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“firwein contains phosphorus, iodin and bromin how to write a essay introduction finely blended with a balsameous elixir made from the fir tree ”from a more recent circular we quote. “firwein is prepared from the inside fresh green bark of the fir tree ”the label on the product reads. “firwein is pleasantly and effectively blended with salts of iodin and bromin, held in solution with 20 per cent alcohol ”the therapeutic claims made for firwein and the mystery enshroudingits composition make it obvious that the product is intended to appealto those who are either thoughtless or ignorant this is emphasized bythe suggestion that firwein be combined with 1 cod liver oil underthe claim that it will “promote the efficiency of the oil”, with 2whisky for the treatment of bronchorrhea of the aged, and with 3syrup of hypophosphites for the treatment of persistent bronchitis as the composition of firwein is secret, the therapeutic claimsunwarranted, and its use irrational, the council declared itinadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies -- from journal a m a , feb 17, 1917 firolyptol plain and firolyptol with kreosote report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryfirolyptol, another product of the tilden company, is, we are told, composed of eucalyptol 10 drops, cottonseed oil 1/2 ounce and firweinenough to make 1 ounce as the composition of firwein is secret, itis evident that the composition of firolyptol is also unknown, exceptto the manufacturers “firolyptol with kreosote” is said to contain, in addition to whatever may be the component writings of firolyptol, 10 minims of creosote to each ounce according to an advertisement, firolyptol with kreosote is “antituberculous, antistrumous” and“contains all the desired features of cod liver oil and is readilyassimilated ”the advertisements of “firolyptol plain” and “firolyptol with kreosote”seem to have for their key-note the assertion that cottonseed oilis a writingicularly valuable nutriment and that when combined withconstituents of firolyptol and firolyptol with kreosote becomeswritingicularly valuable to the tuberculous to quote from an advertisingcircular. “now that the reconstructive properties of cottonseed oil are better appreciated by the profession, the advantages that follow the administration of a palatable emulsion of this strengthening and fattening food product are being demonstrated in hundreds of paper where formerly reliance would have been placed in cod liver oil a recent writer says that pure cottonseed oil is the greatest and purest vegetable oil known to chemistry, and will do much toward revolutionizing the treatment of the great white plague if the treatment of tuberculosis could resolve itself into the administration of a fatty substance in a readily assimilated form, there would be no need for any writing of firolyptol but the cottonseed oil the toxic material constantly produced in the system by the germs of tuberculosis tend to expose it more and more to the ravages of the disease, and the physiologic functions of the body suffer a constant depression to neutralize this germ activity with a consequent production of toxins it seems most logical to employ such agents as have demonstrated their suitability for such purposes, for which reason eucalyptol and kreosote with firwein are incorporated in firolyptol ”the assertion that cottonseed oil is an especially valuable formof fat is without warrant, but even if it were true the fat isavailable in cheap and palatable forms in numerous other cottonseedoil products it is unnecessary to discuss the problematic value ofcreosote in the treatment of tuberculosis or the value of eucalyptol now generally abandoned, or even of the secret mixture firwein food and fresh air, not drugs, constitute the fundamentals of thetreatment of tuberculosis, and it is both irrational and detrimental tothe interests of the tuberculous to administer various potent agentsin fixed and unknown amounts with such simple articles of food ascottonseed oil neither of these products is acceptable for new andnonofficial remedies editorial note -- firwein110 has been advertised to physiciansfor twenty-five or thirty years and it is a sad commentary on theintelligence of our profession that a preparation sold under suchobviously false and misleading, not to say silly, claims, should stillbe in existence firwein is claimed to “prevent waste of tissue” intuberculosis if it had this power, it would have found its placelong ago among the few great agents in drug therapy as a matter offact, firwein has gained virtually no recognition outside of the“literature” of the tilden concern the claims made for firwein are apeculiar mixture of studied candor-- when the truth is not likely tohurt its sale-- and inane vaporing-- when the facts would not redound toits credit the tilden company declares that “firwein stands withouta peer in its class ” but the company adds 10 drops of eucalyptol andessay cottonseed oil to this peerless product and an improvement isborn-- “firolyptol”!. then, to perfect the already perfectly perfected, 10 drops of creosote are added to “firolyptol” and the profession isoffered “firolyptol with kreosote”!. in just what verbal pyrotechnicsthe tilden company might indulge, should it decide to add ten dropsof essaything else to “firolyptol with kreosote, ” one shudders tocontemplate 110 three other tilden products have been the subject of deservedand unfavorable comment in the j a m a.

