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The juice put into thehollow teeth, easeth their pains the root in powder, made up into aplaster with a little pitch, and laid on the biting of mad dogs, or anyother venomous creature, doth wonderfully help the juice or the watersdropped, or tent wet therein, and put into filthy dead ulcers, or thepowder of how to make a good title for an essay the root in want of either doth cleanse and cause them toheal quickly, by covering the naked bones with flesh. The distilledwater applied to places pained with the gout, or sciatica, doth give agreat deal of ease the wild angelica is not so effectual as the garden. Although it may besafely used to all the purposes aforesaid amaranthus besides its common name, by which it is best known by the florists ofour days, it is called flower gentle, flower velure floramor, andvelvet flower descript it being a garden flower, and well known to every onethat keeps it, i might forbear the description. Yet, notwithstanding, because essay desire it, i shall give it it runs up with a stalk acubit high, streaked, and essaywhat reddish towards the root, but verysmooth, divided towards the top with small branches, among which standlong broad leaves of a reddish green colour, slippery. The flowers arenot properly flowers, but tuffs, very beautiful to behold, but of nosmell, of reddish colour. If you bruise them, they yield juice of thesame colour, being gathered, they keep their beauty a long time.

“the cost of the treatment when administered by yourself is $300 cash with orders which includes one complete outfit and technique for administering “should you call me personally in consultation an additional fee of $150 per diem covering the time i am away from my kansas city office. Fees to be collected and held until i arrive ”the letter that was intended only for the doctor eye declared. “you are to have $100 of the fee and $50 of the per diem ”it explained that the “complete outfit” referred to in the “patientletter” would “consist in writing of a tube of intravenous medication” anddoses of “restorative capsules” and “eli 606 capsules ”eli h dunn seems to have had a essaywhat varied and spectacular career after being graduated in 1885 he apparently started practice in orion, ill during the nineties he was practicing at elma, iowa, and about1900 he seems to have moved to kansas city, mo during 1906 and 1908, he also had an additional office at denver, col about this time he wasexploiting “dunn uterine evacuant” which was “a strictly legitimate”product which could “be injected within the uterus with perfect safetyand immediate effect ” this stuff was advertised both from the kansascity and the denver offices the “personal column” of a kansas citypaper in 1910 carried the message to “ladies” that “dr dunn” was a“regular physician for women only, ” dunn violation of the postal lawsin 1911 and of the federal food and drugs act in 1912 need not be goneinto at this time the journal would feel like apologizing for devoting space to such apreposterous scheme were it not for the fact that physicians, beinghuman, essaytimes “fall for” preposterous schemes essay, we know, havenibbled at dunn bait. Others may do so the gross commercialism thatpermeates the advertising matter sent out by dunn again emphasizesthe fact that the fad for intravenous medication offers an attractivefield for those who would exploit our profession -- from the journala m a , nov 22, 1919 glover cancer serumscores of letters have reached-- and are reaching-- the journal officesimilar in effect to the following. “i am enclosing ‘literature’ received from the ‘t j glover research laboratory ’ though purporting to come from toronto, where the $25 00 are to be sent, if you please, the envelope bears the 448 new york postmark ”the above is from new jersey while the two following are from michiganand illinois, respectively. “have you any information in regard to this writingy and his treatment for cancer?. this is the first i have heard of any such work having been done one wonders if it is presented in good faith or if the money god has overcome the gentleman scientific spirit ” “is this just one more of them?. why a roan horse?. essay people might want serum from a nice bay or calico cow pony ”the literature referred to comes in an envelop bearing the name of“t j glover, research laboratory, toronto, canada, ” but mailed, apparently, from new york city the enclosures are a single sheetcircular signed thomas joseph glover and entitled “etiology of cancer, ”a “directions” slip and a card quoting prices in the circular dr glover states that he has prepared a serum from immunized horses, “between ages of seven and nine years, of the roan type, ” and hasinjected this intramuscularly “into patients in the advanced stages ofcancer and noticed that it has a specific action on every known type ofcancer ” further. “up to the present time i have apparently cured cancer of the face, eye, nose, lip, mouth, tongue, stomach, bowel, bladder, breast and uterus ”in addition to the circular, was a small leaflet giving directions forthe injection of the serum and also a card bearing dr glover nameand toronto address and reading. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- | this is to advise you that dr t j glover serum | | for the treatment of cancer can now be had by | | application to office at above address | | | | price five dollars per treatment five treatments | | minimum number sent at one time | | | | send money by post-office money order or certified cheque | | | | directions for treatment with each order | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- this advertising material, which is evidently being widely circulatedin the united states, would indicate that the glover researchlaboratory had received a permit from the united states public healthservice licensing the interstate sale of this serum in the unitedstates no such license has been issued the journal briefly reported in the dewritingment of medical news, oct 30, 1920, that the academy of medicine of toronto had appointed acommittee to investigate the claims made for the glover “cancer serum ”in the meantime, the most charitable thing that can be said is that the“treatment” is in the experimental stage and the reported results havenot been corroborated by independent investigators -- from the journala m a , jan 1, 1921 the toronto academy of medicine reports unfavorably on glover cancer serumthe method of exploitation of the alleged cancer serum being put outby dr t j glover of toronto, canada, was briefly discussed in thisdewritingment of the journal for january 1 at that time it was pointedout that the medical profession of the united states was being widelycircularized by dr glover and that, while the letters purported tocome from toronto, they were, in fact, mailed from new york city sincethis article appeared the circularization seems to have continuedundiminished and physicians in various writings of the united states havesent in the glover advertising material oddly enough, the matter nowsent out, while identical in every respect with that dealt with inthe previous article, bears a different return address on the back ofthe envelop the envelops are the same. But the legend “t j gloverresearch laboratory, 538 jarvis st , toronto, canada, ” has been crudelycrossed out and there has been substituted by means of a rubber stampthe legend “mrs stewart, 309 w 54th st , new york ” still laterletters have been modified to the extent that the letters “rs” of“mrs ” have been cut out of the stamp and it now reads “m   stewart ”there has now come to hand a report just published by a specialcommittee appointed by the council of the academy of medicine, toronto, to investigate the glover serum the report of this committee may besummed up by one of its closing paragraphs, which reads.

And we are, therefore, forced to conclude that none has ever been found by this it is notto be implied that no reputable physician has ever reported favorablyconcerning the therapeutic effects of this preparation it is quitepossible that an extensive literature of that sort might be found ifone examined the older medical journals but the day has passed whenevery improvement that follows the administration of a preparation isblindly attributed to the drug in question clinical research today isfar more exacting we will assume that the reader who has investigated the question withan open mind will have come to the decision that the contention thatfellows’ syrup is of especial therapeutic value is not proved we mightrest with that assumption and ask the clinician whether he is preparedto use a nostrum that has been before the medical profession for halfa century without any satisfactory evidence having been gained thatit possesses therapeutic value we might ask him whether he would bewilling to tell his patients that he was prescribing such a nostrumfor them in the face of the absence of any such evidence of its value the inertness of the hypophosphitesbut we prefer to go even further and show him that not only is therean entire absence of any evidence of its therapeutic value so far aswe have been able to learn, but in addition there is an abundance ofevidence that the hypophosphites are devoid of any such therapeuticeffect as they were formerly reputed to have, and that, in fact, they are, so far as any effect based on their phosphorus content isconcerned, singularly inert while we have thus far taken the fellows’ preparation as the subjectof the discussion, we may take a broader view and examine the subjectof the hypophosphites in general, and the substitutes containingphosphorus that have been introduced from time to time it hardly needsto be said that if the hypophosphites are without therapeutic value, itis impossible to give them value by combining them in a muddy-looking, ill-made preparation