder i got juanita firmly on my back and climbed down into the boat there was a large sea running and as the igotz mendi was stationary on the bottom and the life-boat was riding on the seas, one moment it would be even with my feet and in another would be fifteen feet below the idea was to jump at that instant the boat was even with me this was easy enough with myself and wife, who understood such things and had had previous experience, but to the balance of the passengers it was hard to make them let go at the right time. They all having a tendency to hang on until the boat had started to go down again then, if they should let go, the drop was so great that the men in the life-boat could not hold them when they tried to catch them in essay paper it was necessary absolutely to tear the passengers off the ladder by main force however, we finally got all the women, children and men into the boat and we started for the beach when we got into the breakers and the seas washed clean over us, thesis thought it would be a case of swim or drown, not reckoning on the kind of life-boat we were in or on the class of men that manned it i have seen various life-crews at drill and i spent a season on the beach at cape nome, where everything is surf work, but these old danes, averaging fifty years of age and the living caricatures of that great soap advertisement, "life buoy soap, " familiar to all the reading public, were in a class by themselves on entering the breakers, they dropped a kedge anchor with a long line on it, and literally slacked the boat through a gigantic comber, one of those curling ones, just commencing to break, would rush upon us. Up would go the stern of the boat and just at the instant that i would expect her to go end for end, the old "sinbad" tending the anchor line would check her and in another instant we would rush for the beach, just as the kanakas ride the surf on a board at honolulu when we finally grounded the men from the beach ran out and seized the women, the balance then ran the boat higher up the beach the natives must have thought that we were a bunch of raving maniacs, the way we carried on, getting our feet on good "terra firma" again we danced, we shouted, and cheered, and made damn fools of ourselves generally. But to my mind the situation warranted it what a fitting climax to an adventure of this kind eight months a prisoner on a teuton raider, and set free at the very gates of gerthesis, at the eleventh hour and fifty-ninth minute it is hard to realise just what this meant to us all possibly the very lives of my wife and kiddie, as i feel sure that they could not have stood much more, and at the best, there was from one to a possible five years' being buried alive in a german internment camp, and living under the conditions that i know to exist in that country we were taken to the nearby lighthouse, where the keepers and their families did everything possible for us, drying our clothes and giving us hot coffee to warm ourselves about midday we went into skagen, two miles distant, and separated, going to various hotels my family and i put up at the sailors' home and were excellently taken care of by our host, mr borg hansen i wish to go on record here as saying that at no place that i have ever been in have i met a more whole-souled, more hospitable or more likable class of people in my life than these danish people of the little town of skagen i met people there who were the quintessence of courtesy and hospitality. In fact, they were "regular danish ladies and gentlemen " here at skagen our various consuls took us in charge and sent us to copenhagen, where we separated, going our several ways appendixduring her fifteen months' cruise the wolf laid approximately five hundred mines and captured fourteen vessels, as follows:1 british tank s/s "turitella, " 7300 gross tons, captain s g meadows, captured on february 27, 1917, in the indian ocean, bound from rangoon to europe with a cargo of oil the captain and officers were taken off this vessel and transferred to the wolf a crew of german officers and mine-men were put on board of her, under charge of lieutenant-commander brandes, ex-chief officer of the wolf, and she was sent away as a mine layer, laying mines at bombay and at calcutta, and was afterwards captured at aden, while laying mines, by a british gun-boat. And her crew of chinamen were sent back to china, while her german officers were taken prisoners 2 british s/s "jumma, " 6050 gross tons, captain shaw wickerman, bound from torreirja, spain, to calcutta with a cargo of salt captured in the indian ocean, march 1st after what coal and stores she had on board had been removed, she was bombed on the morning of march 3rd in latitude 8 degrees 9 minutes north and longitude 62 degrees 1 minute east 3 british s/s "wadsworth, " of london, 3509 gross tons, built in 1915, captain john shields, captured on march 11th, in latitude 54 degrees 30 minutes north and longitude 67 degrees east after taking off about fifteen tons of rice and ship's stores the vessel was bombed on the 18th wadsworth was bound from bassinia, india, to london with a cargo of rice, and was six days out from colombo 4 mauritius bark "dee, " 1200 tons, captain ruug, bound from mauritius to bundbury, australia, in ballast, thirty-nine days out captured may 21st, 300 miles off the west coast of australia crew of blacks and stores taken on board the wolf and the vessel immediately bombed 5 new zealand s/s "wairuna, " of the union s/s co line, of new zealand, captain john saunders, with general cargo from auckland to san francisco captured may 21st off sunday island by seaplane the wolf was lying behind sunday island cleaning and repairing boilers at the time of capture the flying machine flew over the wairuna and dropped a message attached to a sandbag, saying to steer towards the wolf or the flying machine would drop bombs on her thus she was taken by the raider after taking off essay forty live sheep and ship's stores and about 900 tons of coal, she was sunk by one bomb and fifteen shells while towing the wairuna to sea, wolf discovered the schooner winslow 6 american schooner "winslow, " 566 gross tons, captain trudgett, bound from sydney to samoa, with general cargo captured off sunday island on june 7th by the seaplane while wolf was sinking the wairuna after removing ship's stores and essay 450 tons of coal the winslow was sunk on june 21st by four bombs and thirty-nine shells, the old wooden box simply refusing to sink 7 american bark "beluga, " of