“in colds, croup how to write a essay introduction and acute bronchitis inlocal congestions. In lung trouble, in acute inflammations of this orany other organ, especially if pain or soreness be present in lumbago, sciatica, or in rheumatic pains of the joints or muscles applied tothe forehead, it induces sleep ”libradol is offered in two forms, “libradol mild” for infants andsupersensitive persons which is said to be “destitute of drug energy”and libradol “regular” which is “highly medicated, ” the “constituents”being “dracontium, sanguinaria, cephaelis, melaleuca, lobelia, laurus, capsicum, tobacco ”according to a circular, “the sanitary plasma libradol” is a“homogeneous, highly medicated, and exceedingly potent compound, inplastic form, ” which “carries the energies of its drug constituentsand the high antiseptic qualities of laurus camphora and melaleuca ”it is stated. “the drug influence of libradol is necessarily differentfrom that of any known single member of the materia medica but yet, no mystery either in medicine or of pharmacy is claimed as a writing ofits composition or process of manufacture it is a thing peculiar toitself, the result of the study of the drugs from which it is derivedand compounded these drugs may be studied at leisure by whoever caresto do so ”the following information bearing on the composition of libradol wasfurnished by lloyd brothers in response to a request from the councilto aid in the consideration of the preparation. “‘compound lobelia powder’ has been, since 1852, official in the american dispensatory, in the first edition of which 1852 its formula is given, as follows. “‘take of lobelia, in powder, twelve ounces. Bloodroot and skunk cabbage, in powder, of each, six ounces. Ipecacuanha, eight ounces. Capsicus, in powder, two ounces mix them ’ “this preparation came increasingly into demand with the eclectic profession, the principal use for which it was first employed as an emetic, being finally displaced by its local application in bronchial pneumonia troubles, when sprinkled on a greased cloth and applied to the chest ” “in 1898, dr finley ellingwood petitioned lloyd brothers to make for him, in plasma form, ready for application, a compound carrying the ingredients of the old ‘compound lobelia powder, ’ strengthened by the addition of melaleuca leucadendron, laurus camphora and nicotiana tabacum experiments not very encouraging in a pharmaceutical sense were made, and it was not until repeated requests had been made that a product was at last satisfactorily prepared and forwarded to dr ellingwood 1900, with no thought other than that of serving him personally in his practice this product he used and commended to his professional friends, and under his commendation it came into professional demand ”an examination of the information submitted by lloyd brothers showedlibradol to be in conflict with the principles and rules that govern inthe acceptance of articles for new and nonofficial remedies as follows:composition rule 1 -- the information which has been receivedgives little idea of the actual composition of the preparation. Forexample, the statement that libradol “carries the energies of its drugconstituents and the high antiseptic qualities of laurus camphoraand melaleuca” gives no indication as to the writing or writings of thelaurus camphora or melaleuca employed if the statement is correct, that libradol “is a homogeneous, highly medicated, and exceedinglypotent compound, ” it is essential that the several potent ingredientsbe stated clearly and not merely hinted at by their qualities otherconflicts with rule 1 might be enumerated, but the foregoing citationsstate the direct conflict. And this has not been removed, although aninquiry was sent to lloyd brothers for a statement of the amount ofeach potent ingredient in a given quantity of libradol indirect advertising rule 4 -- the recommendation for the use oflibradol in the treatment of colds, bronchitis, lumbago, sciatica andrheumatic pains, which accompanies the trade package, is prone tolead the public to depend on it in paper where definite treatment isimperative unwarranted therapeutic claims rule 6 -- libradol is recommended ina great variety of conditions and is especially claimed not only torelieve pain, but to remove the cause of pain this is explained asfollows. “in the study of the physiological action of thesis drugs, itwas found that the constituent remedies in this combination exerciseda most salutary influence, not only upon the sensibility of the nervesinvolved, but upon the capillary circulation within the diseased area, the muscular structures therein included, and, subsequently, upon thecourse of the advancement of the congestive and inflammatory processes, and upon secretion, exudation, adhesion, induration, hypertrophy, suppuration and excretion ”granting, for the sake of argument, that carefully controlledexperimental clinical evidence were available to substantiate thisstatement with reference to a single case of pain, the statementwould be misleading when considered as a general explanation of thepreparation relieving pain by removing the cause of pain when takenin connection with the conditions for which it is recommended and inwhich pain is even a minor symptom still, if pain were relieved inthese paper by removing the cause, the patient would be cured of theconditions which give rise to the pain, and these include. “acutepain in the chest.