such as fellows’ syrup such evidence wassubmitted to the medical profession in a report of the council onpharmacy and chemistry j a m a 67:760 sept 2 1916. And wewould strongly advise any one who is disposed to act on the suggestioncontained in the advertisements of fellows’, and other hypophosphitepreparations, to read that report in full and to think the matter overbefore prescribing one of these nostrums quoting briefly from thereport in question. “although the overwhelming weight of evidence was against the probability that the hypophosphite preparations are of value as therapeutic agents, the council thought it well to investigate the subject dr w mckim marriott of baltimore was therefore requested to review the evidence for and against the therapeutic usefulness of the hypophosphites and to conduct such experiments as seemed necessary ”the council was not content to rest on the mere absence of evidencefor the value of these preparations or any one of them, but soughtto obtain evidence that would fulfil the conditions mentioned above, and in pursuance of this plan it secured the cooperation of a trainedinvestigator, one who would work under the best of conditions forlearning the truth the results of dr marriott investigation werepublished in the journal, feb 12, 1916, p 486, and should be read byeveryone who has any interest in the problem lest essay of our readersmay fail to refer to the original of marriott paper, we will quotebriefly from it. “none of the subjects of the experiment experienced any effect whatsoever from the administration of the drug almost all of the ingested hypophosphite is eliminated unchanged “these experiments forbes demonstrate conclusively that the hypophosphites possess no specific value as a source of phosphorus for the body it is doubtful if there are any conditions in which the body suffers from lack of phosphorus even should such conditions exist, phosphorus, in the form that it occurs in the ordinary foods, or as phosphates, is more efficient in supplying the deficit than hypophosphites that must be oxidized before utilization and which are only about 15 per cent oxidized if at all for example, half a glass of milk contains more available phosphorus than three large doses of hypophosphites of 15 grains each, as great a dosage as is usually given “what then, is the therapeutic value of hypophosphites?.

On the contrary, they exert a purely deleteriousaction on the heart when they enter the circulation the symptoms of cardiac disease are often difficult to distinguishfrom the toxic actions of the digitalis bodies since these bodiesmust often be given how to make a good title for an essay to the point of beginning toxic action in orderto induce the full therapeutic effects, it is obvious that theadministration of a mixture of digitalis, strophanthus, saponin andactive principles of squill is especially liable to induce serioustoxic effects which cannot be distinguished from the symptoms of thedisease hydragogin is a shotgun mixture of semisecret composition. It ismarketed under a therapeutically suggestive name, and advertised bymeans of unwarranted therapeutic claims it is therefore in conflictwith rules 1, 6, 8 and 10 the council held hydragogin ineligible fornew and nonofficial remedies -- from the journal a m a , sept 4, 1915 filudine report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryfiludine is said to be prepared by j l chatelain, paris, and issold in this country by geo j wallau, inc , new york it is offeredas a remedy for “biliary insufficiency, ” “hepatic insufficiency, ”“intestinal dyspepsia, ” “all affections of the liver diabetes, cirrhosis, cancer, etc , ” “malaria, ” “obesity” and “tuberculosis ”no quantitative information is furnished as to the composition of thepreparation and there are noteworthy discrepancies in the variousstatements regarding the ingredients in one number of “treatment, ”a self-styled “review” of medical literature actually devoted toadvertising the preparations sold by wallau, we are told that “this product filudine is a more concentrated and potent extract of the liver, with which is combined an extract of the spleen the liver and the spleen are so intimately interdependent, that the addition of a splenary extract to the liver extract is a signal improvement from which a synergistic action results thiarféine is also added, as it helps essaywhat to combat the anaemia from which all diabetics suffer more or less ”thiarféine is said to be “thiomethylarsinate of caffein, a new salt discovered by m chatelain ”another circular, which gives an imposing formula for “thiarféine” or“thiomethylarsinate of caffein, ” states that “sulphurated methylarsinate is an arsenical preparation devoid of all toxicity on account of the intimate joining of its composing writings ”and that “filudine can never be contraindicated ”a statement of composition in a later number of “treatment, ” however, says that biliary extracts