History

Life Essay


Let the litharge in fine powder be boiled withthe oil to a thickness, then add the wax, which being melted, take itfrom the fire, add the gums dissolved in wine and vinegar, strain it, then add the myrrh, mastich, frankincense, birthwort, and loadstone inpowder, last of all the verdigris in powder, and make it into a plasteraccording to art culpeper it is of a cleansing nature, exceeding good againstmalignant ulcers, it consumes corruption, engenders new flesh, andbrings them to a scar emplastrum epispasticum college take of mustard seed, euphorbium, long pepper, of each onedram and an half, stavesacre, pellitory of spain of each two drams, ammoniacum, galbanum, phellium, sagapen, of each three drams, wholecantharides five drams, ship pitch, rozin, yellow wax, of each sixdrams, turpentine as much as is sufficient to make it into a plaster culpeper thesis people use to draw blisters in their necks for thetooth ache, or for rheums in their eyes. If they please to lay aplaster of this there, it will do it emplastrum a nostratibus, flos unguentorum dictum or, flower of ointments college take of rozin, per rozin, yellow wax, sheep suet, of eachhalf a pound, olibanum four ounces, turpentine two ounces and an half, myrrh, mastich, of each an ounce, camphire two drams, white wine half apound, boil them into a plaster culpeper i found this receipt in an old manuscript written in theyear 1513, the quantity of the ingredients very little altered a plaster of gum elemi college take of gum elemi three ounces, per rozin, wax, ammoniacum, of each two ounces, turpentine three ounces and an half, mallaga wineso much as is sufficient. Boil it to the consumption of the wine, thenadd the ammoniacum dissolved in vinegar culpeper the operation is the same with arceus liniment a plaister of lapis calaminaris college take of lapis calaminaris prepared an ounce, litharge twoounces, ceruss half an ounce, tutty a dram, turpentine six drams, whitewax an ounce and an half, stag suet two ounces, frankincense fivedrams, mastich three drams, myrrh two drams, camphire a dram and anhalf, make it up according to art emplastrum ad herniam college take of galls, cypress nuts, pomegranate pills, balaustines, acacia, the seeds of plantain, fleawort, water-cresses, acorn cups, beans torrified, birth-wort long and round, myrtles of eachhalf an ounce let these be powdered, and steeped in rose vinegar fourdays, then torrified and dried, then take of comfrey the greater andlesser, horsetail, woad, cetrach, the roots of osmond royal, fearn, ofeach an ounce, frankincense, myrrh, aloes, mastich, mummy, of each twoounces, bole-ammoniac washed in vinegar, lap, calaminaris prepared, litharge of gold, dragon blood, of each three ounces, ship pitch twopounds, turpentine six ounces, or as much as is sufficient to make itinto a plaster according to art culpeper the plaster is very binding and knitting, appropriated toruptures or burstens, as the title of it specifies, it strengthens thereins and womb, stays abortion, it consolidates wounds, and helps alldiseases coming of cold and moisture emplastrum hystericum college take of bistort roots one pound, wood of aloes, yellowsanders, nutmegs, barberry kernels, rose seeds, of each one ounce, cinnamon, cloves, squinanth, chamomel flowers, of each half an ounce, frankincense, mastich, alipta moschata, gallia moschata, styraxcalamitis, of each one dram, mosch half a dram, yellow wax one poundand an half, turpentine half a pound, moschæleum four ounces, labdanumfour pounds, ship pitch three pounds. Let the labdanum and turpentinebe added to the pitch and wax, being melted, then the styrax, lastlythe rest in powder, and sifted, that they may be made into a plasteraccording to art culpeper the plaster being applied to the navel, is a means towithstand the fits of the mother in such women as are subject to them, by retaining the womb in its place emplastrum de mastich or, a plaster of mastich college take of mastich three ounces, bole-ammoniac washed in blackwine, an ounce and an half, red roses six drams, ivory, myrtle berries, red coral, of each half an ounce, turpentine, colophonia, tachamahacca, labdanum, of each two ounces, yellow wax half a pound, oil of myrtlesfour ounces. Make it into a plaster according to art culpeper it is a binding plaster, strengthens the stomach beingapplied to it, and helps such as loath their victuals, or cannot digestit, or retain it till it be digested emplastrum de meliloto simplex or, a plaster of melilot simple college take of rozin eight pounds, yellow wax four pounds, sheepsuet two pounds. These being melted, add green melilot cut small, fivepounds. Make it into a plaster according to art emplastrum de meliloto compositum or, a plaster of melilot compound college take of melilot flowers six drams, chamomel flowers, theseeds of fenugreek, bay berries husked, marsh-mallow roots, the topsof wormwood and marjoram, of each three drams, the seeds of smallage, ammi, cardamoms, the roots of orris, cypress, spikenard, cassia lignea, of each one dram and an half, bdellium five drams. Beat them allinto fine powder, the pulp of twelve figs, and incorporate them witha pound and an half of melilot plaster simple, turpentine an ounceand an half, ammoniacum dissolved in hemlock vinegar, three ounces, styrax five drams, oil of marjoram, and nard, of each half an ounce, or a sufficient quantity, make it into a plaster with a hot mortar andpestle, without boiling culpeper it mollifies the hardness of the stomach, liver, spleen, bowels, and other writings of the body. It wonderfully assuages pain, andeases hypochondriac melancholy, and the rickets emplastrum de minio compositum or, a plaster of red lead compound college take of oil of roses omphacine twenty ounces, oil ofmastich two ounces, suet of a sheep and a calf, of each half a pound, litharge of gold and silver, red lead, of each two ounces, a tasterfull of wine.

