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Literary Essay Example


Guinea-pig 1 was sick and weak with loss of appetite for essay days, but gradually recovered guinea-pig 2 died over night autopsy. There was a large amount of exudate in the peritoneal cavity, irritation of the intestine, and other signs of acute inflammation a moderate degree of congestion. Spleen not enlarged. Liver showed cloudy swelling and fibrinous exudate. Lungs and heart about normal except for a moderate degree of congestion but no exudate guinea-pig 3 was sick for essay days, but recovered gradually one week after experiment 20 -- effect of chlorlyptus in vivo on staphylococcus -- the experiment was conducted in the same way as in experiment 17, but 2 c c were used instead of 1 c c result.

The root small and hard, perishing everyyear the whole plant is of an exceeding bitter taste there is another sort in all things like the former, save only it bearswhite flowers place they grow ordinarily in fields, pastures, and woods, but thatwith the white flowers not so frequently as the other time they flower in july or thereabouts, and seeds within a monthafter government and virtues they are under the dominion of the sun, asappears in that their flowers open and shut as the sun, either shewsor hides his face literary essay example this herb, boiled and drank, purges choleric andgross humours, and helps the sciatica. It opens obstructions of theliver, gall, and spleen, helps the jaundice, and eases the pains in thesides and hardness of the spleen, used outwardly, and is given withvery good effect in agues it helps those that have the dropsy, or thegreen-sickness, being much used by the italians in powder for thatpurpose it kill the worms in the belly, as is found by experience the decoction thereof, viz the tops of the stalks, with the leavesand flowers, is good against the cholic, and to bring down womencourses, helps to avoid the dead birth, and eases pains of the mother, and is very effectual in all pains of the joints, as the gout, cramps, or convulsions a dram of the powder taken in wine is a wonderful goodhelp against the biting and poison of an adder the juice of the herbwith a little honey put to it, is good to clear the eyes from dimness, mists and clouds that offend or hinder sight it is singularly goodboth for green and fresh wounds, as also for old ulcers and sores, toclose up the one and cleanse the other, and perfectly to cure themboth, although they are hollow or fistulous. The green herb especially, being bruised and laid thereto the decoction thereof dropped into theears, cleanses them from worms, cleanses the foul ulcers and spreadingscabs of the head, and takes away all freckles, spots, and marks in theskin, being washed with it. The herb is so safe you cannot fail in theusing of it, only giving it inwardly for inward diseases it is verywholeessay, but not very toothessay there is beside these, another small centaury, which bears a yellowflower. In all other respects it is like the former, save that theleaves are larger, and of a darker green, and the stalks pass throughthe midst of them, as it does in the herb thorowan they are all ofthem, as i told you, under the government of the sun. Yet this, ifyou observe it, you shall find an excellant truth. In diseases of theblood, use the red centaury.

Mix them, and make them into an ointmentaccording to art culpeper it gently cleanses and fills up an ulcer with flesh, itbeing of a mild nature, and friendly to the body unguentum aureum college take of yellow wax half a pound, common oil two pounds, turpentine two ounces, pine rozin, colophonia, of each one ounce and anhalf, frankincense, mastich, of each one ounce, saffron one dram, firstmelt the wax in the oil, then the turpentine being added, let them boiltogether. Having done boiling, put in the rest in fine powder, letthe saffron be the last and by diligent stirring, make them into anointment according to art basilicon, the greater college take of white wax, pine rozin, heifer suet, greek pitch, turpentine, olibanum, myrrh, of each one ounce, oil five ounces, powder the olibanum and myrrh, and the rest being melted, make it intoan ointment according to art basilicon, the less college take of yellow wax, fat rozin, greek pitch, of each half apound, oil nine ounces. Mix them together, by melting them according toart culpeper both this and the former, heat, moisten, and digest, procure matter in wounds, i mean brings the filth or corrupted bloodfrom