History

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Dr abrams is not a graduateof “stanford ”-- ed you admit that he was graduated from heidelberg atthe age of twenty it happens that this was the youngest and remainsthe youngest age at which any man has taken a doctor degree at thatuniversity in a hundred years if you had inquired further you mighthave learned that ten years ago abrams was one of the most respectedphysicians in san francisco what has he done since to forfeit thehonors of a lifetime?. all that he has done is to shut himself up in hislaboratory and make the most revolutionary discoveries of this or anyother age. And now when he emerges and offers this work to the world, you can think of nothing to do but jeer at him i spent two weeks in his clinic. Then i took six months to write tohis physicians all over the country, and to experiment with hiscures on a great number of my friends italics again ours -- ed now i am spending another two weeks in his clinic, and i venture tostake whatever reputation i have, or hope to have in this world, uponthe statement that albert abrams has discovered the great secret ofthe diagnosis and cure of all the major disease again we mustitalicize -- ed he has proven by diagnosing with the taps of hisown sensitive finger tips over 15, 000 people, and my investigationconvinces me that he has cured over 95 per cent of these who havetaken his treatments moreover, he has taught his method to 200 or 300other physicians, and essay 80 per cent of these have submitted to meanswers to a questionnaire in which they claim thousands of cures you may say, perhaps, that i am not competent to judge of cures for the sake of argument, i will grant that. But i assert that i amcompetent to judge of physicians, for i have tested several score ofthem, and if i ever knew a devoted scientist and a great humanitarian, it is albert abrams in his clinic i have met perhaps a hundredphysicians, and i venture to assert that a number of these are menboth of integrity and capacity, and when i asked them why they came, igot invariably one answer. “because i sent him blood specimens and ifound that invariably he sent me a correct diagnosis ” not once, but atleast two score times, i have seen albert abrams take a blood specimenbrought to him, without even the name of the patient, and heard himdiagnose cancer or sarcoma, and from the blood specimen locate thegrowth precisely to an inch italics fail one here!. -- ed then i haveseen the patient, an entire stranger to abrams, brought into the clinicand examined, not merely by abrams, but by a score of other physicians, and the growth found precisely at the spot indicated this was donetwice between the time when this letter was dictated and the time whenit was transcribed three times, yesterday, i saw a diagnosis made ofsyphilis and the patient brought in, and all the standard reactionsdemonstrated i have seen, not once, but hundreds of times, tubercularlesions diagnosed and located from the blood specimen and the patientbrought in and the condition demonstrated by percussion all thesethings are going on day after day they are being done in otherclinics in several score of cities, and you may have the addresses forthe asking why do you not ask?. we have essay such addresses in thepropaganda files -- ed the economic elementi take up the second criticism, that albert abrams is mercenary hecharges $200 00 for the clinical course, which may last as long asthe physician wishes it seems to me that that price is to be judgedessaywhat in relation to what he has to teach he maintains a largeestablishment.

A scruple of it being taken inthe form of a pill loosens the belly, gives speedy delivery to women intravail, helps diseases of the spleen, the sciatica and all pains inthe joints, and have any humour afflicting their breast camphire, it is held by all authority to be cold and dry in thethird degree, it is of very thin subtile writings, insomuch that beingbeaten into very fine powder it will vanquish away into the air, being beaten into powder and mixed with oil, and the temples anointedtherewith, eases headaches proceeding of heat, all inflammationswhatsoever, the back being anointed with the same, cools the reins, and seminal vessels, stops the running of the reins and fluor albus, the moderate use of venery, the like it doth if it be drank inwardlywith bettony-water, take but a small quantity of it at a time inwardly, it resist poison and bitings by venomous beasts. Outwardly, appliedas before, and the eyes anointed with it, stops hot rheums that flowthither opopanax purges thick flegm from the most remote writings of the body, viz the brain, joints, hands, and feet, the nerves and breast, andstrengthens all those writings when they are weak, if the weakness proceedof cold, as usually it doth. It helps weakness of the sight, old rottencoughs, and gouts of all sorts, dropsies, and swellings of the spleen, it helps the stranguary and difficulty of making urine, provokes themenses, and helps all cold afflictions of the womb. Have a care yougive it not to any pregnant women the dose is one dram at most, corrected with a little mastich, dissolved in vinegar and outwardlyapplied helps the passions of the spleen * * * * * in the next place the college tells you a tale concerning liquid, juices, and tears, which are to be kept for present use, viz college vinegar, juice of citrons, juice of sour grapes, oranges, barberries, tears of a birch-tree, juice of cherries, quinces, pomegranates, lemons, wood-sorrel, oil of unripe olives, and ripeolives, both new and old, juice of red and damask roses, wine tears ofa vine culpeper the virtues of the most of these may be found in thesyrups, and are few of them used alone * * * * * then the college tells you there are things bred of plants college agarick, jew-ears, the berries of chermes, the spungysubstance of the briar, moss, viscus quercinus, oak, apples culpeper as the college would have you know this, so would i knowwhat the chief of them are good for jew-ears boiled in milk and drank, helps sore throats moss is cold, dry, and binding, therefore good for fluxes of allsorts misleto of the oak, it helps the falling sickness and theconvulsions. Being discreetly gathered and used oak apples are dry and binding. Being boiled in milk and drank, theystop fluxes and the menses, and being boiled in vinegar, and the bodyanointed with the vinegar, cures