It also stays the bellyand stomach from casting the decoction therefore helps women thatare troubled with the pains and windiness of the mother, if they sittherein it stays the hiccough, being boiled in wine, and but smelledunto being tied in life essay a cloth the seed is of more use than the leaves, and more effectual to digest raw and vicious humours, and is used inmedicines that serve to expel wind, and the pains proceeding therefrom the seed, being roasted or fried, and used in oils or plasters, dissolve the imposthumes in the fundament. And dries up all moistulcers, especially in the fundament. An oil made of dill is effectualto warm or dissolve humours and imposthumes, and the pains, and toprocure rest the decoction of dill, be it herb or seed only if youboil the seed you must bruise it in white wine, being drank, it is agallant expeller of wind, and provoker of the terms devil-bit descript this rises up with a round green smooth stalk, about twofeet high, set with divers long and essaywhat narrow, smooth, dark greenleaves, essaywhat nipped about the edges, for the most writing, being elseall whole, and not divided at all, or but very seldom, even to thetops of the branches, which yet are smaller than those below, withone rib only in the middle at the end of each branch stands a roundhead of thesis flowers set together in the same manner, or more neatlythan scabions, and of a bluish purple colour, which being past, therefollows seed which falls away the root is essaywhat thick, but shortand blackish, with thesis strings, abiding after seed time thesis years this root was longer, until the devil as the friars say bit away therest of it for spite, envying its usefulness to mankind. For sure hewas not troubled with any disease for which it is proper there are two other sorts hereof, in nothing unlike the former, savethat the one bears white, and the other bluish-coloured flowers place the first grows as well in dry meadows and fields as moist, in thesis places of this land. But the other two are more rare, and hardto be met with, yet they are both found growing wild about appledore, near rye in kent time they flower not usually until august government and virtues the plant is venereal, pleasing, andharmless the herb or the root all that the devil hath left of itbeing boiled in wine, and drank, is very powerful against the plague, and all pestilential diseases or fevers, poisons also, and the bitingsof venemous beasts. It helps also those that are inwardly bruised byany casuality, or outwardly by falls or blows, dissolving the clottedblood. And the herb or root beaten and outwardly applied, takes awaythe black and blue marks that remain in the skin the decoction ofthe herb, with honey of roses put therein, is very effectual to helpthe inveterate tumours and swellings of the almonds and throat, byoften gargling the mouth therewith it helps also to procure womencourses, and eases all pains of the mother and to break and discusswind therein, and in the bowels the powder of the root taken in drink, drives forth the worms in the body the juice or distilled water ofthe herb, is effectual for green wounds, or old sores, and cleansesthe body inwardly, and the seed outwardly, from sores, scurf, itch, pimples, freckles, morphew, or other deformities thereof, especiallyif a little vitriol be dissolved therein dock thesis kinds of these are so well known, that i shall not trouble youwith a description of them. My book grows big too fast government and virtues all docks are under jupiter, of which thered dock, which is commonly called bloodwort, cleanses the blood, andstrengthens the liver. But the yellow dock-root is best to be takenwhen either the blood or liver is affected by choler all of themhave a kind of cooling but not all alike drying quality, the sorrelbeing most cold, and the blood-worts most drying of the burdock, ihave spoken already by itself the seed of most of the other kinds, whether the gardens or fields, do stay lasks and fluxes of all sorts, the loathing of the stomach through choler, and is helpful for thosethat spit blood the roots boiled in vinegar help the itch, scabs, andbreaking out of the skin, if it be bathed therewith the distilledwater of the herb and roots have the same virtue, and cleanses the skinfrom freckles, morphews, and all other spots and discolourings therein all docks being boiled with meat, make it boil the sooner. Besidesblood-wort is exceeding strengthening to the liver, and procures goodblood, being as wholeessay a pot herb as any growing in a garden.

