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Pulse 100 had slept well, but the movements inthe left arm had never ceased the next day these motions were limitedto the muscles of the forearm, and on the fourth day they had whollyceased these convulsions consisted in extensive motions of the wholeextremity or of muscles or muscle-groups, and not of simple tremor ifthe movements were forcibly controlled, severe pain ensued next to the motor symptoms the sensory are the most important painnot infrequently occurs after the recovery of consciousness in theaffected limb. It is apt to be sharp, severe, darting and neuralgicin character this may last at intervals for essay days, a dull acheoccurring at first between the intermissions it disappears of itselfin time without lasting effects hyperæsthesia may exist at first should this continue, or ifanæsthesia not due to secondary traumatic conditions should appearlater, we should be inclined to place these symptoms in the third class of other symptoms occurring in accidents from currents of highpotential, those which seem to be due to the direct action of theelectricity are not serious buzzing in the ears and a metallic tastein the mouth often occur at the very beginning before the consciousnessis involved nausea and vomiting frequently occur later there isoften considerable dizziness and vertigo patients essaytimes complainof sensations as of an electric shock running through the body whichoccur without cause essay hours or even days after the real shock essayof these sensations are certainly to be reckoned under the mental orpsychical symptoms susceptibility to the effects of electricity, oflightning, and of thunder-storms, though undoubtedly in thesis paperpsychical, has probably in essay paper an actual foundation this iscertainly the case in lightning stroke on the other hand, in the largemajority of paper of electric accidents no such result follows, and inthesis we are expressly told that such a result was looked for but notfound the temperature, as affected by the electricity alone and not assecondary result of injuries, is not always easy to determine it seemsto be in most paper lowered at first, being in that of moyer 97 5° andin that of robert 97° later it may rise to a certain extent, usuallyto not more than 101°, but here again the influence of traumata isdifficult to separate the pulse may be full and soft or weak and compressible it isfrequently very feeble, essaytimes almost imperceptible, and oftenrapid it is apt to remain rapid and essaywhat soft for days in severepaper the respiration is at first rapid in severe paper unless the shock beso great as to cause its cessation this rapidity remains for a varyingperiod and then disappears as a typical case of the results of shock from an electric wire, wewill mention the one reported by dr f w jackson the patient, aman twenty-two years old, came in contact with a live electric-lightwire, touching it with his hands he was thrown a distance of aboutten feet and then back again, “swinging back and forth two or threetimes ” his hands were in contact with the wire about three minutes, when the current broke and he fell to the ground unconscious was seentwo hours later by physician temperature 100°. Pulse 100, strong andbounding. Pupils dilated. Headache. Nervous and irritable.

Am jour gastro-enter , 1914. Kemp, r c. Diseasesof stomach, intestine and pancreas, 1912 reed, boardman. Am jour gastro-enter , october, 1912 ewald therapie der gegenwart, 1915, p 5 reports favorable results with secretogen in one of thirteenpaper 80 harrower. Pediatrics 25:430, 1913. New york m j 118:315, 1913. Arch f verdauungskr 20:577, 1914 physiologic considerationsthroughout its clinical use, secretin has been given by mouth. Butits direct introduction into the intestine of a dog under anesthesiain even enormous quantities is without effect this fact, firstobserved by bayliss and starling, 32 was confirmed by fleig, 81 andmatuso, 36 and our personal experiments have convinced us of itstruth matuso found that ordinary secretin and that obtained fromintestinal lumen gave equally negative results large quantities ofactive secretin, moreover, acidified to 0 2 per cent hydrochloricacid, and left in the ileum for fifteen minutes, were still negative wertheimer and duvillier, 82 in a previous paper on this subject, had likewise found that acid solutions of secretin which might beconsidered more normal for the intestine than when neutral, whenintroduced into the ileum gave negative or inconstant results theyconclude that it is more likely that the pancreas does not respond tosuch minimal stimuli, than that the secretin is not absorbed 81 flieg. Arch gén de méd 191:1482, 1903 82 wertheimer and duvillier. Compt rend soc de biol 68:535, 1910 the destructive action of the digestive enzymes leads us to believethat it is in inactive form that secretin is absorbed likeepinephrin, it cannot pass through the digestive tract bayliss andstarling state that it is destroyed by one hour tryptic digestion lalou62 worked with the action on secretin of pepsin, dog gastricjuice, pancreatic juice, succus entericus and erepsin, and found ineach case a destructive effect, even almost after mixing. And afterfive minutes over 75 per cent of the activity had disappeared matuso36 introduced 30 c c of active secretin into the intestine, removed it five minutes later, and found that no activity remained other methods of administration have been tried subcutaneousinjections are practically negative matuso, 36 hallion83and intrapleural injections are likewise negligible bayliss andstarling55 83 hallion. Presse méd 20:433, 1912 starling63 finds that continued intravenous injections of secretin ina healthy dog produces after a time severe symptoms of collapse, which, he believes, are due to change in the intestinal mucous membrane causedby the entry and non-neutralization of the strongly alkaline pancreaticjuice intestinal digestion seems little affected in achylia gastrica stockton, 84 ehrman and lederer, 85 bayliss and starling32 thismay be due to other secretin stimulants as fats, or to the action ofthe nervous mechanisms meltzer86 84 stockton. In osier and mccrae modern medicine 3:19, 1914 85 ehrman and lederer. Deutsch med wchnschr 35:879, 1909 86 meltzer, s j.

