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How To Write An Evaluation Essay


Stir it up and down till the sugar be melted, and your conserve is made 4 thus you have the way of making conserves. The way of keeping themis in earthen pots 5 the dose is usually the quantity of a nutmeg at a time morning andevening, or unless they are purging when you please 6 of conserves, essay keep thesis years, as conserves of roses. Othersbut a year, as conserves of borage, bugloss, cowslips and the like 7 have a care of the working of essay conserves presently after theyare made. Look to them once a day, and stir them about. Conserves ofborage, bugloss, wormwood, have got an excellent faculty at that sport 8 you may know when your conserves are almost spoiled by this.

Provokes urine andwomen courses, and is much commended for women with child to takeinwardly, and to smell often unto it cures tough phlegm in the chestand lungs, and helps to expectorate it the more easily. Quickens thedull spirits in the lethargy, the juice thereof being snuffed up intothe nostrils the juice dropped into the eyes, clears a dull sight, ifit proceed of thin cold humours distilled from the brain the juiceheated with the oil of roses, and dropped into the ears, eases themof the noise and singing in them, and of deafness also outwardlyapplied with wheat flour, in manner of a poultice, it gives ease tothe sciatica and palsied members, heating and warming them, and takesaway their pains it also takes away the pain that comes by stinging ofbees, wasps, &c savine to describe a plant so well known is needless, it being nursed upalmost in every garden, and abides green all the winter government and virtues it is under the dominion of mars, being hotand dry in the third degree, and being of exceeding clean writings, is ofa very digesting quality if you dry the herb into powder, and mix itwith honey, it is an excellent remedy to cleanse old filthy ulcers andfistulas. But it hinders them from healing the same is excellentlygood to break carbuncles and plague-sores. Also helps the king evil, being applied to the place being spread over a piece of leather, andapplied to the navel, kills the worms in the belly, helps scabs anditch, running sores, cankers, tetters, and ringworms. And being appliedto the place, may haply cure venereal sores this i thought good tospeak of, as it may be safely used outwardly, for inwardly it cannot betaken without manifest danger the common white saxifrage descript this hath a few small reddish kernels of roots coveredwith essay skins, lying among divers small blackish fibres, whichsend forth divers round, faint or yellow green leaves, and greyishunderneath, lying above the grounds, unevenly dented about the edges, and essaywhat hairy, every one upon a little foot-stalk, from whencerises up round, brownish, hairy, green stalks, two or three feethigh, with a few such like round leaves as grow below, but smaller, and essaywhat branched at the top, whereon stand pretty large whiteflowers of five leaves a-piece, with essay yellow threads in the middle, standing in a long crested, brownish green husk after the flowers arepast, there arises essaytimes a round hard head, forked at the top, wherein is contained small black seed, but usually they fall awaywithout any seed, and it is the kernels or grains of the root which areusually called the white saxifrage-seed, and so used place it grows in thesis places of our land, as well in thelower-most, as in the upper dry corners of meadows, and grassy sandyplaces it used to grow near lamb conduit, on the backside of grayinn time it flowers in may, and then gathered, as well for that whichis called the seed, as to distil, for it quickly perishes down to theground when any hot weather comes government and virtues it is very effectual to cleanse the reinsand bladder, and to dissolve the stone engendered in them, and toexpel it and the gravel by urine. To help the stranguary. For whichpurpose the decoction of the herb or roots in white wine, is mostusual, or the powder of the small kernelly root, which is called theseed, taken in white wine, or in the same decoction made with whitewine, is most usual the distilled water of the whole herb, rootand flowers, is most familiar to be taken it provokes also womencourses, and frees and cleanses the stomach and lungs from thick andtough phlegm that trouble them there are not thesis better medicines tobreak the stone than this burnet saxifrage descript the greater sort of our english burnet saxifrage growsup with divers long stalks of winged leaves, set directly oppositeone to another on both sides, each being essaywhat broad, and a littlepointed and dented about the edges, of a sad green colour at the topof the stalks stand umbels of white flowers, after which come small andblackish seed the root is long and whitish, abiding long our lesserburnet saxifrage hath much finer leaves than the former, and verysmall, and set one against another, deeply jagged about the edges, andof the same colour as the former the umbels of the flowers are white, and the seed very small, and so is the root, being also essaywhat hotand quick in taste place these grow in moist meadows of this land, and are easy to befound being well sought for among the grass, wherein thesis times theylay hid scarcely to be discerned time they flower about july, and their seed is ripe in august government and virtues they are both of them herbs of the moon the saxifrages are hot as pepper. And tragus saith, by his experience, that they are wholeessay they have the same properties the parsleyshave, but in provoking urine, and causing the pains thereof, and ofthe wind and colic, are much more effectual, the roots or seed beingused either in powder, or in decoctions, or any other way.