green wounds. They clense and ease pain ointment of bdellium college take of bdellium six drams, euphorbium, sagapen, of eachfour drams, castoreum three drams, wax fifteen drams, oil of elder orwall-flowers, ten drams, the bdellium, and sagapen being dissolved inwater of wild rue, let the rest be united by the heat of a bath unguentum de calce or, ointment of chalk college take of chalk washed, seven times at least, half a pound, wax three ounces, oil of roses one pound, stir them all togetherdiligently in a leaden mortar, the wax being first melted by a gentlefire in a sufficient quantity of the prescribed oil culpeper it is exceeding good in burnings and scaldings unguentum dialthæ or, ointment of marsh-mallows college take of common oil four pounds, mussilage of marsh-mallowroots, linseed, and fenugreek seed two pounds. Boil them together tillthe watery writing of the mussilage be consumed, then add wax half a pound, rozin three ounces, turpentine an ounce, boil them to the consistenceof an ointment, but let the mussilage be prepared of a pound of freshroots bruised, and half a pound of each of the seeds steeped, andboiled in eight pounds of spring water, and then pressed out see thecompound unguentum diapompholygos college take of oil of nightshade sixteen ounces, white wax, washed, ceruss, of each four drams, lead burnt and washed, pompholixprepared, of each two ounces, pure frankincense one ounce. Bring theminto the form of an ointment according to art culpeper this much differing from the former, you shall have thatinserted at latter end, and then you may use which you please unguentum enulatum or, ointment of elecampane college take of elecampane roots boiled in vinegar, bruised andpulped, one pound, turpentine washed in their decoction, new wax, ofeach two ounces, old hog grease salted ten ounces, old oil fourounces, common salt one ounce, add the turpentine to the grease, wax, and oil, being melted, as also the pulp and salt being finely powdered, and so make it into an ointment according to art unguentum enulatum cum mercurio or, ointment of elecampane with quick-silver, college is made of the former ointment, by adding two ounces ofquick-silver, killed by continual stirring, not only with spittle, orjuice of lemons, but with all the turpentine kept for that intent, andwriting of the grease, in a stone mortar culpeper my opinion of this ointment, is briefly this. It wasinvented for the itch, without quick-silver it will do no good, withquick-silver it may do harm unguentum laurinum commune or, ointment of bays common college take of bay leaves bruised one pound, bay berries bruisedhalf a pound, cabbage leaves four ounces, neat-foot oil five pounds, bullock suet two pounds, boil them together, and strain them, that soit may be made into an ointment according to art unguentum de minie sive rubrum camphora or, ointment of red lead college take of oil of roses one pound and an half, red lead threeounces, litharge two ounces, ceruss one ounce and an half, tutty threedrams, camphire two drams, wax one ounce and an half, make it into anointment according to art, in a pestle and mortar made of lead culpeper this ointment is as drying as a man shall usually readof one, and withal cooling, therefore good for sores, and such as aretroubled with defluctions unguentum e nicotiona, seu peto or, ointment of tobacco college take of tobacco leaves bruised, two pounds, steep them awhole night in red wine, in the morning boil it in fresh hog grease, diligently washed, one pound, till the wine be consumed, strain it, andadd half a pound of juice of tobacco, rozin four ounces, boil it to theconsumption of the juice, adding towards the end, round birthwort rootsin powder, two ounces, new wax as much as is sufficient to make it intoan ointment according to art culpeper it would take a whole summer day to write the writingicularvirtues of this ointment, and my poor genius is too weak to give itthe hundredth writing of its due praise. It cures tumours, imposthumes, wounds, ulcers, gun-shot, stinging with nettles, bees, wasps, hornets, venomous beasts, wounds made with poisoned arrows, &c unguentum nutritum, seu trifarmacum college take of litharge of gold finely powdered, half a pound, vinegar one pound, oil of roses two pounds, grind the litharge ina mortar, pouring to it essaytimes oil, essaytimes vinegar, till bycontinual stirring, the vinegar do no more appear, and it come to awhitish ointment culpeper it is of a cooling, drying nature, good for