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The root is hotand dry, cleansing and scouring, proper for such as have the yellowjaundice, it opens obstructions of the liver, looking for someone to do my assignment being boiled in whitewine, and the decoctions drank. And if chewed in the mouth it helpsthe tooth-ache celandine the lesser is that which usually we callpilewort, which with us is hot in the first degree. The juice of theroot mixed with honey and snuffed up in the nose, purges the head, helps the hemorrhoids or piles being bathed with it, as also doth theroot only carried about one. Being made into an ointment, it helps theking evil or scrophula china, wonderfully extenuates and dries, provokes sweat, resistsputrefaction. It strengthens the liver, helps the dropsy and malignantulcers, leprosy, itch, and venereal, and is profitable in diseasescoming of fasting it is commonly used in diet drinks for the premises cichorii of succory. Cool and dry in the second degree, strengthensthe liver and veins, it opens obstructions, stoppings in the liver andspleen, being boiled in white wine and the decoction drank colchici of meadow saffron the roots are held to be hurtful to thestomach, therefore i let them alone consolidæ, majoris, minoris consolida major, is that which weordinarily call comfry, it is of a cold quality, yet pretty temperate, so glutinous, that, according to dioscorides, they will join meattogether that is cut in sunder, if they be boiled with it. It isexcellent for all wounds, both internal and external, for spitting ofblood, ruptures or burstness, pains in the back, it strengthens thereins, it stops the menses, and helps hemorrhoids the way to use themis to boil them in water and drink the decoction consolida minor, isthat we call self-heal, and the latins prunella see the herb costi utriusque of costus both sorts being roots coming from beyondsea, hot and dry, break wind, being boiled in oil, it is held to helpthe gout by anointing the grieved place with it cucumeris a grestis of wild cucumber roots. They purge flegm, andthat with such violence, that i would advise the country man that knowsnot how to correct them, to let them alone cinaræ, &c of artichokes the roots purge by urine, whereby the ranksavour of the body is much amended cynoglossæ, &c of hounds-tongue, cold and dry. Being roasted andlaid to the fundament, helps the hemorrhoids, is also good for burningsand scaldings curcumæ of turmerick, hot in the third degree, opens obstructions, is profitable against the yellow jaundice, and cold distemper of theliver and spleen, half a dram being taken at night going to bed in thepulp of a roasted apple, and if you add a little saffron to it, it willbe the better by far cyperiutriusque, longi, rotundi of cyprus grass, or english galanga, both sorts, long and round. Is of a warm nature, provokes urine, breaksthe stone, provokes the menses.

Skin mottled. Small ecchymosisjust above line of cord right side right sterno-mastoid muscle torn hyoid bone fractured. Spine not injured no seminal discharge ninetyminutes, pulsation in right subclavian vein. Heart-beat, eighty perminute. Thorax opened, heart exposed. Right auricle showed full andregular contractions and dilatations the spinal cord was then divided one hundred and twenty minutes, heart-beats forty per minute thesepulsations of right auricle continued at intervals for three and a halfhours longer. Readily excited by point of scalpel heart normal. Leftventricle contracted. Right ventricle not so. No coagulation brainnormal.

“christ is theall-restorer, and as such he cooperates in every corporeal cure ” inthis sense ringseis calls the sacraments “the talismans coming from thephysician of all physicians, and, therefore, the most excellent of allphysical, stimulating, and alterative remedies ”thus, after almost three thousand years, medicine had returned to thestage at which it originated namely, to the view that incorporeal, supernatural factors were to play a determining writing in pathologyand therapy however, that there are plenty of individuals even inour time who are at any moment ready again to sacrifice wantonlyall enlightenment and all progress to this varied superstition, is demonstrated by the paper of mrs eddy and the reverend dowie, those modern representatives of medical superstition there is onlyone protection against these relapses, against these atavistictendencies, and that is education in natural science the more itbecomes disseminated among the people the less danger there will bethat the heresies of a false philosophy, or of an overheated religioussentiment, may again conjure up medical superstition to the detrimentof humanity vthe relations of natural science to medical superstitionthe point of view from which man has regarded nature for thousands ofyears up to modern times has been such as to promote most effectuallythe development of superstition. For the idea that a satisfactoryinsight into the character of natural phenomena can be obtained onlyby means of adequate experiments, and of observation perfected by theemployment of the inductive reasoning and ingenious instruments, iscomparatively recent natural science applying such means is scarcelytwo hundred years old fit instruments for the observation of natureexisted only to a limited extent up to the eighteenth century, and, besides, their complete efficiency left much to be desired theattempts to wrest from nature her secrets by means of experiment werebut feeble and unsuccessful altho the ancients, as is shown by thewritings of hippocrates, galen, and others, had essay knowledge ofvivisection, they had practised it to a most limited extent duringthe middle ages and the period of the renaissance comparatively fewphysical experiments were made whatever researches in natural sciencewere then undertaken were intended much less for the investigation ofnature than for fantastic and superstitious purposes as, for instance, the investigations of alchemy and astrology it is quite obvious that, under such circumstances, a number ofsuperficial, imperfect, and distorted observations crept into thetheoretic system of natural science however, this was not all. The diagnostico-theoretical method, bymeans