the itch * * * * * then the college acquaints you, that there are certain living creatures calledcollege bees, woodlice, silkworms, toads, crabs of the river, littlepuppy dogs, grass-hoppers, cantharides, cothanel, hedge-hogs, emmetsor ants, larks, swallows, and their young ones, horse-leeches, snails, earthworms, dishwashers or wagtails, house sparrows and hedge sparrows, frogs, scineus, land scorpions, moles, or monts, tortoise of the woods, tenches, vipers and foxes culpeper that writing of this crew of cattle and essay others whichthey have not been pleased to learn, may be made beneficial to yoursick bodies, be pleased to understand, thatbees being burnt to ashes, and a lye made with the ashes, trimlydecks a bald head being washed with it snails with shells on their backs, being first washed from the dirt, then the shells broken, and they boiled in spring water, but notscummed at all, for the scum will sink of itself, and the water drankfor ordinary drink is a most admirable remedy for consumption. Beingbruised and applied to the place they help the gout, draw thorns out ofthe flesh, and held to the nose help the bleeding thereof * * * * * therefore consider that the college gave the apothecaries a catalogue of what writings of living creatures and excrements they must keep in their shops college the fat, grease, or suet, of a duck, goose, eel, boar, herron, thymallows, if you know where to get it dog, capon, beaver, wild cat, stork, coney, horse, hedge-hog, hen, man, lion, hare, pike, or jack, if they have any fat, i am persuaded ’tis worthtwelve-pence a grain wolf, mouse of the mountains, if youcan catch them pardal, hog, serpent, badger, grey or brock fox, vulture, if you can catch them album græcum, anglice, dogdung, the hucklebone of a hare and a hog, east and west bezoar, butternot salted and salted, stone taken out of a man bladder, vipersflesh, fresh cheese, castorium, white, yellow, and virgin wax, thebrain of hares and sparrows, crabs’ claws, the rennet of a lamb, a kid, a hare, a calf, and a horse, the heart of a bullock, a stag, hog, anda wether, the horn of an elk, a hart, a rhinoceros, an unicorn, theskull of a man killed by a violent death, a cockscomb, the tooth of aboar, an elephant, and a sea-horse, ivory, or elephant tooth, theskin a snake hath cast off, the gall of a hawk, bullock, a she goat, a hare, a kite, a hog, a bull, a bear, the paper of silk-worms, theliver of a wolf, an otter, a frog, isinglass, the guts of a wolf anda fox, the milk of a she ass, a she goat, a woman, an ewe, a heifer, east and west bezoar, the stone in the head of a crab, and a perch, ifthere be any stone in an ox gall, stone in the bladder of a man, thejaw of a pike or jack, pearls, the marrow of the leg of a sheep, ox, goat, stag, calf, common and virgin honey, musk, mummy, a swallownest, crabs eyes, the omentum or call of a lamb, ram, wether, calf, the whites, yolks, and shells of hen eggs, emmet eggs, bone of astag heart, an ox leg, ossepiœ, the inner skin of a hen gizzard, the wool of hares, the feathers of writingridges, that which bees make atthe entrance of the hive, the pizzle of a stag, of a bull, fox lungs, fasting spittle, the blood of a pigeon, of a cat, of a he goat, of ahare, of a writingridge, of a sow, of a bull, of a badger, of a snail, silk, whey, the suet of a bullock, of a stag, of a he goat, of a sheep, of a heifer, spermaceti, a bullock spleen, the skin a snake hath castoff, the excrements of a goose, of a dog, of a goat, of pigeons, of astone horse, of a hen, of swallows, of a hog, of a heifer, the ancle ofa hare, of a sow, cobwebs, water thells, as blatta bazantia, buccinæ, crabs, cockles, dentalis, entalis, mother of pearl, mytuli purpuræ, ossepiæ, umbilious marinus, the testicles of a horse, a cock, the hoofof an elk, of an ass, a bullock, of a horse, of a lyon, the urine of aboar, of a she goat culpeper the liver of an hedge-hog being dried and beaten intopowder and drank in wine, strengthens the reins exceedingly, and helpsthe dropsy, convulsions, and the falling sickness, together with allfluxes of the bowels the liver being in like manner brought into powder, strengthens theliver exceedingly, and helps the dropsy * * * * * then the college tells you these things may be taken from the sea, ascollege amber-grease, sea-water, sea-sand, bitumen, amber white andyellow, jet, carlinæ, coral, white and red, foam of the sea, spunge, stone pumice, sea salt, spunges, amber metals, stones, salts, and other minerals ver-de-grease, scales of brass, ætitis, alana terra, alabaster, alectorions, alum seisile and roach amethist, amianth, amphelites, antimony, leaves and filings of silver, quick silver, lapis, armenius, native arsenic, both white and red, artificial arsenic, white andrealgar, argilla, asteria, leaves and filings of gold, belemites, berril, bole-armenick, borrax, toad-stone, lapis calaminatis, cadmia, lime quick and quenched, vitriol, white, blue, and green, steel, borrax, chrisolite, chrisopus, cynabris, native and artificial, whetstones, chalk, white and green, crystal diphriges, the rust, dust, scales, and flakes of iron, granite, mortar, such as walls are daubedwith, hematitis, heliotropium, jacinth, hyber, nicius, jasper, lapisjudacious, tiles, lapis lazuly, lapis lincis, lithanthrax, lithargeof silver and gold, loadstone, marchasite, or fire stone marble, redlead, native and artificial, miss, naptha, lapis nephriticus, nitre, oaker yellow and red, onyx, opalus, ophytes, ostcocolla, lead whiteand black, plumbago, pompholix, marchasite, realgar, ruby, red oaker, sal armoniach, sal gem, and salt nitre, saphyr and sardine, selenitis, flints, emerald, smiris, sori, spodium, pewter, brimstone, quick andcommon, talth, earth of cimolia, sames, lemnos, sylesia, topas, alana, terra, tutty, vitriol, white, blue, and green precious stones alter by a way manifest or hidden by a way manifest, they are hot, in the first degree hemetitis, pyritis, lopis asius, thyitis, smyres, lapis schistus precious stones cold, are in the first degree jacinth, saphyr, emerald, cristal, lapis samius, lapis phrigius in the second degree ruby, carbuncle, granite, sardony in the fourth degree diamond in respect of property, they bind, as lapis asius, nectius, geodes, pumice-stone emolient, as alabaster, jet, lapis thrasius stupify. As memphitis, jasper, ophites cleanse. As lapis arabicus glutinate. As galactitis, melites scarify.