itching ofwounds, and such like deformities of the skin unguentum ophthalmicum or, an ointment for the eyes college take of bole-ammoniac washed in rose water, one ounce, lapis calaminaris washed in eye bright water, tutty prepared, of eachtwo drams, pearls in very fine powder half a dram, camphire half ascruple, opium five grains, fresh butter washed in plantain water, asmuch as is sufficient to make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it is exceeding good to stop hot rheums that fall downinto the eyes, the eyelids being but anointed with it unguentum ex oxylapatho or, ointment of sharp-pointed dock college take of the roots of sharp-pointed dock boiled in vinegaruntil they be soft, and then pulped, brimstone washed in juice oflemons, of each one ounce and an half, hog grease often washed injuice of scabious, half a pound, unguentum populeon washed in juice ofelecampane, half an ounce. Make them into an ointment in a mortar culpeper it is a wholeessay, though troubleessay medicine for scabsand itch unguentum e plumbo or, ointment of lead college take of lead burnt according to art, litharge, of each twoounces, ceruss, antimony, of each one ounce, oil of roses as much as issufficient. Make it into an ointment according to art culpeper take it one time with another, it will go neer to do moreharm than good unguentum pomatum college take of fresh hog grease three pounds, fresh sheep suetnine ounces, pomewater pared and cut, one pound and nine ounces, damaskrose-water six ounces, the roots of orris florentine grossly bruisedsix drams, boil them in balneo mariæ till the apples be soft, thenstrain it, but press it not and keep it for use. Then warm it a littleagain and wash it with fresh rose-water, adding to each pound twelvedrops of oil of lignum rhodium culpeper its general use is, to soften and supple the roughness ofthe skin, and take away the chops of the lips, hands, face, or otherwritings unguentum potabile college take of butter without salt, a pound and an half, spermaceti, madder, tormentil roots, castoreum, of each half an ounce:boil them as you ought in a sufficient quantity of wine, till the winebe consumed, and become an ointment culpeper i know not what to make of it unguentum resinum college take of pine rozin, or rozin of the pine-tree, of thepurest turpentine, yellow wax washed, pure oil, of each equal writings:melt them into an ointment according to art culpeper it is as pretty a cerecloth for a new sprain as most is, and cheap unguentum rosatum or, ointment of roses college take of fresh hog grease cleansed a pound, fresh redroses half a pound, juice of the same three ounces, make it into anointment according to art culpeper it is of a fine cooling nature, exceeding useful in allgallings of the skin, and frettings, accompanied with choleric humours, angry pushes, tetters, ringworms, it mitigates diseases in the headcoming of heat, as also the intemperate heat of the stomach and liver desiccativum rubrum or, a drying red ointment college take of the oil of roses omphacine a pound, white wax fiveounces, which being melted and put in a leaden mortar, put in the earthof lemnos or bole-ammoniac, lapis calaminaris, of each four ounces, litharge of gold, ceruss, of each three ounces, camphire one dram, make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it binds and restrains fluxes of humours unguentum e solano or, ointment of nightshade college take of juice of nightshade, litharge washed, of eachfive ounces, ceruss washed eight ounces, white wax seven ounces, frankincense in powder ten drams, oil of roses often washed in watertwo pounds, make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it was invented to take away inflammations from wounds, and to keep people from scratching of them when they are almost well or, ointment of tutty college take of tutty prepared two ounces, lapis calaminaris oftenburnt and quenched in plantain water an ounce, make them, being finelypowdered, into an ointment, with a pound and an half of ointment ofroses culpeper it is a cooling, drying ointment, appropriated to theeyes, to dry up hot and salt humours that flow down thither, theeyelids being anointed with it valentia scabiosæ college take of the juice of green scabious, pressed out with ascrew, and strained through a cloth, hog grease, of each as muchas you will, heat the hog grease in a stone mortar, not grind it, putting in the juice by degrees for the more commodious mixture andtincture, afterwards set it in the sun