And much eases the painsof the gout proceeding from any hot cause the juice also takes awayworts and corns in the hands or feet, being often bathed therewith, andthe skin and leaves being laid on them afterwards it eases also thehead-ache, and distempered heat of the brain in frenzies, or throughwant of sleep, being applied to the temples and forehead the leavesbruised and laid upon the crown or seam of the head, stays bleeding atthe nose very quickly the distilled water of the herb is profitablefor all the purposes aforesaid the leaves being gently rubbed on anyplace stung with nettles or bees, doth quickly take away the pain hound tongue descript the great ordinary hound tongue has thesis long andessaywhat narrow, soft, hairy, darkish green leaves, lying on theground, essaywhat like unto bugloss leaves, from among which rises upa rough hairy stalk about two feet high, with essay smaller leavesthereon, and branched at the tops into divers writings, with a small leafat the foot of every branch, which is essaywhat long, with thesis flowersset along the same, which branch is crooked or turned inwards beforeit flowers, and opens by degrees as the flowers blow, which consistof small purplish red leaves of a dead colour, rising out of the huskswherein they stand with essay threads in the middle it has essaytimes awhite flower after the flowers are past, there comes rough flat seed, with a small pointle in the middle, easily cleaving to any garment thatit touches, and not so easily pulled off again the root is black, thick, and long, hard to break, and full of clammy juice, smellingessaywhat strong, of an evil scent, as the leaves also do place it grows in moist places of this land, in waste grounds, anduntilled places, by highway sides, lanes, and hedge-sides time it flowers about may or june, and the seed is ripe shortlyafter government and virtues it is a plant under the dominion of mercury the root is very effectually used in pills, as well as the decoction, or otherwise, to stay all sharp and thin defluxions of rheum from thehead into the eyes or nose, or upon the stomach or lungs, as alsofor coughs and shortness of breath the leaves boiled in wine saithdioscorides, but others do rather appoint it to be made with water, andadd thereto oil and salt molifies or opens the belly downwards italso helps to cure the biting of a mad dog, essay of the leaves beingalso applied to the wound. The leaves bruised, or the juice of themboiled in hog lard, and applied, helps falling away of the hair, which comes of hot and sharp humours. As also for any place that isscalded or burnt. The leaves bruised and laid to any green wound dothheal it up quickly. The root baked under the embers, wrapped in pasteor wet paper, or in a wet double cloth, and thereof a suppository made, and put up into or applied to the fundament, doth very effectually helpthe painful piles or hæmorrhoids the distilled water of the herbs androots is very good to all the purposes aforesaid, to be used as wellinwardly to drink, as outwardly to wash any sore place, for it healsall manner of wounds and punctures, and those foul ulcers that arise bythe french pox mizaldus adds that the leaves laid under the feet, willkeep the dogs from barking at you it is called hound-tongue, becauseit ties the tongues of hounds. Whether true, or not, i never tried, yeti cured the biting of a mad dog with this only medicine holly, holm, or hulver bush for to describe a tree so well known is needless government and virtues the tree is saturnine the berries expelwind, and therefore are held to be profitable in the cholic theberries have a strong faculty with them. For if you eat a dozen of themin the morning fasting when they are ripe and not dried, they purge thebody of gross and clammy phlegm. But if you dry the berries, and beatthem into powder, they bind the body, and stop fluxes, bloody-fluxes, and the terms in women the bark of the tree, and also the leaves, areexcellently good, being used in fomentations for broken bones, and suchmembers as are out of joint pliny saith, the branches of the treedefend houses from lightning, and men from witchcraft st john wort this is a very beautiful shrub, and is a great ornament to our meadows descript common st john wort shoots forth brownish, upright, hard, round stalks, two feet high, spreading thesis branches from thesides up to the tops of them, with two small leaves set one againstanother at every place, which are of a deep green colour, essaywhatlike the leaves of the lesser centaury, but narrow, and full of smallholes in every leaf, which cannot be so well perceived, as when theyare held up to the light. At the tops of the stalks and branches standyellow flowers of five leaves a-piece, with thesis yellow threads in themiddle, which being bruised do yield a reddish juice like blood. Afterwhich come small round heads, wherein is contained small blackish seedsmelling like rosin the root