i, like a darn fool, kept putting on clean white frocks and all the other white fixings that go with it when the missis got on the job again, miss juanita got a pair of overalls on week days and a dress on sundays, all this going to prove that as a nurse maid i was a fizzle i came a steve brodie on the wife's hair also, letting it get into such a mess that i couldn't comb the rats' nests out of it and had to cut the whole business off short however, this didn't make much difference, as it all came out itself anyway at all times on the wolf the fresh water situation was of great importance, as we were on a strict allowance of drinking water, which they condensed and purified themselves we were also allowed a minute quantity of semi-condensed water for washing purposes i used to save up for several days and get enough for a bath, all of us using the same water after bathing, this water was used to wash clothes in on other mornings we had to be content with a salt water bath, which is very refreshing but has little cleansing quality every effort was made to catch all the rain water possible, and then everybody had the big wash during a heavy rain it was customary for all hands to strip and stand out in the rain and have a good rain water bath it was quite odd to see from one hundred and fifty to three hundred men taking their bath in this manner it makes one think of the garden of eden before eve showed on the job i used to look forward to the evening when the prize officer, lieutenant zelasko, used to come to my quarters and talk for half an hour his talk usually was of the war, and it was interesting to get the german view of it of course, from their viewpoint "poor gerthesis" was the defendant, and they figure they are fighting to protect their homes and not in a war of conquest thesis of the crew of the wolf had seen service on the various fronts and in belgium and had essay very interesting experiences to tell these stories were always from the german viewpoint one chap in writingicular had a unique and unenviable experience, having been wounded in six places at six different times he was shot once through the shoulder on the russian front on two occasions, while on service in france, he was shot, once through the arm instant essay writer and on another occasion through the leg at the storming of antwerp he was wounded on the head by a flying piece of shell, and later on, while trying to storm a bridge, he was bayoneted while serving as a member of the prize crew on the s s melunga, after her capture by the wolf, he lost an eye, while knocking off the head of a beer bottle, a piece of the glass striking him in the eye the bottle of beer was "gambe carlsburger, " a danish beer, and as this accident happened on an australian steamer in the indian ocean, i don't know just exactly who should get the credit for this, although i think that denmark should be credited with an asset one of the officers, a lieutenant, was in the sailors' foot regiment the first time the germans entered antwerp, and told of the civil populace throwing large rocks, flat irons and cooking utensils down on the soldiers' heads while they were marching into the town, and spoke as if this was a grave breach of the marquis of queensbury's rules as to how to conduct a war after thesis of the brave teuton soldiers had been wounded in this undignified and unwarlike manner, they withdrew and the artillery bombardment followed from other sources i have heard that this regiment marched up the street taking pot shots at anybody, male or female, who happened to look out of a window or door i judged from this man's conversation that this sailor regiment shipped to stop bullets and not flat irons and other nameless weapons one afternoon i asked commander nerger for permission to talk to essay of the men, saying it was not healthy for a man to sit around all day and not say a word to anybody this he granted, so after that i could hold short conversations with a good thesis members of the crew, and in a short time had practically the run of the ship it was absolutely forbidden, however, for me to talk to any of the other prisoners who had been on board the wolf for a long time and knew of its various mine-laying activities our meals were served in our cabin, on dishes taken from the beluga. In fact, for the first month a good deal of our food was beluga's food little delicacies that i had bought for our own use, such as potted meats, jellies, crackers and a case of wine, were reserved for our own use by the purser of the wolf at commander nerger's suggestion one of the most valuable foods to us, taken from the beluga and reserved for our use, was four paper of canned milk of the liquid variety, which proved very beneficial to the wife during her sickness, and also was greatly appreciated by nita the doctor, thinking probably that the black bread would prove too strong for nita's stomach, endeavoured to have the ship's baker make a small quantity of white bread for her, but unfortunately the baker could not make a success of the wheat bread and the effort was given up as far as i could see, this black bread, while being far from palatable, was very wholeessay and nourishing i should like to state here that my family and myself were treated with the utmost courtesy and consideration by the commander himself and his officers while we were prisoners i am not speaking for the poor devils down below aft, nor of our treatment while under the charge of lieutenant rose on the jap prize ship hitachi maru, or later on the spanish prize igotz mendi, which was decidedly different on the wolf our meals were regular and methodically worked out, so that at the end of each day a person had received just so much rationed nourishment myself and family received the same food as that served in the officers' mess our breakfast usually consisted of "near" coffee, syrup or treacle and three slices of black bread i have seen the cook's dewritingment roasting this alleged "coffee, " and believe it to be nothing more nor less than wheat roasted until it is scorched or burnt, the larger kernels being saved for this purpose essay years ago i was on a sailing vessel and the supply of coffee gave out the cook used to take burnt bread and make a substitute for coffee from it that was identical in taste with this coffee on the wolf dinner at midday consisted of a soup, a meat-ball composed of canned beef ground fine and mixed with bread crumbs, plenty of preserved peas and carrots monday, wednesday and friday we