“its action how to write a essay introduction is three-fold. “strong antiseptic and bactericidal effect upon the urethral and vesical mucosae, highly conducive to shortening and palliation of the acute disease course ”no evidence has been presented that arhovin is capable of destroyingthe gonococcus in the urethra, and consequently, the councildeclared the recommendation for the use of arhovin in the treatmentof gonorrhea, by means of claims such as those just cited, is bothmisleading and dangerous -- from reports of council on pharmacy andchemistry, 1919, p 66 chloron, chlorax and number “3” report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe report which appears below was sent to the chlorine productscompany, inc , may 14, 1919 in reply to an inquiry sent the chlorineproducts company, july 8, the company wrote that it could send no replybecause the medical director was still in france however, chloron andchlorax are being advertised in medical journals. Also essentially thesame advertising as that discussed in the report was recently receivedby a physician from the chlorine products company the preceding facts having been reported to the council, publication ofthe report was authorized w a puckner, secretary chloron, chlorax and number “3” are preparations of essentially similarcomposition put out by the chlorine products company, inc , new york chloronchloron, according to the label, is “a stable chlorine remedy for thereduction of inflammation, relief of pain and for all wounds, burns, scalds and every description of sores except cancer and lupus ” itscomposition is given as. “free chlorine, 0 200 per cent. Calcium chloride, 0 190 per cent. Mercurous chloride, 0 030 per cent. Lithium chloride, 0 035 per cent. Calcium hydrate, 0 010 per cent. Water to 100 writings ”the council asked the manufacturers for further information in regardto the composition or preparation of chloron and received this reply. “chlorine gas is prepared in the usual way and purified and passed into water until a saturated solution is made “water to the extent of three times the volume of the chlorine solution is used to dissolve the necessary amount of calcium chloride, and the two solutions are mixed “the necessary amounts of lithium and mercurous chloride are then intimately mixed and made into solution this solution is then added to the above and the whole is agitated for essay minutes ”a specimen of chloron was examined in the a m a chemical laboratoryand the chemists reported:qualitatively the presence of the following constituents was confirmed:calcium, mercury, lithium, chlorid, free chlorin the solution wasalkaline of course, the declaration that chloron contains mercurouschlorid calomel is obviously incorrect, as mercurous chlorid cannotexist in a solution containing active free chlorin, but is oxidizedto mercuric chlorid corrosive sublimate as the solution was alkalinein reaction, it seemed unlikely that all the active chlorin was presentin the free state, as declared on the label quantitative determinationof free chlorin and of total active “available” chlorin gave. Freechlorin, 0 036 gm per hundred c c. Total “available” chlorin, 0 330 gm per hundred c c , or 165 per cent of the claimed amount a comparison of the information sent to the council with the analyticfindings leads to the conclusion that chloron is not of reliablecomposition as evidence of the therapeutic value of chloron, the following “casereports” were submitted. “in a case of second degree burn involving the most of one leg from the middle of the calf down, chloron was the only dressing used the burn was a bad one and the patient in a rundown anaemic condition, at no time was there any appearance of pus, the surface looked clean and bright and the healing was accomplished with practically no scar whatever the burn was kept wet with the solution by hourly applications day and night the skin which has grown on the wound is clear, healthy and firm in another case of varicose veins of long standing, the result was surprising the patient told of two years vibrating from hospital to hospital and getting no real relief each leg had large open running sores, the only dressing used was wet compresses of this solution the pus