san francisco, 590 gross tons, captain cameron, bound from san francisco to sydney, australia, with a cargo of benzine captured latitude south 26 degrees, on july 9th after removing 300 paper of oil, the stores and boatswain's supplies, the beluga was set on fire on july 11th by gun fire, by the nineteenth shot 8 american schooner "encore, " 651 gross tons, captain oleson, bound from columbia river to sydney, australia, with a load of lumber captured july 16th in latitude south 21 degrees and longitude east 169 degrees after removing stores she was set on fire and left 9 australian s/s "matunga, " of the burns & phillips line, captain donaldson, en route from sydney to rabul, new guinea captured august 4th, about 122 miles southwest of rabul both vessels proceeded from this point to pirate's cove, at the northernmost end of new guinea, arriving there on august 10th transferred cargo to the wolf, amounting to essay 850 tons of coal and 350 tons of supplies. Also prisoners passengers, including two army medical corps officers and three military captains on august 26th wolf proceeded to sea and sunk the matunga by three bombs, vessel sinking in six and one-half minutes full writingiculars of the matunga's cargo was picked up by the wolf in a wireless message to her consignees, giving a copy of her outward manifest, also all sailing dates from time to time by burns & phillips themselves 10 japanese s/s "hitachi maru, " of the n y k co , 6558 gross tons, captain kokmoa, en route from colombo to england, via african ports captured on september 26th off the maldive islands and proceeded to southernmost group of the maldives, where 800 tons of bunker coal were transferred to the wolf, also 250 tons of copper and tin, silk, tea, approximately 400 tons of rubber, further cocoanuts and hides on october 7th both vessels proceeded in different directions, the wolf seeking for another vessel with coal while the hitachi loafed along in a general southeasterly direction wolf picked up hitachi again on october 19th, forty-two miles west of the chagos group on october 20th both vessels arrived at the chagos islands and tied up together additional rubber and silk and remaining coal were transferred to the wolf on the morning of november 7th both vessels left chagos and the hitachi was bombed 11 spanish steamer "igotz mendi, " of bilboa, 4648 tons captured in the indian ocean november 10th, en route from delagoa bay to colombo with a cargo of coal this vessel was sent to gerthesis, but grounded off denmark 12 american bark "william kirby, " 1200 tons, of new york, captain blum, from new york to port elizabeth, africa, with a general cargo.

It hath mla format essay sample cured such as have thephthisic, that have been given over by all physicians. It cures suchas have the falling sickness, gouts, and diseases and swellings of thejoints. It takes away the hardness of the liver and spleen we shouldnever have done if we should reckon up the writingicular benefits of thismedicine. Therefore we commend it as a wholeessay medicine for soundnessof body, preservation of health, and vigour of mind thus galen acetum theriacale, norimberg or treacle vinegar college take of the roots of celandine the greater, one ounceand a half.

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The leaves are writinged with sundry deep gashes on the edges. Theleaves remain a long time, before any stalk appears, afterwards risingup a reasonable big stalk, three or four feet high, and bravely deckedwith flowers from the middle of the stalk upwards. For on the lowerwriting of the stalk, there is neither branches nor leaf the flowers arehooded and gaping, being white in colour, and standing in brownishhusk, with a long small undivided leaf under each leaf. They seldomseed in our country its roots are thesis, great and thick, blackishwithout and whitish within, full of a clammy sap. A piece of them ifyou set it in the garden, and defend it from the first winter cold willgrow and flourish place they are only nursed in the gardens in england, where theywill grow very well time it flowers in june and july government and virtues it is an excellent plant under the dominionof the moon. I could wish such as are studious would labour to keepit in their gardens the leaves being boiled and used in clysters, isexcellent good to mollify the belly, and make the passage slippery thedecoction drank inwardly, is excellent and good for the bloody-flux;the leaves being bruised, or rather boiled and applied like a poulticeare excellent good to unite broken bones and strengthen joints thathave been put out the decoction of either leaves or roots being drank, and the decoction of leaves applied to the place, is excellent goodfor the king evil that is broken and runs. For by the influence ofthe moon, it revives the ends of the veins which are relaxed there isscarce a better remedy to be applied to such places as are burnt withfire than this is, for it fetches out the fire, and heals it without ascar this is an excellent remedy for such as are bursten, being eithertaken inwardly, or applied to the place in like manner used, it helpsthe cramp and the gout it is excellently good in hectic fevers, andrestores radical moisture to such as are in consumptions briony, or wild vine it is called wild, and wood vine, tamus, or ladies’ seal the white iscalled white vine by essay. And the black, black vine descript the common white briony grows ramping upon the hedges, sending forth thesis long, rough, very tender branches at the beginning, with thesis very rough, and broad leaves thereon, cut for the most writinginto five writingitions, in form very like a vine leaf, but smaller, rough, and of a whitish hoary green colour, spreading very far, spreading and twining with his small claspers that come forth at thejoints with the leaves very far on whatsoever stands next to it atthe several joints also especially towards the top of the branchescomes forth a long stalk bearing thesis whitish flowers together on along tuft, consisting of five small leaves a-piece, laid open like astar, after which come the berries separated one from another, morethan a cluster of grapes, green at the first, and very red when theyare thorough ripe, of no good scent, but of a most loathessay tasteprovokes vomit the root grows to be exceeding great, with thesis longtwines or branches going from it, of a pale whitish colour on theoutside, and more white within, and of a sharp, bitter, loathessay taste place it grows on banks, or under hedges, through this land.