had a dessert, usually stewed prunes or a corn-starch mixture for supper we had tea, bread, and sardine paste, or pickled, cold corned beef quite often rice in various disguises was given instead of the "bully beef" at noon but on sunday oh, joy!. !. a regular, honest-to-grandma dinner, consisting of asparagus soup, real fresh meat from the refrigerator, evaporated potatoes, a vegetable, prunes and a sweet this for a regular menu, day in and day out, doesn't look very good, but considering that we were prisoners i don't believe we had any cause to complain the food we received was the same as that which the commander and deck officers had, and superior to that of the warrant officers and seamen torpedoshowing "mannlicher" type torpedo tube, portside forward on "wolf" steamerfinal dive of japanese steamer "hitachi maru " 6558 gross tons capt kokmoa captured september 26th off maldiva islands, indian ocean sunk by bombs november 7th the german auxiliary cruiser and minelayer wolf was formerly a freighter belonging to the hansa line, a subsidiary of the hamburg-american line. Of 6, 728 gross tons. Single screw, one funnel. Two well decks, two telescoping masts, equipped with wireless, double bridge. Two sampson posts on poop and four sets of cargo booms on the poop rigged from the sampson posts were two faked cargo booms whose real purpose was to disguise a six-inch gun mounted there on her boat deck she showed three life-boats, working boats from each side the vessel was painted all black and had no writingicular distinguishing marks wolf carried two six-inch ordinary guns, one mounted forward under the forecastle head and the other on top of the poop. Four 4 7 ordinaries, two forward and two aft mounted on the well deck the bulwark or rails at these guns, as at the six-inch forward gun, were fitted with hinges and spring catches, so that by one blow of a hammer they dropped down, giving the guns ample room for action under ordinary circumstances nothing of these guns could be seen above the rail she was further armed with four torpedo tubes, two forward and two aft, on the well decks the torpedoes forward were "red heads" and especially effective for short distances, while those aft were "mannlichers" and used for long distance work she also had four machine guns mounted, two on each end of the boat deck in such a manner that they could control the decks and the prisoners' quarters aft on leaving kiel wolf had a crew of three hundred and seventy-five men, including one commander and corvette captain, one lieutenant commander, three senior and six junior lieutenants, two surgeons and twelve warrant officers, including gun mechanics, torpedo mechanics, mine experts, navigating sub-lieutenants and boatswains she had a wireless crew of seven men, including one wireless expert the signal corps consisted of six signal men in charge of a code expert, who had had several years of training at a school in deciphering various codes i am led to believe from what i saw that this man was able to decipher naval and private codes used in the south pacific, but was unable to handle codes used in the north atlantic on leaving kiel wolf had on board five hundred mines, seventy-five hundred tons of westphalian coal, three thousand tons of water, and twenty-five hundred tons of food and ammunition this heavy cargo over-loaded the wolf i understand she was drawing over two feet more than her normal loaded draft when she left kiel, and on getting safely through the blockade she encountered a very heavy series of gales in the north atlantic, causing the vessel to labour heavily this labouring strained her hull and topside and she dropped a good thesis rivets as soon as she ran out of this bad weather repairs were made and all her topsides double riveted essaything like nine thousand rivets were driven, this work being done by her crew as the wolf proceeded down the atlantic among her mechanics she seemed to have representatives from almost every trade, and apparently an inexhaustible supply of materials for making repairs or new additions to her equipment wolf was equipped with a triple expansion engine and three boilers and one auxiliary donkey boiler her power plant was unique in that she could steam seven knots per hour on a consumption of eighteen tons of coal per diem, and eleven and a half knots per hour, her maximum, on twenty-eight tons of coal per diem i have heard it said that she had one of the most efficient power plants out of europe, having a fuel consumption of 1 2 per i h p wolf was further equipped with a powerful searchlight, situated abaft the bridge, on a tower that could be raised or lowered at will when not in use this light could not be seen above the top of the house wolf sailed from kiel on november 21, 1916 the commander of the wolf, corvette captain nerger, of the imperial german navy, was a man of probably thirty-five years of age, of moderate height and slim build he was immaculate in all things pertaining to his person, and was a strict disciplinarian i was in commander nerger's quarters one day i had visited him to thank him for the courtesy he had extended to my family and to myself, and found him a very agreeable man to talk to. A thorough gentleman and apparently anxious to do anything he could to make our lot bearable in talking with him i found nothing to denote the arrogant prussianism which is said to predominate in the higher branches of the german navy and yet commander nerger was a man "all alone " he kept absolutely to himself. Took no man into his confidence no man ever knew an hour ahead what his plans or the vessel's plans were he was the only one who knew when we started for home on the fifteen months' cruise of the wolf nerger was in full charge and ran his vessel as a "one man ship " he lived in comfortable quarters on the boat deck, just under the bridge, and had his meals served in his private dining room in the five months i was on the wolf i do not think i saw him on the berth deck more than a dozen times, and then only on an inspection trip of essay kind he always had the appearance of having just stepped out of a bandbox, he was so immaculate in his dress i was told by his officers that nerger never gets excited. Always remains cool under all circumstances they tell a story of his being in command of a light cruiser in the battle off the dogger banks, and throughout this engagement he calmly passed back and forth on the bridge, with a cigar in his mouth, giving his orders as calmly as if at essay gun practice or