in a convenient vessel, so asthe juice may overtop the grease, nine days being passed, pour off thediscoloured juice, and beat it again as before, putting in fresh juice, set it in the sun again five days, which being elapsed, beat it again, put in more juice, after fifteen days more, do so again, do so fivetimes, after which, keep it in a glass, or glazed vessel tapsivalentia college take of the juice of mullen, hog grease, of each as muchas you will, let the grease be cleansed and cut in pieces, and beat itwith the juice, pressed and strained as you did the former ointment, then keep it in a convenient vessel nine or ten days, then beat ittwice, once with fresh juice, until it be green, and the second timewithout juice beaten well, pouring off what is discoloured, and keep itfor use tapsimel college take of the juice of celandine and mullen, of each onewriting, clarified honey, two writings, boil them by degrees till the juicebe consumed, adding the physician prescribing vitriol, burnt alum, burnt ink, and boil it again to an ointment according to art ointments more compound unguentum agrippa college take of briony roots two pounds, the roots of wildcucumbers one pound, squills half a pound, fresh english orris roots, three ounces, the roots of male fern, dwarf elder, water caltrops, oraaron, of each two ounces, bruise them all, being fresh, and steep themsix or seven days in four pounds of old oil, the whitest, not rank, then boil them and press them out, and in the oil melt fifteen ouncesof white wax, and make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it purges exceedingly, and is good to anoint the belliesof such as have dropsies, and if there be any humour or flegm in anywriting of the body that you know not how to remove provided the writing benot too tender you may anoint it with this. But yet be not too busywith it, for i tell you plainly it is not very safe unguentum amarum or, a bitter ointment college take of oil of rue, savin, mints, wormwood, bitter almonds, of each one ounce and an half, juice of peach flowers and leaves, andwormwood, of each half an ounce, powder of rue, mints, centaury theless, gentian, tormentil, of each one dram, the seeds of coleworts, thepulp of colocynthis, of each two drams, aloes hepatic, three drams, meal of lupines half an ounce, myrrh washed in grass water a dram andan half, bull gall an ounce and an half, with a sufficient quantityof juice of lemons, and an ounce and an half of wax, make it into anointment according to art unguentum apostolorum or, ointment of the apostles college take of turpentine, yellow wax, ammoniacum, of eachfourteen drams, long birthwort roots, olibanum, bdellium, of each sixdrams, myrrh, gilbanum, of each half an ounce, opopanax, verdigris, ofeach two drams, litharge nine drams, oil two pounds, vinegar enough todissolve the gums, make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it consumes corrupt and dead flesh, and makes flesh softwhich is hard, it cleanses wounds, ulcers, and fistulas, and restoresflesh where it is wanting unguentum catapsoras college take of ceruss washed in purslain water, then in vinegarwherein wild rhadish roots have been steeped and pressed out, lapiscalaminaris, chalcitis, of each six drams, burnt lead, goat blood, of each half an ounce, quick-silver sublimated an ounce, the juiceof houseleek, nightshade, plantain, of each two ounces, hog greasecleansed three pounds, oil of violets, poppies, mandrakes, of each anounce. First let them sublimate and exungia, then the oils, juices, andpowders, be mixed, and so made into an ointment according to art unguentum citrinum or, a citron ointment college take of borax an ounce, camphire a dram, white coral halfan ounce, alum plume an ounce, umbilicus marinus, tragacanth, whitestarch, of each three drams, crystal, dentalis utalis, olibanum, niter, white marble, of each two drams, gersa serpentaria an ounce, cerusssix ounces, hog grease not salted, a pound and an half, goat suetprepared, an ounce and an half, hen fat two ounces and an half powder the things as you ought to do both together, and by themselves, melt the fats being cleansed in a stone vessel, and steep in them twocitrons of a mean bigness cut in bits, in a warm bath, after a wholeweek strain it, and put in the powders by degrees, amongst which letthe camphire and borax be the last, stir them, and bring them into theform of an ointment unguentum martiatum college take of fresh bay leaves three pounds, garden rue twopounds and