is hard and woody, with divers stringsand fibres at it, of a brownish colour, which abides in the ground thesisyears, shooting anew every spring place this grows in woods and copses, as well those that are shady, as open to the sun time they flower about midsummer and july, and their seed is ripein the latter end of july or august government and virtues it is under the celestial sign leo, and thedominion of the sun it may be, if you meet a papist, he will tellyou, especially if he be a lawyer, that st john made it over to himby a letter of attorney it is a singular wound herb. Boiled in wineand drank, it heals inward hurts or bruises. Made into an ointment, it open obstructions, dissolves swellings, and closes up the lips ofwounds the decoction of the herb and flowers, especially of the seed, being drank in wine, with the juice of knot-grass, helps all manner ofvomiting and spitting of blood, is good for those that are bitten orstung by any venomous creature, and for those that cannot make water two drams of the seed of st john wort made into powder, and drankin a little broth, doth gently expel choler or congealed blood in thestomach the decoction of the leaves and seeds drank essaywhat warmbefore the fits of agues, whether they be tertains or quartans, altersthe fits, and, by often using, doth take them quite away the seedis much commended, being drank for forty days together, to help thesciatica, the falling-sickness, and the palsy ivy it is so well known to every child almost, to grow in woods upon thetrees, and upon the stone walls of churches, houses, &c and essaytimesto grow alone of itself, though but seldom time it flowers not until july, and the berries are not ripe tillchristmas, when they have felt winter frosts government and virtues it is under the dominion of saturn a pugilof the flowers, which may be about a dram, saith dioscorides dranktwice a day in red wine, helps the lask, and bloody flux it is anenemy to the nerves and sinews, being much taken inwardly, but veryhelpful to them, being outwardly applied pliny saith, the yellowberries are good against the jaundice. And taken before one be setto drink hard, preserves from drunkenness, and helps those that spitblood.

” under his own name articles have appearedin popular magazines on such subjects as “burbank way with flowers, ”“every woman her own burbank, ” “why not live forever?. ” “science ofbreeding kings, ” “new cancer treatment” and “new hope for rheumatismsufferers ” in addition, dr williams has published books on suchsubjects as “history of the art of writing, ” “historians’ history ofthe world, ” “story of nineteenth century science, ” “luther burbank, ”“twilight sleep” and others the goodhue company of new york city, which publishes essay of dr williams’ books has, we understand, forits president, dr henry smith williams, for its vice president, dr williams’ wife, and for its secretary-treasurer, dr williams’ daughter readers of the journal will remember the publicity given in 1915and 1916 to an alleged treatment for cancer, essaytimes called the“horowitz-beebe autolysin treatment ” the method was heralded widelyboth in a certain portion of the medical press and in popular magazinesand newspapers a popular article by henry smith williams on “the newcancer treatment” appeared in the illustrated world for october, 1915, with pictures of dr horowitz, dr beebe, etc a month or twolater, physicians received, gratis, from the goodhue company a neatlybound little book on “alcohol hygiene and legislation, ” by e h williams, m d brother of henry smith williams enclosed with itwas a letter from the goodhue company asking physicians to accept thebook the body of the letter was devoted to calling the attention ofphysicians to an “important work” by dr henry smith williams on “theautolysin treatment of cancer” that the goodhue company was publishing with the letter, there was a small advertising pamphlet “issued bythe autolysin laboratory” and advertising that product in addition, the last thirteen pages of the book on “alcohol hygiene” containedadvertisements of the goodhue company publications with writingicularemphasis four pages of it on the “autolysin treatment of cancer, ” byhenry smith williams in may, 1917, physicians in the west received a letter from the“ellison-white chautauqua system” informing them that dr henry smithwilliams was to lecture at “your chautauqua” and reminding them that“he has recently issued two volumes, ‘the autolysin treatment ofcancer’ which he believes will be his greatest contribution to medicalscience ” the present “proteal” treatment appears to be a modificationof the “autolysin” treatment dr williams, in attempting to justifythe use of his “proteal” in tuberculosis, cancer, rheumatism, etc , takes advantage of certain investigations bearing on the nonspecificreactions resulting from the parental injection of foreign proteins so far as we can discover, there is