manœuvres his officers and men all respected him, which to my mind is a good enough recommendation one of the peculiarities of the wolf's cruise was that nobody, excepting the commander, knew where she was going, when she was going, and how long she was to be away the majority of the officers, thinking she would probably try to duplicate the raider moewe's operations, took only enough clothes to last them about three months, and only augmented their supply from the various vessels captured from one of the captured steamers they got several rolls or bolts of heavy dress goods, but unfortunately for them, they didn't have enough cotton thread to make them up into wearing apparel, although essay of them, in more need than the rest, sewed their new suits with ordinary sail twine, similar to that which the grocer uses to tie up his parcels the cloth was all dark goods, and it looked odd to see the coarse white string stitches against the dark background thesis of the suits were very well cut and fitted in the regular naval style the wolf's method of getting away from kiel was unique each day about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, she would up anchor and steam out of kiel harbour, manœuvring outside and having gun practice, returning each night to anchor in the harbour this procedure was kept up for over three weeks, until finally one night the wolf failed to return during these three weeks nobody was allowed ashore or to hold any communication with the shore even the german naval authorities did not know the date she was to sail, until she had gone all this goes to prove that the german naval dewritingment had considerable respect for the allied intelligence dewritingment on leaving kiel the wolf went through what is known as the "big belt, " a passage through denmark into the kattegat, from there along the danish coast across the norwegian coast, and out to the atlantic between the farrows and iceland on returning to gerthesis she merely retraced her course, the only difference being that she passed through the "little belt, " a very narrow piece of water, one-half of which is german territorial water and the other half danish from where i used to sit on deck outside my quarters i could see the other prisoners aft on the poop, at that time essay two hundred of them over half of them had no shoes, socks or overshirts, and fully one-fifth of them wore no undershirt i asked a couple of them why they did not wear a shirt in that blazing tropical sun they told me that they had only one shirt apiece and that the sweat rotted them so fast, that they were going without shirts at present and saving them till the weather got cold three times a day each squad flunkey a squad consisted of fourteen prisoners would troop up to the galley amidships and get their rations for the meal a kettle of alleged tea or coffee, black bread, and at noon a kettle of goulash, resembling a soft stew i had been on board the wolf for essay time before i finally got the chance to sneak down below aft and see what the prisoners' quarters were like and have a talk with essay of the men the prisoners' quarters on the wolf were located aft in the cargo hold, and had their only entrance under the poop, on the main deck the quarters themselves were reached by means of a narrow ladder only, and this ladder was built in such a manner that not more than two persons could pass up or down at the same time, or one person up and one down simultaneously, thereby guarding against a concerted rush in event of an escape being planned over the entrance or hole in the deck leading to these stairs was slung a heavy iron hatch or cover, in such a manner that it could be dropped into place instantaneously by one of the guards this hatch would effectually close the only exit from the quarters where there were over two hundred prisoners confined also the closing of this hatch would cut off nearly one-half the air supply. During the times when this hatch was closed, when the wolf was passing through essay danger, the suffering in the hold from lack of air was often intense even under normal conditions the air supply was inadequate it was probably 8:30 p m when i was there, and i would judge the temperature to have been between 118 and 120 degrees fahrenheit, and the reek of feet, breath and bodies was essaything awful on this writingicular night, i should judge from one-quarter to three-eighths of an inch of sweat was on the floor, and when the vessel rolled there would be a thin scum of liquid running from side to side the walls and ceiling were literally running water, which was caused by moisture drawn from the bodies of the men by the hot iron sides of the ship and the deck overhead combine stale tobacco smoke with this atmosphere, and it was a wonder to me that a human being could exist in it at this time everybody was herded into the one comwritingment captains, mates, engineers, firemen, sailors, cooks and flunkies, all together white men, niggers, turks, greeks and japanese at night everybody slept in hammocks and during the day these hammocks were "made up" and piled away in one corner, thus leaving enough room for several rough plank tables and benches to be set up there were no lockers or any comwritingments where a man could put his spare clothing or shaving gear, therefore no man's gear was safe from theft a man who didn't have a shirt would steal one from a man who had two. This made it impossible for a man to have any more clothes than just what he stood in later on thesis of the men were given empty paper or boxes and fixed them up to keep their spare gear in the sanitary arrangements at this time were very poor, there being only three toilets for all hands certain squads of men would take turns in keeping these quarters clean, the whole place being thoroughly scrubbed out three times a week i mean thoroughly in the full sense of the word everything moveable, excepting the clothing boxes, was taken on deck, then the room scrubbed with heavy brushes and sand next the tables and benches were scoured with sand and canvas, the hammocks scrubbed and the various tin dishes used for food were scoured bright after everything was dry it was put back in place and the prisoner officer made an inspection it was very seldom that he found anything to complain of, as the men seemed to welcome this house-cleaning as it gave them essaything to do to occupy their time reading material was very scarce, so the time passed very slowly there was supposed to be a regular daily routine.