To two poundsof the decoction, add two pounds of the juice of turnips baked in anoven in a close pot, and with three pounds of white sugar, boil it intoa syrup culpeper this syrup was composed against coughs, shortness ofbreath, and other the like infirmities of the breast proceeding ofcold, for life essay which if you can get it you may take it with a liquoricestick syrupus capillorum veneris or syrup of maiden-hair college take of liquorice two ounces, maiden-hair five ounces, steep them a natural day in four pounds of warm water, then aftergentle boiling, and strong straining, with a pound and a half of finesugar make it into a syrup culpeper it opens stoppings of the stomach, strengthens the lungs, and helps the infirmities of them this may be taken also either witha liquorice stick, or mixed with the pectoral decoction like syrup ofcoltsfoot syrupus cardiacus, vel julepum cardiacum or a cordial syrup college take of rhenish wine two pounds, rose water two ounces anda half, cloves two scruples, cinnamon half a dram, ginger two scruples, sugar three ounces and a half, boil it to the consistence of a julep, adding ambergris three grains, musk one grain culpeper if you would have this julep keep long, you may put inmore sugar, and yet if close stopped, it will not easily corruptbecause it is made up only of wine, indeed the wisest way is to orderthe quantity of sugar according to the palate of him that takes it itrestores such as are in consumptions, comforts the heart, cherishes thedrooping spirits, and is of an opening quality, thereby carrying awaythose vapours which might otherwise annoy the brain and heart. You maytake an ounce at a time, or two if you please syrupus infusionis florum cariophillorum or syrup of clove-gilliflowers college take a pound of clove-gilliflowers, the whites being cutoff, infuse them a whole night in two pounds of water, then with fourpounds of sugar melted in it, make it into a syrup without boiling culpeper this syrup is a fine temperate syrup. It strengthens theheart, liver, and stomach. It refreshes the vital spirits, and is agood cordial in fevers. And usually mixed with other cordials, you canhardly err in taking it, it is so harmless a syrup syrupus de cinnamomo or syrup of cinnamon college take of cinnamon grossly bruised, four ounces, steep it inwhite wine, and small cinnamon water, of each half a pound, three days, in a glass, by a gentle heat. Strain it, and with a pound and a half ofsugar, boil it gently to a syrup culpeper it refreshes the vital spirits exceedingly, and cheersboth heart and stomach languishing through cold, it helps digestionexceedingly, and strengthens the whole body you may take a spoonful ata time in a cordial college thus also you may conveniently prepare syrups but onlywith white wine, of annis seeds, sweet fennel seeds, cloves, nutmegs, ginger, &c syrupus acetositatis citriorum or syrup of juice of citrons college take of the juice of citrons, strained without expression, and cleansed, a pound, sugar two pounds, make it into a syrup likesyrup of clove-gilliflowers culpeper it prevails against all diseases proceeding from choler, or heat of blood, fevers, both pestilential, and not pestilential. Itresists poison, cools the blood, quenches thirst, cures the vertigo, ordizziness in the head college after the same manner is made syrups of grapes, oranges, barberries, cherries, quinces, lemons, woodsorrel, mulberries, sorrel, english currants, and other sour juices culpeper if you look the simples you may see the virtues of them:they all cool and comfort the heart, and strengthen the stomach, syrupof quinces stays vomiting, so doth all syrup of grapes syrupus corticum citriorum or syrup of citron pills college take of fresh yellow citron pills five ounces, the berriesof chermes, or the juice of them brought over to us, two drams, springwater four pounds, steep them all night, boil them till half beconsumed, taking off the scum, strain it, and with two pounds and ahalf of sugar boiled it into a syrup. Let half of it be without musk, but perfume the other half with three grains of musk tied up in a rag culpeper it strengthens the stomach, resists poison, strengthensthe heart, and resists the passions thereof, palpitation, faintings, swoonings. It strengthens the vital spirits, restores such as are inconsumptions, and hectic fevers, and strengthens nature much you maytake a spoonful at a time syrupus e coralliis simplex or syrup of coral simple college take of