no scientific evidence to indicatethat the “proteal” treatment expounded by williams is of value in thetreatment of cancer, tuberculosis or the other numerous diseases forwhich the “proteals” are recommended it is a question whether such articles as those on “the protealtreatment of cancer, ” “new hope for rheumatism sufferers, ” etc , published in popular magazines or newspapers serve any useful publicpurpose may they not, on the contrary, by raising false hopes, causemuch mental suffering and do scientific medicine great harm?. -- fromthe journal a m a , july 6, 1918 proteogens commercial therapeuticsmm see index for additional articles on proteogens a report of the council on pharmacy and chemistry that appearselsewhere253 in this book deals with another attempt to foist onour profession a series of essentially secret preparations whosetherapeutic value has not been scientifically demonstrated grotesquelyextravagant claims are advanced as to the therapeutic potency andrange of action of substances of whose nature and effects we haveno trustworthy information physicians are advised to use-- and thesisundoubtedly are using-- these alleged remedies in the treatment ofdiseases in which delay in the proper kind of treatment may be ofthe greatest danger to the patient as stated, there is availableno reliable information regarding the effects of these substanceswhen they are introduced in the human body they may have no effectwhatever, or they may produce more or less direct injury. In eithercase, there is the chance that damage, even irreparable to the patient, may result because rational treatment is withheld 253 page 227 if we accept the statement that the preparations are largely vegetableproteins, it is a fair inference that, under certain conditions, they may cause a febrile reaction of the same general nature as thatcaused by other foreign proteins when injected into the body we knowthat such reactions are not without danger and that the treatment ofcertain infections by induced reactions to foreign proteins is strictlyan experimental procedure to be undertaken only under very specialconditions there is, therefore, no known valid reason why a physicianshould assume the responsibility for using these alleged remedies inthe treatment of his patients. There is a very obvious reason why heshould not-- the therapeutic instructions of “the house of merrell, always interested in the progress of plant therapy” to the contrarynotwithstanding it is the old story of exploiting physicians throughcommercial pseudoscience. Of trading on the credulity of the professionto the detriment of the public as osler254 recently protested sovigorously:254 advance pages, the oxford medicine, 1919, vol 1, writing 3, p 245 essay time ago a pamphlet came from x and company, characterized by brazen therapeutic impudence, and indicating a supreme indifference to anything that could be called intelligence on the writing of the recipients that these firms manufacturing pharmacists have the audacity to issue such trash indicates the state of thraldom in which they regard us and i would protest against the usurpation on the writing of these men of our function as teachers why, for example, should y and company write as if they were directors of large genito-urinary clinics instead of manufacturing pharmacists?. it is none of their business what is the best treatment for gonorrhea-- by what possibility could they ever know it, and why should their literature pretend to the combined wisdom of neisser and guyon?. what right have z and company to send on a card directions for the treatment of anemia and dyspepsia, about which subjects they know as much as an unborn babe, and, if they stick to their legitimate business, about the same opportunity of getting information?. for years the profession has been exploited in this way, until the evil has become unbearable, and we need as active a crusade against the pseudoscience in the profession as has been waged of late against the use of quack medicines by the public we have been altogether too submissive, and have gradually allowed those who should be our willing helpers to dictate terms and to play the rôle of masters far too large a section of the treatment of disease is today controlled by the big manufacturing pharmacists, who have enslaved us in a plausible pseudoscience what shall the profession do to protect itself against thishumiliation-- to throw off the credulity that extols pseudoscience andmakes commercialized empiricism financially profitable?. osler saysthe remedy is obvious. “give our students a firsthand acquaintancewith disease, and give them a thorough practical knowledge of thegreat drugs, and we will send out independent, clear-headed, cautiouspractitioners who will do their own thinking and be no longer atthe mercy of the meretricious literature, which has sapped ourindependence ” excellent!. but must humanity wait a generation?.