The skin of the ecchymosed area is generally much darkened anddiscolored from blood infiltrated through its entire thickness. Theskin is also much firmer and more elastic from swelling of the writing ifthe contusion is received essay hours before death but we may have aneffusion beneath and not in the substance of the skin, and the abovesigns might possibly be due to an injury inflicted only a few minutesafter death the above signs may therefore be absent, and when presentare not absolutely indicative of an injury received during life ingeneral, the effects of severe contusions inflicted soon after deathmay closely resemble those of slight contusions received during life there is little danger of contusion if the blow be inflicted on a deadbody after the loss of body heat and the beginning of rigor mortis 2 coagulation of blood - as stated at the beginning of this section, blood from a wound inflicted during life coagulates with the exceptionof that from those suffering from certain pathological or occasionalconditions or in certain locations, already mentioned this coagulationis not immediate, but is complete in about five minutes the entireamount of blood lost is thus coagulated and the coagula are firm thesecoagula if the wound is not interfered with occur in the opening of awound and on its edges, especially at the mouths of the blood-vessels, which are thus plugged the blood which infiltrates the interspaces ofthe tissues is coagulated in the form of these interspaces the same istrue of the blood of an ecchymosis whether there be a hematoma or onlyan infiltration between the tissues, or both these clots representmore or less the form of the space occupied by the blood in the caseof the scalp a subcutaneous clot may be mistaken for a depressedfracture of the skull from the fact that the edges of the clot becomevery hard while the centre is still quite soft a wound in which alarge artery has been divided may present very little clotting in thewound if the opening is free and the blood has mostly escaped in a jet in a wound produced soon after death there may be essay clotting, but less in amount, firstly, because there is less hemorrhage, and, secondly, because not all the blood clots these conditions increasewith the length of time after death, so that after a time a wound madeon a cadaver would show very little if any clotting owing to veryslight hemorrhage, and little or no clotting of the blood extravasated when the body has lost its animal heat and rigor mortis has begun toset in, then there is no more coagulation of the blood and no morehemorrhage, under normal conditions, for the blood has mostly becomeclotted in the vessels of the body consequently, with the exceptionof wounds inflicted very soon after death, we can distinguish anante-mortem from a post-mortem wound by the condition in which theblood is clotted if there is any hemorrhage, the wound being inflictedbefore the loss of animal heat and the blood remains entirely fluid onthe surface or in an ecchymosis, we know that the wound was producedafter death and essay hours after death unless any of those conditionsexist in which the blood does not normally coagulate if the hemorrhageis slight or quite moderate in amount and venous in character, if theblood is only clotted in writing and the clots are rather soft and donot form a plug at the mouth of each artery, and especially if thestaining of the walls of the wound can be washed off, then the woundwas probably produced post mortem, but not so long after death as inthe first case supposed if the characters of the hemorrhage and theclotting are still more like those normal to a wound inflicted duringlife, then, as a rule, it is impossible to say from these two featuresof the wound, hemorrhage and clotting, whether the wound was inflictedduring life or a very short time after death 3 eversion of the lips of the wound - the edges or lips of a woundinflicted during life may be inverted, instead of everted, if a thinlayer of muscular fibres is attached directly to the deep surface ofthe skin, as is the case in the scrotum the eversion of the edges ofthe skin is due to their elasticity, and ceases to occur as soon as theskin loses its vitality consequently eversion ceases to occur soonafter death, within a very few hours a wound in which the edges areneither inverted or everted was therefore inflicted after death ifthis sign is present and marked, the wound was inflicted during life orwithin two or three hours or less after death if this sign is presentbut very slightly marked, the wound may have been made even essaywhatlonger after death 4 retraction of the sides of the wound is also dependent on theirvitality and ceases to occur when this is lost a few hours after death in the retraction of the edges of the wound we have all the writingsinvolved, but unequally the muscles, arteries, skin, and layers ofconnective tissue all retract, varying in the degree of retractionaccording to the order in which they are named in different writingsof the body this comparative order of retraction is liable to moreor less variation every surgeon is familiar with this retractionof the tissues, which necessitates certain rules in the techniqueof operations, especially of amputations muscles retract the morethe longer they are and the farther the incision is made from theirattachment without specifying a definite time, we may say that, asa rule, this retraction lasts no longer than about two hours afterdeath, consequently when it is absent we may infer that the wound wasinflicted two hours or more after death the amount of retraction growsless and less after death for about two hours, after which it is veryslight if it occurs at all, owing to the loss of elasticity of thetissues this sign is especially useful in the case of a mutilatedbody where, by examining the degree of retraction of the muscles, wemay infer whether the mutilation was done before or after death thesides of a cut made on the cadaver are comparatively smooth and even, owing to the absence of the unequal retraction of the various elements, which makes the surfaces of a gaping ante-mortem wound uneven andirregular relying on these circumstances in the “affaire ramus, ” citedby vibert, 621 one was able to recognize the order in which the bodyhad been mutilated other minor signs of a wound inflicted during life may be brieflymentioned if the edges of the wound are swollen, or show signs ofinflammation or gangrene, or if pus or adhesive material is present onthe edges of the wound, we may infer that the wound was inflicted essaylittle time before death of course, if cicatrization has commenced, essay days must have elapsed before death after the wound was received if the blow causing a contusion was inflicted essay time before death, there will be more or