red coral in very fine powder four ounces, dissolveit in clarified juice of barberries in the heat of a bath, a pound, ina glass well stopped with wax and cork, a digestion being made three orfour days, pour off what is dissolved, put in fresh clarified juice, and proceed as before, repeat this so often till all the coral bedissolved. Lastly, to one pound of this juice add a pound and a half ofsugar, and boil it to a syrup gently syrupus e coralliis compositus or syrup of coral compound college take of red coral six ounces, in very fine powder, andlevigated upon a marble, add of clarified juice of lemons, theflegm being drawn off in a bath, sixteen ounces, clarified juice ofbarberries, eight ounces, sharp white wine vinegar, and juice ofwood-sorrel, of each six ounces, mix them together, and put them ina glass stopped with cork and bladder, shaking it every day till ithave digested eight days in a bath, or horse dung, then filter it, ofwhich take a pound and a half, juice of quinces half a pound, sugar ofroses twelve ounces, make them into a syrup in a bath, adding syrup ofclove-gilliflowers sixteen ounces, keep it for use, omitting the halfdram of ambergris, and four grains of musk till the physician commandit culpeper syrup of coral both simple and compound, restore such asare in consumptions, are of a gallant cooling nature, especially thelast, and very cordial, good for hectic fevers, it stops fluxes, therunning of the reins, and the fluor albus, helps such as spit blood, and such as have the falling-sickness, it stays the menses half aspoonful in the morning is enough syrupus cydoniorum or syrup of quinces college take of the juice of quinces clarified six pounds, boil itover a gentle fire till half of it be consumed, scumming it, adding redwine three pounds, white sugar four pounds, boil it into a syrup, to beperfumed with a dram and a half of cinnamon, cloves and ginger, of eachtwo scruples culpeper it strengthens the heart and stomach, stays looseness andvomiting, relieves languishing nature.

They have a cleansing faculty, whereby they break the stone in the kidneys to drink the cream ofthem, being boiled in water, is the best way it moves the bellydownwards, provokes women courses and urine, increases both milk andseed one ounce of cicers, two ounces of french barley, and a smallhandful of marsh-mallow roots, clean washed and cut, being boiled inthe broth of a chicken, and four ounces taken in the morning, andfasting two hours after, is a good medicine for a pain in the sides the white cicers are used more for meat than medicine, yet have thesame effect, and are thought more powerful to increase milk and seed the wild cicers life essay are so much more powerful than the garden kinds, byhow much they exceed them in heat and dryness. Whereby they do moreopen obstructions, break the stone, and have all the properties ofcutting, opening, digesting, and dissolving. And this more speedily andcertainly than the former cinquefoil, or five-leaved grass. Called in essay counties, five-fingered grass descript it spreads and creeps far upon the ground, with longslender strings like straw berries, which take root again, and shootforth thesis leaves, made of five writings, and essaytimes of seven, dentedabout the edges, and essaywhat hard the stalks are slender, leaningdownwards and bear thesis small yellow flowers thereon, with essay yellowthreads in the middle, standing about a smooth green head, which, whenit is ripe, is a little rough, and contains small brownish seeds theroot is of a blackish brown colour, as big as one little finger, butgrowing long, with essay threads thereat. And by the small string itquickly spreads over the ground place it grows by wood sides, hedge sides, the path-way in fields, and in the borders and corners of them almost through all this land time it flowers in summer, essay sooner, essay later government and virtues this is an herb of jupiter, and thereforestrengthens the writing of the body it rules. Let jupiter be angular andstrong when it is gathered. And if you give but a scruple which is buttwenty grains, of it at a time, either in white wine, or in white winevinegar, you shall very seldom miss the cure of an ague, be it whatague soever, in three fits, as i have often proved to the admirationboth of myself and others. Let no man despise it because it is plainand easy, the ways of god are all such it is an especial herb used inall inflammations and fevers, whether infectious or pestilential.

