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How To Write An Essay On A Book


Yet this, ifyou observe it, you shall find an excellant truth how to write an essay on a book. In diseases of theblood, use the red centaury. If of choler, use the yellow. But ifphlegm or water, you will find the white best the cherry-tree i suppose there are few but know this tree, for its fruit sake. Andtherefore i shall spare writing a description thereof place for the place of its growth, it is afforded room in everyorchard government and virtues it is a tree of venus cherries, as theyare of different tastes, so they are of different qualities the sweetpass through the stomach and the belly more speedily, but are of littlenourishment. The tart or sour are more pleasing to an hot stomach, procure appetite to meat, to help and cut tough phlegm, and grosshumours.

The rate of growth is retarded;necrosis and metastasis are prevented, and inoperable tumors becomeoperable how are we to interpret these observations?. how are we toexplain the fact that they are the almost invariable accompanimentof the most diverse methods of treatment?. i have already quoted thestatement of ledoux-lebard that every therapeutic novelty appears toexercise a favorable effect on cancer paper the same fact has beenobserved in a variety of other diseases, such as locomotor ataxia in order to arrive at a safe and reliable estimate as to the valueof any new or experimental procedure in paper of cancer, it seemsadvisable to accept certain definite therapeutic criteria by which thepaper are to be judged in the absence of such a method, alterationsin symptoms which are actually of no real value or importance receiveundue emphasis the natural course of the disease is associatedwith such fluctuations that a sanguine therapeutist can gain essayencouragement from even the most hopeless paper hence it follows thatevery mode of treatment has found adherents the market is floodedwith cancer drugs, and cancer charlatans flourish in the most highlyeducated communities unfortunately, even well trained, honest andreputable physicians have fallen victims to this fallacy, and havelent their names to the support of modes of treatment which in realityproduce no determinable effect on the natural evolution of the disease it was the desire to combat this unfortunate tendency which led meessay time ago to attempt to establish a reliable set of criteria oftherapeutic effects in cancer these were embodied in an article280which appeared two years ago, and i may be here permitted to quote themin extenso. Criteria of therapeutic effects in determining the effects of any given mode of treatment on a tumor, a variety of criteria may be relied on circulatory changes in the tumor, the relief of pain and the restoration of a secondarily impaired function are certain of the criteria on which stress has been laid by the majority of observers in the past important as are these criteria in determining the progress of purely inflammatory processes, it is unquestionable that their value in judging of the effects of therapeutic methods when applied to malignant disease is open to criticism it is a curious and interesting fact that almost every therapeutic claim made in recent years in connection with cancer has included among its virtues the relief of pain this is true of vaccination with cancer tissue, of hodenpyl method and of thesis others in view of this very general effect, not much stress can be laid on this symptom, and it is probably fair to assume that in the great majority of these paper the result is in no small measure psychic the improvement of function is also largely a subjective phenomenon, and as such requires most careful criticism osler relates that he has known a patient with gastric cancer to be relieved of digestive disturbances and to gain 18 pounds in weight as the result simply of the visit of a sanguine consultant who denied the presence of a tumor improvement in the ability to chew food, to articulate words or to move a limb are phenomena familiar to those who attempt to treat paper of cancer the victims of this disease seem to be in a very high degree “suggestible” and impressionable and respond nobly to every therapeutic effort circulatory changes in tumors offer an interesting group of clinical symptoms the observation has often been made, especially in ulcerated new growths, that treatment is associated with swelling, peripheral hyperemia, and an altered character of the discharge in spite of the fact that there is no reasonable relationship between this congeries of symptoms and the actual cure of the tumor, they generally receive considerable emphasis and are cited as an indication of the specific local action of the agent employed it is also true, however, that the growth may continue to advance in spite of their presence it is of essay importance to inquire into the mechanism which produces these circulatory changes and into their clinical interpretation it is a well known fact that thesis drugs, when introduced into the body either by the mouth or through the skin, are excreted not only by the normal channels of elimination, such as the kidney or the intestine, but also from such ulcerated surfaces as may be present on the body this is easily shown to be true, for example, of certain of the anilin dyes, which, when introduced by way of the veins, produce an intense discoloration of the dressings over ulcers it is likewise true of certain of the metals, such as arsenic in order to understand the