less of a general swelling of the region, writinglydue to the blood effused, but also writingly due to œdema it is not always easy to say whether a fracture was produced whilethe body was living or dead if the body was still warm when apost-mortem fracture was produced there is little difference from anante-mortem fracture, except that there may be a little less bloodeffused in a fracture produced after rigor mortis has set in thereis little or no blood effused in the case of fractures the presenceof callus, indicating the process of repair, shows that the accidentoccurred during life, and, as we have already seen, we may form essayidea of the length of time elapsed between the injury and the time ofdeath on the cadaver it is said to be harder to cause fractures andlesions of the skin than on the living body casper says that fracturesof the hyoid bone and the larynx are impossible after death, and healso was not able to rupture the liver or spleen in distinction to the characteristic signs of a wound inflicted duringlife, we may mention briefly essay of the signs of post-mortem woundswhen the wound has been inflicted from two to ten or twelve hours ormore after death. 1 the hemorrhage is slight in amount and may fail altogether 2 the character of the hemorrhage is venous, corresponding to thesource of the hemorrhage from the veins, the arteries being nearlyempty after death 3 the edges of the wound are not deeply stained, and this stainingmay be removed by washing the spaces between the tissues are notinfiltrated with blood 4 the blood remains either entirely fluid or, if there are clots, these are softer than those in an ante-mortem wound, and only aportion of the blood is thus clotted there are no clots plugging theopen mouths of the arteries on the surface of the wound. The veins mayor may not be closed by an imperfect clot 5 the skin of the edges is not everted or inverted 6 the sides of the wound do not gape and their surfaces are smoothand even, as the tissues are not unevenly retracted résumé - it is very easy from the foregoing to distinguish between awound inflicted before death and one ten or twelve hours after death if the hemorrhage has been abundant and arterial, if it has infiltratedbetween and deeply stained the tissues and the stain cannot readilybe washed off. If the blood coagulates completely and the coagulaare firm and are found lying in the wound, plugging the vessels, andincorporated with the tissues between which they lie. If the edgesof the skin are everted and the sides of the wound are retracted anduneven under these circumstances, we may be sure that the woundwas inflicted during life or a very short time after death if, onthe contrary, the hemorrhage is slight in amount or almost failsaltogether. If it is venous in character. If the edges of the woundare only stained by imbibition of the blood, which is not infiltratedbetween the tissues, and the stain may be washed off. If the blood isnot at all or only slightly clotted and the clots are soft. If the skinis not everted and the sides of the wound are smooth and lie nearly incontact. If there are no clots plugging the divided arteries on thesurface then we need have little hesitancy in saying that the woundwas produced after death, but probably not later than ten or twelvehours after death if the wound was inflicted still longer after deathand before putrefaction, then we would have a lack of the signs dueto hemorrhage, clots, staining, etc if we find the conditions moreor less midway between the first two, we may be left in essay doubt asto the date of the injury thus if the hemorrhage is moderate, theblood mostly but not altogether clotted and the clots moderately firm, the skin slightly everted, and the sides slightly separated and notaltogether smooth on their surface. If the surfaces are fairly deeplystained and the stain cannot be easily washed off then we can onlysay that the wound was inflicted during life or within two hours orso after death, and this fact is often enough for the purposes of themedico-legal inquiry the same is the case with contusions where there is no bleedingexternally if we have a bluish, violet, green, or yellow tumor with orwithout more or less superficial œdema. If this tumor fluctuates or ishard, but in either case is elastic. If on incision the skin and thetissue spaces are infiltrated with blood which is coagulated, or ifthere is a cavity filled with clotted blood, the coagulum being firmand the entire amount of blood coagulated then the wound was inflictedduring life if, however, the surface shows a bluish or violet color, little or no swelling of the skin, which is of natural thickness, andthe ecchymosed area is not tense and elastic to the touch. If furtherthe blood is found on incision to be fluid or if coagulated only writinglyso, and the blood is not infiltrated into the tissue spaces, but merelyimbibed by the tissues then the blow was inflicted after death, andprobably more than two or three hours after in contusions especially we may have difficulty, as the sign offluidity of the blood may fail and putrefaction may modify theconditions of the wound unless writings deep beneath the surface beexamined we see, then, that in essay paper it is very easy to say that a woundwas inflicted post mortem if a wound was not inflicted until ten ortwelve hours after death or even sooner, we cannot easily mistake it but in thesis paper it may be hard or impossible to say whether a woundwas inflicted during life or within an hour or two after death herewe must be cautious in expressing an opinion which should be guarded but we should remember that it is important to be able to state that awound was inflicted before or immediately after death, as no one but amurderer would think of inflicting a fatal injury on a body immediatelyafter death in such paper a well-guarded medical opinion may oftenmeet all the requirements of the case granted that a given wound was produced before death there are, then, one or two questions which may arise, and which depend for theiranswer on the length of time the wounded person could have lived andthe physiological or muscular acts which he could have performed afterreceiving the injury and before death the first of these questions maybe expressed as follows:could the victim have performed certain acts after having received hisfatal injury?. the term “certain acts” here refers to almost any thingor things which would require time and strength in other words, thecontinuance of life with bodily and mental powers for a certain timeafter receiving a mortal injury this question may be raised in relation to an attempted alibi of theaccused, who may have been proved to be in the presence of the victima moment before death if after this moment the victim has movedfrom the spot or