And he has not the privilege of proving ittrue before the coroner he should, therefore, not be discharged, andhe cannot have the case investigated again before it is passed upon bythe grand jury 555under the provisions of the new york criminal code the defendantagainst whom an inquisition has been found by a coroner jury isentitled to a hearing before a magistrate, whether he has been arrestedbefore the inquisition has been filed or is arrested after such filing under the provisions of sec 779, in the case of a defendant who hasbeen arrested before the inquisition can be filed, the prisoner isentitled to be examined before the magistrate, before whom he may bebrought, as provided in sec 781, and in the case of a prisoner who hasnot been arrested until after the inquisition was filed, under secs 781 and 783 the defendant is entitled to be heard before a magistratein all respects as upon a warrant of arrest on an information themagistrate must proceed to examine the charge contained in theinquisition, and hold the defendant to answer or discharge himtherefrom 556 the information is the allegation made to a magistratethat a person has been guilty of essay designated crime 557 when evidence taken before coroner of a writingy charged with crime admissible in evidence upon his trial subsequently there is nothing which distinguishes between the proceedings of acoroner inquest and any other official proceedings taken andreturned in the discharge of official duty as to their admissibility inevidence a witness, therefore, may be contradicted by the productionof a deposition thus given by him before a coroner 558 but the lineis sharply drawn in what paper the testimony of a witness examinedbefore a coroner inquest can be used on his subsequent trial, and inwhat paper it cannot when a coroner inquest is held before it hasbeen ascertained that a crime has been committed, or before any personhas been arrested charged with the crime, and a witness is called andsworn before the coroner jury, the testimony of that witness, shouldhe afterward be charged with the crime, may be used against him on histrial, and the mere fact that at the time of his examination he wasaware that a crime was suspected, and that he was suspected of beingthe criminal, will not prevent his being regarded as a mere witness, whose testimony may be afterward given in evidence against himself if he desires to protect himself he must claim his privilege butif, at the time of his examination, it appears that a crime has beencommitted, and that he is in custody as the supposed criminal, heis not regarded merely as a witness, but as a writingy accused, calledbefore a tribunal vested with power to investigate preliminarily thequestion of his guilt, and he is to be treated in the same manner asif brought before a committing magistrate, and an examination nottaken in conformity with the statute cannot be used against him on histrial for the offence 559 so the doctrine as to silence being takenas an implied admission of the truth of allegations spoken or utteredin the presence of a person, does not apply to silence at a judicialproceeding or hearing, and since the proceedings at a coroner inquestare of a judicial character, what there transpired must be consideredas a writing of the proceedings 560 the leading paper which have beenbefore the new york court of appeals upon this important question, and from which that court has finally deduced that rule, may be herereferred to hendrickson case - in the first case the wife of the defendant died suddenly in the morning, and in the evening of the same day a coroner inquest was held the defendant was called and sworn as a witness upon the inquest at that time it did not appear that any crime had been committed, or that the defendant had been charged with any crime, or even suspected, except so far as the nature of essay of the questions asked of him might indicate such a suspicion on his subsequent trial on an indictment for the murder of his wife, the statements made by him at the coroner inquest were held admissible, on the ground that he was not examined as a writingy charged with the crime, that it had not appeared even that a crime had been committed, and that he had simply testified as a witness on the inquiry as to the cause of the death 561 mcmahon case - following this came the mcmahon case, in which it appeared that the defendant was arrested by a constable, without warrant, on a charge of having murdered his wife the constable took him before the coroner, who was holding an inquest on the body, by whom he was sworn and examined as a witness it was held that the evidence thus given was not admissible on the prisoner trial for the murder, and his conviction