series of events previously enumerated it is therefore only necessary to assume that the therapeutic agent is excreted from the ulcerated surface of tumors if an irritant, it will tend to produce hyperemia of the margins of the ulcer, and an increase of the secretions if an astringent, however, it may produce just the opposite of these effects such a result, however striking, is purely accidental, and has no necessary bearing on the growth or destruction of the tumor itself it constitutes a symptom on which no reliance should be placed excluding from consideration all of these secondary factors, we may conclude that the observation of the size of the tumor itself is the sole criterion on which we can place reliance in judging of the effect of therapeutic measures this implies, in the first place, that a tumor must be accessible to fairly accurate measurement tumors of the uterus, for example, and intra-abdominal growths will only exceptionally fall into this class in the second place, indirect evidence of a decrease in the size of tumors, such as is afforded by the increased permeability of obstructed passages, as in the case of tumors of the esophagus, pylorus or intestine, must be accepted only with great reserve remissions in the obstructive symptoms characteristic of such tumors are a frequent feature of the normal evolution of the clinical history of such growths the relief of obstruction, however, may be due either to necrosis of the obstructing portions of the tumor, while the remainder continues to grow progressively, or to a relief of the accompanying muscular spasm finally, evidence of decrease afforded by the roentgenogram is not sufficiently exact in most paper to afford ground for so important a conclusion as that at present in question not only must there be unquestionable evidence, however, of the diminution in size of the tumor, but this diminution must be of a kind not ordinarily attributable to the natural evolution of the tumor it is safe to say that multiple tumors offer enormous difficulties in the matter of interpreting therapeutic results at present we have in the wards of the hospital a patient with multiple metastatic carcinomas of the skin for several months we have at intervals made accurate measurements of certain of these tumors and have found that essay have undergone retrogression, others have entirely disappeared, while still others have continued to grow steadily in the case which afforded the ascitic fluid used in hodenpyl experiments, thesis of the lymphatic metastases underwent complete retrogression, while the metastatic process in the liver, as was demonstrated at necropsy, increased progressively, and ultimately almost destroyed that organ thus, in multiple carcinosis, the retrogression of individual nodules is no indication that therapeutic intervention has produced an improvement i shall not delay to emphasize those variations in the size of solid tumors which accompany hemorrhage and its absorption, edematous swelling, necrosis in the depths, and other familiar factors which clinically simulate, or induce, the softening and the reduction that are so often attributed to therapeutic interference but it is important to draw attention to a similar feature in that type of superficial epithelioma known as rodent ulcer these new growths not infrequently advance at one point of the periphery, while they recede at another, and thus cicatrization and contracture may simulate a writingial recovery this effect is due in writing to alterations not in the growth itself, but in the accompanying ulcerative process the secretions from the growths, especially if confined under dressings, may have eroded and destroyed the surrounding skin, and it is tempting to interpret a recession of the associated ulcerative disease as an indication of a favorable effect on the new growth it is unquestionably this aspect of rodent ulcers which plays so generously into the hands of the numerous venders of nostrums for this disease in brief, the demonstrable reduction in size of a tumor, of a kind not to be attributed to the natural processes of evolution of that tumor or of its associated lesions, is the one essential feature of effective therapeutic intervention when the various methods of treatment which have been discussed inthis paper are judged by the standard advocated above, it is apparentthat none of them can lay claim to therapeutic effectiveness themodifications of the disease attributed to them are modifications whichoccur spontaneously in a very large proportion of paper as a resultof the natural evolution of the disease process this is a fact whichcannot be too strongly emphasized owing unfortunately to the hopelesscharacter of cancer, men are not prone to study with care all thelesser changes which the disease and the patient present under ordinaryconditions. But when a “cure” is under investigation, the patient andhis medical attendant note every apparent improvement with painstakingattention and enthusiasm as a result, essay evidence of improvement intreatment is entered on the books -- from the journal a m a , april17, 1915 the direct sales companyduring the past four or five years, the journal has had inquiriessimilar in effect to this, just received from dr e p jewett ofgardner, mass. “will you kindly inform me regarding a drug manufacturing company by the name of the direct sales company, buffalo, new york?. are their products standard and reliable so far as you know?. ”the direct sales company, inc , buffalo, has, according