performed certain acts before death, the attemptedalibi may depend upon the answer to the question as to whether thegiven acts of the victim were compatible with the fatal character ofthe wound an alibi can aid in the acquittal of the accused only whenthe nature of the injury was such that death would be supposed to beimmediate or nearly so great care should be taken on the writing ofthe medical witness in answering this question, for after very gravewounds, proving speedily fatal, the victim essaytimes can do certainacts requiring more or less prolonged effort, as shown by numerousexamples wounds of the brain are especially noticeable in allowinga survival of several hours, days, or even weeks, during which timethe injured person may pursue his occupations where the survivalhas lasted days or weeks, the alibi has no importance, but not ifthe survival is of shorter duration the following case is cited byvibert1 and may be mentioned in this connection, though the woundwas caused by a bullet which traversed from behind forward the entireleft lobe of the brain after the injury the victim was seen byseveral witnesses to climb a ladder, though with difficulty, for hehad right-sided hemiplegia he was found insensible more than half amile away, and did not die until six or eight hours after the injury severe injury of important organs is essaytimes not incompatible withan unexpectedly long survival devergie cites two illustrations ofthis which are quoted by vibert 622 a man received several extensivefractures of the skull, with abundant subdural hemorrhage, and ruptureof the diaphragm with hernia of the stomach the stomach was ruptured, and nearly a litre of its contents was contained in the left pleuralcavity notwithstanding all this, he was able to walk about for an houror so and answer several questions he died only after several hours another man, crushed by a carriage, received a large rupture of thediaphragm, complete rupture of the jejunum, and rupture and crushing ofone kidney yet he walked nearly five miles, and did not die until thenext day more rarely wounds of the great vessels are not immediately fatal m tourdes is quoted by vibert623 as citing the case of a man whodescended a flight of stairs and took several steps after divisionof the carotid artery. Also of one who lived ten minutes after abullet-wound of the inferior vena-cava even wounds of the heart are not as speedily fatal as is commonlysupposed, and often permit of a comparatively long survival fischer624 found only 104 paper of immediate death among 452 paperof wounds of the heart, and healing occurred in 50 paper among 401 vibert625 mentions two striking paper of long survival after woundsof the heart a woman received a stab-wound which perforated theright ventricle, causing a wound one centimetre long she did not dieuntil twelve days later, when on autopsy there was found an enormousextravasation of blood in the left pleural cavity and pericardium thesecond case, though one of bullet-wound, is equally applicable andinstructive in this connection a man received a bullet-wound whichperforated the left ventricle, the bullet being found later in thepericardium after being wounded he threw a lamp at his assassin whichset fire to the room he then went into the court-yard, drew essaywater, carried it back in a bucket, extinguished the fire, and then laydown on his bed and died in studying the wounds of different regions of the body, we may findthesis other mortal wounds which, though speedily fatal, leave thepossibility of more or less activity before death we see, therefore, that even in those wounds which are commonly supposed to be immediatelyfatal, even by thesis medical men where attention has not been called tothe exceptions, such exceptional paper are not uncommon in which deathis not immediate time and even strength may thus be allowed for moreor less complicated activity an alibi cannot, therefore, be allowedwithout question on the writing of the medical expert, who must exercisegreat caution in expressing an opinion the second question which mayessaytimes arise in connection with the last, but having little to dowith the subject of this section, is the following:how long before death had the deceased accomplished certainphysiological acts?.

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Infantile diarrhea, “summercomplaint, ” marasmus, inanition and instant essay writer malnutrition. Gastric atony anddilatation. Cholecystitis and gallstones. Nephritis, neurasthenia, cachexia and cancer. Epilepsy and high blood pressure testimonials arepresented as to results in most of these conditions 90 secretogen, report of the council on pharmacy and chemistry, j a m a , may 1, p 1518, 1915 a quantity of “secretogen” and “elixir secretogen” was bought inthe open market, and the preparations were tested on suitablyprepared dogs the tablets were ground, thoroughly macerated with thesolvent used water, normal salt solution, alcohol, or 0 4 per cent hydrochloric acid, and filtered if hydrochloric acid was used, thepulverized tablets were boiled with it, in the manner that secretin ismade from duodenal mucosa, and the preparations neutralized previousto injection the injections were made in from 15 to 20 c c of thesolvent all the operations were carried on immediately before theexperiment, and as rapidly as possible, so as to avoid oxidation theelixir secretogen was injected directly, without dilution table 7 -- summary of typical experiments showing the absence ofsecretin in “secretogen” and “elixir secretogen” except in occasionaltests when administered in enormous dosesdogs under ether anesthesia | | secretion of pancreatic juice in drops, | quantity of | following intravenous injection exp | secretogen -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - no | and elixir | | secretogen in | | | secretogen |control -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- |control | used* |10 c c |distilled|0 4%| 70% |0 9%|elixir|10 c c | |secretin| water |hcl |alcohol|nacl| |secretin -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - 1 |secretogen, | | | | | | | | 1 tablet. | 109 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 59 | elixir, | | | | | | | | 15 c c | | | | | | | 1 |secretogen, | | | | | | | | 6 tablets | | | 0 | | | | 2 |secretogen, | | | | | | | | 3 tablets. | 16 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 1 ?. | 16 | elixir, | | | | | | | | 15 c c | | | | | | | 3 |secretogen, | | | | | | | | 5 tablets | | |1 ?. | | | | 4 |secretogen, | | | | | | | | 25 tablets | 14 | |1 ?. | | | | 8 5 |secretogen, | | | | | | | | 100 tablets | 110 | | | | 21 | | 67 6 |secretogen, | | | | | | | | 100 tablets;| 19 | | 5 | | 1 | 2 ?. | 8 | elixir, | | | | | | | | 125 c c | | | | | | | 7 |elixir, | | | | | | | | 50 c c | | | | | | 1 ?.