are components, in addition to the liver andspleen extracts moreover, thiarféine, the “new salt discovered by m chatelain, ” is no longer “thiomethylarsinate, ” but “thiocinnamate ofcaffein”. And a new formula is furnished for it we are told that “methyl-arsinate cannot be used in paper where fever is present ” “m chatelain at first studied the action of thiomethylarsinate. Clinical and physiological experimentation led him, however, to adopt thiocinnamate of caffein, of greater activity and with no contraindications ”nevertheless the same absence of contraindications was urged infavor of filudine when it was said to contain the now discardedthiomethylarsinate of caffein the following are essay of the unwarranted and even absurd claims. “filudine restores the liver functions it is to the liver what digitalis is to the heart. It overcomes the insufficiency and stimulates the debilitated organ ” in malaria “it is the only true specific when associated with quinine ” “filudine is the ideal medication for tuberculosis, conforming as it does with the most recent researches in the therapeusis of this affection ” “we will not go as far as to say that opotherapy completely restores unhealthy livers, for although the lesions of the hepatic parenchyma may be obliterated by regeneration, the lesions of the connective tissues are permanent, and may be observed at the postmortem examination the new cells, however, do not present the same unhealthy conditions as those of the former diseased gland which they have replaced, and the liver can therefore function normally, so that the patient lives on. And he is satisfied with that ” “therefore, while regenerating the liver with filudine, we cleanse it and combat its congested state with urodonal we cause it to produce urea from the excess of uric acid which it contains ” “by the judicious and harmonious combination of the beneficial effects of filudine and urodonal, physicians not only possess the means of treating by rational methods cirrhosis of the liver in its various forms which is one of the most terrible diseases which can afflict anyone but what is still better, they can cure it ” “the liver of a person suffering from obesity being incapable of fulfilling its functions in regard to the fatty tissues, the rational and up-to-date method of treatment is therefore to restore to the system, in the form of filudine, the liver extracts which are lacking ”filudine is a mixture of semisecret composition the therapeuticclaims are manifestly unwarranted the name is not indicative of thecomposition, whatever that may be, and no rational excuse is offeredfor the combination of liver and spleen extracts with or without bileextracts with “thiomethylarsinate” or “thiocinnamate” of caffein the council therefore held filudine ineligible for new and nonofficialremedies -- from the journal a m a , sept 18, 1915 lactopeptine and elixir lactopeptine report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrymixtures of pepsin and pancreatin are therapeutically irrational;the two substances are not indicated in the same conditions, nor canthey act together under physiologic conditions, such mixtures arechemically impossible. In a liquid medium the ingredients destroy eachother lactopeptin is manufactured by the new york pharmacal association, yonkers, n y it is sold under the claim that it contains, pepsin, diastase, pancreatin, lactic acid and hydrochloric acid this productwas among the first proprietary preparations examined by the council onpharmacy and chemistry the report of the investigation was publishedin the journal, march 16, 1907, p 959 the preparation was found to bepractically inert-- “essentially a weak saccharated pepsin, ” devoid oftryptic activity six years later it was still widely advertised with the same irrationalclaims a referee a therefore examined lactopeptine powdered forthe council in 1913, and confirmed the previous findings the refereereport was published in the journal, aug 2, 1913, p 358 nearly four months after this publication, the manufacturer protestedagainst the report, maintaining, contrary to the findings of thecouncil, that lactopeptine possesses pancreatic activity and contains“loosely combined” hydrochloric acid referee a therefore repeatedhis examination, and a second referee b, independently, examinedspecimens of lactopeptine powder purchased on the open market for thepurpose shortly before a few specimens examined by these two referees showed a slight trypticactivity. Most of them showed none the amount of hydrochloric acidpresent was insignificant the reports of the two referees were referred to the manufacturers, whoagain protested vehemently against these findings, this time on theground that the specimens were old the manufacturers also cited thework of three chemists to disprove the findings of the referees, anddemanded that the council reexamine lactopeptine, making use of freshspecimens the council refused for the