to itsletterhead, the following officers. Geo j dotterweich, president and treasurer, c k dotterweich, vice-president, louis b seufert, secretary this concern circularizes physicians and emphasizes that it sells“only by mail ” it also features a “profit sharing rebate” scheme, whereby purchasers receive a coupon representing 10 per cent of theinvoice value of each purchase after $100 worth of merchandise hasbeen purchased the $10 worth of coupons when “presented for redemptionat one time” will be “honored as cash”-- presumably on the purchase ofadditional goods the direct sales company catalogues have for essay years, carried aguaranty, which reads, in writing. “we absolutely guarantee all preparations to be in exact accordance with the national pure food and drugs act, june 30, 1906 “we also absolutely guarantee all preparations bearing our label to be equal, if not superior, to any on the market ”in one of the quarterly bulletins of the state board of health of newhampshire, issued last year, this paragraph appeared. “the direct sales company, inc , buffalo, n y , is a pharmaceutical concern which until recently has done business direct with new hampshire physicians in two or three instances complaints have been received by this dewritingment that the preparations sold seemed to be lacking in potency essay time ago a physician sent us a specimen of codein sulphate tablets, one-fourth grain, concerning which he was suspicious, admission being made that the price paid was very much less than current quotations the amount of codein sulphate actually found per tablet proved to be but one-sixteenth grain later on, having subsequently received a new lot from this source, the same physician sent us a second sample, the composition of which was found to be practically identical with the first acting under the federal law, 500 lot packages of the following preparations were next purchased of the company direct, the analytical results indicating serious deficiency in every case, as follows. “tablets salicylic acid, 5 grains 1 72 grains found “tablets acetylsalicylic acid, 5 grains 2 31 grains found “tablets acetanilid, 3 grains 1 88 grains found “tablets codein sulphate, 1/4 grain 1/15 grain found “tablets nux and pepsin no 2, claiming pepsin 1 grain, extract nux vomica, 1/10 grain, found to have a gross average weight per tablet of only 1 17 grains, 0 54 grains of which was represented by sugar and other medicinally inert material “tablets infant anodyne waugh showed serious discrepancy from formula ”the bulletin added the statement that, as the company could not bereached under the new hampshire laws, the federal authorities wereappealed to the result of this appeal appeared in chemical supplement54, issued aug 21, 1918, by the bureau of chemistry of the u s dewritingment of agriculture this government bulletin contained noticeof judgment no 6193, which describes paper of adulteration andmisbranding of essay of the drugs put out by the direct sales company briefly, it may be said that essay 2 grain acetanilid tablets sold bythis concern were found by the government chemists to contain, roughly, about 1-2/3 1 61 grains.

Brainnormal. Mark of cord slight. Subcutaneous tissue infiltrated withblood marks of pressure on chest. Bloody froth in trachea. Lungscongested. Heart contained fluid blood opinion given that she hadbeen struck on head, causing unconsciousness. Then writingly stranded andwritingly suffocated by pressure on neck and chest body afterward burntto cover up the crime 31 ibid , p 211 - three murders by one man all women all injuredabout the head and then strangled by both hand and ligature two died;one had an odor of alcohol and had apparently not resisted the thirdwas resuscitated she was strong and stout, and resisted marks offingers and nails on neck afterward she had headaches and giddinessfor a long time suicide 32 francis. Med times and gaz , december 2d, 1876, p 634 - hindoo lunatic, a giant, strangled himself he passed two orthree coils of stout thread around his neck, attached the ends securelyto his wrists, and then extended his arms to their utmost limit thisoccurred during a ten-minute absence of his attendant, who, returning, found the man had fallen to one side from a kneeling position, with hisback against a wall, quite dead no reason to suspect homicide 33 badahur. Indian med gaz , december, 1882, p 330 - hindoowoman, age about 17, strangled herself with the border of her saree necroscopy. Circular depressed mark caused by the border of a bandof cloth, which she had passed in three coils around her neck, thecoils tightly overlapping each other. The short ends had been knottedtogether with a “granny” knot at the back of the neck, like the nativewomen tie up their hair the coils were so tight that they had to becut off face swollen, dark purple. Conjunctivæ congested tonguebetween the shut teeth. Bloody froth issuing from mouth and nostrilsthe examination was in september, thirty hours after death skin ofneck reddened in nearly a continuous line all around, both above andbelow the band, about three-fourths inch wide, evidently caused by thepressure of the three folds considerable ecchymosis above and belowthe coils. The neck underneath the folds was swollen and red brain andmembranes much congested trachea, pharynx, and œsophagus congested lungs congested right cavity auricle?. of heart full, left empty liver, spleen, and kidneys congested intestinal peritoneum congested stomach contained half-digested food small intestines empty.