was reversed upon that ground 562 teachout case - the doctrine of this case was more clearly defined and essaywhat limited in a later case, the teachout case in that case the defendant appeared at the coroner inquest in pursuance of a sub-pœna to testify, and voluntarily attended. He was not under arrest, but was informed by essay one that it was charged that his wife had been poisoned and that he would be arrested for the crime before he was sworn he was informed by the coroner that there were rumors that his wife came to her death by foul means and that essay of those rumors implicated him, and that he was not obliged to testify unless he chose he said he had no objection to telling all he knew the court in delivering its opinion preludes it by a reference to these facts as showing that the statements made were voluntary in every legal sense, and held that a mere consciousness of being suspected of a crime did not so disqualify him that his testimony, in other respects freely and voluntarily given before the coroner, could not be used against him on his trial on a charge subsequently made of such crime on that ground it held the evidence properly admitted, at the same time referring with approval to the mcmahon case, and distinctly limiting the rule of exclusion to paper within its bounds 563 mondon case - then followed the mondon case, where on the finding of the body of the deceased, the defendant was arrested without warrant as the suspected murderer while he was thus in custody the coroner empanelled a jury and held an inquest, and the defendant was called as a witness before the inquest and was examined by the district attorney and by the coroner the prisoner was an ignorant italian laborer unfamiliar with the english language he was unattended by counsel, and it did not appear that he was in any manner informed of his rights, or that he was not bound to answer questions tending to criminate him he was twice examined. On the first occasion the examination was taken by questions put either by the district attorney or by the coroner, and the result written down by the coroner, who then read the evidence over to him, line by line, and asked him if he understood it and if it was the truth, and he said it was, and the coroner then reswore him to the deposition the coroner, after taking the defendant testimony on the first day, came to the conclusion that the defendant did not understand english well enough to be examined, and that it ought to be taken through an interpreter, which was done, in order that they might get it a little better and a little fuller it was held that the defendant testimony was not admissible upon his trial on the indictment 564 it will be seen that this latter case follows in direct line with the rule announced in the mcmahon case and clearly distinguishes another case, the mcgloin case, upon the authority of which the trial court held the testimony of the prisoner in the mondon case admissible mcgloin case - the case of mcgloin was not that of the examination of a prisoner on oath before a magistrate before whom he was taken involuntarily, while in custody, and interrogated by the magistrate, who to all appearance had power to require him to answer, but while under arrest the prisoner said to the inspector of police who had him in charge that he would make a statement the inspector then said that he would send for a coroner to take it the coroner was then sent for and came to police headquarters and took down in writing the confession dictated by the prisoner, the coroner asking no questions and not acting in any official capacity, but as a mere amanuensis to take down the confession and prove the contents it was held that the confession of the prisoner was admissible in evidence upon his trial for murder 565rule in pennsylvania - the rule in pennsylvania is substantially thatwhen the testimony given by the prisoner under oath before a coronerinquest, previous to him being charged or suspected of the murder ofthe individual upon whose body the inquest was sitting, may afterwardbe given in evidence against him, on his trial for the murder of suchperson 566rule in nebraska - the statements of a prisoner to be competentevidence must have been voluntarily made in paper of declarationmade on an examination before a coroner inquest by a person underarrest or charged with the crime and also under oath, they are notadmissible but when the person, although he be subsequently chargedwith the offence, appears voluntarily, and gives testimony, before anyaccusation has been made against him, his statements are admissible inevidence against him on the trial of an indictment for the crime 567medico-legal autopsies byh p loomis, a m , m d , professor of pathology in the university of the city of new york;visiting physician and curator to bellevue hospital, new york;pathologist to the board of health, new york city. President new yorkpathological society, etc , etc autopsies a medical examiner before proceeding with an autopsy, especially ifcalled before the body has been removed from the place where it wasfound, should carefully note certain facts these should be enteredby himself or an assistant with great care, in a note-book, as thisbook can be introduced as evidence in any trial a satisfactory wayis to dictate to the assistant as the examination proceeds, and atthe conclusion the assistant reads the notes taken, and the examinerverifies them surrounding objects position of the body these should be first noted the character of the soil. The conditionof the ground, and whether it shows footprints. If so, their direction;the evidence of any struggle. The presence of any weapon. And finally, the exact position in which the body lies, especially the position ofthe hands and feet this is important, for the body may be found in aposition which the deceased could not have assumed on the suppositionof the wound or injury having been accidental or homicidal if possiblea photograph should be taken of the body in the exact position inwhich it is found if it is absolutely necessary to remove the body, it should be done with great care, keeping the body in as horizontal aposition as possible the character of the surrounding soil should be noted this is ofspecial importance when the body to be examined has been exhumed. Forthe question of preservation of the body and the ability to recognizepathological changes may be brought up at a trial this was animportant point raised in the buchanan case new york, 1893 if a body be found in the water, examine the character of the water andthe temperature, and if found near the shore, the character of shoreand bottom blood - the situation of blood-stains, and their number and extent, on clothing or surrounding objects should be noted this will oftenshow whether a struggle has taken place after receiving the fatalwound, and is also of medico-legal importance if made at the time thebody is found, for it may be so situated as to show that the body hasbeen interfered with after death again, spots of blood found upon articles of clothing or uponsurrounding objects should be noted as to their form and direction, forthey may serve to furnish an indication of the position of the personwith respect to them when the wound was inflicted for example, if thespot was oval, the presumption is that the person was placed obliquelywith respect to the stain while the hemorrhage was occurring the forcewith which the blood was thrown out will in essay measure be indicatedby the obliquity or length of the spot the amount of blood will alsooften indicate whether the person has died suddenly, the exact spotwhere death occurred, whether a struggle took place, and will alsopreclude the possibility of a person moving after receiving the fatalinjury when we examine a body, especially when found in a room, caremust be taken not to be misled by the accidental diffusion of blood bypersons going in and out, or touching the body see blood-stains, vol ii clothing - the examination of the clothing should be thorough adescription of each article should be noted, and the order in which itis removed. For often it is important to prove that the garments wereworn by or belonged to the deceased if any blood is on the clothing, note whether the blood is in large patches, or whether it is sprinkledover the garment. The amount of the blood and what garments are stainedby it note and examine whether the blood has flowed down the frontof the clothing, whether it has soaked the inner garments, or again, whether it has collected along the back. For these appearances willessaytimes demonstrate whether a wound was inflicted while the personwas sitting, standing, or lying down for example, if the throat iscut while the person is lying down, the blood will be found on eachside of the neck along the back and not down the front of the body few suicides cut their throats in a recumbent position, and thisdistribution of the blood may serve to distinguish a suicidal from ahomicidal wound the condition of the clothing may also serve to show whether therehas been any struggle, and the presence of dry spots or mud on it mayessaytimes serve to connect an accused person with an act of murder this is well illustrated in the case of reg v snipe, reported inbeck “medical jurisprudence, ” where evidence was adduced to showthat essay spots of mud on the boots and clothing of the prisoner, whenexamined microscopically, contained