following reasons:1 so long as the packages of lactopeptine are not dated, the activityof specimens known to be fresh is of no practical importance theactivity of the actual market supply is the only question of interestto the profession the only fair test is that made on specimensrepresentative of the product sold to the ultimate consumer 2 the evidence presented by the manufacturers did not warranta reexamination, since the work of two of the chemists citedsubstantially corroborates the results obtained by the councilreferees from the fresher specimens the figures for tryptic activityobtained by the third chemist cited by the manufacturers could not beaccepted by the council, since it was at variance with all other knownresults of investigations of lactopeptine 3 as stated at the outset, whatever the tryptic activity of themixture, it is therapeutically useless a demonstration of trypticactivity in a mixture containing both pepsin and pancreatin is ofmerely theoretical interest such activity, of course, cannot be expected, even on theoreticalgrounds, in liquid mixtures like elixir lactopeptine the council therefore again declared lactopeptine powder and tabletsand elixir lactopeptine ineligible for new and nonofficial remedies andauthorized publication of the following statement w a puckner, secretary the council reportlactopeptine powder new york pharmacal association, yonkers, n y was examined by the council in 1907 at that time it was claimed tocontain “ the five active agents of digestion-- pepsin, diastase veg ptyalin, pancreatin, lactic acid and hydrochloric acid-- combined in the proper proportion to insure the best results ”the examination showed that the preparation was essentially “a weaksaccharated pepsin, ” containing but small amounts of pepsin, nohydrochloric acid, or mere traces only, and no diastase or pancreatin the journal, march 16, 1907 in 1913, the product was reexamined, because the claims, as to bothcomposition and therapeutic value, were still being made sampleswere tested both of the american product, and of a british productfrom john morgan richards & sons, london the original findings wereconfirmed and the results were published in the journal, aug 2, 1913, p 358 nearly four months later november 24 the new yorkpharmacal association wrote to the council, objecting to the findingsand maintaining that lactopeptine possesses pancreatic activity andcontains “in loose chemical combination” hydrochloric acid inaccordance with the custom of the council, the work was sent back forreview to the referee a, whose conclusions were then tested by asecond referee b, a physiologic chemist, not a member of the council, selected because of his special knowledge of the subject in december, 1913, referee a made a large number of new tests todetermine proteolytic and amylolytic power his results show thatthe ferment activity of the preparation is so low as to merit norecognition in practical use the tests also show that the amount oflactic acid or “loosely combined hcl” or both present is too small tohave any appreciable physiologic activity and therefore to be of anytherapeutic value nine samples of lactopeptine purchased in the open market in december, 1913, and january, 1914, were examined by referee b early in 1914 hisstudies show absence of amylase in all samples. Presence of pepsin, giving weak reactions even when compared with those of old pepsinpreparations. Complete absence of trypsin in seven out of nine samples, tryptic reaction being obtained in two samples, in one of which thereaction, “slight at best and of no practical import, ” was obtainedonly after treatment for twelve hours or more the presence of tryptic activity in two out of the nine samples maybe due to the fresher condition of these specimens, as indicatedby the serial numbers the evidence shows that it is a commercialimpossibility to market mixtures of pepsin, pancreatin and lactic acidso that they can display any material tryptic activity it should be reaffirmed that mixtures combining peptic and pancreaticactivities are not feasible, because pepsin cannot act except in thepresence of acid, and pancreatin is destroyed by acid and by pepticactivity furthermore, in conditions in which pancreatin is calledfor, pepsin is not, and vice versa. Therefore the administration ofmixtures of pepsin and pancreatin would be unjustified, even if bothconstituents could be expected to exert activity the foregoing observations apply to lactopeptine in powder and tabletform while mixtures of pepsin and pancreatin are unscientific andunjustified, theoretically the two substances may coexist in a solidpreparation, and the activity of such a preparation is consequently aproper subject of investigation theoretically as well as practically, however, pepsin and pancreatin cannot exist together in solution theclaims made for elixir lactopeptine and all other liquid preparationssold as mixtures of pepsin and pancreatin are therefore