“that there is no rightof property in a dead body, using this word in its ordinary sense, may be well admitted, yet the burial of the dead is how to write an essay on a book a subject whichinterests the feelings of mankind to a much greater degree than thesismatters of actual property there is a duty imposed by the universalfeelings of mankind to be discharged by essay one toward the dead. Aduty, and we may also say a right, to protect from violation. It may, therefore, be considered as a sort of quasi property, and it wouldbe discreditable to any system of law not to provide a remedy in sucha case. but the person having charge of it cannot be considered asthe owner of it in any sense whatever, he holds it only as a sacredtrust for the benefit of all who may from family or friendship havean interest in it ” see also wyncoop v wyncoop, 42 pa st , 293. 4albany law jour , 56. Snyder v snyder, 60 how prac , 368. Weld v walker, 130 mass , 422. Guthrie v weaver, 1 mo apps , 136. Johnsonv marinus, 18 abb n c , 72, and note 493the law casts the duty of burial of the wife upon the husband, andof the husband upon the wife in secord v secord cited in note 1above, the court said. “there are cogent reasons connected with publicpolicy and the peace of families, where in the absence of testamentarydisposition the possession of a corpse and the right to determine itsburial should follow the administration of the estate ” inasmuch asthe husband has the first right to administer upon the estate of thewife, and the wife upon the estate of the husband, the law imposes thecorrelative duty of burial upon the person having such right. And soit has been held that the husband is liable for the necessary expenseof the decent interment of his wife from whom he has been separated, whether the writingy incurring the expense is an undertaker or merevolunteer 494where the deceased leaves a will appointing executors, the executorshave a right to the possession of the body, and the duty of burialis imposed upon them, but it has been doubted whether at common lawa direction by will concerning the disposal of the body could beenforced, and therefore the right to make such direction has beenconferred by statute in several states 495and where a widow ordered a funeral of her husband, it was held thatshe was liable for the expense, although she was an infant at the time, the court holding that the expense fell under the head of necessaries, for which infants’ estates are liable 496if there be no husband or wife of the deceased, the nearest of kinin the order of right to administration is charged with the duty ofburial 497such acts as casting a dead human body into a river without the ritesof sepulture kanavans case, 1 me , 226. Stealing a corpse 2 east, pc , 652 or stealing for dissection a dead body of one executed whenthe death sentence did not direct dissection rex v cundick, d &r , n p , 13, were indictable offences at common law 498in the works of the early dramatists, and by essay writers of fiction, it has been stated, or implied, that the body of a deceased personcould be seized and detained to compel the payment of his debts thiswas never the law in jones v ashburnham, 4 east, 460, it was heldthat to seize a dead body on pretence of arresting for debt would becontra bonos mores, and an extortion on the relatives, and that casedistinctly overrules any authority to be derived from the case of quickv coppleton, 1 vent , 161, to the effect that forbearance to seizeor hold a body upon such a pretence would afford any consideration fora promise to pay a debt so, also, where a jailer refused to give upa body of a person who had died while a prisoner in execution in hiscustody, to the executors of the deceased, unless they would satisfycertain claims against the deceased due the jailer, the court issueda peremptory mandamus in the first instance, commanding that the bodyshould be delivered up to the executors rex v fox, 2 q b , 247 and in r v scott, 2 q b , 248, it was said, that a jailer whoshould attempt to do so would be guilty of misconduct in his publiccharacter, for which he would be liable to prosecution 499how and by whom the dead human body may be removed or exhumed - wherethe right of burial has been exercised, and the body interred inits final resting-place, no person has any right to interferewith it without the consent of the owner of the grave, or of theproperly constituted public authorities in foster v dodd, 8 d & e , 842-854, it was held, that a dead body belongs to no one, andis, therefore, under the protection of the public if it lies inconsecrated ground, ecclesiastical authorities will interpose forits protection. But whether in ground consecrated or unconsecrated, indignities offered to the remains or the act of indecentlydisinterring them, are the ground of an indictment 500even the purchaser of land upon which is located a burial-ground maybe enjoined from removing bodies therefrom, if he attempts to do soagainst the wishes of the relatives or next of kin of the deceased every interment is a concession of the privilege which cannot afterwardbe repudiated, and the purchaser title to the ground is fettered withthe right of burial 501on the other hand, the right of the municipal or state authorities, with the consent of the owner of the burial lot or in the execution ofthe right of eminent domain, to remove dead bodies from cemeteries iswell settled 502after the right of burial has once been exercised by the person chargedwith the duty of burial, or where such person has consented to theburial by another person, no right to the corpse remains except toprotect it from unlawful interference 503on the other hand, where a husband did not freely consent to the burialof his wife in a lot owned by another person, it was held that a courtof equity might permit him, after such burial, to remove her body, coffin, and tombstones to his own lot, and restrain