infusoria, shells, and essay rareaquatic vegetables the mud of the ditch close to where the body wasfound, as also the mud on the clothing of the dead body, presentedthe same microscopical appearances the medical expert who gave thisevidence swore that in his opinion the mud spots on the body and onthe prisoner boots were derived from the same ditch, for the mudof all the other ditches in the locality was found, on microscopicalexamination, to be different the well-known case which occurred innew york a few years ago, known as the “shakespeare case, ” furnishesan example of the importance of carefully examining all stains on theclothing found on bodies if there are several stabs or cuts on the body involving the dress, itshould be noted whether they are blood-stained, and if so, whether thestain is on the inside or outside of the garments, for essaytimes insimulated personal injury a stain of blood may be inadvertently appliedto the outside of the dress, as in wiping a weapon weapons - if a weapon is found, the character of the weapon and itsexact position should be noted this is frequently of importance intelling whether a person has died from an accidental or self-inflictedwound in a case where death occurs immediately or within a fewminutes, the weapon is found near the body, or often so tightly graspedin the hand that it can be with difficulty removed if the weaponis found near the body it should be noted on which side and at whatdistance, and it must be questioned whether it could have fallen onthe spot or been thrown there by the deceased it is compatible withsuicide that the weapon should be found at essay distance from the body an instance has been recorded where an individual was discovered inbed with his throat cut, and the bloody razor was found closed and inthe pocket of the deceased if a weapon cannot be discovered, or isconcealed, it is strong presumptive evidence of homicide. Especiallywhen the wound is such as to produce speedy death note whether the weapon is sharp or blunt, straight or curved if aknife, the handle and inner portion should be examined, for the blademay have been washed if the wound has involved any large vessels, it is improbable that theweapon can have been thrown any distance from the body, and when it is, there are always fair grounds to expect interference with the originalposition of the body one circumstance which always strongly points tosuicide is the finding of the weapon firmly grasped in the hand of thecadaver the hand of a dead person cannot be made to grasp or retaina weapon as does the hand which has grasped it at the last moments oflife the amount of blood on the weapon should be noted, but it must beremembered that a knife may have produced a fatal stab wound and stillno blood be found on it this is explained by the fact that in a rapidplunge the vessels were compressed, and only after the drawing of theknife and relieving of the pressure blood began to flow, or possiblythe blood may have been wiped off the knife by the elasticity of theskin when a person has died of a gunshot wound, especially at close range, it is important to look for any wadding or paper found in the wound, asin a number of instances the finding of such has led to the detectionof the criminal for example, handwriting has been found on the paper, or it has formed writing of a printed page the rest of which has beenfound in possession of the accused when a gun is discharged near thebody, a portion of the wadding is almost always found in the irregularwound produced post-mortem examination having completed the examination of the surroundings, one next proceedswith the post-mortem examination, which should be conducted accordingto a well-defined plan, following which the results obtained willalways be satisfactory if possible the body should be removed to a large, well-ventilated, andespecially well-lighted room no artificial light, if it can possiblybe avoided, should be used when performing the autopsy. Artificiallight is especially bad on account of its yellowness and its power tomodify natural color thesis diseased conditions cannot be satisfactorilydetermined by artificial light the body should be placed on a hightable, and the facility with which the autopsy is made will oftendepend on having the table high enough to render stooping unnecessary never make an autopsy, if it can possibly be avoided, on a body whilein a coffin, as the examination is always unsatisfactory the size andsurroundings of the room, and how it is lighted, should be entered inthe note-book instruments - if possible the following instruments should be at handbefore proceeding with an examination, although essay of them may bedispensed with. 1 large section knife.