impossible the council has previously taken action the journal, feb 2, 1907, p 434 refusing to approve for inclusion with new and nonofficialremedies such preparations, calling the attention of the medicalprofession and of manufacturers to their worthlessness, and requestingthe american pharmaceutical association to instruct its committee onthe national formulary to omit from the next edition of that work aliquid preparation of pepsin and pancreatin recognized under the titleof “elixir digestivum compositum ”it is recommended that the council reaffirm this previous action, and that lactopeptine and elixir lactopeptine be declared ineligiblefor new and nonofficial remedies because of conflict with rule 10 “no article will be admitted which, because of its unscientificcomposition, is useless or inimical to the best interests of the publicor of the medical profession” manufacturers’ protest and council answerthe foregoing was submitted, together with the findings of the tworeferees, to the manufacturers they protested again, alleging that. Age of specimensfirst -- the specimens of lactopeptine examined by the second refereewere old the dates of manufacture corresponding to the several batchnumbers are supplied by the manufacturers as follows. 2275 powder september, 1908 2301 powder june, 1909 2312 powder december, 1909 2348 powder october, 1911 2352 powder december, 1911 2364 powder july, 1912 2374 powder march, 1913 2383 powder october, 1913 1638 tablets october, 1911the manufacturers assert that they do not understand how specimens ofthese ages could have been purchased on the open market in 1913 and1914, inasmuch as their agents are and long have been instructed totake up from the druggist all lots of lactopeptine which, as indicatedby the batch numbers, have attained “any appreciable age ” the age ofthe specimens, the manufacturers declare, deprives the table in thesecond referee report of “all significance or interest ”as previously stated, however, the specimens of lactopeptine examinedwere purchased on the open market in various localities in unbrokenpackages, in december, 1913, and january, 1914 they thus representstock used in filling physicians’ prescriptions or sold to thepublic neither the referees nor any one connected with the councilhad any means of knowing the age of the specimens until the dates ofmanufacture were furnished by the new york pharmacal association thefirst tests of the second referee were made in february, 1914, onspecimens 2374 and 2383, which were then, it would appear, about oneyear old and four months old, respectively the council has repeatedlyurged that pharmaceutical substances which are subject to deteriorationshould be dated by the manufacturer, and a similar suggestion hasbeen made by the bureau of chemistry of the u s dewritingment ofagriculture concerning mixtures containing enzymes notwithstandingthe instructions which the new york pharmacal association claims tohave given its agents, the market supply of lactopeptine in december, 1913, and january, 1914, was not composed of new stock, and untilthe manufacturers adopt the practice of dating packages, there canbe no assurance that it will be fresh in this connection, it is ofinterest to note that the bureau of chemistry of the u s dewritingmentof agriculture has issued a warning that it will judge such products bythe degree of their activity when they reach the consumer, i e , asthey are found on the market reports of other chemistssecond -- the new york pharmacal association cites the work of severalchemists, who have examined lactopeptine and report the presence oftryptic activity dr s r benedict in december, 1913, reported tothe council “distinct” tryptic activity digestion in twelve hours bylactopeptine of 4 2 times its weight of fibrin containing 50 per cent moisture in specimens examined by him these specimens were numbered2382, and were therefore probably manufactured in october, 1913;compare the dates furnished by the manufacturer for the specimens usedby the second referee no tests against other preparations possessingtryptic activity are reported, and dr benedict expressly disclaimsany opinion as to the therapeutic value of the preparation 27 dr p b hawk, whose report was submitted by the manufacturers, found inlactopeptine by fermi method one-fifth tryptic activity of that ofmerck pancreatin, and by grützner method an activity of 18 percent of the pancreatin a test for the production of tryptophan wasreported positive the new york pharmacal association also submitteda report from dr a w balch, who found pepsin, rennin, trypsin, steapsin, amylopsin and lactic acid present in lactopeptine. Alsoan amount of combined hydrochloric acid in 1 gm the equivalent of1 05 c c tenth normal solution or 0 00383 gm hydrochloric acid hereports digestion in twenty-four hours by lactopeptine of 25 times itsown weight of fibrin “an active extract of pancreas reacted exactlylike the lactopeptine solution ” the serial numbers of the specimenstested by hawk and balch are not given, but no doubt they were fresh 27 dr benedict personal communication to a member of the councilis as follows:“in the report of the council upon lactopeptine which you sent to me, i find the following statement. ‘careful examination failed to showthe presence of either diastase or pancreatin ’ in this connectioni will cite to you the following experiment carried out by myself:a package containing a 1-ounce bottle of lactopeptine powder withseal unbroken was purchased in the open market and opened in thislaboratory the label bore the special number 6 2382 two hundredmilligrams of this product was dissolved in 50 c c of a 0 25 per cent solution of sodium carbonate in water this solution was divided intotwo portions of 25 c c each one of these portions was boiled at once, and after cooling was added to 1 gm of moist fibrin contained in aflask the other portion unboiled was also added to 1 gm of moistfibrin contained in a flask both flasks after addition of 5 c c of toluene to each were stoppered and placed in an incubator at 37degrees, and left there for twelve hours examination of the two flasksat the end of this period showed that the one to which the unboiledsolution of lactopeptine powder had been added contained much lesssolid protein than did the other although this fact was obvious tothe naked eye, the exact extent of digestion in the two flasks wasdetermined by heating both to boiling, acidifying with acetic acid, diluting to definite volume, filtering and determining the nitrogen inthe filtrate by kjeldahl method subtracting the trace of nitrogencontained in the filtrate of the control flask, the results showedthat 42 per cent of the original fibrin present had been dissolvedby the unboiled lactopeptine solution this can be ascribed only totryptic activity under the conditions of this experiment furthermore, this is not simply a ‘trace’ of activity, but is at least sufficientlymarked to warrant a statement that this sample showed a distincttryptic activity inasmuch as i have obtained exactly similar resultswith two other samples of lactopeptine powder these being the onlyones i have examined, i am inclined to question the correctness ofthe council statement regarding the absence of trypsin from thispreparation as noted above, a fresh preparation was used -- ed “may i again add that i am making no statement regarding therapeuticvalue of preparation, and that i have no opinion upon that matter oneway or the other?. my work was undertaken solely out of interest tosee whether trypsin could exist in the powder which gives a markedlyacid solution when dissolved in water the elixir lactopeptine couldtheoretically show no tryptic activity, nor have i found any trace ofsuch activity in one sample of the elixir examined “in making use of any of the contents of my letters kindly include thestatement that my work upon lactopeptine was done without remunerationof any kind, and was done only for the scientific interest attached tothe question ” conclusionsthe new york pharmacal association demanded that the referee reexaminelactopeptine, making use of fresh specimens the council held that thiswas unnecessary, for the following reasons:1 the previous finding of the council, that specimens of lactopeptinefound on the open market are essentially weak saccharated pepsins, isnot to be refuted by examination of fresh specimens even if it beassumed that all old specimens of lactopeptine have been withdrawnfrom the market since the last purchase of specimens for the use ofthe council referee, there can be no assurance that the stock willbe constantly kept fresh unless the manufacturers date their product, physicians cannot know that their prescriptions are filled with freshmaterial nor is it reasonable to ask that the council examine themarket supply of any given proprietary at a time selected by themanufacturers 2 without entering into all questions of detail in the analyses, the council is willing to accept the reports of drs benedict andhawk as representative of fresh lactopeptine powder it is thereforeunnecessary for the council to make further experiments along thisline the results of these two chemists in no wise contradict theconclusions of the council referees, being comparable with thoseobtained by the referee on the fresher specimens used by them theexperiments of drs hawk and benedict show a degree of trypticactivity which, though chemically not negligible, is quite withoutsignificance practically, even if it could be assumed that the trypsinin the fresh lactopeptine escaped destruction in the stomach thefigures for tryptic activity given by dr benedict do not differmaterially from those of the first referee those of professorhawk show a tryptic activity of from 18 to 20 per cent of that ofcommercial pancreatin-- and commercial pancreatins ordinarily are oflow tryptic activity, if not inert see long and muhleman.