any person frominterfering with such removal 504in rhodes v brandt, 21 hun, n y , 1, the defendant brought anaction against one beelard to recover for services rendered by him, asa physician, in treating a child of beelard for a fracture of thethigh-bone, in which action beelard set up malpractice on the writing ofthe defendant as a defence during the pendency of the action the childdied and was buried subsequently beelard, the father, acting under theadvice of his counsel, directed and allowed the plaintiff, a physician, to cause the body of the child to be exhumed, and a portion of thethigh-bone to be removed, in order that it might be used in evidence onthe trial of the question of malpractice after the bone was removed, the body was returned to the grave the defendant thereupon caused theplaintiff to be arrested for unlawfully removing the body from thegrave contrary to the provisions of the statute, and the plaintiffsued the defendant for malicious prosecution the court held that theplaintiff had not removed the body from the grave “for the purpose ofdissection or from mere wantonness, ” as these terms were used in thestatute 3 r s , 6th ed , 965, for violation of which he had beenarrested, nor had he committed any offence against public decency orthe spirit of the statute 505autopsies, by whom ordered. The rights of relatives and accusedpersons - as shown in a previous article in this volume, on the powersand duties of coroners and medical examiners, in paper of sudden orsuspicious death, it has been the law for nearly a thousand yearsthat an inquisition or inquest super visum corporis must be held byan officer known as a coroner, and that this office and its powers andduties were inherited by this country as writing of the english common-lawsystem in force at the time of the formation of the republic of theunited states when a body has been buried, and the coroner believesthat an inquest is necessary, he has power to disinter the body andhold an inquest, and he may direct a post-mortem examination to bemade, but after having done so he must cause the body to be reinterred it is now well settled that in holding such an inquest, and making suchan autopsy or post-mortem examination required by his official duty, the coroner has authority to employ, and it is his duty to employ, professional skill and aid, and his contract will bind the county topay a reasonable compensation for the same 506as will be seen below from a synopsis of the statutes relating tothis matter, thesis of the states have enacted statutes defining andprescribing the duties of the coroner and other public officers in suchpaper at an early period in england see 2 and 3 will iv , chap 75, sec 7 it was enacted by the english parliament that any executoror other person having lawful possession of the body of a deceasedperson, and not being an undertaker or other writingy entrusted with thebody for the purpose only of interment, might lawfully permit the bodyof such deceased person to undergo an anatomical examination, unlessto the knowledge of such executor or other writingy such person shouldhave expressed his desire during his life in writing, or verbally inthe presence of two or more witnesses during his illness whereof hedied, that his body after death might not undergo such examination, orunless the surviving husband or wife or known relative of the deceasedshall require the body to be interred without such examination byanother section of this statute sec 10, professors of anatomy andother persons duly licensed were declared not liable to punishment forhaving in their possession human bodies when having such possessionaccording to the provisions of the act section 308 of the new york penal code, subdivision 3, as amendedby chapter 500, laws 1889, enacts that whenever and so far as thehusband, wife, or next of kin of the deceased, being charged by lawwith the duty of burial, may authorize dissection for the purposeof ascertaining the cause of death and no further, the right existsto dissect the dead human body the same statute also provides thatwhenever any district attorney of that state, in the discharge ofhis official duties, shall deem it necessary, he may exhume, takepossession of, and remove the body of a deceased person, or anyportion thereof, and submit the same to a proper physical or chemicalexamination or analysis, to ascertain the cause of death, whichexamination or analysis will be made on the order of a justice of thesupreme court of the state, or the county judge of the county in whichthe dead bodies shall be, granted on the application of the districtattorney, with or without notice to the relatives of the deceasedperson, or to any person or corporation having the legal charge ofsuch body, as the court may direct the district attorney shall alsohave power to direct the sheriff, constable, or other peace officer, and employ such person or persons as he may deem necessary to assisthim, in exhuming, removing, obtaining possession of, and examiningphysically or chemically such dead body, or any portion thereof. Theexpense thereof to be a county charge paid by the county treasurer onthe certificate of the district attorney the matter of ordering autopsies and dissections of dead bodies, orexhuming the same for that purpose or other purposes, is a matter of somuch public importance that it has been regulated in nearly all of theunited states by statutory enactments, which together with the otherstatutes relating to the subject-matter of this article are hereuntoappended the author of this article is greatly indebted for assistance inpreparing the same, and in compiling these statutes, to mr amasa j parker, jr , of the albany, n y , bar appendix statutory regulations concerning dead bodies the coroner has power to hold inquest and direct autopsy, ala , code, sec 4, 801 et seq ariz , pen code, sec 2, 309 et seq ark , r s , sec 692 cal , pen code.