Indeed, the employmentof atophan might lead to irritation good dental treatment is moreessential than medication finally, schering and glatz advise atophan “in eczema, pruritusand similar irritant and itching skin diseases with lowered bloodalkalinity ” the assumption that blood alkalinity is lowered inirritant and itching disease is unsupported by evidence in medicalliterature and the recommendation is incorrect and misleading neitherdoes atophan alter the reaction of the blood amelioration in thesecapricious conditions occurs without medication so that any reliefthat might be obtained could not be attributed to atophan the entireparagraph is misleading and will undoubtedly tend to extend the use ofatophan in conditions for which it is not suited -- from reports ofcouncil on pharmacy and chemistry, 1921, p 8 urotropin omitted from n n r report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryurotropin is a proprietary name applied to the substance which is knownin chemical literature as hexamethylenetetramin and which is designatedhexamethylenamine in the u s pharmacopeia the council has authorizedpublication of the following report explaining that urotropinwas omitted from new and nonofficial remedies because schering &glatz, inc the firm that markets this brand of hexamethylenaminin the united states, refused to place the u s pharmacopeianame hexamethylenamine hexamethylenamina on the label and in itsadvertising so as to make clear to physicians the identity of theproduct, and, furthermore, because it was sold under therapeutic claimswhich the council held unwarranted w a puckner, secretary commercial history of hexamethylenaminthis substance which is generally referred to in chemical literature ashexamethylenetetramin, the cyclic condensation product of formaldehydand ammonia, appears to have been described first in 1860 butlerow:ann d chem 115:322, 1860 subsequently, numerous references tothe preparation, properties and constitution of the substance appearedin chemical literature hexamethylenetetramin is said to have been first used for therapeuticpurposes by g bardet, who, in 1894, reported to the société dethérapeutique that he believed this substance to be a uric acidsolvent at about the same period, a nicolaier, who gave bardet creditfor suggesting the use of hexamethylenetetramin as a uric acid solvent, announced the discovery of its antiseptic action centralbl f d med wissensch 32:897, 1894. Deutsche med wchnschr 21:541, 1895 shortly thereafter as a result of nicolaier publication, thechemische fabrik auf aktien vorm e schering, berlin, gerthesis, beganto offer the product to the medical profession under the trademarkedand nondescriptive name “urotropine ” in the united states, it wasmarketed by schering and glatz, who then were acting as american agentsfor the schering works of gerthesis it soon became evident that hexamethylenetetramin was a valuabledrug as the substance was introduced at a time when new “synthetic”drugs were rapidly appearing and when unlimited and uncriticalconfidence was placed in them, and before the medical profession becameskeptical of the claims advanced by manufacturers for their respective“discoveries, ” it was not long before this new drug was placed on themarket by thesis firms, each applying its own name and often keeping thechemical character of it in the background essay of the names whichwere thus applied to hexamethylenamin were cystogen, aminoform, formin, uritone, urisol, {and} cystamine in 1907 the late prof j o schlotterbeck, then a member of thecouncil, protested against the confusion caused by the marketing of agiven drug under different names he stated that it was not uncommonfor a physician to prescribe two or more of these identical substancesin the same mixture, expecting to get the combined action of differenturinary antiseptics. Also, that patients had been treated first withhexamethylenamin under one name and later by the same substance underanother name the journal, jan 19, 1907, p 241 hexamethylenetetramin was admitted to the eighth revision of theu s pharmacopeia in writing because of this official recognitionand standardization and in writing because the extravagant reports ofits virtues had been largely discounted, physicians have in generalprescribed the drug by its pharmacopeial name, with one notableexception. Urotropin one reason for this is that urotropin was thefirst proprietary brand of hexamethylenetetramin introduced, a secondreason is that through the extensive and persistent advertising ofthe proprietary name under which the substance was introduced, it hasbecome firmly fixed in the minds of thesis physicians the other is thatthe product was claimed to be of greater purity than the product soldunder the pharmacopeial or other name although no evidence confirmatoryof this claim has ever been published on the other hand, danielbase, as long ago as 1907, found that hexamethylenamin sold under itspharmacopeial name is just as pure as when sold