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Make it into a plaster according to art culpeper it is a binding plaster, strengthens the stomach beingapplied to it, and helps such as loath their victuals, or cannot digestit, or retain it till it be digested emplastrum de meliloto simplex or, a plaster of melilot simple college take of rozin eight pounds, yellow wax four pounds, sheepsuet two pounds. These being melted, add green melilot cut small, fivepounds. Make it into a plaster according to art emplastrum de meliloto compositum or, a plaster of melilot compound college take of melilot flowers six drams, chamomel flowers, theseeds of fenugreek, bay berries husked, marsh-mallow roots, the topsof wormwood and marjoram, of each three drams, the seeds of smallage, ammi, cardamoms, the roots of orris, cypress, spikenard, cassia lignea, of each one dram and an half, bdellium five drams. Beat them allinto fine powder, the pulp of twelve figs, and incorporate them witha pound and an half of melilot plaster simple, turpentine an ounceand an half, ammoniacum dissolved in hemlock vinegar, three ounces, styrax five drams, oil of marjoram, and nard, of each half an ounce, or a sufficient quantity, make it into a plaster with a hot mortar andpestle, without boiling culpeper it mollifies the hardness of the stomach, liver, spleen, bowels, and other writings of the body. It wonderfully assuages pain, andeases hypochondriac melancholy, and the rickets emplastrum de minio compositum or, a plaster of red lead compound college take of oil of roses omphacine twenty ounces, oil ofmastich two ounces, suet of a sheep and a calf, of each half a pound, litharge of gold and silver, red lead, of each two ounces, a tasterfull of wine. Boil them by a gentle fire continually stirring it tillit grow black, let the fire be hottest towards the latter end, then addturpentine half a pound, mastich two ounces, gum elemi one ounce, whitewax as much as is sufficient. Boil them a little, and make them into aplaster according to art culpeper it potently cures wounds, old malignant ulcers, and isvery drying emplastrum de minio simplicius or, a plaster of red lead simple college take of red lead nine ounces, oil of red roses one poundand an half, white wine vinegar six ounces, boil it into the perfectbody of a plaster it is prepared without vinegar, thus. Take of redlead one pound, oil of roses one pound and an half, wax half a pound, make it into a plaster according to art culpeper it is a fine cooling healing plaster, and very drying emplastrum metroproptoticon college take of mastich one ounce and an half, galbanum dissolvedin red wine and strained, six drams, cypress turpentine two drams, cypress nuts, galls, of each one dram and an half, oil of nutmegsby expression one dram, musk two grains and an half, pitch scrapedoff from old ships two drams and an half. Beat the galbanum, pitch, turpentine, and mastich gently in a hot mortar and pestle, towards theend, adding the oil of nutmegs, then the rest in powder, last of allthe musk mixed with a little oil of mastich upon a marble, and by exactmixture make them into a plaster emplastrum nervinum college take of oil of chamomel and roses, of each two ounces, of mastich, turpentine, and linseeds, of each an ounce and an half, turpentine boiled four ounces, rosemary, bettony, horsetail, centaurythe less, of each a handful, earth-worms washed and cleansed in winethree ounces, tops of st john wort a handful, mastich, gum elemi, madder roots, of each ten drams, ship-pitch, rozin, of each an ounceand an half, litharge of gold and silver, of each two ounces and anhalf, red lead two ounces, galbanum, sagapen, ammoniacum, of each threedrams.