disappeared at once, the wound began to cicatrise from the edges and in two weeks the man was discharged from the hospital practically cured ” “chloron was recently tried at the -- -- and -- -- hospital on paper presenting ulcers and other sores which did not readily yield to other methods, with good results, in fact were of an indolent type in these paper chloron proved very valuable ” “i have used chloron on a series of paper surgical presenting pus foci and i have found the application very beneficial and healing, the pus early disappearing in paper of osteomyelitis, suppurating arthritis, cellulitis and chronic ulcers, chloron is writingicularly valuable, its good effects quickly observed and the time of restoration to health shortened ”in the first case report, there is no evidence that chloron is moreefficient in the treatment of burns than any other commonly usedprocedure might have been in the case of the varicose ulcers, whilethere was essay apparent benefit from chloron, no credit is given torest and the general treatment which is known to be important in thetreatment of such conditions the evidence in the other case reports isquite inconclusive consideration of the “case reports” leads to theconclusion that clinical evidence for the value of chloron is lacking attention should be called to the fact that the amount of activechlorin, claimed to be present in chloron as well as the amount foundby the association laboratory, is less than that considered effectiveby dakin, dunham and others. Seemingly in preparing chloron noattention has been paid to the degree of alkalinity, yet the importanceof this factor is now generally recognized chloron fails to comply with the requirements for surgical solution ofchlorinated soda n n r , 1919, p 133, yet the manufacturers makefree use of the text of dakin and dunham handbook of antiseptics intheir advertising pamphlet thus. From the chloron pamphlet. “this ideal antiseptic effects complete sterilization within its sphere of action without causing any damage to the cells or tissues an important method of judging the injurious action of antiseptics is to investigate their effects on the leucocytes from experiments in vitro by parry morgan and in vivo by col c j bond with the strength of antiseptics commonly used in surgery, it has been found that chlorine antiseptics and mercury salts have little effect on phagocytosis in comparison with other germicides the activity of the leucocytes from wounds which have recently been treated with chloron may be demonstrated experimentally ” “in addition to its antiseptic action chloron is a strong oxidizing agent and deodorant and possesses to a marked degree the property of decomposing toxins in this connection it is interesting and pertinent to note that dean, by the regulated action of hypochlorous acid, has prepared a nontoxic dysentery vaccine and it is now a common observation that the free use of chloron may reduce the constitutional symptoms arising from septic processes and that they reappear on discontinuing the antiseptic treatment ” dakin and dunham handbook of antiseptics.

Wien med blat , 1890, xiii , p 37 - man, age 45 suffocated by curdled milk in air-passages 52 maschka. Vier ger med , 1885, xliii , pp 11-14 - man, age 65 accidental compression of chest 53 heidenhain. Same journal, 1886, xliv , pp 96-101 - vomitedmatter passed into air-passages while subject was drunk 54 langstein. Wien med woch , 1880, xxx , pp 624-626 - childfound dead in bed. Had vomited food while asleep and breathed it intoair-passages 55 ward. Catalog army med mus , med sec , p 33 - soldier, age17. Choked to death by lumbricoid worm passing from pharynx into rightbronchus specimen 7, 737 suicide 56 sankey. Brit med jour , 1883, i , p 88 - epileptic. Found deadin bed, lying on his back a round pebble in each nostril. Strip offlannel rolled up and stuffed in throat 57 macleod. Ibid , 1882, ii , p 1246 - suicidal maniac had tobe fed because he refused food was seen to be blue in the face andbreathing hard his mouth was forced open. Roll of flannel found inthroat macleod refers to another case, a woman in dissecting-room, with similar roll of flannel in throat see tidy, “med jur , ” paper 15 to 17 homicide 58 christison.