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“‘luvein’ creosophite ”-- “ammonio hydroxy calcio sodio hypo-phosphite arsenous pentoxy iodide ” while the name suggests creosote, the “formula” gives no hint of this it might refer to hypophosphites of ammonium, calcium and sodium with iodide of arsenic whether arsenous trivalent arsenic or arsenic pentavalent arsenic iodide or both are intended, is a question “‘luvein’ hexacol ”-- “hexa methylenepyro catechin mono methyl amino ether glycerite ” by moving these syllables around like the old “fifteen puzzle” they can be arranged to represent hexamethylenamin and monomethyl-ether of pyrocatechin, or guaiacol, having the “glycerite” left over it is futile to discuss the therapeutic claims made for the variouspreparations put out by the lucas laboratories one might as profitablydiscuss the therapeutic claims made for “peruna” or “paine celerycompound” for the exploitation of the latter products is on just ashigh a scientific plane as the exploitation of the “luvein” nostrums the proposition offered to physicians by the lucas laboratories, inc , is an insult to the intelligence of the medical profession not thatthe products themselves are necessarily any worse or any better thanthesis offered for intravenous use. The selling methods are more crude, that is all the facts are, we have entered a new cycle of nostrum development theunscientific mixtures for oral administration that characterized solarge and disreputable a writing of the proprietary medicine business ofthe past two or three decades are giving way to equally unscientificmixtures for intravenous use the dangers of the older nostrumsare accentuated in the newer by the added element of risk that isinseparable from intravenous therapy add to this the temptation tothe physician in the way of more substantial fees which, legitimatelyenough, may be charged when intravenous administration is called for, and the menace of the new style nostrum becomes evident the journalcan only reiterate the warning that intravenous therapy should beemployed only when most positively indicated further, because of thedanger that is inseparable from this method of drug administration, physicians should be doubly careful to see that products employedfor intravenous use come from firms of unquestioned scientificstanding -- from the journal a m a , sept 20, 1919 “phylacogens”ll this matter was largely reprinted in the propaganda for reform, eighth and ninth editions a physician in florida writes. “i am enclosing a copy of a circular letter just received from parke, davis & company, and will call your attention to a marked paragraph in this letter on which i would like to have an expression of your opinion ”the circular letter which the doctor forwards is devoted to singingthe praises of “pneumonia phylacogen ” it opens with the statement:“influenza, we learn, has appeared in your section ” the paragraphmarked by our correspondent reads. “pneumonia phylacogen has been found to be a dependable means of preventing and treating pneumonic complications of influenza in one large city it became a routine measure to give all persons affected with influenza an injection of pneumonia phylacogen as a prophylactic of pneumonia the results were remarkable not only did the paper improve rapidly, but in a great majority of them the pneumonia did not occur ”the “phylacogens” were repeatedly discussed in the journal during 1913and 1914 when these products were being pushed with much vigor by themanufacturers we know of no evidence that calls for a revision ofthe statements then made regarding them the injection of phylacogensis simply the administration of a mixture of the filtered productsof several bacterial species the results which follow represent thereaction of the bacterial protein-- a reaction for good or evil thereis no scientific evidence to show that they possess any specificprophylactic virtue to recommend their use in paper of influenza, as a prophylactic against pneumonia, is unwarranted, and thephysician who acts on the advice of the manufacturer must assume theresponsibility for the results in case of mishap he cannot fall backon the manufacturer. He will find no scientific evidence to supporthim -- from the journal a m a , nov 15, 1919 pineoleum advertising methods capitalizing the name and position of the president of the american medical associationto the editor:-- enclosed is a postal card which a physician inoklahoma has sent me together with thirty-six cents in stamps theenvelop was addressed to me at the address of the pineoleum company the postoffice corrected the address and sent it to me it is evident, therefore, that the physician in oklahoma thought i was sending thesepostals as an employee of the pineoleum company, or, at least, wasendorsing their products illustration. Postal card capitalizing the name and position of the president of the american medical association kindly do me the favor to publish this letter in the journal as aprotest against the dishonesty of this method of advertising what isquoted from an article that i wrote appeared originally in the newyork state journal of medicine and was abstracted in the journalof the american medical association of august 2, 1919 the obviousinference to be drawn from this postal is that i referred to theproducts of the pineoleum company in that article i did not have theproducts of the pineoleum company in my mind i never have used theirproducts and never prescribed them this form of advertising is done with intent to deceive and did deceivethe doctor in oklahoma it was therefore a successful