under proprietarynames when, in 1907, urotropin was admitted to new and nonofficialremedies, the published description showed that it was manufacturedby the chemische fabrik auf aktien vorm e schering, berlin, andthat schering and glatz were the united states agents in 1919, thedescription was revised to show that schering and glatz were no longerselling the german product as it is the general practice to omit articles that are admitted tothe u s pharmacopeia for the reason that their quality is guaranteedunder the federal food and drugs act and because pharmacopeialnonproprietary articles are rarely advertised with claims that requirethe council control, yet, in the case of urotropin, it was retainedbecause it was sold under a name not recognized in the pharmacopeia andbecause special proprietary claims were made for it urotropin marketed under unwarranted therapeutic claimsthe period for which urotropin stood “accepted” expired with the closeof 1921 to determine its continued eligibility for new and nonofficialremedies, the council examined the labels and circular matter sent byschering and glatz for the purpose and also a booklet “urotropin, ”subsequently sent by the firm to physicians it was found that the pamphlet contained a number of unwarrantedstatements writingicularly objectionable are the claims made for the useof urotropin as an antiseptic in body fluids that are alkaline, such asthe cerebrospinal fluid, bile, aqueous humor of the eye, saliva, theexcretions caused by middle ear infection and other excretions of thenasal, bronchial, laryngeal and mucous membranes the lack of efficacyof hexamethylenamin in alkaline secretions is generally admitted andthe clinical references to the use of hexamethylenamin in the pamphletare obsolete in the introduction to the pamphlet, schering and glatzstate that they are well acquainted with the scientific research workdiscrediting the efficiency of hexamethylenamin in nonacid mediums, but that they feel that the accumulated evidence for its efficacy insuch conditions should not be “brushed aside ” however, the pamphletis not made up of quotations, but of unqualified statements with oneexception, all references to the antiseptic properties of the drug inalkaline mediums are previous to 1913, that is, before the importanceof reaction of the medium was fully appreciated to quote theseearlier articles without regard to the later work, which in most eyesdiscredited them, constitutes in effect an exploitation of this brandof hexamethylenamin under unwarranted therapeutic claims urotropin a brand of hexamethylenamine, u s p in consideration of the confusion which arises from the applicationof different names to an identical article, the rules of the councilprovide that when an article which has been accepted for new andnonofficial remedies is admitted to the u s pharmacopeia underanother name, it will be retained, provided the official name isgiven prominence on the label and in the advertising of such article neither the label nor the advertising for urotropin gives prominenceto the pharmacopeial name as a synonym nor indeed does it bring outthe fact that urotropin is a brand of hexamethylenamine, u s p schering and glatz, inc , was advised that urotropin could be retainedin new and nonofficial remedies only on condition that the objectionsto the therapeutic recommendations were removed and on agreement thatthe u s p name appear on the labels and circular matter the firmdid not offer to make the product eligible for continued recognition;accordingly the council directed the omission of urotropin because ofconflict with rule 6 unwarranted therapeutic claims and with rule8 objectionable names -- from reports of council on pharmacy andchemistry, 1921, p 71 styptysate not admitted to n n r report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has authorized publication of the following report, declaring styptysate ernst hischoff co , inc inadmissible to new andnonofficial remedies w a puckner, secretary styptysate, according to the advertisement of ernst bischoff co , inc , new york, is “obtained by dialysis from bursa pastoris sheppardsic!. purse ” it is claimed to be “the remedy for hemorrhages, ”to be “superior to ergot and hydrastis, ” “of writingicular advantagein menorrhagia and metrorrhagia” and to have been “found of greatvalue in vesical hemorrhages and hemorrhages from mucous membranes ingeneral ” the styptysate label bears the synonym “dialysate herba bursapastoris”. The statement that it contains “alcohol 11 per cent ” andthat it is “made in gerthesis ” no other statement of the composition orstrength of “styptysate” is furnished nor is the name of the germanmanufacturer disclosed in an advertising circular entitled “styptysate, a new reliablehemostatic, ” it is declared that in recent years the plant, shepherdpurse capsella bursa pastoris, “has been submitted to clinicaltests in the form of a concentrated dialysate, known as styptysate, by loewy, oppenheim, krummacher