of which antiquity, the middle ages, and even the greatest writingof more modern times, had seen the natural sciences treated, wasradically wrong man did not feel his way carefully from experimentto experiment, from observation to observation, until the generalprinciple was found which inductively comprised a number of phenomenaunder one uniform principle of law, but the principle which was atthe bottom of phenomena was fixed upon a speculative basis, and inaccordance with this principle the phenomena were interpreted as wasdone, for instance, in medicine in the case of humoral pathology andas this speculatively constructed principle was obtained exclusively bya method dangerous to the cognition of natural sciences, by conclusionfrom analogy, naturally the most fantastic and adventurous conceptionssoon became accepted in the realm of natural philosophy but naturalphilosophy once lost in such a labyrinth, an aberration of theperceptive powers can not fail to follow at least, in certain domainsof nature as a matter of fact, this fallacious perception promptlymade its appearance, and has proved the stumbling-block of sciencefrom its earliest days up to the present times occultism, mysticism, or whatever the names may be of the various forms of superstition, have sprung from these erroneous conceptions of natural science itmay even be contended that no variety of superstition exists which isnot essayhow connected with a distorted observation or explanation ofnature however interesting these considerations may be, we can nothere pursue them any further such investigations belong to the history of superstition in general, and any one who desires more detailed information is referred to theenormous literature of the subject we can here consider only thoserelations which prevail, or have prevailed, between superstition andnatural science, and principally the influence which was thus exertedupon the art of healing by astronomy astronomy and medicine became most intimately connected during theearliest periods of human civilization the literature of cuneiforminscriptions shows us that the attempt to bring the stars intoconnection with human destinies is primeval, and reaches back to theancient babylonian age, even to the sumero-accadic period sudhoff, med woche 1901, no 41 how primeval peoples came to connecttheir destinies with the heavenly bodies and their orbits is explainedso lucidly by troels-lund page 28, etc that we shall cite hisdescriptions, even if they are rather long for quotation he says. “thechaldean history of creation is inscribed upon seven clay tablets onthe fifth tablet we read. ‘the seventh day he instituted as a holy day, and ordained that man should rest from all labor ’ why just seven?.

You may look for them in cold grounds, byponds and looking for someone to do my assignment ditches’ sides, and also by running waters. Essaytimes youshall find them grow in the midst of waters time they all flower in july or august, and the seed is ripepresently after government and virtues it is a plant of jupiter, as well as theother agrimony, only this belongs to the celestial sign cancer itheals and dries, cuts and cleanses thick and tough humours of thebreast, and for this i hold it inferior to but few herbs that grow it helps the cachexia or evil disposition of the body, the dropsy andyellow-jaundice it opens obstructions of the liver, mollifies thehardness of the spleen, being applied outwardly it breaks imposthumesaway inwardly. It is an excellent remedy for the third day ague itprovokes urine and the terms. It kills worms, and cleanses the body ofsharp humours, which are the cause of itch and scabs. The herb beingburnt, the smoke thereof drives away flies, wasps, &c it strengthensthe lungs exceedingly country people give it to their cattle when theyare troubled with the cough, or broken-winded alehoof, or ground-ivy several counties give it different names, so that there is scarcelyany herb growing of that bigness that has got so thesis. It is calledcat-foot, ground-ivy, gill-go-by-ground, and gill-creep-by-ground, turn-hoof, haymaids, and alehoof descript this well known herb lies, spreads and creeps upon theground, shoots forth roots, at the corners of tender jointed stalks, set with two round leaves at every joint essaywhat hairy, crumpledand unevenly dented about the edges with round dents. At the jointslikewise, with the leaves towards the end of the branches, come forthhollow, long flowers, of a blueish purple colour, with small whitespots upon the lips that hang down the root is small with strings place it is commonly found under hedges, and on the sides ofditches, under houses, or in shadowed lanes, and other waste grounds, in almost every writing of this land time they flower essaywhat early, and abide a great while. Theleaves continue green until winter, and essaytimes abide, except thewinter be very sharp and cold government and virtues it is an herb of venus, and therefore curesthe diseases she causes by sympathy, and those of mars by antipathy;you may usually find it all the year long except the year be extremelyfrosty. It is quick, sharp, and bitter in taste, and is thereby foundto be hot and dry. A singular herb for all inward wounds, exulceratedlungs, or other writings, either by itself, or boiled with other the likeherbs. And being drank, in a short time it eases all griping pains, windy and choleric humours in the stomach, spleen or belly. Helps theyellow jaundice, by opening the stoppings of the gall and liver, andmelancholy, by opening the stoppings of the spleen. Expels venom orpoison, and also the plague. It provokes urine and women courses. Thedecoction of it in wine drank for essay time together, procures easeto them that are troubled with the sciatica, or hip-gout. As also thegout in hands, knees or feet. If you put to the decoction essay honeyand a little burnt alum, it is excellently good to gargle any soremouth or throat, and to wash the sores and ulcers in the privy writings ofman or woman. It speedily helps green wounds, being bruised and boundthereto the juice of it boiled with a little honey and verdigrease, doth wonderfully cleanse fistulas, ulcers, and stays the spreading oreating of cancers and ulcers.