an half, marjoram two pounds, mints a pound, sage, wormwood, costmary, bazil, of each half a pound, sallad oil twenty pounds, yellowwax four pounds, malaga wine two pounds, of all of them being bruised, boiled, and pressed out as they ought, make an ointment according toart culpeper it is a great strengthener of the head, it being anointedwith it. As also of all the writings of the body, especially the nerves, muscles, and arteries unguentum mastichinum or, an ointment of mastich college take of the oil of mastich, wormwood, and nard, of each anounce, mastich, mints, red roses, red coral, cloves, cinnamon, wood ofaloes, squinanth, of each a dram, wax as much as is sufficient to makeit into an ointment according to art culpeper this is like the former, and not a whit inferior to it;it strengthens the stomach being anointed with it, restores appetiteand digestion before it was called a stomach ointment unguentum neapolitanum college take of hog grease washed in juice of sage a pound, quick-silver strained through leather, four ounces, oil of bays, chamomel, and earthworms, of each two ounces, spirit of wine an ounce, yellow wax two ounces, turpentine washed in juice of elecampane threeounces, powder of chamepitys and sage, of each two drams, make theminto an ointment according to art culpeper a learned art to spoil people. Hundreds are bound to cursesuch ointments, and those that appoint them unguentum nervinum college take of cowslips with the flowers, sage, chamepitys, rosemary, lavender, bay with the berries, chamomel, rue, smallage, melilot with the flowers, wormwood, of each a handful, mints, betony, pennyroyal, parsley, centaury the less, st john wort, of each ahandful, oil of sheep or bullock feet, five pounds, oil of spike, half an ounce, sheep or bullock suet, or the marrow of either, twopounds.

Eucalyptus referee, rats, hypodermic 1/5. 1 rivas guinea-pig, peritoneal 1/3. 1 rivas guinea-pig, pleural 1/4. 1 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- evidently, the toxicity of chlorlyptus is about one-fourth of that ofeucalyptus oil the difference is considerable, but not fundamental moreover, the symptoms of chlorlyptus resemble the characteristics ofeucalyptus oil according to the tabulation of barker and rowntree, 136 the mean fataldose of eucalyptus oil for man, in the twenty-nine clinical paperreported in the literature, is about 20 c c if the toxicity ratio ofthe two substances were the same as for the rat experiments a ratherhazardous assumption, the fatal dose of chlorlyptus for man would beabout 80 c c 136 barker and rowntree bull johns hopkins hospital 29:215, 221oct 1918 obtained the following results with eucalyptus oil:cat, hypodermic. Survived 3 c c per kg. Killed by 5 5 c c per kg cat, intraperitoneal. Killed by 5 c c per kg dog, hypodermic.

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And usually mixed with other cordials, you canhardly err in taking it, it is so harmless a syrup syrupus de cinnamomo or syrup of cinnamon college take of cinnamon grossly bruised, four ounces, steep it inwhite wine, and small cinnamon literary essay example water, of each half a pound, three days, in a glass, by a gentle heat. Strain it, and with a pound and a half ofsugar, boil it gently to a syrup culpeper it refreshes the vital spirits exceedingly, and cheersboth heart and stomach languishing through cold, it helps digestionexceedingly, and strengthens the whole body you may take a spoonful ata time in a cordial college thus also you may conveniently prepare syrups but onlywith white wine, of annis seeds, sweet fennel seeds, cloves, nutmegs, ginger, &c syrupus acetositatis citriorum or syrup of juice of citrons college take of the juice of citrons, strained without expression, and cleansed, a pound, sugar two pounds, make it into a syrup likesyrup of clove-gilliflowers culpeper it prevails against all diseases proceeding from choler, or heat of blood, fevers, both pestilential, and not pestilential. Itresists poison, cools the blood, quenches thirst, cures the vertigo, ordizziness in the head college after the same manner is made syrups of grapes, oranges, barberries, cherries, quinces, lemons, woodsorrel, mulberries, sorrel, english currants, and other sour juices culpeper if you look the simples you may see the virtues of them:they all cool and comfort the heart, and strengthen the stomach, syrupof quinces stays vomiting, so doth all syrup of grapes syrupus corticum citriorum or syrup of citron pills college