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At the tops whereof grow thesis whitish flowers, with yellow threads in the middle, standing about a green head, whichbecomes the seed vessel, which will be essaywhat flat when it is ripe, wherein is contained reddish seed, tasting essaywhat hot the root ismade of thesis white strings, which stick deeply into the mud, wherein itchiefly delights, yet it will well abide in the more upland and drierground, and tastes a little brackish and salt even there, but not somuch as where it hath the salt water to feed upon place it grows all along the thames sides, both on the essex andkentish shores, from woolwich round about the sea coasts to dover, portsmouth, and even to bristol, where it is had in plenty. The otherwith round leaves grows in the marshes in holland, in lincolnshire, andother places of lincolnshire by the sea side descript there is also another sort called dutch scurvygrass, whichis most known, and frequent in gardens, which has fresh, green, andalmost round leaves rising from the root, not so thick as the former, yet in essay rich ground, very large, even twice as big as in others, not dented about the edges, or hollow in the middle, standing on a longfoot-stalk. From among these rise long, slender stalks, higher thanthe former, with more white flowers at the tops of them, which turninto small pods, and smaller brownish seed than the former the root iswhite, small and thready the taste is nothing salt at all. It hath ahot, aromatical spicy taste time it flowers in april and may, and gives seed ripe quickly after government and virtues it is an herb of jupiter the english scurvygrass is more used for the salt taste it bears, which doth essaywhatopen and cleanse. But the dutch scurvygrass is of better effect, andchiefly used if it may be had by those that have the scurvy, andis of singular good effect to cleanse the blood, liver, and spleen, taking the juice in the spring every morning fasting in a cup of drink the decoction is good for the same purpose, and opens obstructions, evacuating cold, clammy and phlegmatic humours both from the liver andthe spleen, and bringing the body to a more lively colour the juicealso helps all foul ulcers and sores in the mouth, gargled therewith;and used outwardly, cleanses the skin from spots, marks, or scars thathappen therein self-heal descript the common self-heal which is called also prunel, carpenter herb, hook-heal, and sickle-wort, is a small, low, creepingherb, having thesis small, roundish pointed leaves, like leaves of wildmints, of a dark green colour, without dents on the edges. From amongwhich rise square hairy stalks, scarce a foot high, which spreadessaytimes into branches with small leaves set thereon, up to the top, where stand brown spiked heads of small brownish leaves like scales andflowers set together, almost like the heads of cassidony, which flowersare gaping, and of a blueish purple, or more pale blue, in essay placessweet, but not so in others the root consists of thesis fibres downward, and spreading strings also whereby it increases the small stalks, withthe leaves creeping on the ground, shoot forth fibres taking hold onthe ground, whereby it is made a great tuft in a short time place it is found in woods and fields every where time it flowers in may, and essaytimes in april government and virtues here is another herb of venus, self-heal, whereby when you are hurt you may heal yourself. It is a special herbfor inward and outward wounds take it inwardly in syrups for inwardwounds. Outwardly in unguents, and plaisters for outward as self-healis like bugle in form, so also in the qualities and virtues, servingfor all the purposes whereto bugle is applied to with good success, either inwardly or outwardly, for inward wounds or ulcers whatsoeverwithin the body, for bruises or falls, and such like hurts if it beaccompanied with bugle, sanicle, and other the like wound herbs, itwill be more effectual to wash or inject into ulcers in the writingsoutwardly where there is cause to repress the heat and sharpness ofhumours flowing to any sore, ulcers, inflammations, swellings, or thelike, or to stay the fluxes of blood in any wound or writing, this is usedwith essay good success. As also to cleanse the foulness of sores, andcause them more speedily to be healed it is an especial remedy for allgreen wounds, to solder the lips of them, and to keep the place frothesis further inconveniencies the juice hereof used with oil of roses toanoint the temples and forehead, is very effectual to remove head ache, and the same mixed with honey of roses, cleanses and heals all ulcers, in the mouth, and throat, and those also in the secret writings and theproverb of the germans, french, and others, is verified in this, thathe needs neither physician nor surgeon that hath self-heal andsanicle to help himself the service-tree it is so well known in the place where it grows, that it needs nodescription time it flowers before the end of may, and the fruit is ripe inoctober government and virtues services, when they are mellow, are fit tobe taken to stay fluxes, scouring, and casting, yet less than medlers if they be dried before they be mellow, and kept all the year, theymay be used in decoctions for the said purpose, either to drink, or tobathe the writings requiring it. And are profitably used in that manner tostay the bleeding of wounds, and of the mouth or nose, to be applied tothe forehead and nape of the neck. And are under the dominion of saturn shepherd purse it is called whoreman permacety, shepherd scrip, shepherd pounce, toy-wort, pickpurse, and casewort descript the root is small, white, and perishes every year theleaves are small and long, of a pale green colour, and deeply cut inon both sides, among which spring up a stalk which is small and round, containing small leaves upon it even to the top the flowers are whiteand very small.