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They crush the soft writings to a certain extent, and thebones may be indented or even fractured wounds caused by fragments of bottles, pieces of china, earthenware, or glass, though strictly speaking incised wounds, are often curved, angular, and irregular, and their edges jagged and contused wounds caused by scissors may essaytimes be of the nature of incisedwounds when they present a double wound of triangular shape, with theapex of the triangle blunt, they are more of the nature of puncturedwounds in general a “tail” or long angle in the skin at one end of anincised wound indicates the end of the wound last inflicted, and essaylight may thus be thrown upon the inflicter of the wound incised wounds present very favorable conditions for healing by primaryunion, but often fail in this and heal by secondary union when anincised wound fails to unite by primary union, bleeding continuesfor several hours or even as long as a day, the blood being mixedmore or less with a serous discharge the latter continues until thethird day or so by the fourth or fifth day the surface has begun togranulate, and there may be a more or less profuse purulent dischargefrom the surface the granulating surfaces do not necessarily dischargepus, however for essay days, therefore, after the infliction of anincised wound, or until the surface is covered with granulations, thecharacteristics of the wound permit of a diagnosis as to the nature ofthe wound the diagnosis of an incised wound is generally without difficulty essay wounds by blunt instruments, however, in certain regions of thebody, resemble incised wounds very closely such instances are foundwhere a firm, thin layer of skin and subjacent tissue lies directlyover a bony surface or a sharp ridge of bone these are seen most oftenin the scalp or in wounds of the eyebrow where the sharp supra-orbitalridge cuts through the skin from beneath the diagnosis of an incisedwound can often be made with great probability from the cicatrix thisis especially the case if the wound has healed by primary union and thecicatrix is linear the prognosis in incised wounds is good as to life unless a largevessel has been divided or unless an important viscus has beenpenetrated the prognosis as to function varies with the position andextent of the wound, and the circumstance of the healing of the wound punctured wounds, stabs, etc - these are characterized by narrownessas compared to depth, though the depth is not necessarily great they are more varied in character than incised wounds owing to thegreat variety of form of the weapons by which they may be made fromthe form, etc , of a writingicular wound we may often infer the varietyof weapon by which it was produced according to the weapon used, punctured wounds have been divided into several classes, of which m tourdes distinguishes four. 1st punctured wounds by cylindrical orconical instruments like a needle if the instrument be very fine likea fine needle, it penetrates by separating the anatomical elementsof the skin, etc , without leaving a bloody tract such wounds aregenerally inoffensive, even when penetrating, if the needle is aseptic, and they are difficult to appreciate on the cadaver it is almostimpossible to find the tract of such a wound if the instrument be alittle larger it leaves a bloody tract, but it is difficult to followthis in soft tissues, more easy in more resistant structures, such astendon, aponeurosis, cartilage, or serous membrane if the instrument be of any size this variety of punctured woundspresents a form quite different from that of the weapon instead of around wound it is generally a longitudinal wound with two very acuteangles and two elongated borders of equal length, showing but littleretraction this is the shape of the wound even when the instrumentproducing it is so large that the resulting wound resembles that madeby a knife see fig 2 the direction of the long axis of these woundsvaries in different writings of the body and is uniform in the same writing their shape and direction are explained by the tension of the skin orstill more clearly by the direction of the fibres of the skin, justas with the same round instrument in a piece of wood a longitudinalopening or split would be made parallel to the grain see fig 1 inessay regions, as near the vertebræ, the fibres may run in differentdirections, and the resulting wound is stellate or triangular in shapeas if a thesis-sided instrument had caused it as the direction of thefibres of the various tissue layers, such as aponeuroses, serous andmucous membranes, etc , may be different, a deep wound involvingseveral such layers would have a different direction for each layer inillustration of this, examine the figure of a wound through the wall ofthe stomach see fig 3 illustration. Fig 1 - direction of the long axis of wounds of theback caused by conical instruments after langer the wounds above described when large are smaller than the weapon, as the splitting of the skin has certain limits and also owing to theelasticity of the skin, which is put on the stretch by the weapon andrelaxed on its withdrawal when such wounds are small they are largeras a rule than the instrument causing them illustration.