take of fresh yellow citron pills five ounces, the berriesof chermes, or the juice of them brought over to us, two drams, springwater four pounds, steep them all night, boil them till half beconsumed, taking off the scum, strain it, and with two pounds and ahalf of sugar boiled it into a syrup. Let half of it be without musk, but perfume the other half with three grains of musk tied up in a rag culpeper it strengthens the stomach, resists poison, strengthensthe heart, and resists the passions thereof, palpitation, faintings, swoonings. It strengthens the vital spirits, restores such as are inconsumptions, and hectic fevers, and strengthens nature much you maytake a spoonful at a time syrupus e coralliis simplex or syrup of coral simple college take of red coral in very fine powder four ounces, dissolveit in clarified juice of barberries in the heat of a bath, a pound, ina glass well stopped with wax and cork, a digestion being made three orfour days, pour off what is dissolved, put in fresh clarified juice, and proceed as before, repeat this so often till all the coral bedissolved. Lastly, to one pound of this juice add a pound and a half ofsugar, and boil it to a syrup gently syrupus e coralliis compositus or syrup of coral compound college take of red coral six ounces, in very fine powder, andlevigated upon a marble, add of clarified juice of lemons, theflegm being drawn off in a bath, sixteen ounces, clarified juice ofbarberries, eight ounces, sharp white wine vinegar, and juice ofwood-sorrel, of each six ounces, mix them together, and put them ina glass stopped with cork and bladder, shaking it every day till ithave digested eight days in a bath, or horse dung, then filter it, ofwhich take a pound and a half, juice of quinces half a pound, sugar ofroses twelve ounces, make them into a syrup in a bath, adding syrup ofclove-gilliflowers sixteen ounces, keep it for use, omitting the halfdram of ambergris, and four grains of musk till the physician commandit culpeper syrup of coral both simple and compound, restore such asare in consumptions, are of a gallant cooling nature, especially thelast, and very cordial, good for hectic fevers, it stops fluxes, therunning of the reins, and the fluor albus, helps such as spit blood, and such as have the falling-sickness, it stays the menses half aspoonful in the morning is enough syrupus cydoniorum or syrup of quinces college take of the juice of quinces clarified six pounds, boil itover a gentle fire till half of it be consumed, scumming it, adding redwine three pounds, white sugar four pounds, boil it into a syrup, to beperfumed with a dram and a half of cinnamon, cloves and ginger, of eachtwo scruples culpeper it strengthens the heart and stomach, stays looseness andvomiting, relieves languishing nature. For looseness, take a spoonfulof it before meat, for vomiting after meat, for both, as also for therest, in the morning syrupus de erysimo or syrup of hedge-mustard college take of hedge-mustard, fresh, six handfuls, the rootsof elecampane, colt-foot, liquorice, of each two ounces, borrage, succory, maiden-hair, of each a handful and a half, the cordialflowers, rosemary and bettony, of each half a handful, annis seeds halfan ounce, raisins of the sun stoned, two ounces, let all of them, beingprepared according to art, be boiled in a sufficient quantity of barleywater and hydromel, with six ounces of juice of hedge-mustard to twopounds and a half, the which, with three pounds of sugar, boil it intoa syrup according to art culpeper it was invented against cold afflictions of the breastand lungs, as asthmas, hoarseness, &c you may take it either with aliquorice stick, or which is better, mix an ounce of it with three orfour ounces of pectoral decoction, and drink it off warm in the morning syrupus de fumaria or syrup of fumitory college take of endive, common wormwood, hops, dodder, hart-tongue, of each a handful, epithimum an ounce and a half, boilthem in four pounds of water till half be consumed, strain it, andadd the juice of fumitory a pound and a half, of borrage and bugloss, of each half a pound, white sugar four pounds, make them into a syrupaccording to art culpeper the receipt is a pretty concocter of melancholy, andtherefore a rational help for diseases arising thence, both internaland external, it helps diseases of the skin, as leprosies, cancers, warts, corns, itch, tetters, ringworms, scabs, &c and it is the betterto be liked, because of its gentleness it helps surfeits