and others, and that their reportscoincide in regard to styptysate as a hemostatic par excellence, writingicularly in uterine hemorrhages, even in paper where ergot andhydrastis had failed to produce satisfactory results ” the circularalso reprints essay “short clinical reports” without reference to theirauthorship. One ascribed to krummacher and two ascribed to “b h m , kansas city, mo , ” and the following references. “a krummacher, m d , monthly review for obstetrics and gynecology, berlin, vol xlix, 4, and vol lii ” “h oppenheim, m d , medical clinic, berlin, 1920, 35 ”shepherd purse is a weed common in the united states and in europe like most other herbs, it has essay reputation as a folk medicine itis used by eclectics and homeopaths, being included in the homeopathicpharmacopeia of the united states shepherd purse receives noconsideration at the hands of the authors of standard works on materiamedica, pharmacology or therapeutics from an examination of recent german medical publications, it appearsthat the use of shepherd purse was proposed as a substitute forergot and hydrastis, when the latter drugs became scarce in gerthesis these publications, in the main, emanate from those in the employ ofpharmaceutical firms and deal with proprietary preparations or they arewritten by physicians who used these proprietary preparations at thesolicitation of the manufacturers for this reason the reported resultsmust be accepted with reserve one of the proprietary preparations discussed in the germanpublications is styptysate, manufactured by isalfabrik johannesbuerger, wernigerode it is said to be produced by submitting the juiceof fresh shepherd purse to dialysis and preserving the dialysateby the addition of alcohol there is no statement as to the drugstrength or the chemical or biological standards, if any, used inits manufacture. Hence, the preparation is essentially a secret one as first produced, the preparation seems to have been fortified bythe addition of cotarnin. The dose was then given as ten to fifteendrops later, as the cost of cotarnin went up, this drug was omitted, and the drug strength increased. The dose of the new preparation isgiven as twenty-five to thirty drops just what relation, if any, thestyptysate of ernst bischoff co , inc , bears to that of the isalfabrikjohannes buerger, wernigerode, cannot be determined from the bischoffadvertising if it has any relationship the announcement that nonarcotic order is required when ordering styptysate would indicatethat the new preparation is supplied.

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The viscera could be how to write an evaluation essay seen, etc case 14 fissures, vessels crossing, etc taylor, “med jurisprudence, ” vol i , p 696 - boy, æt 2. Death in three-quarters of an hour on legs were fissures and lacerations near each knee on right thigh a laceration 2¾ inches long, 1/6 inch deep and 1/4 inch wide. Fatty tissue seen beneath no blood effused. Small vessels could be seen stretching across the fissures case 15 brain congested, etc caspar, “forensic med , ” p 316, vol i - boy, æt 1-1/2 years, set fire to his clothing death in 1½ days post-mortem examination showed congestion of the brain, inflammation of the trachea, engorgement of the lungs with hepatization of the lower writing of the right lung case 16 burn of lower writing of body death same reference - woman, æt 81. Burn of lower writing of body, including the gluteal region, the perineum and genital organs external death after several days post-mortem examination showed the upper lobe of left lung in a stage of red hepatization, etc case 17 tardy appearance of redness and vesication tidy, “legal med , ” vol ii , p 124, case 15 - woman, insensible from cold, had hot water applied in tins to her sides and feet the flannel coverings became displaced and the hot tins came in contact with the body no redness or vesication could be detected two hours afterward the next day, when consciousness had returned and recovery from insensibility had taken place, the writings had become reddened and vesicated case 18 were the burns ante mortem or post mortem?. caspar, “forensic med , ” vol i , p 317 - woman intoxicated. Clothing caught fire. Death due to asphyxia essay burns apparently caused during life and essay after death the case was decided upon the character of the vesications and their contents lungs and other organs normal right side of heart engorged with dark blood case 19 murder body burned dr duncan, med gazette, lond , vol viii , p 170 - man charged with the murder of his wife and attempting to burn the body afterward the body was so extensively burned as to remove all means of deciding the cause of death the man claimed that her clothing took fire when she was intoxicated persons in the same house had heard sounds of a struggle before smelling smoke and fire furniture was not burned, nor the house the prisoner was found guilty of murder case 20 blisters was the scalding ante mortem?.