falsehood, itssuccess depending on the false use of the name of the president of theamerican medical association to bolster up the sale of the product i resent the use of my name in connection with the quack advertisingof nostrum venders the low, vulpine cunning of the method used ison the same level as the deceit and dishonesty which use this formof advertising to the injury of my name and reputation as presidentof the american medical association i must insist that you protectme by publishing this letter in the journal, giving it as widespreadpublicity as possible alexander lambert comment -- “pineoleum” is a “patent medicine” advertised in thecheapest and most effective way-- by the aid of the easy going andcomplacent physician in 1906 pineoleum was being marketed by thewinslow laboratory of new york city, which also put out three or fourother nostrums-- “morumalt, ” “egeriol, ” “digestylin, ” and “fordnucleo-peptone ” pineoleum was advertised to the public then as it isadvertised now, via the medical profession physicians are circularizedand are offered a petty graft in the form of a cheap nebulizer and asample bottle of pineoleum essay time ago the company seems to havedeveloped a scheme whereby physicians could make money “dispensingpineoleum nebulizer outfits at more than 140 per cent profit ” thepineoleum concern for years has also polluted the stream at its sourceby attempting to get the secretary of the senior class of every medicalschool to distribute its free nebulizer outfits to members of theclass and receive therefor 5 cents for each outfit distributed!. thelife history of pineoleum is that of the typical nostrum epidemics, of course, are utilized as opportunities for pushing the product in1911 a card was sent out featuring “a special lagrippe offer”. In 1916the profession was circularized recommending pineoleum as “the idealprophylactic” in infantile paralysis. During the past year influenzahas again been the selling point the case described by dr lambert is not the first example of themisuse of names and statements of physicians last december thepineoleum concern was sending out an advertising card in which dr mccoy of the united states public health service was quoted asrecommending pineoleum as the “bulwark of prevention” and “battery ofrelief” in influenza of course, dr mccoy never said anything of thesort a protest against this writingicular falsehood resulted in anothercard being sent out several months later by the pineoleum peoplepurporting to explain and apologize for the misquotations and puttingthe blame on the printer the “apology” ended with a postscript inlarger and bolder face type than the body of the card that urgedphysicians to “secure our liberal introductory advertising propositionon improved oil nebulizer outfits ” from the standpoint of publicityfor pineoleum, the “explanation and apology” was doubtless as good anadvertisement as the original card of misrepresentation -- ed -- fromthe journal a m a , nov 1, 1919 “proteal therapy” and henry smith williams to the editor:-- will you please advise as to the success and safeness in using the proteal treatment for tuberculosis by henry smith williams, m d , ll d , 104 east 40th street, new york?. c p burchard, alamogordo, n m to the editor:-- kindly send me any available information on “the proteal treatment for cancer ” an article by dr henry smith williams, 120 west 32 street, new york city, in april hearst has caused relatives to request its use in a case of carcinoma of the liver under my care m m reppard, middlebourne, w va to the editor:-- i am enclosing a leaflet, mailed to me on request, by dr henry smith williams of new york city, who published a series of articles during the last year in hearst magazine on “proteal therapy ” if you have investigated this man and his proteal treatment, i should like to know the result of your findings i am a consumptive and am, therefore, writingicularly interested in its alleged benefactions for the treatment of tuberculosis michael a long, glen lake sanitarium, hopkins, minn to the editor:-- what information can you give me regarding henry smith williams, m d , ll d , 104 east fortieth street, new york, and the therapeutic value of the “proteal therapy” that he has originated?. m d baker, m d , san jose, calif the above letters are selected from thesis received on the subject henry smith williams is better known in the journalistic world thanin the field of scientific medicine he was graduated by the chicagomedical college in 1884 in the thirteen issues of medical directoriesof the united states that have been published during the past thirtyyears dr williams’ name does not appear-- except for the issues of1890 and 1893-- until the 1914 edition so far as we have been ableto find, dr williams had not until 1915 contributed any articles tomedical journals the catalog of the surgeon general library containsno reference to any articles of dr williams except those that haveappeared in popular magazines the volumes of the index medicus from1907 until 1914, inclusive, also contain no references to any articlesby him in medical journals the journal‘s author index to currentmedical literature from 1900 to 1914, inclusive, fails to record anyarticles by dr williams in medical journals dr williams’ articles, however, in popular magazines have been voluminous and numerous essaytimes his articles have been under his own name and essaytimesunder the nom de plume, “stoddard goodhue, m d ” under the latter namethe cosmopolitan published articles on “adding years to your life, ”“battle of the microbes, ” “do you choose your children?.