exceedingly, cleanses, cools, and strengthens the liver, and causes it to make goodblood, and good blood cannot make bad flesh i commend this receipt tothose whose bodies are subject to scabs and itch if you please you maytake two ounces by itself every morning syrupus de glycyrrhiza or syrup of liquorice college take of green liquorice, scraped and bruised, two ounces, white maiden-hair an ounce, dryed hyssop half an ounce, steep these infour pounds of hot water, after twenty-four hours, boil it till halfbe consumed, strain it, and clarify it, and with honey, penids, andsugar, of each eight ounces, make it into a syrup, adding, before it beperfectly boiled, red rose water six ounces culpeper it cleanses the breast and lungs, and helps continualcoughs and pleurisies you may take it with a liquorice stick, or addan ounce of it or more to the pectoral decoction syrupus granatorum cum aceto. Vulgo, oxysaccharum simplex or syrup of pomegranates with vinegar college take of white sugar a pound and a half, juice ofpomegranates eight ounces, white wine vinegar four ounces, boil itgently into a syrup culpeper look the virtues of pomegranates among the simples syrupus de hyssopo or syrup of hyssop college take eight pounds of spring water, half an ounce of barley, boil it about half an hour, then add the roots of smallage, parsley, fennel, liquorice, of each ten drams, jujubes, sebestens, of eachfifteen, raisins of the sun stoned, an ounce and a half, figs, dates, of each ten, the seeds of mallows and quinces, gum tragacanth tiedup in a rag, of each three drams, hyssop meanly dryed, ten drams, maiden-hair six drams, boil them together, yet so, that the roots mayprecede the fruits, the fruits the seeds, and the seeds the herbs, about a quarter of an hour. At last, five pounds of water beingconsumed, boil the other three being first strained and clarifiedinto a syrup with two pounds and a half of sugar culpeper it mightily strengthens the breast and lungs, causes longwind, clears the voice, is a good remedy against coughs use it likethe syrup of liquorice syrupus ivæ arthriticæ, sive chamæpityos or syrup of chamepitys college take of chamepitys, two handfuls, sage, rosemary, poleymountain, origanum, calaminth, wild mints, pennyroyal, hyssop, thyme, rue, garden and wild, bettony, mother of thyme, of each a handful, theroots of acorns, birthwort long and round, briony, dittany, gentian, hog fennel, valerian, of each half an ounce, the roots of smallage, asparagus, fennel, parsley, bruscus, of each an ounce, pellitory ofspain, an ounce and a half, stœchas, the seeds of annis, ammi, caraway, fennel, lovage, hartwort, of each three drams, raisins of the sun twoounces, boil them in ten pounds of water to four, to which add honeyand sugar, of each two pounds, make it into a syrup to be perfumed withsugar, nutmegs, and cubebs, of each three drams syrupus jujubinus or syrup of jujubes college take of jujubes, violets, five drams, maiden-hair, liquorice, french barley, of each an ounce, the seeds of mallows fivedrams, the seeds of white poppies, melons, lettice, seeds of quincesand gum tragacanth tied up in a rag of each three drams, boil them insix pounds of rain or spring water till half be consumed, strain it, and with two pounds of sugar make it into a syrup culpeper it is a fine cooling syrup, very available in coughs, hoarseness, and pleurisies, ulcers of the lungs and bladder, as alsoin all inflammations whatsoever you may take a spoonful of it once inthree or four hours, or if you please take it with a liquorice stick syrupus de meconio, sive diacodium or syrup of meconium, or diacodium college take of white poppy heads with their seeds, gathered alittle after the flowers are fallen off, and kept three days, eightounces, black poppy heads so ordered six ounces, rain water eightpounds, steep them twenty-four hours, then boil and press them gently, boil it to three pounds, and with twenty-four ounces of sugar boil itinto a syrup according to art syrupus de meconio compositus or syrup of meconium compound college take of white and black poppy heads with their seeds, fiftydrams, maiden-hair fifteen drams, jujubes thirty, the seeds of lettice, forty drams, of mallows and quinces tied up in a rag, a dram and ahalf, liquorice five drams, water eight pounds, boil it according toart, strain it, and to three pounds of decoction add sugar and penids, of each one pound, make it into a syrup culpeper meconium is nothing else but the juice of englishpoppies boiled till it be thick.