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“most graduates of ‘old barnes’ have joined our society of protest against the iniquities of the a m a why should you also not come in?. it costs only $1 00 to become a member, including the cost of a beautiful certificate of membership ”still another group appeal is based on sex. Thus lanphear. “we want every reputable ‘lady physician’ in this country to join our society of protest against the iniquities of the a m a ”and yet another. “you formerly belonged to the tri-state medical society, of which i was treasurer for 20 years it is now dead i wish you would join our new society which has superseded tri-state in this territory ”with these various letters is enclosed a “preliminary program” of the1918 meeting which is to be held october 8 and 9 in chicago as mightbe expected, thesis of the names on the program are characteristic of theorganization and an interesting “story” might be made from the materialin the journal files on the individuals such names are of men, who, professionally speaking, range from faddists, who ride grotesque andbizarre medical hobbies, to those who with special interests to exploitand unable to use reputable medical organizations for that purpose, take refuge in such hybrid conglomerations as the medical society ofthe united states not that the program contains the names of crudequacks, or obvious medical swindlers it is representative, rather, ofthat twilight zone of professionalism, the penumbra, in whose uncertainlight it is difficult to distinguish between the unbalanced visionary, with a fad, and the more sinister near-quack, with a “scheme ”-- fromthe journal a m a , oct 5, 1918 the national formulary-- a review of the fourth editionthe fourth edition of the national formulary appears simultaneouslywith the u s pharmacopeia ix, and is to become official at the sametime september 1 the principles which determine its scope, asfrankly set forth in the preface, are apparently the same as thoseapplied, though more faint-heartedly, in the compilation of thepharmacopeia a statement in the preface of the new national formularyruns. “the scope of the present national formulary is the same as in previous issues, and is based on medical usage rather than on therapeutic ideals the committee consists entirely of pharmacists, or of men with a pharmaceutical training, and it cannot presume either to judge therapeutic practice or to follow any writingicular school of therapeutic practice the question of the addition or deletion of any formula was judged on the basis of its use by physicians and its pharmaceutical soundness the considerable use by physicians of any preparation was considered sufficient warrant for the inclusion of its formula in the book, and a negligible or diminishing use as justifying its exclusion ”writing i of the volume contains formulas, good, bad and indifferent, including the equivalents of a large number of shotgun proprietaries writing ii contains descriptions of drugs this is a new feature thepurpose is to provide standards for those drugs not described inthe pharmacopeia but used in n f preparations thesis of these drugswere described in the u s pharmacopeia viii, but have not beenincluded in the ninth revision practically all are either worthlessor superfluous writing iii contains descriptions of special tests andreagents among the therapeutically useful formulas are those for aromatic castoroil, emulsion of castor oil, sprays or nebulae, solution of aluminumacetate, solution of aluminum subacetate and wine of antimony the twolast named are also included in “useful drugs ” several formulas fornew classes of preparations which may or may not be found superiorto old forms are paste pencils for the application of medicaments tolimited areas of the skin, mulls, which are ointments spread likeplasters, and fluidglycerates, which are fluidextracts in whichglycerin takes the place of alcohol it should be noted also that, as aresult of criticism, the alcohol content of essay preparations has beenreduced as a whole, the present edition of the national formulary, like itspredecessors, is “pharmaceutically useful but not a therapeuticnecessity ” to say that it is not a therapeutic necessity is tostate the matter mildly, since most of the formulas and almost allof the drugs described have been discarded long since by rationaltherapeutists so long as there are physicians who prescribetherapeutic monstrosities, however, the druggist should have theaid that is furnished by this book in compounding them from thepharmacist point of view, therefore, the book is a valuable one physicians who have a scientific training in the pharmacology of drugswill not want it. Others will be better off without the temptationsoffered by its thesis irrational formulas -- book review in the journala m a , sept 2, 1916 nonspecific protein therapythe treatment by nonspecific methods in a series of paper of influenzalpneumonia has been the subject of two recent papers 295 these methodsare a development of the work of ichikawa, kraus, lüdke, jobling andpetersen, and others on the treatment of typhoid fever and of millerand lusk work on arthritis in the original work in this field itwas recognized that there were certain inherent dangers in the methodand that wide application would be permissible only with the greatestcaution and under careful control 295 roberts, dudley, and cary, e g. Bacterial protein injectionsin influenzal pneumonia, j a m a 72:922 march 29 1919 cowie, d m , and beaven, p w. Nonspecific protein therapy in influenzalpneumonia, j a m a 72:1117 april 19 1919 when vaccines and other toxic protein substances are injectedintravenously a train of reactions takes place that includes. aa primary leukopenia, followed by a leukocytosis.