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Jour physiol 30:400, 1904 secretin is oxidized readily if left standing uncovered for a summerday, the preparation will be inactive 51 even if kept in theice-chest no other precaution being taken, its activity is lost ina very few days sunlight undoubtedly hastens the oxidative process if care is how to write an essay on a book taken as to sterility, however, and the secretin is kept inthe ice-chest, well stoppered and in a dark flask, it will retain itsactivity for several weeks dixon and hamill51 claimed that secretin disappears quantitatively onpassage through a berkefeld filter at 5 mm pressure lalou, 62 usinghigher pressure, was unable to confirm the finding, but obtained amarked decrease in activity our results are in accord with those oflalou 62 launoy. Arch internat de physiol 3:62, 1906 morel andterroine. Compt rend soc de biol 67:36, 1909 zunz. Arch internat de physiol 8:181, 1909 lalou. Jour de physiol 14:465, 1912 analogy to epinephrin -- the analogy of secretin to epinephrindoes not generally receive enough emphasis both substances arenonspecific in distribution, but specific chemically, and especiallyphysiologically, epinephrin acting on the myoneural junctions, secretinon intestinal digestion they are both relatively simple substancesof low molecular weight, and subject to rapid oxidation whereby theirproperties disappear the action in both paper is very transient theyare the two examples of what starling calls the “acute hormones, ” inwhich it is essential that reaction take place immediately, and shalldisappear as soon as the exciting cause is removed 6363 starling. Proc roy soc med , 8, no 4, 1914, therap and pharm section, p 29 clinical use of secretindiabetes mellitus -- moore, edie and abram64 were the first tosuggest a therapeutic value for secretin, having obtained favorableresults with secretin administration in diabetes they argued that theinternal secretion of the pancreas may be stimulated by secretin, and that essay paper of diabetes may be due to lack of this necessaryexcitant owing to the importance of the question, their announcementwas followed quickly by numerous investigations by other observers previously, spriggs, at the suggestion of starling, had triedintravenous injections of secretin free from depressor substance in adiabetic patient, and had obtained negative results moore, edie andabram gave their secretin by mouth over long periods of the five papercited in their first paper, two were negative the third was that of aman, aged 25, who received daily 30 c c of secretin after a latentperiod of three weeks, the sugar suddenly fell, and after four monthsthe urine was sugar-free six months later a relapse occurred with thedevelopment of phthisis and death the other two patients were a boy, aged 7, and a girl, aged 9, whose urine in from three to five weeksbecame sugar free during the secretin treatment in spite of severediabetes one of these patients later relapsed 65 bainbridge andbeddard66 gave secretin a thorough trial in three paper with negativeresults, and are disposed to attribute the results of moore to dieting dakin and ransom67 cited one case, secretin being given for twelveweeks, with negative results. Foster, 65 nine paper, all negative;charles, 68 three paper, all negative crofton, 69 however, gavesecretin a trial in one case with favorable results moore, edie andabram, in a later paper, 70 report a large number of paper tried withthe majority of results negative, though in essay paper an improvementin the digestion, and in certain paper an increase of weight was noted 64 moore, edie and abram.